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resin pallet, smoothing board

udnanboy
udnarrarr
janboy
maana (yuku -)
in Uw Oykangand and Uw Olkola
in Uw Oykangand and Uw Olkola
in Uw Oykangand and Uw Olkola
in Pakanh


Resin pallet, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, April 1996 [PH].


Resin pallets, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.


Resin pallet, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.


Baby board, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.


Baby board, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.

A resin pallet is a carved, flat, roughly ovate shaped piece of very hard wood, usually ironwood. It is used in material culture industry to flatten out wax surfaces on spears and woomeras. It is used in ways similar to a putty knife.

The surfaces of a resin pallet are treated with sugarbag wax. Aboriginal men grease it with forehead perspiration immediately before using it. Wax is heated before being applied to a surface and the resin pallet is used to smooth it down as it cools.

Koolatah Station is named for the resin pallet. The Uw Olkola place name for Koolatah Station is udnanboy ambungg or janboy ambungg, resin pallet story place.

There is no direct Uw Ilbmbanhdhiy counterpart for the Uw Oykangand and Uw Olkola words. The Uw Ilbmbanhdhiy tree classifier is supplied when speaking in this register: onychar udnanboy in Uw Oykangand and onyjar udnanboy in Uw Olkola, etc.

This implement can also be used as a baby board or bullroarer. (See the two bottom images below.) These were sacred ritual objects used by Oykangand and Olkola people in traditional times and figure in traditional stories. In both cases string is tied to one end of the piece of wood. A baby board is hung from a tree or over a baby as it sleeps. A bullroarer is whirled round and round on the string and makes a loud roaring noise. Baby boards and bullroarers are offensive to the traditional owners of the land around Kowanyama; mention, display and use of them is not permitted.

e-mail: Philip Hamilton.
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