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07840 Master Specification

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Master Spec. Section 07840 Firestopping

Related Sections to 07840

Penetration Seal Drawings

Building Joint Drawings 1

Building Joint Drawings 2

Building Joint Drawings 3

History of Firestops in North America

Warnock Hersey Experience

Firestop Trade Jurisdiction

Achim Hering Bio

Man Made Mineral Fibres

Fire Protection Industry Links

Firestop Products and Equipment

Firestop Mortar

Firestop Silicone Foam

Intumescent Products

Endothermic Products

Insulation Products

Caulking & Paint Firestops

Firestop Pillows

Firestop Devices

Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

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This page contains guidelines on co-ordinating a project manual for the use of a successful Section 07840 Firestopping. The consultant is encouraged to review the entire master specification for overlaps and conflicts.

Series 0: Bidding Requirements, Contract Forms and Conditions of the Contract

Bid Form: Allow for listing of Firestop Subcontractor name and contract value in general contractor's cost breakdown.

Definitions: Copy appropriate definitions from http://www.oocities.com/astximw/firestop_terminology.html and paste into project manual.

Division 1: General Requirements

Cutting and Patching: Delete any conflicting statements and replace with this text: Sealing modification or repair of firestops in service penetrations or building joints in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840, at the expense of the party responsible for the damage.

Co-ordination: The Section 07840 subcontract shall be awarded within 30 days of award to general contractor in order to facilitate co-ordination of affected trades in Divisions 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 15 and 16.

Mechanical through-penetrations in floor assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating must be installed such that the mechanical and electrical services are tested and firmly in place, as per spacing tolerances in Section 07840, and penetrations firestopped prior to the installation of drywall tracks.

Division 3: Concrete

Erection of Forms: This section shall be responsible for corrections as a result and in the event of oversized concrete building joints (larger than drawn, and/or specified).

Observe penetration and joint sizing as per Section 07840.

Division 4: Masonry

Horizontal head-of-wall (HOW) joints, shall be 15 - 25mm in size. Firestopping of HOW joints in masonry assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840.

Vertical control joints within fire-resistance rated masonry assemblies as well as intersections between masonry and other assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be 10 -15 mm in size. Firestopping of vertical joints within masonry assemblies and intersections of fire-resistance rated masonry and other assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840.

Mechanical and electrical through penetrations shall be be formed in accordance with the sizing provisions of Section 07840, in co-ordination with Divisions 15 and 16. Firestopping of mechanical and electrical through-penetrations shall be done by Section 07840.

Division 7: Thermal and Moisture Protection

Sealants and Caulking: Sealing of building joints and mechanical and electrical through penetrations in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840.

Spray Applied Fireproofing: Firestopping as per Section 07840 of deflection spaces (head-of-wall or HOW joints) shall precede the installation of spray-applied fireproofing.

Division 8: Doors and Windows

Curtain Wall: The perimeter slab edge joint, between the curtain wall and the edge of the concrete slab shall be firestopped by Section 07840.

Division 9: Finishes

Spec-Note: Metal Studs and Gypsum Wall Board: For the deflection spaces as well as for the vertical control joints, there are proprietary metal tracks available, which are simply installed by the drywaller. There are also systems, which require caulking by the firestop trade. Make your choice based on what is currently available in terms of UL and ULC listings. You (the architect) have to nail this down early on because of the staging of the work. If a drywall joint has to be firestopped in a manner which requires a proprietary insulation to be stuffed into tracks or studs, this must be done by the drywaller, who must allow for it pre-tender. You (the architect) also have to determine the amount of operational joint motion, which can be entertaining to discuss with your civil engineer. Only once you have nailed down the maximum joint motion parameters can you choose the correct firestop system, because some of them warrant ZERO motion, while others are tested to a certain percentage of maximum motion. You have to know the baseline width of the joint. The motion is then quantified in terms of % movement up or down from your baseline width. This section, as well as Section 07840 must be adjusted to reflect your choice so that there is no misunderstanding about who does what, since this is a case where more than one trade is installing firestop products in the same opening, to achieve one fire protection rating. One good place to nail this choice down is on your PC, by selecting the appropriate joint system on the web: http://www.mmm.com/firestop. But beware that regardless of the system you choose, if you permit alternates, you must reconsider adjustments to the related sections of work.

Mechanical and electrical through-penetrations in gypsum wallboard assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be formed in accordance with the sizing parameters stated in Section 07840, in consultation with Divisions 15 and 16, as well as the Section 07840 subcontractor. Firestopping of mechanical and electrical through-penetrations in gypsum wall board assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840.

Division 15: Mechanical

SPEC-NOTE: In some regions it is customary for mechanical engineers to leave out certain piping in the drawings, such as some of the vent piping. To facilitate proper firestopping AND maintainable, documented fire safety, it is imperative that the mechanical engineer have no doubt that it is a requirement on your job do draw everything. It shall also not be permissible to restrict one's drawings to typical scenarios and thus leave the cumulative effects of services (and connections thereto) to and from 'typical' areas to the imagination of others. In order to have documented, maintainable firestops, without which fire safety on the entire project is questionable, everything must be drawn. Drawings prepared by the mechanical engineer must be overlayed on those architectural drawings, which clearly show and identify fire separations, occupancy separations and fire walls, plus the hourly fire-resistance duration.

SPEC-NOTE: Yes, you (the architect) most likely have to effect change in the mechanical engineer's specification. Check the history of firestops (http://www.oocities.com/achim_hering/history_of_firestops_in_north_america.html) on this topic, as well as the tour of firestop examples, which starts on http://www.oocities.com/astximw. Letting each trade do his or her own firestopping, particularly the mechanical and electrical trade, is to make absolutely certain beyond the shadow of a doubt that there will be safety compromises and no traceability - except to the one with overall responsibility - the architect. This is a popularly denied but irrevocable fact, accurately documented all over this site.

Now, there are many potential spots within the typical mechanical specification, which can lead to misinterpretations, overlaps etc. all of which are religiously or even ritually exploited to decimate the firestopping in exchange for a token cashback, as a consequence of the low tender system, which forces trades to desperately seek room to actually make some money on the job. The mechanical trade complicates this matter because there are more subtrades working for one mechanical contractor, who may sublet sheet metal work, insulation and sprinklers, who may all be forced to do their own firestopping, using different sub-contractors yet again, different materials, etc. This reduces the chances of intact fire separations considerably. At the end of such a job, you can't even answer the question "How many firestopped penetrations are there on this job?" When you can't answer that and document it, you cannot guarantee the fire safety of the building because you cannot prove that you have any real clue as to what is going on. Again, go through the tour and check the history to see for yourself.

Check for overlaps under such catch-all phrases as Sleeving, Cutting and Patching, within the General Requirements (15050). Also check for overlaps in the Insulation (15250) and in Fire Protection (Sprinklers and any other dire suppression systems).

Delete conflicting statements and insert the following:

The forming of through penetrations in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done in accordance with the sizing parameters stated in Section 07840.

Firestopping of through penetrations in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840.

SPEC-NOTE: (We all know you can't tell the general contractor how to divide his work. But you also don't want the liability associated with the mess that inevitably ensues when the firestop workscope is busted up among all the trades. Imagine what you might tell the family of a fire victim about not being able to direct fire protection work on your project. And then simply follow your conscience. It is not an axe murder offence to specify the way that is suggested here. It is simply the only thing that gives you and your client a fighting chance at meeting the building code and being able to meet the fire code after commissioning because you are then actually turning over a building where the firestops are neatly identified, databased and indexed and maintainable.)

Insulation:

SPEC-NOTE: Here, you (the architect) and the mechanical engineer have to come to some compromises. Basically, the best thing for your project (fire safety-wise and cost-wise) is if all the pipe covering is made of rockwool. Check general technical guidelines on this topic under this URL: http://www.oocities.com/astximw/profistops.html.  Also check under "Ratings for Firestops" in the Glossary. You have to provide FT ratings on firestops, that are equivalent to the fire-resistance rating of all occupancy separations and fire walls that are penetrated. Lots of folks don't know this and if you just leave it to chance or the effects of a weasel clause, it will not happen, and it will be your liability if it does not, at least partially. Now, to get equivalent FT ratings, again for through penetrations in occupancy separations and in fire walls, you have to use systems that employs a minimum 25mm thickness of rockwool pipe covering. Check the listings if you like, but the pipe covering in T rated firestops runs through the firestop itself and is intended to traverse the entire fire compartment on either side of the fire wall and/or occupancy separation. The FT requirement is universal for all penetrants, including electrical, by the way. Fibreglass melts and fall off in a fire. So do organic foam based pipe coverings. The mechanical engineer is typically, and rightly, concerned about vapour barriers around chilled or otherwise cold piping. The vapour barrier provided by ASJ jacketing (or metal jacketing, caulked in, on industrial jobs) around the outside of rockwool pipe covering usually will suffice to do the job. That is why they permit fibreglass pipe covering for this purpose. Simply insist that rockwool be used everywhere. But specifically for occupancy separations and fire walls, the pipe covering must extend throughout the length of each fire compartment on either side of the firestop. Also, mechanical and electrical services are affected by this, even when they would ordinarily not be insulated. Therefore, first of all, make sure you clearly identify your drawings such that not only all the fire-resistance ratings are identified, but also the fire walls and occupancy separations must be uniquely identified. Then clean up any and all mechanical specification overlaps in this regard and insert as follows:

All piping, tubing and ductwork penetrating fire walls and/or occupancy separations required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be insulated for the entire length of each fire compartment on either side of the fire-separation with a minimum thickness of 25mm of rockwool by Fibrex or Roxul. Except in the case of fire dampers, the rockwool pipe covering must protrude through the opening. Additionally, ferrous jacketing (galvanised or stainless, cut and rolled, minimum 0.010" or 0.25mm thick) must be fixed around the exterior of the pipe covering for the entire length of the pipe within the fire compartment on both sides of the fire wall or occupancy separation.

Alternatively, the local AHJ may buy into doing this with but a 3' length (that is what pipe covering is sold in) of rockwool pipe covering on either side of the fire wall or occupancy separation. If you can sell this to the AHJ, you must still make a choice as to who installs this. Section 07840 is set up for the firestopper to do this, because it is a fire protection function. But it would also do to let the mechanical insulator do this. In unionised construction, this should really be the same trade. In the non-union sector, who knows? Either way, you must make your choice pre-tender because you have to specify it SOMEWHERE and avoid any overlaps. Fixing it afterwards is really costly and tedious. Beforehand, it's but a call to the local building inspector. Do you accept 3' on either side or not? If not, then it has to get insulated all the way and it makes no sense to let the firestopper do it. But this means that the pipe insulator has much more work to do, on piping and conduit that he has never insulated before, among other things.

The forming of openings for through penetrations in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done in accordance with the sizing parameters stated in Section 07840.

Firestopping of through penetrations in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840.

Division 16: Electrical

SPEC-NOTE: See the comments above for Division 15 Inserts. If you have fire walls and occupancy separations, insulation will be required for electrical penetrants. Also read the text on Ampacity Derating in the Glossary under this URL: http://www.oocities.com/astximw/firestop_terminology.html. No, really read those before you go on please! Welcome back! The 3' insulation solution advocated above and in the Section 07840 page may be more than attractive for your electrical engineer because he, and all those who have held a vacuum cord while the vacuum was running, know that electricity generates heat. If you let that build up by insulating around it, you have to derate the cables more, meaning you will have to run more or bigger cables to run the same amount of power. Also, heat build ups are not good for fire protection. As far as cables are concerned, it is possible to get good T ratings with very thick firestop mortar systems - at least as thick as the fire separation. In the case of two 8" concrete block walls, which you may be using to form a fire wall assembly with a four hour fire-resistance rating, let that firestop mortar run the full thickness of both block walls. If you do that, make special mention of it in the specifications as well as the drawings. This costs more money and must be accounted for pre-tender, without any pointless arguments post-tender. This issue is worth a pre-tender discussion both with your firestop vendors and the electrical engineer. Next, clean up any overlaps and insert as follows:

The forming of openings for through penetrations in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done in accordance with the sizing parameters stated in Section 07840.

Firestopping of through penetrations in assemblies required to have a fire-resistance rating shall be done by Section 07840.

SPEC-NOTE: In some regions it has become customary for electrical engineers to only draw certain of the penetrants, such as cable tray or wireway. Conduit and naked cables are often only partially shown. What happens is that the electrical engineer must include schematics, or a single line diagram. These can vary in terms of legibility to the layman. But suffice it to say that electrical equipment, such as outlet boxes, lighting, motors, switchgear etc. are all shown. Then, the connections between said equipment is also shown on the single line diagram as well as unconnected boxes on the plans. For instance, on the single line diagram, you might see a line between two boxes (which each represent an electrical widget of some sort, such as an MCC for motor control centre etc.). The line may say 1C500MCM, meaning that what connects the two widgets is a single conductor 500MCM cable. But when you look at the plan, you will likely only see the two widget boxes, possibly in different rooms or even on different floors. There is no mention of on the plan view, that, or how these two boxes are connected. What happens is that the electrical contractor then chooses the shortest, least expensive path to connect these two boxes, such that the the lowest cost results in terms of labour and materials. Finding the shortest path and measuring the length is essentially now the work of the electrical estimator. It is not brain surgery. The electrical engineer also often draws 'typical' penetrant scenarios, which may leave more to the imagination of the non-electrician. The reason why the electrical engineer does not draw that which he or she designs is primarily competitive pressure. You, the architect, can insist (pre-tender for the consultant that is) that he or she in fact draws all penetrants. He or she will then have to draw them on the architectural plans, which clearly show the fire-resistance ratings as well as the type of separations concerned. Otherwise, once again, you have unclear data as to what openings are where and which penetrants can be combined into larger openings, which typically happens, particularly in corridors and main service rooms. It is really quite simple: DRAW EVERYTHING! As a result, you will have the basis for maintainable systems post commissioning. It is quite common to draw everything in many market segments. For a bit more money, your electrical engineer can oblige and sort out and draw what goes where. The alternative is to pay much more for the firestop documentation after the fact, or to ignore it all and gamble that nothing ever happens.

Firestop Page

07840 Master Specification

Main Page

Glossary

Contact

Main Site

Firestop Site

Code Evaluations AVAILABLE!

Glossary of Fire Protection Terms

3M Fire Barriers

Vectorising Drawings and Maps; Paper to CAD

Circuit Integrity Fireproofing

Bounding

Code Req's for Firestops

Essay on Performance Based Codes

Master Spec. Section 07840 Firestopping

Related Sections to 07840

Penetration Seal Drawings

Building Joint Drawings 1

Building Joint Drawings 2

Building Joint Drawings 3

History of Firestops in North America

Warnock Hersey Experience

Firestop Trade Jurisdiction

Achim Hering Bio

Man Made Mineral Fibres

Fire Protection Industry Links

Firestop Products and Equipment

Firestop Mortar

Firestop Silicone Foam

Intumescent Products

Endothermic Products

Insulation Products

Caulking & Paint Firestops

Firestop Pillows

Firestop Devices

Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

ULC           UL

T O S

(Theory of Survival)

DIBt

TU Braunschweig iBMB

CONTACT

1