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shark-tooth fighting knife

uyulng in Uw Oykangand and Uw Olkola


Shark-tooth fighting knife, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 26 1996 [PH].


Shark-tooth fighting knife, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.


Shark-tooth fighting knife, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.


Shark-tooth fighting knife, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH].


Shark-tooth fighting knife, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.

The shark tooth fighting knife, called uyulng in Uw Oykangand and Uw Olkola, is a fighting weapon composed of a flat wood body with a groove cut along one edge. Shark teeth are embedded and fastened in the groove and fastened in place with sugarbag wax (see the page on wax). Specimens observed at Kowanyama were 25 to 35 cm in length. Shark teeth are very sharp, making this a formidable and dangerous weapon. It is held as shown in the accompanying image.

A string or rope loop is fastened to one end with wax and used as a wrist strap. When fighting the strap is kept around the wrist so that if you lose hold it won't fall to the ground. This weapon is often painted with white paint, as shown in some of the accompanying images.

e-mail: Philip Hamilton.
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