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Firestop Pillows

Firestop pillows made of rockwool batts and intumescent/endothermic additives inside 3 mil plastic bags

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Master Spec. Section 07840 Firestopping

Related Sections to 07840

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Building Joint Drawings 1

Building Joint Drawings 2

Building Joint Drawings 3

History of Firestops in North America

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Firestop Trade Jurisdiction

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Fire Protection Industry Links

Firestop Products and Equipment

Firestop Mortar

Firestop Silicone Foam

Intumescent Products

Endothermic Products

Insulation Products

Caulking & Paint Firestops

Firestop Pillows

Firestop Devices

Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

ULC           UL

T O S

(Theory of Survival)

DIBt

TU Braunschweig iBMB

CONTACT

Firestop pillows have more of a psychological function than real world application. They are supposed to make you feel good. One might call them a 'desk-idea', like those battle plans that never survive first contact with the enemy, or in this case a close look at actual installations.

Firestop Pillow Installation

The idea is that if you have openings that are subject to frequent cable changes, you can shove them full of pillows. The applicable buzz-word is Re-enterability. Thus, to make a change, you just push the new cable between the pillows, or you remove a pillow, then put in your cable and then shove the pillow back in. Sounds good. But it's a Cheech and Chong solution. To pass a hose-stream test, you can't have very large openings - unless you put wire mesh over it on both sides. Shoving these things in is no picnic. You need a certain compression rate, which you had better quantify for each hole. Now just think, mesh, lots of hard shoving - and just how do you expect to get in between all the blasted cables??? Then calculate the compression rate to determine just how many pillows SHOULD be shoved in the hole? When you use the mesh, you need mechanical fasteners, anchors, bolts etc. By the time you're done, you've done a lot more work than if you had used mortar. And guess what? You get to mess with it each time you run a new cable through! Now we add the curiosity factor, when the mesh isn't there. Someone walks past and sees pillows there. Just in time for break! My, won't that feel nice to sit on, or won't that look good on my couch, or how about a pillow fight?? Then you have your pseudo experts, talking about "temporary seals". What on earth is that supposed to be? Feel like opening the can of worms with the label "Just how long do firestops last anyway?" That's just about as precious as the fellow at the firestop manufacturing company, who attempts to justify the testing costs by saying: "How about if we use those DURING construction?" There's a novel concept. It almost takes an act of Parliament to get people to firestop properly, and now someone wants to "temporarily" firestop while the building is under construction? And how about a smoke seal with those? I can guarantee you that a smoke seal with pillows does not take an act of parliament. It takes an act of God! Years ago, I was in charge of a small plant with 3 people, including me, where we made these pillows. We sliced rockwool, mixed and sprayed on the intumescent, shoved the batts into plastic bags and then heat-sealed them. The stories behind those pillows is quite animated. You have your intumescent, which holds chemically bound water. The fire hits the pillow. On the fire side, the plastic bag burns off. No big deal. The intumescent gets activated and releases the water in the form of vapour or steam. The steam rises and hits the plastic bag interior on the unexposed side. That's where it turns to water, which runs back down to cool matters below and thus the cycle keeps going. It's really a fine story to tell, and quite true. You can see the droplets of water through the plastic bag on the unexposed side. But when it comes to installing pillows, the fun stops. What looks so clean and lovely in the literature actually contains lots of fibres, which become airborne and exit the bags through the punched holes on the sides. The fibres' bounce-back effect causes a 're-compression' inside of the hole - until you've done it a few times. By the time you get to cable bundles and hard to reach areas, you want to scream. The pillows shown here were the first real ones in firestop history. There were two somewhat goofy predecessors, which consist of MMMF fabric bag exteriors and either a batt or loose fill insulation interior. Older versions have no intumescent contents, whereas newer ones do intermix small quantities of intumescent material with the interior pillow fill. Of course, with a loose fill, it's like sleeping on a well used, 20 year old down feather pillow: There is no bounce-back and therefore no compression. In those cases you need mesh just to keep the pillows from falling out of the hole. And the instant you start using mesh (regardless of the type of pillow used), you've just admitted that all the advantages of the product (Re-enterability) have gone down the tube. Because now you've made the installation that much more cumbersome, which sort of negates the whole idea behind the pillows. The last type of pillow comes from an entrepreneur from Cologne, Germany. The basic material is Bayer Fomox intumescent foam, which can be extruded into various shapes. For countries that use a hose-stream test, the Fomox is re-enforced with intumescent graphite, whereas for those who don't use a hose-stream, this ingredient is omitted. It's basically intumescent foam rubber. I really liked pillows, until I had to install some. And when you see lots of them used in pillow fights on site, or simply missing, or if you have the misfortune to have to install them yourself, you realise that firestop pillows are a desk idea. Best confined to a drawer.

BACK to Products

Firestop Page

Main Page

Contact

Main Site

Firestop Site

Code Evaluations AVAILABLE!

Glossary of Fire Protection Terms

3M Fire Barriers

Vectorising Drawings and Maps; Paper to CAD

Circuit Integrity Fireproofing

Bounding

Code Req's for Firestops

Essay on Performance Based Codes

Master Spec. Section 07840 Firestopping

Related Sections to 07840

Penetration Seal Drawings

Building Joint Drawings 1

Building Joint Drawings 2

Building Joint Drawings 3

History of Firestops in North America

Warnock Hersey Experience

Firestop Trade Jurisdiction

Achim Hering Bio

Man Made Mineral Fibres

Fire Protection Industry Links

Firestop Products and Equipment

Firestop Mortar

Firestop Silicone Foam

Intumescent Products

Endothermic Products

Insulation Products

Caulking & Paint Firestops

Firestop Pillows

Firestop Devices

Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

ULC           UL

T O S

(Theory of Survival)

DIBt

TU Braunschweig iBMB

CONTACT

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