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yamstick, digging stick or fighting stick

achin
ajin
ugnggul
malak
kachin
in Uw Oykangand
in Uw Olkola
in Uw Ilbmbanhdhiy
in Uw Ilbmbanhdhiy
in Pakanh


Yamstick, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size. Sugarbag wax has been smeared on the grips of this specimen.


Yamstick, Kowanyama Land and Natural Resources Management Office, March 16 1997 [PH]. The Australian 50 cent coin, roughly 32 mm in diameter, allows for an estimation of size.

The yamstick is extremely important as a digging implement and as a weapon in hand-to-hand combat. It is made from a straight, hard length of wood and may be carved to give it one sharp end and one blunt end. When digging it is used to break up hard ground. The name 'yamstick' comes from its use in digging yams but it is used whenever digging in hard ground.

The generic name for yamsticks in Uw Oykangand is achin and in Uw Olkola is ajin. This was the name used for medium length yamsticks, approximately 125 cm in length.

A short yamstick (the specimen in the first photo below, 82 cm in length) at Kowanyama was called ajin oyonggodh in Uw Olkola.

A long yamstick (172 cm in length) at Kowanyama was called ajin umuj in Uw Olkola.

e-mail: Philip Hamilton.
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