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A lot has been said all over this website, about  B O U N D I N G  of firestops.

The necessity of bounding applies to much more than just firestops. It encompasses all fire resistive and many more products.

"The installed configuration must be bounded by a certification listing".

Why?

Scroll down please.

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Code Evaluations AVAILABLE!

Glossary of Fire Protection Terms

3M Fire Barriers

Vectorising Drawings and Maps; Paper to CAD

Circuit Integrity Fireproofing

Bounding

Code Req's for Firestops

Essay on Performance Based Codes

Master Spec. Section 07840 Firestopping

Related Sections to 07840

Penetration Seal Drawings

Building Joint Drawings 1

Building Joint Drawings 2

Building Joint Drawings 3

History of Firestops in North America

Warnock Hersey Experience

Firestop Trade Jurisdiction

Achim Hering Bio

Man Made Mineral Fibres

Fire Protection Industry Links

Firestop Products and Equipment

Firestop Mortar

Firestop Silicone Foam

Intumescent Products

Endothermic Products

Insulation Products

Caulking & Paint Firestops

Firestop Pillows

Firestop Devices

Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

ULC           UL

T O S

(Theory of Survival)

DIBt

TU Braunschweig iBMB

CONTACT

 Because that, in combination with the observance of mandatory ratings criteria stipulated by the code for certain types of fire separations and fire walls and occupancy separations is the only way to meet code.

Huh?

Here is an analogy: Look at your toaster. Unplug it and empty the crumbs over your sink first. Then look for the certification label. You may find labels there from cUL through CSA. These certification labels indicate typically what the item is, who the maker is and a listing number. The laboratory that did the testing, has to be accredited in Canada by the SCC, both for testing and certification purposes. Otherwise it's actually illegal for you to operate this toaster in this country. Because that is how the Government of Canada protects its residents and visitors from injury or accidental death. This is a basic human rights issue, anchored firmly in Canadian law. The SCC accredited testing and certification organisation (such as UL, ULC or WH) has a certification  agreement (a.k.a. follow-up agreement) with the maker of that toaster. The toaster (in Canada) was tested to a nationally approved (approved by SCC that is) standard. The standard is a written test procedure, which was developed by volunteers at a committee chaired by CSA. CSA also tests and certifies. But apart from that, anyone who does testing and certification of electrical equipment must follow CSA standards because that is who is designated by the SCC as the standards writing organisation on record for electrical equipment. The standard developed by the group of volunteers, which is monitored for 'balanced representation' as per SCC guidelines, is first approved by a council at the standards writing organisation and can then be forwarded for approval by the SCC. Thus, in Canada, we have several levels of checks and balances to attempt to check special agendas by any one group or company or individuals. Having said that, one cannot interdict on behalf of groups who may never bother to show up for a meeting. The squeaky wheel gets the oil. If one has a problem with the status quo, well, show up for the meetings where these things are decided and speak up. But on the whole, our system is reasonably sound. Back to your crumb relieved toaster: The number given by the certification organisation can be traced six ways to breakfast. It is traceable to a follow-up procedure, which is intended to make sure that when the manufacturer tested a $5.00 toaster, he hasn't suddenly substituted parts to make make it any different, such as a $2.50 toaster - for economic gain, obviously, or even unintended error. The follow-up agreement between the certification organisation and the manufacturer enables regular unannounced access to the factory, to make sure that this toaster is identical to the one, which was tested - so you won't get zapped through ordinary operation of the device, such as for toasting bread. The instructions, which accompany the toaster, must be approved by the certification organisation. Thus, when you opened the box, after you brought the toaster home from the store, you were asked to read these instructions before operating the toaster, so that the retailer and the wholesaler and the manufacturer don't get sued by the attorney representing your estate, when you and the (plugged in) toaster go for a bath in the tub. The listing number on the label also is traceable to the annual publications of the certification organisation. Thus, an electrical inspector can look up whether or not a listed device is still in the certifier's 'good books'. That also protects the user. How? Well, sometimes, devices and entire companies get de-listed. Why? Because of a variety of potential reasons. The company may have violated the follow-up agreement in some manner. Or, new information may have come to light, which has convinced the certifier or the maker that the product may not be safe after all. Or, it may simply be a case of the maker may not have paid his bills to the certifier or the maker may have chosen to test and certify with a competitor to the original certifier. All of this is the red tape and protective barrier behind a certification listing. Without the label, you cannot prove whether or not the widget is in compliance with the law. It thus becomes illegal in this country and in such a case, the sellers and users become negligent and liable in a court of law.  As the user, you are responsible to operate the toaster within the confines of the certification listing, which is what you do when you follow the operating instructions. Bathe with a live toaster, and you are reasonably out of compliance and your attorney won't have a chance to defend your case. Replace the plug and upgrade the size so that you can plug it into the 240V outlet you use for your welding machine, hoping you can toast bread FASTER than ever before, you are now no longer bounded by the certification listing. Only the label on the product is proof of proper certification. If the follow-up program has been invalidated or violated, the manufacturer has obligated himself to pay for the certifier to remove the labels from all products, including those located in stores, warehouses, distributors' premises, or wherever they may be reached. But if you, as the user, violate the certification listing terms (meaning that you are no longer BOUNDED by the listing), you also become negligent and liable for the consequences.

How does this apply to firestops?

Everything in the paragraph above applies to firestops verbatim. Toaster or firestop, the laws are the same. What makes bounding firestops more tricky, which is why users need expert help, is the complexity of the certification listings. The toaster is a single purpose device. You toast with it. That's it. You can under-toast or burn your bread beyond recognition, but you are still just toasting bread. You might think: "But with firestops you JUST firestop and therefore one size fits all." WRONG. Firestops are but interdependent SYSTEM COMPONENTS. A firestop product by itself has the fire-resistance rating of a whopping ZERO hours. Look at a product data sheet for one of the better intumescent  firestop caulking materials. 3M's CP25WB+ caulking is a great product (which is not to say that all else is junk). Have a look at how many listing numbers it shows up in. I have lost count of listings, which include this product as an interdependent component, between UL, ULC, WH and OPL listings, plus assorted foreign approvals, such as the prestigious DIBt.

Now look at one of the many listings:

Click here: http://www.3m.com/us/arch_construct/firestop/system/CAJ8073.html

What you see there is the result of the test which you can see photographically documented on the following page:

http://www.oocities.com/astximw/test.html

Please review both of the two links immediately above. As you can clearly see, each item is described in mandatory terms, with maximum and/or minimum tolerances. When firestops are bounded by certification listings, what that means is that an installed field configuration, such as you can see here, falls within all applicable parameters and tolerances of the certification listing. And for many products, there are literally hundreds of listings. When a firestop system is chosen for installation, each component, not just the firestop product(s), must fall within the minimum and/or maximum tolerances of the listing. Check http://www.3m.com/us/arch_construct/firestop/system/CAJ8073.html again. You will see that UL chose to divide this one big firestopped hole into SIX different configurations. Each of the configurations describe precisely the hole, the penetrant(s) and the firestop procedure, as well as the LISTED repair procedures. There are location and sizing tolerances for each item. When your installed firestop configuration falls within the required listing tolerances, your firestop is BOUNDED. And that is your necessary first step towards code compliance.

Additional Code Requirements

There are also some code requirements, which must become part of system selection - regardless of whether the firestop is in an existing facility and must comply with the Fire Code, or in a new building, which must comply with the Building Code. The determination of the hourly ratings (of which there are 5 at present - F, FT, FH, FTH and L) must be determined, which depends upon the type of fire separation the firestop is to be located in. Firestops in common fire separations can be downgraded, as per the closure table. Thus a 2 hour wall only needs 90 minute F ratings for firestops and 90 minute rated fire dampers and fire doors - unless the penetrant is combustible (i.e. plastic) piping, in which case the firestop must have an FT rating equivalent to the fire-resistance rating of the fire separation. Also, firestops in fire walls and occupancy separations must have an FT rating equivalent to the fire-resistance rating of the fire wall and/or occupancy separation that contains it. FT ratings are hard to come by on metallic penetrants. Metal piping for instance, try as you might, is difficult to convince not to conduct heat through to the unexposed side. Fully insulated certification listing, thus, must be employed, which means that each penetrant on both sides of the fire wall and/or occupancy separation must be fully insulated for the entire penetrant run within each fire compartment (which may be more than one room!) on both side of that fire wall and/or occupancy separation. Fulfilling these code requirements PLUS complete bounding of each seal meets code. Nothing else does. Everything else is false and a code violation.

Firestop Page

Main Page

Glossary

Contact

Main Site

Firestop Site

Code Evaluations AVAILABLE!

Glossary of Fire Protection Terms

3M Fire Barriers

Vectorising Drawings and Maps; Paper to CAD

Circuit Integrity Fireproofing

Bounding

Code Req's for Firestops

Essay on Performance Based Codes

Master Spec. Section 07840 Firestopping

Related Sections to 07840

Penetration Seal Drawings

Building Joint Drawings 1

Building Joint Drawings 2

Building Joint Drawings 3

History of Firestops in North America

Warnock Hersey Experience

Firestop Trade Jurisdiction

Achim Hering Bio

Man Made Mineral Fibres

Fire Protection Industry Links

Firestop Products and Equipment

Firestop Mortar

Firestop Silicone Foam

Intumescent Products

Endothermic Products

Insulation Products

Caulking & Paint Firestops

Firestop Pillows

Firestop Devices

Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

ULC           UL

T O S

(Theory of Survival)

DIBt

TU Braunschweig iBMB

CONTACT

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