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Trade Jurisdiction in Firestopping

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Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

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Trade Jurisdiction for Firestopping in the Province of Ontario, as well as in the remainder of North America remains disputed. We are referring, of course, to the unionised construction sector. The one trade most organised, most experienced and most documented to address this work is the International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers, Local 95, Toronto, ON. The insulators have firestopped most, if not all nuclear powers stations across North America. Insulators also have an agreement with the IBEW (International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers). Under this agreement, firestopping work is insulator work, except when working in live electrical cabinets, where the use of a composite crew is mandatory, whereby an IBEW master electrician must supervise the insulator's work, for safety reasons. The agreement was signed on 08. March 1985 and remains in effect. It refers to position papers from as far back as 1959. For the most part, this agreement has worked well, between the parties, who could otherwise have elected to cancel it. It is not unusual, however, that electricians at times need reminders about the existence of the agreement, when electrical contractors decide to do their own firestopping. This is not an uncommon occurrence in some regions. In Ontario, Local 95 has a collective agreement with the Master Insulators Association (MIA). Local 95 represents the workers, whereas MIA represents the employers. Contractors who sign on with one entity obligate themselves to join the other as well. In Ontario, not all MIA members are entirely enthusiastic about making firestopping a part of the agreement. Some MIA members are concerned that if firestopping were entered into the collective agreement as a common work item, such as wrapping pipes for thermal insulation purposes, this might be a draw on the available labour force. Firestopping work is also far from easily attainable or necessarily profitable. There is recorded history on that concern. When there is little work to go around, trades other than insulators may attempt to lay claim to the work. The most infantile of approaches to such claims include reference to basic materials used in firestopping. Firestopping products draw on a wide range of technologies, including caulking, insulation, mortar, etc. Since firestopping is at times relegated to the cheapest possible and illconceived (cost-only-driven) methods, labourers, who may push a broom and do the most basic of tasks on behalf of general contractors may have smeared this or that gunk in a hole, in a vain attempt at firestopping, lacking all required knowledge to do the job right. Thus, if a bricklayer sees an insulator install a firestop mortar, he or she may attempt to claim the work, because the product contains cement. But by that definition, masons may as well claim dentistry work too. Carpenters are often convinced that the entire building is their oyster. After all, it all started with carpentry, back to biblical times. On that rationale, of course, one may also claim that perhaps it's teamster work, because this relates to concrete and after all, the first humans were cave dwellers, residing in rock, which is most closely resembled by concrete! But alas, carpenters could possibly make a case to claim caulking, the most disorganised and ill-represented trade of all, consisting in large part of travellers, seeking their meagre fortunes by travelling from one site to another, working peace-work without benefits and poor safety regimes, breathing assorted fumes from caulking and thinners all day long. So, if an insulator is seen to install a caulking based firestop product, in lean times, this may be an irritant to a carpenter, who may think that caulking is HIS or HER domain. Of course, the carpenter may be competing against the glaser, because he or she regularly uses caulking as well and thus think that all caulking may be glasers' work. 'Cutting and patching' is a common catch-all phrase that may be used by drywallers, masons, plumbers and sprinkler fitters to lay claim to firestopping work. Sprinkler fitters may be more convinced that firestopping falls under THEIR cutting and patching because they do 'fire protection work' to begin with. The same loosey-goosey argument may be used by plasterers or painters insofar as they may have done fireproofing work, which is totally separate from firestopping work. All of these claims are born of desperation, and typically only appear in very lean times, where lay-offs are common and the lists at the local union halls grow longer because there is insufficient work to go around and feed all the hungry mouths. In times when there is enough work to go 'round, firestopping is admittedly a pain in the neck that most anyone goes to great lengths to avoid. In the preparation of a consensus document on firestopping, I contacted assorted building trades' business managers and asked them if they thought they should be doing firestopping work. Apart from the electricians, who have the agreement with the Insulators, they all emphatically said: "Yes!". Then I asked them to supply me with documentation, which supports their position for claiming firestopping work. Not one of them had any response whatsoever. Nothing at all! Zilch, Nada. Local 95, on the other hand, along with the rest of their brotherhood and its locals all over North America has real documentation, not only of work done, but also of accredited courses in firestopping, which form part of the regular training for all members. In conclusion, firestopping in the unionised construction sector, is insulators' work. Period. Also, there is no formal training on firestopping available outside of that, which is offered by the Insulators.

Firestop Page

Main Page

Contact

Main Site

Firestop Site

Code Evaluations AVAILABLE!

Glossary of Fire Protection Terms

3M Fire Barriers

Vectorising Drawings and Maps; Paper to CAD

Circuit Integrity Fireproofing

Bounding

Code Req's for Firestops

Essay on Performance Based Codes

Master Spec. Section 07840 Firestopping

Related Sections to 07840

Penetration Seal Drawings

Building Joint Drawings 1

Building Joint Drawings 2

Building Joint Drawings 3

History of Firestops in North America

Warnock Hersey Experience

Firestop Trade Jurisdiction

Achim Hering Bio

Man Made Mineral Fibres

Fire Protection Industry Links

Firestop Products and Equipment

Firestop Mortar

Firestop Silicone Foam

Intumescent Products

Endothermic Products

Insulation Products

Caulking & Paint Firestops

Firestop Pillows

Firestop Devices

Firestop Slide Show 1 of 10 Basics

Firestop Slide Show 2 of 10 Code

Firestop Slide Show 3 of 10 No Seal

Firestop Slide Show 4 of 10 Deemed-to-comply

Firestop Slide Show 5 of 10 Misinstalled

Firestop Slide Show 6 of 10 Re-entered

Firestop Slide Show 7 of 10 Faulty Spec.

Firestop Slide Show 8 of 10 Proper Firestops

Firestop Slide Show 9 of 10 Test

Firestop Slide Show 10 of 10 Smoke and Trays

Sample Firestop Listing

Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning; Boiling-Hot Pressure Washing

ULC           UL

T O S

(Theory of Survival)

DIBt

TU Braunschweig iBMB

CONTACT

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