SOME CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS OF NORTHWESTERN MAINE (M-Z)

The total list now includes more than 1100 men, so it has been divided in two parts - the first part, with surnames beginning A-L, is at the original address, www.oocities.com/barbour1048/CWsoldiers.htm.

Unfortunately, historical information is often incomplete, tentative or even wrong, so as always, comments, additions and corrections are welcome.  Please write barbour1028@yahoo.com. 
My primary sources have been Ancestry.com (Census, pensions, service records), civilwardata.com (service records), the Franklin County usgenweb.com page (cemeteries), and local histories and genealogies, including Shirley Adams' Rangeley Allied Families, the Thompson genealogy of Freeman and the Gould history of Farmington.

Updated June, 2007.

Andrew C. Mace, son of James and Deborah Mace of Farmington, enlisted from there at 22  in Company A, 11th Maine Infantry, on November 7, 1861.  He was killed on April 29, 1862, at Lee's Mills, Virginia.

Cornelius S. Mace, 19 year-old son of Benjamin and Rhoda Mace of Farmington, enlisted from there in Company E, 12th Maine Infantry,  on November 15, 1861, and was mustered out on December 7, 1864.  His wife Jennie was born in Iowa of Scottish parents.  They were in Missouri in 1869-1877, when their oldest children were born, and in Kansas by 1881.  In 1900, Mace was a farmer in Saint John, Kansas, with his wife and four children.  His wife died before 1910, when he was a widower living in Saint John with two of his children.

Edward A. Mace, son of Benjamin and Rhoda Mace of Farmington, was born abut 1846.  He enlisted in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry on September 12, 1862.  He was wounded at Dinwiddie Courthouse and was discharged on June 15, 1865 (estimated date).  He applied for a pension on July 1, 1865.  In 1870, he was a dry goods clerk in Hamburg, Iowa.

Hiram A. Mace was the son of Joseph and Sarah Mace.  The family was in Redfield in 1850 and in Farmington in 1860.  Mace enlisted at 19 from Farmington in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on March 22, 1865, and was mustered out on August 28.  In 1870, he was a laborer on the farm of Josiah Prescott in Farmington.  In 1880, he was a teamster and lived in Rochester, New Hampshire, with his wife, Mattie, their son George and his stepdaughter Hattie Wescott.  He was listed in Rochester on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he stated that he had been wounded in the leg.  He applied for a pension on March 17, 1891.  He may be the Hiram A. Mace who was an inmate at the New Hampshire State Hospital in Concord in 1910.

John W. Mace, 24, son of James and Deborah Mace, enlisted from Farmington in Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on November 15, 1863.  He and his wife Ann and their children lived in New Vineyard in 1870 and in Industry in 1880.  He applied for a pension in 1880.

R. Everett Mace, oldest son of James and Deborah Mace of Farmington,  was born about 1833.  He was drafted from Farmington into Company I, 3rd Maine Infantry, on July 15, 1863.  He transferred to the 17th Maine Infantry on July 19 and to Company F, 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, on June 28, 1864.  He and his wife Eliza had five children and lived in Farmington.

Andrew B. Macomber was born on July 12, 1838, and in 1850 he lived on the farm of Luther Chaney in Wilton.  In 1860 he and 19 year-old Hannah Macomber, probably his sister, lived on the farm of Jeremiah Walker in Wilton.  He enlisted from Wilton on December 10, 1861, in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, and transferred to the 30th Maine Infantry as a Corporal.  He married Olive Pease, daughter of Calvin and Olive Pease of Wilton.  She died in 1871.  Macomber was a  farm hand in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1880 and he was listed in Worcester on the 1890 Veterans Schedule.  He died on January 4, 1906, and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery with Olive.

Alanson C. Maddocks was born about 1845, and lived with his mother, Catharine, and two brothers in Chesterville in 1860.  He enlisted from Farmington in Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He is listed as deserting on December 11, 1862.  He died sometime before August 18, 1866, the date that his mother applied for a pension based on his service.

Stephen Manchester was born in Mount Desert.  In 1850 he was a farmer and lived with Ezra and Mary Averill in Wilton.  He was married and had two children before the war.  He enlisted at 31 from Avon in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on January 13, 1864, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  He moved to Minnesota and was a dry goods merchant and lived in Marshfield, Minnesota, in 1880 with his wife and three children.  He was listed in Lake Benton, Minnesota, on the 1890 veterans schedule and applied for a pension in 1892.  He died after 1910 and his widow, Dolly, applied for a pension in 1914.

Aaron B. Marden was born on October 20, 1842, in Berlin Plantation, the son of Nathaniel and Abigail (Beedy) Marden.  In 1860 he was a farm worker and lived with the family of Benjamin and Abigail Durrell in Flagstaff.  He enlisted from Flagstaff in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and re-enlisted on February 29, 1864.  He was wounded, "shot in shoulder", on May 18 at Drewry's Bluff, Virginia.  He was taken prisoner in October at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and received a disability discharge on June 10, 1865.  In 1870 he was a laborer and lived on the farm of Leonard Parsons in Eustis.  He married Caroline "Abbie" Gordon of Eustis about 1871.  He was listed in Greenvale (Sandy River) on the 1890 veterans schedule, and settled his family in Farmington by 1900.  He died on April 19, 1914, in Temple and his wife died in 1932.  They are buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

Edward Marcelus Marden was born on October 5, 1829, in Vermont, the son of Nathaniel and Abigail (Beedy) Marden.  He enlisted from Byron in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 14, 1861, and re-enlisted and transferred to Company A on January 1, 1864.  He was listed as missing and possibly a prisoner at Cedar Creek, Virginia, on October 19, 1864, and was absent when the regiment was mustered out on August 28, 1865.  He  married Dolly Annis Perry.  He applied for a pension in December, 1866.  In 1890 he lived in Strong.  Marden died on January 15, 1900, in West Freeman and his wife died in 1911.  They are buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

John J. Marden, 21, enlisted from Byron in  Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 14, 1861.  He was listed as sick, in hospital, in 1862, and died on February 23, 1863.

Nathaniel Marden enlisted at 23 from Byron in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He was listed as missing on May 16, 1864, at Drewry's Bluff, Virginia.  He may be the Nathaniel Marden who died on June 7, 1864, and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Nathaniel Marden/Mardon was married to Sally J. Linnell of Magalloway.  On November 15, 1861, at the age of 44, he enlisted from Upton in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry.  The record states that he was discharged on September 12, 1863, but according to Heywood's History of Upton, Maine, he was killed in the war.

Mason H. Marshall was the son of Henry and Rebecca Marshall and lived with his parents in Minot in 1850.  He enlisted from Roxbury in Company H, 23rd Maine Infantry, on September 29, 1862.  He was promoted to Corporal on May 1, 1863, and was mustered out on July 15.

John A. Marston, 21, enlisted from Farmington in Company M, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on January 19, 1864.  He was listed as sick, in hospital, in 1864, and deserted from the hospital on October 8, 1864.

Daniel Marston was born on June 22, 1813.  In 1850 he was a farmer in Phillips living with his wife Rosannah and three children.  In 1860 he was a Phillips merchant who owned real estate worth $12,000 and other property worth $4,000.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 22, 1861, and was discharged for promotion on June 15, 1862.  On August 14 he enlisted as a Captain in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, and received a disability discharge on December 22, 1864.  In 1870 he was a grocer in La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he, his second wife Susan and his son Daniel W. boarded with Charles and Mary Clark.  In 1880 he was in La Crosse with his son and his son's family.  He submitted a pension application from Wisconsin in 1883.  He is listed in Phillips on the 1890 Veterans Schedule and Rosana, who is described as his widow, is listed in Cambridge, MA.  Marston died on November 26, 1891.  Rosanna applied for a pension from Massachusetts and died in 1900.  They are buried in Riverside Cemetery in Phillips.

Daniel W. Marston, son of Daniel and Rosannah Marston, was born in June, 1849.  He enlisted from Phillips with his father as a musician in Company D, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 22, 1861, and transferred to Company C, 16th Maine Infantry on June 15, 1862.  He was discharged on September 20, 1864.  In 1870 he was a grocery clerk and lived with his father and his father's second wife in La Crosse, Wisconsin.  In 1880 he, his wife Eva, their two young children and his father were in La Crosse, where he was a grocer.  He was listed in La Crosse on the 1890 Veterans Schedule.  He lived in Marshalltown, Iowa, with his wife Frances in 1900.  In 1910, they were in Marshalltown, where he was a "common laborer"  in a wholesale grocery and lived with three Gablemann stepchildren and two Hollister in-laws.  He submitted a pension application from Iowa in 1910 and Frances applied from there in 1917.

Lendell/Lendall C. Marston, 19, enlisted from Wilton in Company M, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on January 2, 1864.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1865 and was mustered out on December 6.  In 1870 he and his wife Miranda lived in Farmington and he was a railroad brakeman.  He died before 1890, when Miranda is listed as his widow on the veterans schedule.  She lived in Farmington with her niece in 1910.

George H. Martin, 25, enlisted from Wilton in Company F, 9th Maine Infantry, on August 9, 1862.  He was detailed as a nurse in a general hospital in 1863 and was discharged on June 16, 1865.  He is listed in Lower Waterford, Vermont, on the 1890 veterans schedule with a note that his wife lived in Chelsea, Massachusetts.

Marshman W. Marvell was the son of Elliot and Mary Marvell of Farmington.  He enlisted at 18 from Farmington as an Artificer in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on February 17, 1862 and was discharged on February 11, 1865.  He died on May 5, 1866, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

Mayhew/Mayhue N. Marvell was the son of Jesse and Mary Marvell of Farmington.  He enlisted at 21 from Farmington in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on February 12, 1862.  He re-enlisted on February 16, 1864, and deserted on July 16, 1864.

Leander E. Maxim was born on February 3, 1837, in Starks.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Company D, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 9, 1861.   He was wounded at Cane River Crossing, Louisiana, on April 23, 1864, and was mustered out with the regiment on January 6, 1865.  He was married to Cornelia Jones.  He applied for a pension from Nebraska in 1889.  He was listed in Grand Island, Nebraska, on the 1890 Veterans Schedule, and in 1900 he lived alone in May, Nebraska, described himself as single, and was employed as a carpenter.  In 1910 he lived alone on Forbes Avenue in Kenesaw Township, Nebraska, and described himself as a widower.  He is thought to have returned to Maine and died sometime after January, 1928, probably in North Anson.

Ethan E. Maxwell was born about 1828 in Maine.  In 1860 he was a farmer in Phillips and owned real estate worth $1250.  His wife Hannah owned real estate worth $3000 as well as $500 in personal property.  He enlisted from Phillips in Battery 5, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 19, 1864, and was mustered out on July 6, 1865.     In 1870 he lived in Avon with his wife Ann (possibly the same woman as Hannah) and four children.  He was a tailor and owned real estate worth $400.  In 1880 he was a tailor and lived in Pittsfield with his wife Ophelia and her son, Orrigen Lowell, who was also a tailor.  He applied for a pension in March, 1886, and was listed in Pittsfield on the 1890 Veterans Schedule.  Ophelia applied for a widow's pension in October, 1898.

Henry McAllister enlisted at 19 from Farmington in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on March 22, 1865, and was mustered out on August 28.  He may have been the son of Asa McAllister, a physician in Ellsworth.

David McCleery/McLeary married Mary Corbett of Farmington.  He enlisted at 39 from Farmington as a Corporal in Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was listed as sick, in hospital, in 1862, and was discharged on January 7, 1863.  He died in California on May 19, 1881.

Albert McCrillis was born about 1836, the son of Charles and Abigail McCrillis of Wilton.  In 1860 he was a farmer in Wilton with his wife Sarah and an infant daughter.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He was listed as sick in Portland later that year and was discharged at Lowell, MA, on December 29, 1861.  He enlisted in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863.  He is listed as deserting on February 4, 1864 but also reported as missing in action on May 8, 1864.  He was a farmer in Temple in 1870 and he and Sarah had three children.  On the 1890 Veterans Schedule he was listed in Wilton.

Charles F. McCrillis was the father of Albert and William H. McCrillis.  He enlisted at 44 from Wilton in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864, and transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1.  He received a disability discharge on December 3.  He returned to Wilton after the war and was a farmer.  He is buried with his wife Abigail in the East Wilton Cemetery.

William H. McCrillis was born about 1840, the son of Charles and Abigail McCrillis of Wilton.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and deserted on November 27.  He lived with his parents in Wilton in 1870.

Hugh McGrail, 18, enlisted from Phillips in Company K, 15th Maine Infantry, on February 17, 1865, and deserted on May 1.

Thomas McGinley was born in New Brunswick, Canada, about 1824.  In 1860 he was a farmer in Springfield and lived there with his wife, Lydia.  He enlisted from Springfield in Company E, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 9, 1863, and was discharged on May 23, 1865.  He returned to Springfield after the war and in 1870 he and Lydia had a daughter and four sons.  He applied for a pension in 1876.  By 1880 they had five more sons.  He died on July 21, 1892, and is buried in the Cushman Road Cemetery, Springfield.  Lydia applied for a pension in March, 1893.  She died in 1911 at 74 and is buried with him.

Benjamin P. McKeen, son of William and Dorothy McKeen of Strong, was born about 1838 and lived with his parents in 1850.  In 1860 he was a laborer on the farm of Joshua Allen in Walpole, MA.  He enlisted from Cambridgeport, MA, in Company D, 74th New York Infantry on July 7, 1861.  He was transferred from Campbell Hospital to the Veteran Reserve Corps (no transfer or discharge date given).  On September 26, 1864, he enlisted from Strong in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  In 1870 he had a farm in Strong and he and his wife Winifred had two young children.  In 1890 on the veterans schedule he was listed as living on Decatur Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  He died on May 19, 1898, and is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong with his wife, who died in 1913.

Ezra McKeen, a 21 year-old Farmington resident, enlisted on November 1, 1864, in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, and re-enlisted on December 28, 1863.  He was promoted to Wagoner in 1864 and to Sergeant in 1865.  He was mustered out at Petersburg, Virginia, on August 1, 1865.   He was a laborer on the farm of Moses Fellows in Avon in 1870.  In 1880, he and his wife Frances (listed on the Census as "Frank") lived in Strong, where he was a farm laborer.  He applied for a pension in September, 1882 and was listed in Phillips on the 1890 veterans schedule.  McKeen died in 1902 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips with his wife, who died in 1900.

Harper C. McKeen, enlisted at 21 from Avon in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He and his wife Margaret lived in Temple (Avon post office) in 1870, and they were in Temple with three sons in 1880.  He is listed in Temple on the 1890 veterans schedule.  His widow applied for a pension on December 3, 1902.

James W. McKeen, 18, enlisted from Farmington in Company K, 12th Maine Infantry, on March 21, 1865, and was discharged on August 2.  He applied for a pension from New Hampshire in August, 1887, and is listed in Groveton, New Hampshire on the 1890 veterans schedule.  His widow, Hannah, submitted a pension application from New Hampshire in May, 1906.

William H. McKeen, 25, enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He applied for a pension in 1880 and was listed in Phillips on the 1890 Veterans Schedule.  He died on September 3, 1903 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, Nellie (1841-1908).

Hartson W. McKenney was the son of Richard and Betsy McKenney of Phillips and a brother of Richard and Seward.  He enlisted at 19 from Phillips as a musician in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and was mustered out on June 5, 1865 at Arlington Heights, Virginia.  He submitted a pension application from Massachusetts in 1905.  His widow, Sophia (Smith) McKenney, applied in 1924 from Florida.

James E. McKenney, 23, enlisted from Upton in Company B, 23rd Maine Infantry, on October 23, 1862, and was mustered out at Portland on July 15, 1863.

Richard H. McKenney, son of Richard and Betsy McKenney of Phillips, enlisted at 30 from Madrid as a Corporal in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was reduced in rank to Private at his request and was mustered out with the regiment on August 13, 1863.  He died in 1910 and is buried in the Field Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, Marilla (1834-1868).

Seward D. McKenney was the son of Richard and Betsy McKenney of Phillips.  He married Laura A. Thompson, and in 1860 they lived in Kingfield, where he was a farmer, with their son Franzeno.  Seward McKenney enlisted at 23 from Kingfield as a Sergeant in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He applied for a pension in 1884.  He was listed in Phillips on the 1890 veterans schedule and died on October 4, 1920.  He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with Laura (1833-1896).

William H. McKenney was born in 1845, the son of Benjamin and Dardana McKenney of New Portland.  He enlisted from Embden in Company A, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married Caroline "Carrie" Howes in June, 1868, and lived in Embden.

Zachary T. McLaughlin was born in Weld on November 18, 1848, the son of James and Rhoda (Lawrence) McLaughlin.  He lived with his parents in Weld before the war.  He enlisted from there in Company F, 12th Maine Infantry, on February 23, 1865, and was discharged on August 14.  He married Electa Record in 1874.  In 1880 they lived in Salem with three children.  In 1920, McLaughlin and his wife lived on Park Street in Phillips.  She died in 1926 and he died on November 7, 1947.  They are buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips.

Archibald McLean was born in Canada of Scottish parents.  He enlisted at 18 in Company H, 1st Veteran Maine Regiment, on January 13, 1865, as a substitute for David H. Chandler of Farmington.  He was mustered out on June 28.  He and his wife Frances, who also was born in Canada, lived in Seattle in 1900 and in 1920.    He applied for a pension on March 10, 1885, and Frances submitted an application from Washington on January 24, 1928.

Charles H. McLoon, son of Patrick and Hulda (Gilbert) McLoon, enlisted at 21 from Kingfield on November 15, 1861, in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry.  He died on May 29, 1862, in New Orleans, LA.  His mother applied for a pension based on his service in 1868.  According to one researcher, Richard F. McLoon, Charles' burial site is unknown and it is his younger brother, born in 1862 and given the same name, who is buried with Patrick and Hulda in Riverside Cemetery in Kingfield.

Leonard Mecham/Meacham was born on June 17, 1834, the son of David and Mary (Thompson) Mecham.   He enlisted from Lyman in Company F, 8th Maine Infantry, on August 11, 1862, and was discharged on June 5, 1865.  He was married to Phebe Augusta Waite of Freeman.  They they lived in Kennebunkport and had settled in  East Madrid by 1885.  He died on April 15, 1912, and is buried in the West Freeman Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1918.

John Mealler of Kingfield served in the DC Cavalry and transferred to Company A, 1st Maine Cavalry on February 19, 1864.  He was taken prisoner on September 16, 1864, and is listed as deserting to the rebel service in October.

Marcellus H. Merrick enlisted at 23 from Wilton in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863.  He died on September 17, 1864, at Barrancas, Florida, and is buried in the Barrancas National Cemetery (grave 5-0-497).

Edward I. Merrill was a millman living on the farm of Abial Abbott in Farmington in 1850.  In 1860 he was a cabinet maker and lived in Farmington with his wife, Celinda, and three sons.  On August 18, 1862, at the age of  36, he was commissioned as a Captain in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was wounded at Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863, and was discharged for disability on December 11.  In 1870 he was a farmer and postmaster in Farmington, and he and his wife had five sons at home.  He died on September 26, 1897, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Farmington, with Celinda, who died in 1908.

George Dana Merrill was born on August 8, 1833, the son of Enos and Hannah (Abbott) Merrill.  He was a cabinet maker and lived with his parents in Brunswick in 1850.  In 1860 he was a painter and lived in Farmington with his wife and their 1 year-old daughter, Martha.  He enlisted from Farmington as a Musician in the 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on November 1, 1862.  He died on May 14, 1867 and is buried at Riverside Cemetery, Farmington, with his wife Martha, who died in 1880 at 44.

James Merrill, 22, enlisted from Farmington as a substitute for Andrew J. Dodge in Company F, 15th Maine Infantry, on March 8, 1865.  He deserted on August 3.

John S. Merrill was the son of John H. and Matilda Merrill of Byron, and lived there with his parents.  He enlisted at 18 from Byron in Company A, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and was discharged because of disability on July 17, 1862.  He applied for a pension in December, 1886.

William O. Merrow  was the son of Asa and Eliza Merrow of Farmington.  He lived on his parents' farm before the war.  He enlisted at age 27 from Farmington in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and is listed as deserting on February 11, 1862.  He was a mechanic living in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, when he enlisted on March 7, 1862, in Company K, 1st Massachusetts Cavalry.  He received a disability discharge on November 18, 1862, at Beaufort, South Carolina.  He lived with his wife and son in New Sharon in 1870 and 1880, and worked in shoe manufacturing.  His 1887 pension application lists service in both regiments.  His widow, Mary Ann (George) Merrow, applied for a pension in April, 1899.  She died in 1917 and is buried with her parents in the New Sharon Village Cemetery.

John Metcalf was born on May 24, 1847, the son of Daniel and Cynthia (Walker) Metcalf of New Portland.   He enlisted from New Vineyard as a substitute in Company I, 16th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1864, and was discharged on May 23, 1865.  After the war he was a tanner in New Portland, owned a shoe shop, became an undertaker, and was Justice of the Peace for several years.  He was married to Flora E. (True) Caswell, who died in 1872, and to M. Belle (last name not known).   He died in 1917 and is buried in the West New Portland Cemetery with his wives.

John B. Miles, 22, enlisted from New Vineyard in Company A, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862, and was accidentally killed in Virginia on February 8, 1865.  His mother, Rozilla Pratt, applied for a pension in 1878.  Miles is buried in the West New Portland Cemetery.

Nelson Millett, 19, enlisted from Wilton in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 14, 1861.  He applied for a pension in 1888..

George W. Mills was born in February, 1830.  He married Mariah Heath in 1853 and was a farmer in Salem.  He enlisted in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He was listed as sick at New Orleans in 1862 and was discharged in 1863.  He returned to his farm in Salem after the war.  On the 1890 veterans schedule he reported that his left hand had been shot off.  He died on January 20, 1915, and is buried in the Mount Abram Cemetery in Salem with his wife, who died in 1900 at 75.


Algernon M. Mitchell
was the son of Jonathan and Mary Mitchell and lived with his parents in Lewiston in 1850.  He enlisted at 23 from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and was officially mustered out on September 9, 1864.  However, he enlisted from Lewiston in Company D, 32nd Maine Infantry on March 23, 1864, transferred to Company D, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1, 1864, and later transferred to the 14th Veteran Reserve.  His pension application in July, 1880, lists all four regiments.  He lived in Sabbatus in 1890.  His widow, Sarah M., applied for a pension in December, 1898.


Charles Henry Mitchell was born in September, 1847, the son of Jessie and Elmira Mitchell of Letter E Plantation.  On May 5, 1864, he enlisted from Letter E in Company I, 32nd Maine Infantry.  The 32nd Maine was organized at Augusta in the spring of 1864, and was engaged in battles at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania and the siege of Petersburg.  Before it was consolidated with the 31st Maine in December, 1864, the 32nd lost 85 men in battle and 117 to disease.  Mitchell was transferred to Company I, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1, 1864, and was later transferred to the 1st Veteran Reserve, which was made up of partially disabled soldiers who were not fit for regular duty.  There is no record of his date of discharge. Mitchell married Lucy Jane Lakin, and in 1870 they lived with his parents in Letter E.  In 1880 he had a farm in Letter E, and lived there with his wife had two children.  He applied for a pension in June, 1892.  In 1900, he and his wife and two sons lived in East Livermore, where he was a yard foreman at a paper mill.  He died in 1909, and his widow applied for a pension in February of that year.


Harris S. Mitchell was an unmarried laborer in East Machias in 1850.  In 1860 he lived in Northfield on the farm of Benjamin Harmon (probably his wife's father) with his wife Laura and their twins, Clarence and Florence.  He enlisted from there at 29 in Company H, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  Another son, Harris L. Mitchell was born after he enlisted.  Mitchell was killed at Fort Butler in Donaldsonville, Louisiana, on June 28, 1863.  His wife applied for a pension in August, 1863.  She later married Charles Gardner and they moved to Minnesota.  (Thanks to a descendant, John Mitchell, for information).

John W. Mitchell was the son of John and Lydia Mitchell and lived on his parents' farm in Avon in 1860.  He enlisted at 27 as an Assistant Surgeon in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry on July 16, 1863.  He was discharged for transfer on September 8.  On September 27, he enlisted as a Surgeon in the 4th Connecticut Infantry.  He was promoted to Brevet Colonel in March, 1865 and was mustered out on May 4, 1866.

Simon D. Mitchell was the son of Amariah and Ruth Mitchell of Roxbury, and lived there with his parents before the war.  He enlisted from Byron in Company F, 23rd Maine Infantry, on September 29, 1862, and was mustered out on July 15, 1863.  In 1870, he was a farm laborer, and he and his mother lived in Byron with the family of Joseph Reed.  In 1880, he and his wife Anna and four children lived in Roxbury.  He applied for a pension in November, 1885.  He was in Lewiston in 1890 and complained on the veterans schedule that he was "troubled all the time" with malaria.    In 1900, he and his wife and son lived on Pettingill Street in Lewiston.  Living with them was 72 year-old Emily Simpson, listed as an in-law and possibly his wife's mother.  In 1910, Mitchell and his wife lived on Poland Springs Road in Auburn.  His wife applied for a pension as a widow on January 21, 1926.

R. Albertus Mooar, son of E.H. and Nancy Mooar, died on September 15, 1864, at 21 and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery with a veteran's flag holder.  No record of Civil War service has been found.

Converse Moody enlisted at 44 from Farmington in Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and was discharged on October 31.  He died on March 8, 1894, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Farmington, with two wives, Frances who died in 1890 at 62, and Esther who died in 1905.

Davis Moody was born in 1830, and in 1860 he lived with his wife Emily and two children in Kingfield.  He served at some time in Company F, 1st Maine Light Artillery, and on September 20, 1864, he was drafted into Company F, 8th Maine Infantry.  He was discharged from the 8th Maine on June 11, 1865.  In 1870, he was a farmer in Eustis and lived with his wife and five children.  The family was in Farmington in 1880.  He applied for a pension in June, 1880, listing service in both regiments.  He is listed in Salem on the 1890 veterans schedule, and noted that he suffered from lung disease and deafness.  In 1900, he lived in Salem with his daughter, Minnie, and her husband, blacksmith George Harris.  He is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington with his wife.

Henry C. Moody, 18, enlisted from Avon in Company G, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 16, 1864, and died later that year.  His mother, Judith, applied for a pension in October, 1865.

Hubbard C. Moody was born in Jerusalem Plantation.  In 1860 he was a farmer in Kingfield and lived with his wife Susannah and five children.  He enlisted at 38 from Dead River in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and was discharged for disability on April 23, 1864.  He applied for a pension in 1867.  In 1880 he and his wife lived in Fayette with his mother, Phebe.  He was listed in Lexington on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died on November 24, 1890.  He is buried with his wife, Susannah (Stimans) Moody  in the East New Portland Cemetery.

Joseph Moody was a farmer and lived with his wife Emma and their five children in Eustis in 1860.  He enlisted at 37 from Dead River in 1st Massachusetts Light Artillery Regiment, on January 28, 1864.  He died at Morganzia, Louisiana, on January 19, 1865.

Dennis Moore was the son of Silas and Clarissa Moore.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850 and Farmington Falls in 1860.  He enlisted at 22 from Farmington in Company I, 3rd Maine Infantry, on June 4, 1861, and died on August 23.  His father applied for a pension based on his service in December, 1879.

John W. Moore, 21, enlisted from Letter C, R1, in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on August 25, 1862.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1864 and mustered out on June 17, 1865.

William S. Moore was born in May, 1841, in Maine.  He enlisted from Livermore in Company A, 30th Maine Infantry, on December 15, 1863.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1864 and was mustered out on August 20, 1865.  In 1880 he was a farmer in Livermore and lived with his wife and son Everett.  In 1900, he and his wife lived in Livermore with Everett.  Moore died on May 12, 1915, and is buried in the Twin Bridges Cemetery, Livermore, with his wife, Louise S. Hewitt, who died in 1904.

James J. Moores was drafted at the age of 29 from Letter E Plantation into Company I, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 20, 1864, and was discharged in 1865.  His father, James, applied for a pension based on his service in 1866 and his mother, Mary, applied in 1869.

Charles A. Morrill was the son of David and Martha Morrill of Farmington.  He enlisted at 18 from Farmington as a Corporal in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was promoted to Drummer in 1862;  was reduced to Private at his own request in 1863;  and was promoted to Corporal again in 1864.  He was wounded at the Wilderness on May 6, 1864, and was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on June 15.  He applied for a pension on July 10, 1865, and his widow, Selina R., applied from Illinois in 1901.

Charles Plummer Morrill was born on September 13, 1839, the son of Samuel and Mary (Case) Morrill of Farmington.  He enlisted from there in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He served as a Hospital Steward and was mustered out on August 25, 1863.  He married Ellen S. Corbett in 1866 and in 1885 was a physician living in North Andover, Massachusetts.  He applied for a pension from Massachusetts in 1904 and his widow applied from there on July 15, 1913.

George Henry Morrill was born on February 1, 1847, the son of Samuel and Mary (Case) and brother of Charles Plummer Morrill.  He enlisted from Farmington in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 26, 1864, and was mustered out on June 17, 1865.  He applied for a pension in August, 1891.

John M. Morrill was born in Maine about 1837.  In 1860 he was a carpenter and lived with the family  of Elias Porter in Strong.  He enlisted from Strong as a Sergeant in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was promoted to 1st Sergeant and to 1st Lieutenant in 1863, and was discharged because of wounds on October 20, 1864.

Charles Morrison, son of David and Hannah Morrison, enlisted at 18 (grave says 16) from Madrid in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He was transferred to E Company, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1, 1864, and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  He is buried in the Madrid Village Cemetery.

Cyrus Morrison was born about 1822, the son of David and Eleanor Morrison of Candia, New Hampshire.  He married  Emma Jane Philbrick, daughter of Stephen and Hannah Philbrick, on November 11, 1847.   In 1850, he was a farmer in Sandy River Plantation with $150 in real estate.  His wife died in childbirth in August, 1850, leaving an infant son, Adelman, who was raised by her brother Titus in Rangeley.  In 1851, Morrison married fifteen year-old Bethia Ann Hewey, daughter of his neighbors Hiram and Dianna Hewey.  In 1860 he and Bethia and their three children lived in Sandy River, where he was a farm laborer.  Morrison enlisted from Sandy River in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861, and died of disease on December 30, 1863.  His brother James submitted a pension application on behalf of his children in 1864.

David Morrison, a brother of Charles, enlisted at 18 from Madrid in Company A, 11th Maine Infantry, on November 7, 1861.  He was wounded at Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862, and died on July 27, probably as a result of his wounds.  He is buried in the Military Asylum Cemetery in Washington, DC.

Henry C. Morrison, 24, enlisted as a substitute for Chester Whitney of  Madrid in Company D, 3rd Maine Infantry, on August 19, 1863, and transferred to the 17th Maine Infantry on June 28, 1864.  His father, Moses, submitted a pension application in October, 1866.

James Morrison, Jr., a nephew of Cyrus, was born in 1841.  He enlisted from Phillips as a Corporal in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was promoted to Sergeant in 1865.  He was mustered out with the regiment at Barrancas, Florida, on December 6, 1865. He died in 1884 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, Louise, who died in 1908.

Bennett Morse, was born in on May 23, 1839, in Otisfield, the son of Ira and Abigail (Edwards) Morse.  He lived with his parents in Grafton in 1850 and 1860.  He  enlisted from there in the 5th Maine Light Artillery on December 4, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 4, 1864, and was mustered out at Augusta on July 6, 1865.  He lived with his parents in Grafton in 1870.  He married Jerusha Peasley on October 9, 1876.  In 1880 they lived in Grafton with two daughters and his mother.  In 1910, the couple lived in Upton with three daughters.  In 1920 they were on Chapman Street in Upton with a daughter and two grandsons.  Morse died in 1920.

Charles H. Morse, son of Leonard and Mary Morse of Carthage, enlisted at 21 from there in Company D, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He died aboard the U.S.S. Constitution off  Fort Monroe, Virginia, on January 26, 1862.  Morse is buried in the Storer Hill Cemetery in Carthage.

David Morse was probably the son of Nathaniel and Betsy Morse of Westbrook.  In 1860 he was a carriage manufacturer and lived in Turner with his mother, wife and two sons.  He enlisted from Leeds at the age of 38 in Company K, 14th Maine Infantry, on March 25, 1865, and was mustered out on August 28.  In 1870 he was a plasterer and lived in South Livermore with his wife and five children.  He died on June 25, 1876, and is buried with his wife, Hannah Elizabeth, and one of their sons in the Twin Bridges Cemetery in Livermore.

Ira Morse enlisted from Grafton at age 44 in the 5th Maine Light Artillery on December 4, 1861.  He was listed as a deserter on September 3, 1863, and was discharged at Baltimore on February 23, 1864.  Heywood's History of Upton, Maine says that he was the husband of Abigail Edwards and father of Bennet Morse, but that man would have been approximately 58 years old in 1861.

Stevens/Stephen Edwards Morse, son of Ira and Abigail Morse and brother of Bennett, was born in Otisfield on April 2, 1833.  He lived with his parents in 1850.  He married Esther Richardson and was a farmer in Upton in 1860.  He was drafted from Pittsfield into Company C, 11th Maine Infantry, on July 17, 1863, and received a disability discharge on September 18, 1865.  He farmed in Upton after the war.  He applied for a pension in 1891 and died on May 30, 1907.  He is buried in Grafton.

Francis M. Morton, son of Benjamin and Hannah Morton, enlisted at 18 from New Vineyard in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 25, 1863.  He and his wife Hattie and son Charles lived in New Vineyard in 1870.  In 1910, he lived in New Vineyard with a subsequent wife, Abbie, whom he had married six years earlier.  He died in 1918 and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery with Abbie, who died in 1921.

Zepheniah/Zephaniah Morton was born in October, 1827, the son of George and Anna Morton.  He was married to Mary Bray.  He enlisted  from Strong in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and died on August 22, 1863.  He is buried in the McLain-Peabody Cemetery in New Vineyard.  His wife, who died on June 30, 1863, is buried there with her parents.

Elias N. Mosher was born in Maine about 1839.  In 1860, he was a laborer on the farm of Hiram Pease of Avon.  He enlisted from Avon in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1863 and died on July 21, 1864.

George G. Mossman, 34, enlisted from Farmington in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on September 10, 1862, and was discharged for disability on March 24, 1863.

Judson A. Mossman was born in Maine about 1834.  He gave his residence as Roxbury, Maine, when he enlisted on February 5, 1863, in Company E, 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry, which was raised in California and assigned to the quota of Boston.  He was taken prisoner at Dranesville, VA, on February 22, 1864.  He survived Andersonville Prison and was paroled November 26, 1864, at Annapolis, MD.  He was mustered out on July 20, 1865, at Fairfax Court House, VA.  In 1880 he and his wife Hannah, who was born in Maine, lived in Leelanaw, Michigan, with their five children, all born in Massachusetts.

Daniel W. Moulton, son of Stephen and Mehitable Moulton, was born about in October, 1832 in Maine.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850, and was a farmer living in Phillips with his wife Triphenia and their three children in 1860.  He enlisted from Madrid on October 26, 1864, in Company K, 16th Maine Infantry, and transferred the same day to Company G, 20th Maine Infantry.  He was mustered out with that company on July 16, 1865.  In 1870 he worked for a wheelwright and lived in Hudson, Massachusetts with his wife, three children and his father.  He and his wife lived in Natick, Massachusetts, in 1880 and 1900.  At that time they had been married for 46 years and had had five children, only two of whom were still living.

Joel D. Moulton, a shoemaker, was born in Maine in January, 1825.  He lived in Phillips with his wife Maria and son Henry in 1860.  He enlisted from there in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1864 and mustered out on June 5, 1865.  He and his wife lived in Phillips in 1870.  She died in 1878 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery there.  Moulton boarded with George Wiley, another shoemaker, in Watertown, Dakota Territory in 1880.  In 1890, he lived in Cosmopolis, Washington, and he submitted a pension application in November of that year.  He also married again in 1880, and in 1900 he and his wife, Hellen, lived in Cosmopolis.  She submitted an application for a widow's pension in January, 1903. 

Andrew Chauncey Munsey was born in Haverhill, MA, on June 13, 1821, the son of Andrew and Betsey (Sawyer) Munsey.  He married Mary Jane Hopkins in 1847.  He enlisted in Company H, 20th Maine Infantry, on August 29, 1862, and was discharged at Bowdoin on June 15, 1864. He and his wife lived in East Livermore in 1880.  She died in 1882 and he married Mary Morse Atwood in 1883.  He died on July 1, 1907, in Livermore Falls.  (Thanks to Don MacNaught, a descendant, for information)

James Murdock was born about 1822 in Hartford, Maine.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Company I, 7th Maine Infantry, on April 16, 1864, and transferred August 21 to Company I, 1st Veteran Maine Infantry.  He was wounded on October 19 at Cedar Creek, VA, losing his right leg.  He received a disability discharge on June 22, 1865.  He lived in Dover, NH, after the war and never married.

William F. Murray, 44, enlisted from Phillips as a "representative recruit" for Ezekiel Crosby in Company H, 12th Maine Infantry on March 16, 1865.  He was listed as absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on April 11, 1866.  He may be the William Murray who was born in New Brunswick and was a laborer in Fort Kent in 1860.

Hiram J. Neal may have been the son of John and Emily Neal of Vienna, Kennebec County.  He enlisted at age 22 from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on April 2, 1862.  He applied for a pension in July, 1863, listing service in Company G, 4th Maine Infantry as well as the 8th.  In 1870 he was a carpenter and lived in Blackstone, Massachusetts, with his wife Libby.  In 1890, his widow, now Lizzie Billcliffe, lived in Fall River, Massachusetts.  She applied for a widow's pension in 1910.

Solomon A. Nelke was born in Prussia about 1838.  In 1860 he was a clerk and lived in a boarding house in Quincy, Illinois.  Nelke enlisted from Winthrop in Company K, 3rd Maine Infantry, on June 4, 1861, and was discharged on September 16, 1861. He may be the Solomon Nelke who enlisted in Company A, 72nd Illinois Infantry on August 21, 1862 and deserted on January 19, 1863.  He enlisted on October 27, 1864 in Company A, 1st U.S. Sharpshooters;  transferred to Company A of the 20th Maine Infantry in June, 1865;   and was mustered out on July 16, 1865.  His 1868 pension application does not include the Illinois regiment.  He married Pamela A. Raymond and worked in a scythe factory after the war.  In 1870 they lived in North Wayne with four children, and in 1880 they lived in Wilton with five children as well as his German-born sister and brother.  Nelke died on March 1, 1916, and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1930.

Josiah W. Newell was born on May 12, 1839, the son of Lorenzo and Sally (Wethern) Newell of North New Portland.  In 1860 he lived in North New Portland with John Newell, who was perhaps his grandfather.  He enlisted from New Portland as a Corporal in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and re-enlisted on February 29, 1864.    He  was wounded on March 20, 1864 and received a disability discharge on January 7, 1865.  He married Martha Knowlton in 1864.  They lived in Turner until at least 1890, and then on Turner Street in Auburn.  Martha died in 1910 and Josiah died in November, 1931.  They are buried in the East New Portland Cemetery.

Prescott Newman was born in Maine about 1832.  In 1860 he was a deputy sheriff and lived in Phillips with his wife, Florda and their daughter Cora.  Florida died in 1862 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Phillips (Cora lived with the family of Seward Dill of Phillips in 1870).  Newman enlisted from Phillips on August 18, 1862, as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry.  He was discharged for disability on December 29, 1862.  He was in Minnesota by 1870 and lived there with his wife, Ellen, and their children.  Ellen applied for a widow's pension in June, 1891.

Frederick H. Nevens, son of Hugh  and Mary Nevens of Poland, was born in Maine 1826.  In 1860 he and his wife Harriet and two children lived in Freeman.  He enlisted from Auburn in Company D, 32nd Maine Infantry, on March 23, 1864.  He was wounded at Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, on May 12, 1864, and was transferred to  the Veteran Reserve Corps.  In 1880 he was a farm laborer and lived with the family of Jessie Locke in Poland.  He was listed in Auburn on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Albert S. Nichols was born in Augusta on March 24, 1835, the son of Amos and Catherine Nichols of Augusta  In 1860 he and his wife Hannah and their infant daughter lived in Kingfield with the family of Joseph Givheard.  He enlisted from Dead River in Company D, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 9, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1863;  re-enlisted on February 29, 1864;  and was discharged in 1864.  In 1870 he lived with his wife Jane in Boston and worked as a carpenter.  He was listed in Augusta on the 1890 veterans schedule and in 1900 was a state prisoner in Augusta.  He was a resident of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Augusta in 1910.  He died at Augusta on December 16, 1911.

Hiram B. Nichols was the son of Amos and Catherine Nichols of Augusta and a younger brother of Albert.  He enlisted at 18 from Augusta as a substitute in Company C, 11th Maine Infantry, on July 7, 1863.  He was wounded at Deep Bottom Run, Virginia, on August 16, 1864, and received a disability discharge on June 17, 1865.  He applied for a pension in August, 1865.  He lived with his wife and four children in Highland Plantation in 1880 and he was listed in New Portland on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died on April 18, 1893 and is buried in the North New Portland Cemetery with his wife, Phebe, who died in 1920.

Albert A. Nickerson was the son of Heman Nickerson, a Methodist clergyman, and lived with his father's family in Kendall's Mills in 1860.  He enlisted at 21 from Phillips in Company G, 7th Maine Infantry on August 21, 1861;  transferred to Company B, 1st Veteran Maine Infantry, on March 15, 1863;  transferred to Company G, 1st Veteran Maine Infantry, on August 21, 1864;  was promoted to Captain sometime in 1864;  and was discharged on March 23, 1865.  In 1870 he and his wife Florence and son lived with the family of Osgood Carr in Phillips and he was an agent for a sewing machine company.   He applied for a pension in 1878.  In 1880 he was a tailor and they lived on Bradford Street in Portland.   He was listed in Portland on the 1890 veterans schedule.  In 1900 he was a tailor and lived on Congress Street in Portland with his wife, their son Harry, who was a physician, and Harry's wife Ella.

Dearborn Nickerson was born on May 16, 1822, in Redfield, the son of Constant and Lydia (Howland) Nickerson.  In 1860 he lived in Madrid with his wife Mahala (Dunham) and two children.  He was drafted from Madrid into Company H, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 28, 1864, and was discharged on June 10, 1865.    He applied for a pension in 1876.  He lived in Phillips after the war, and was a widower living there with his son Gary in 1900.  He died on December 18,  1901 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, who died in 1891.

Charles S. Noble was born in Maine in March, 1836.  He enlisted from Wilton on January 4, 1864, in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, and was mustered out with the regiment on December 6, 1865.  He married for the first time in 1868, and may be the shoemaker who lived in Portland in 1870 with his wife Olive and two children.  He applied for a pension in 1886 and was listed on the 1890 veterans schedule in Paris.  In 1900, he lived in Paris with Carrie, his second wife whom he married about 1895, and their daughter Clara, born in 1899.  Carrie applied for a widow's pension in 1916.

Alden L. Norton, son of James and Rebecca Norton, was born about 1836 and lived with his parents in Livermore in 1850.  In 1860 he was a farm laborer and lived in Livermore with the family of Philemon Hewett.  He enlisted from Livermore in Company A, 30th Maine Infantry, on December 15, 1863, and was mustered out on August 20, 1865.  He died on September 5, 1865.  His wife, Melinda, applied for a widow's pension in August, 1866, and died in 1901.  They are buried in the Twin Bridges Cemetery in Livermore.

Dehan/Dehave F. Norton was the son of James and Jane Norton and lived with his parents in Farmington in 1860.  He enlisted at 19 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  He died at Donaldsonville, Louisiana, in May, 1863.

Hebron Norton was the son of Charles and Mary Norton (and probably the grandson of Hebron Norton) of Livermore.  He enlisted from Livermore in Company D, 32nd Maine Infantry, on March 23, 1864;  transferred to Company D, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1, 1864;  and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  At some time in his life he was also known as Hobson Weston.  He submitted a pension application from Iowa in 1890.  In 1900, he lived in Iowa with his wife Nancy, probably his second wife, and three children.  He lived in Sioux City in 1910 with two of his children, and lived with his daughter Cora and her husband Judd Spayde in Sioux City in 1920. 

James I. Norton may have been the son of Ephraim and Jane Norton of New Vineyard.  In 1860 he lived in Farmington with his wife Lydia and three children, and he owned land worth $2500 as well as $560 in personal property.  He enlisted at age 35 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1870 he was a landless farm worker in Farmington and he and his wife had six children.  He applied for a pension in 1879 and in 1880 was a laborer living in Farmington with his wife and three children.  He was listed in Farmington on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he complained that he suffered from "malarial poisoning".  His wife applied for a widow's pension in 1911.

Samuel R. Norton was born in November, 1843, the son of Jeremiah and Amanda Norton, and he lived with his parents in Strong in 1860.  He enlisted from Strong as a substitute in Company G, 11th Maine Infantry, on July 23, 1863.  He was wounded on July 26, 1864 (place not specified) and again on August 14, 1864, at Deep Bottom Run, VA.  He was discharged on June 1, 1865, and applied for a pension on June 7.  He married in 1868, and in 1870 he and his wife Mary and infant son lived in Farmington, where he had land and personal property totaling $2200 and his wife claimed an additional $800 in personal property.  They lived in Farmington in 1880, were in Temple in 1890 and 1900, and lived in Farmington in 1910.  Mary applied for a widow's pension in April, 1919.

Zachariah Norton was born on June 20, 1843, in Phillips, the son of Zebulon and Abigail (Hartford) Norton.  He enlisted from Freeman in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1864, he married Orianna Taylor.  They lived in Freeman, New Vineyard and, by 1910, in Farmington.  She died in 1914 and he died in May, 1924.  They are buried in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

Gustavus Nutting was the son of John and Sally Nutting of Wilton.  It appears likely that his father died before 1850, when Gustavus lived with the family of John Farnham in Rumford.  He lived with his mother and stepfather, Jacob Skinner, in Strong in 1860.  He enlisted at 25 from Strong as a Corporal in Company G, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 21, 1861.  He was killed at Fort Wagner, SC, on July 18, 1863.  His mother applied for a pension based on his service in 1865.

Isaac W. Nutting, 21, enlisted from Wilton in the 1st Maine Light Artillery on March 26, 1864, and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  In 1870 he lived in Sheridan, Michigan with his 19 year-old wife, Esther.  In 1880 he lived in Rushford, Wisconsin with his 50 year-old wife Rachel and a seven year-old daughter.  He was listed in Rushford on the 1890 veterans schedule.  His widow, Frances, submitted a pension application from Wisconsin, but the application date is illegible.

Reuben H. Nutting lived with the family of Samuel Smith in Wilton in 1850 and with the family of John Chandler in Wilton in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Wilton in the 1st Maine Light Artillery on December 18, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 1, 1864, and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.

Thomas Almarin Nutting was a brother of Gustavus Nutting and son of John and Sarah Nutting of Wilton.  He lived with the family of Hiram Norton in Wilton in 1850 and with his mother and stepfather Jacob Skinner in Strong in 1860.  He enlisted at 20 from Strong in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on February 12, 1862, and was discharged on February 11, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1868.

Watson Nye was the son of William and Olive Nye of Temple, and lived there with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted at 18 on the quota of Chesterville in Company E, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He was promoted to Musician in 1862 and transferred to Company F.  On June 15, 1863, he transferred to the Maine Colored Infantry, and apparently was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant at that time.  In 1880 he and his wife Jennie lived on McGee Street in Kansas City, Missouri, and he was a blacksmith.  He was listed in Fitchburg, Massachusetts on the 1890 veterans schedule and he applied for a pension from Massachusetts in December, 1892.  In 1930 he was an 87 year-old widower living on Main Street in Farmington with $18 in assets.

Stanslow Oakes was born in Madrid on January 9, 1839, the youngest child of Gilbert and Abigail (Moore) Oakes.  In 1850, "Stansle" lived with his parents in Madrid.   He married Roxanna Moore about 1859.  On October 13, 1862, he enlisted from Madrid in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry. The 28th was mustered out at Augusta on August 31, 1863.  On November 25, 1864, Oakes enlisted in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry.  He was discharged from the 8th Maine on May 25, 1865.   In 1870, Oakes and his wife and four children lived in Sandy River, where he was a farm laborer who owned $100 in real estate and an additional $15 in personal assets.  In 1880, they lived in Dallas with their eight children.  Oakes applied for a pension on July 15, 1888.  He died on September 21, 1914, and he and his wife, who died in 1884, are buried in Evergreen Cemetery.

Andrew J. Orbeton (also spelled Orberton and Oberton) lived with the family of Horatio Thomas in Freeman in 1850 and with the family of Asa and Ann Orbeton, perhaps his brother, in East Livermore in 1860.  He enlisted from Phillips at the age of 29 in Company K, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 21, 1961.  He left the Army, possibly a deserter, on September 30, 1863.  He enlisted again in the 9th Maine, this time in Company E, on January 1, 1864, and was discharged on August 7, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1866, and in 1870 he was a laborer and lived with the family of Caleb Eastman in Phillips.   He and his wife Mary are buried in the Village Cemetery in Temple.

James H. Orbeton  (also spelled Orberton and Oberton) enlisted at 33 from Phillips in Company K, 9th Maine Infantry on September 21, 1861.  He re-enlisted on December 31, 1863, and was wounded on May 20, 1864, at Bermuda Hundred, VA.  He was mustered out on September 27, 1864.  In 1870 he was a farmer with $250 in property and personal assets, and lived in Chesterville with his wife Mary and two young children.  He was listed in Livermore Falls on the 1890 veterans schedule, and in 1900 he lived in Livermore with his daughter Emma and her husband, Benjamin Walker.  He died on October 27, 1906, and is buried in the Borough-Bean Cemetery in Chesterville with his wife, who died in 1899.

Jonathan Orbeton/Orberton enlisted from Phillips as a Wagoner in Company B, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 4, 1861, and died (estimated date) on September 15, 1862.  

Alonzo J. Odell was the son of Cyrus and Betsey Odell of Farmington, and lived there with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted at 20 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He lived with his parents in 1870.  He applied for a pension in 1879.  In 1880 he lived in Farmington with his wife Mary and their son.  He was listed in Farmington on the 1890 veterans schedule, and lived there with his son, daughter in law and granddaughter in 1910.

Solomon H. Odell was the son of Cyrus and Betsey Odell of Farmington and brother of Alonzo.  He lived with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted at 28 from Farmington in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He re-enlisted on December 28, 1863;  was taken prisoner as St. Mary's Church, Virginia, on June 24, 1864;  and was discharged on July 22, 1865.  In 1880, he lived in Farmington with his wife Emma, their five children and his parents.  He died on February 9, 1882, and is buried in the Bragg-Porter Hill Cemetery in Farmington.  His widow applied for a pension in April, 1882.

Charles Franklin Packard was born in 1847, the son of Rev. Charles and Hannah Packard.  He lived with his parents in Harrison in 1850.  He enlisted from Limerick as a Musician ("drummer boy") in Company A, 27th Maine Infantry, on September 30, 1862, and was mustered out on July 17, 1863.  He also served as a Lieutenant in Company F, 102nd US Colored Infantry in 1863-1864.  He lived with his parents in Waldoboro in 1870 and was a sleigh manufacturer.  He applied for a pension in 1880 and was listed in Farmington on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died in 1897 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Farmington, with his parents.  His widow, Julie E., submitted a pension application from New York on June 28, 1897.

Frederick A. Page was born on December 4, 1845, in Fayette, the son of Samuel and Lucy Page and brother of Gustavus.  He lived with his parents in Freeman in 1860.  He enlisted as a substitute for James Thompson of Phillips in Company G, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 27, 1864, and was discharged on June 18, 1865.  He married Orlena "Lena" Ames in Salem on November 28, 1866.  He worked as a butcher and farm laborer in Freeman and Strong.  Lena died in Strong in 1917, and Page married Ladora (Dodge) Tracy.  He died in Strong on March 8, 1927, and is buried in the Strong Village Cemetery.  Ladora died in 1930.

Gustavis Albion/Alpheus Page (1843-1917) was the son of Samuel and Lucy Page and brother of Frederick.  He lived with his parents in Freeman in 1860.  He enlisted from Freeman as a musician in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married Emily J. Brackley about 1872, and they lived in Strong, where he worked in a clothes pin factory, in 1880.  He lived in Freeman in 1890, and in 1900 he and his wife lived there with two of their sons, their daughter Mabel and Mabel's husband Frank Thompson.  Page moved to Kingfield in 1901, and is buried in there in Riverside Cemetery.

George Paine, an 18 year-old resident of Forks Plantation, enlisted September 7, 1861, in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry, and was mustered out on September 16, 1864.  He died in 1876 and is buried in the Stratton Upper Cemetery in Eustis with his wife Laura and their son George, who died in 1877 at the age of two..

James W. Painter of Farmington enlisted at 30 from Masardis in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He re-enlisted on December 28, 1863, and deserted on April 4, 1864.

Benjamin Palmer, Jr. lived with his parents in North New Portland in 1860.  He enlisted at 20 from New Portland in Company A, 19th Maine Infantry, on August 4, 1863.  He died of disease on January 12, 1864, at Brandy Station, VA., and is buried in the North New Portland Cemetery.  His father, Benjamin, applied for a pension in 1880, and his mother, Tamar, applied later (date illegible).

Charles W. Palmer, son of Charles and Lucy Palmer, lived with his parents in Wilton in 1860.  He enlisted at 20 from Wilton on January 2, 1864, in Company M, 2nd Maine Cavalry.  He died on August 20 in New Orleans.

Wallace Palmer, 19, enlisted from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  He was discharged at New York City, date not specified.

Alanson Parker, son of Andrew and Lydia Parker, lived with his parents in Phillips in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Phillips in Company K, 5th Maine Infantry, on June 24, 1861, and was discharged for disability on February 9, 1863.  He died on April 30, 1867, and is buried in the Weld Road Cemetery in Phillips.

Allison Parker was born about 1843, the son of Joseph and Harriet Parker.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850.  His first wife, Lillias died in 1857.  In 1860 Parker lived in Salem with his second wife, Chloe, and a three year-old daughter, Ella.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on January 13, 1862 and re-enlisted on February 29, 1864.  He was transferred to Company B, 30th Maine Infantry on January 1, 1865, and was mustered out on August 20, 1865.  He was a farmer in Phillips in 1880.  He applied for a pension in 1880 and was listed in Phillips on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He is buried in the Sand Hill Cemetery, Phillips, with his wives and three of his children.

Frank W. Parker was born in July, 1838.  He enlisted from Farmington in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and received a disability discharge on June 17, 1862. He and his wife Mary (Witham) and son lived in Phillips in 1880.  He applied for a pension in 1889 and was listed in Phillips on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He and his wife lived in Salem in 1900 with their son and his family, and in Phillips in 1910.  He died in 1920 and is buried in the New Vineyard Notch Cemetery with his wife, who also died in 1920.

Simon W. Parlin was born in Wilton on April 7, 1837.  In 1850 he lived with the family of Ebenezer Whitney in Phillips.  In 1860 he was a farm laborer and lived in Phillips with the family of John Hoyt, whose daughter Sarah he married in 1866.  He enlisted from Phillips on October 13, 1862, in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry;  was promoted to 1st Sergeant in November; and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He enlisted on December 11, 1863, as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, and was discharged on May 15, 1865.  He and his wife and infant daughter Phebe lived in Phillips in 1870.  He later moved to Massachusetts and was a book keeper for American Cultivator Company.  He lived in Malden in 1880 and listed Boston as his residence on the 1890 Phillips veterans schedule.  He applied for a pension in 1898 from Massachusetts.  In 1910 he and his wife lived in Somerville, Massachusetts, and he was a newspaper editor.  He died on June 1, 1925, and his widow applied for a pension that year from Massachusetts.  Parlin is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Phillips.

James Parsons was born in Wiscasset in 1826.  He enlisted from Lexington as a Corporal in Company A, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and was promoted to Sergeant in 1863.  He was taken prisoner at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, but returned to his unit.  He was taken prisoner again on August 18, 1864, at Weldon Railroad, Virginia, and died in the prison camp at Salisbury, North Carolina, on December 21.  He left a widow, Hannah (Proctor) Parsons, and five children.

Leonard P. Partridge was the son of Daniel and Mary Partridge, and lived in Strong with his parents in 1860.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry on October 10, 1862, and was promoted to Corporal in April, 1863.  He was mustered out with the regiment on August 31, 1863.  He died on June 10, 1866, and is buried in the Bragg-Porter Hill Cemetery in Farmington with his wife, Mary, who died in 1875 at the age of 34, and their son.

Samuel T. Patterson was born in 1841, the son of Moses and Lucinda Patterson of Salem.  He enlisted from Salem in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861;  re-enlisted on February 1, 1864;  was promoted to 1st Sergeant; and was killed at Winchester, VA, on September 19, 1864.  He is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong.

Edward A. Pearson was born about 1842 in Massachusetts and lived with his parents, Edward and Laura Pearson, in Farmington in 1860.  He enlisted from Farmington as a Sergeant in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.

David Porter Peary (also spelled Peavey) was the son of War of 1812 veteran Moses Peary, and was born in 1822 in Denmark, Oxford County.  In September, 1850, he was a Sandy River farmer who owned $50 in real estate and lived with the family of David and Betsy Hoar.  He married their daughter Deborah later that year and in 1860 was a farm laborer in Rangeley with two daughters.  Peary enlisted from Rangeley in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, and was transferred to Company B, 30th Maine Infantry, on January 5, 1865, when the 13th was mustered out.  He was mustered out with the 30th Maine on August 20, 1865, at Savannah, Georgia.. In 1870, Peary was a farmer in Rangeley with three children, real estate worth $600, and other assets valued at $160.  He and his wife lived in Rangeley in 1880 with their four daughters and an infant grandson, David.  Peary applied for a pension in 1883.  In 1900, he and his wife, who had been married for 50 years, were living in Greenvale Plantation, which soon became part of Sandy River.  He died on September 19, 1901. His widow applied for a pension that year and died in 1916.  They are buried in Evergreen Cemetery;  stones for them and their daughter Florence are at the Schoolhouse Cemetery in Rangeley.          

James Hall Peary (also spelled Peavey) was born in on Christmas day, 1843, the son of Stephen and Susanna (Rowe) Peary.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1860, and enlisted from there in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864.  He died on August 17, 1864, when the regiment was on duty in Washington and veterans were on two months' furlough - sources differ on whether he died of wounds or disease, and the place is not specified.  His mother applied for a pension in 1890 and died in 1908.  Peary and his mother are buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips.

Ezra Peary, son of Samuel and Abigail (Heath) Peary and a nephew of David, was  born in Dallas Plantation on March 19, 1845.  He served in Company F, 9th Maine Infantry, and died in the service sometime in 1865.  His mother applied for a pension based on his service on July 6, 1869.

Augustus Pease was the son of Sewall and Nancy Pease of Wilton, and lived there with his parents before the war.  He was a school teacher.  He enlisted from Wilton as a musician in the band of the 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on November 1, 1862.   His first wife, Lydia, died in 1869, following the birth of their son, who died in 1870.  Pease and his daughter Fannie lived with his parents in Wilton in 1870 and was a teacher.  In 1880 he was a teacher and he and his wife Louise lived in Fayette with Fannie (born in 1866) and Mary (perhaps his stepdaughter, born 1868).  He applied for a pension in January, 1883, and was listed in Fayette on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died in August, 1911, and Louise applied for a pension that year.  Pease is buried in the Bean's Corner Cemetery, Jay, with his first wife, Lydia, and two children.

Charles H. Pease was the son of Albert Pease, farmer and Free Will Baptist minister, and his wife Ann.  He lived with his parents in Salem in 1850 and Phillips in 1860.  A sailor, he enlisted from New York City in Company D, 17th New York Infantry, on May 21, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1861, Sergeant and 1st Sergeant in 1862, and was mustered out on June 2, 1863.  He enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant in Company A, 17th New York Infantry on July 29, was promoted to Captain and transferred to Company G on January 1, 1865, and was mustered out on July 13, 1865.    In 1880 he was a "photograph artist" and lived in Saratoga, New York, with his wife, Emily, and son Harry, who was born in Indiana.  On the 1890 veterans schedule in Saratoga, he stated that he had received a "gun shot wound through the abdomen".  He died in 1927 and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1931.  His gravestone says that  "he was shot through the body at 2nd Bull Run".

Daniel Pease was born in September, 1845, the son of Jeremiah and Mary Pease of Wilton.  He lived with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from Chesterville in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on March 1, 1865, and was mustered out on April 18, 1866.  He lived with his parents again in 1870 and married in 1872.  In 1880 he and his wife Helena and two sons lived in Wilton and his mother lived with them.  On the 1890 Wilton veterans schedule he listed his residence as Bean's Corner. He continued to farm in the area until his death in 1923.  He is buried with his wife in the East Wilton Cemetery.

George W. Pease, 34, enlisted from Wilton in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was a bugler in 1864.  He was mustered out on December 6, 1865.

Gustavus Pease was born about 1844, the son of Arnold and Lucy Pease of Wilton.  He lived with them in 1850, and in 1860 was a laborer and lived in Jay on the farm of Lewis Bean.  He enlisted from Jay  in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on November 1, 1862.  He re-enlisted in Company A, 8th Maine, on February 29, 1864, and was mustered out as a Sergeant Major on January 18, 1866.  In 1870 he and his wife Florella and three children lived on the farm of Lucinda Goding in North Jay.  Florella died in 1888 and  Pease married Emma West, widow of Silas Foster, in Jay on November 9, 1895.  He died on July 14, 1925, and is buried with Florella in the Bean's Corner Cemetery in Jay.

John Q. Pease was born about 1842, the son of Albert and Ann Pease and brother of Charles.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850 and in Salem in 1860.  He enlisted from Salem in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry on December 11, 1863, and died in Warrenton, Florida, on August 7, 1864.

Josiah Pease was the son of Charles and Hannah Pease, and in 1850 he was a carpenter and lived with his parents in Phillips.  In 1860 he and his wife Grace and their three sons lived in Lewiston.  He was drafted from Wilton into Company A, 3rd Maine Infantry, on July 15, 1863.  He transferred to Company F, 17th Maine Infantry on August 15 and was discharged on March 21, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1866.  His wife died in 1896 and he married again in 1900.  He died on August 10, 1919, and is buried in the Mount Abram Cemetery, Salem, with  his wives Grace  and Laura, who died in 1901.

Amos H. Penley (also spelled Penly), age 11, lived with the family of Stephen Littlefield in Wilton in 1850.  In 1860 he lived in Lewiston on the farm of Samuel Penly, probably a relative but most likely not his father.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and re-enlisted on February 29, 1864.  He was wounded in 1864 and received a disability discharge on December 15, 1864.  He was married sometime that year - his wife's name was Mahala and she was very likely the daughter of Stephen Littlefield.  They lived in Lisbon in 1870.  In 1880 he was a watchman and lived in Lewiston with wife Mahala and two children.   He was listed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he stated that he had lost his left arm as a result of a gunshot wound.  In 1900, he and his wife lived in Minneapolis and he was a house painter.  Living with them were their son Linn/Leon, a teacher, and their daughter Bertha who was married to Otto Cole, a  plumber.  Mahala died in Minneapolis in 1927.

Isaac Pennell, the son of Thomas and Rhoda, Pennell was born in April, 1835.  He lived in New Portland with his mother and brother in 1850.  He enlisted from New Portland on July 30, 1862, as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company A, 16th Maine Infantry.  He was discharged from that regiment for disability in October, 1862, but apparently continued in the Army as a recruiter.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in 1862 and to Captain in 1863.  He died on December 1, 1865,  and according to his gravestone he died of illness contracted in the service.  He is buried in the West New Portland Cemetery.

Calvin Pennock was born in November, 1834, the son of Nathaniel and Betsy Pennock.  He lived with his parents in Haverhill, New Hampshire, in 1850.  In 1860 he, his wife Ellen, and their four month-old daughter lived in Haverhill on the farm of James Glynn, Ellen's father.   On October 4, 1862, Pennock enlisted at Concord, New Hampshire, in Company B, 15th New Hampshire Infantry, which was enrolled as a  nine-month unit.  The 15th New Hampshire served in Louisiana and was engaged in the siege of Port Hudson.  During its service, the regiment lost 27 men in battle and 134 to disease.  Pennock was mustered out with the 15th New Hampshire in Concord on August 13, 1863.  On December 28, 1863, he enlisted from Newbury, Vermont, in the 1st Vermont Light Artillery Company, which at that time was on duty at Brashear City, Louisiana.  On July 13, 1864, a few days before the 1st was shipped home, Pennock transferred to the 2nd Vermont Light Artillery Company, which was on duty at Port Hudson.  On March 1, 1865, he transferred to the 1st Company, Vermont Heavy Artillery, which was also at Port Hudson.   He was mustered out with that regiment in Vermont on July 25, 1865.   In 1870, Pennock was employed as a carpenter in Haverhill and boarded with the family of Francis Hannifer.  At the same time, Ellen Pennock was a dressmaker in Haverhill and boarded with another family (she returned to her parents' home by 1880).  Also in Haverhill in 1870 was Alma Clark, a domestic servant who was the daughter of Samuel and Diana Clark of Dallas Plantation.  Pennock and Alma Clark were married about that time, and according to his journal they went to Rangeley from Franconia, New Hampshire, in 1871.  Pennock worked as a carpenter, trapper and guide in Rangeley, and he became something of a local character.  His exploits and knowledge of the woods were the subject of  a series of articles in the Phillips Photographer in the 1890's.  In 1895, he moved to the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers at Togus, and he died there sometime after 1900.   He and Alma are buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Rangeley.

 

Charles H. Perham was the son of John and Eunice Perham of Farmington and a brother of Silas.  In 1860 he lived on the farm of Nathaniel Voter in Farmington.  He enlisted at 18 from Farmington in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 17, 1864, and was mustered out on June 17, 1865.

Silas Perham, son of John and Eunice Perham and brother of Charles, served in Company A, 23rd Maine Infantry from September 10, 1862 to July 15, 1863.  He later enlisted from Farmington in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 17, 1864.  He was promoted to Artificer in 1865 and mustered out on June 17.   In 1880 he and his wife Anna (Lake?) lived in Farmington and he was a harness maker.  He was listed in Farmington on the 1890 veterans schedule.  Anna died in 1888 and he died in 1911.  They are buried in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

John H. Perkins, a 22 year-old resident of New Sharon, enlisted in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and died of disease on May 1, 1864.

Nathaniel Perkins was born in Rangeley Plantation about 1840.  In 1860 he was a laborer on the farm of Augustus Chandler in Weld.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, and was mustered out on January 18, 1866.  He applied for a pension in 1877.  He and his wife and three children lived in Jay in 1880, and he was listed in Jay on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he complained of deafness as a result of his military service.  He died in 1910 and is buried in the Stone's Corner Cemetery in Jay with his wife, India, who died in 1940.

Nathaniel Perkins was born in April, 1827, in Maine.  In 1850 he was a farm laborer and lived with the family of Moses Wadsworth in Chesterville.  In 1860 he and his wife Caroline lived there with two sons.  He enlisted from Chesterville in the 6th Maine Light Artillery on September 23, 1862 and was mustered out on June 17, 1865.  In 1880 he lived in Chesterville with his second wife, Hannah, and five Thornton stepchildren.  On the 1890 veterans schedule for Chesterville he listed his residence as Farmington Falls.  He and Hannah lived in Chesterville in 1900.  He died on November 11, 1909, and is buried in the Chesterville Hill Cemetery with Hannah and three of his sons from his first marriage.

John E. Perley, 31, enlisted from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  received a back injury and was discharged for disability in New York City in February, 1863.  His first wife, Esther, died in 1867.  In 1870 he lived in Industry with his second wife Helen and their son Charles.  They lived with Charles in Farmington in 1880 and Perley is listed in Farmington on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died November 10, 1894, and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery with his wives.

Albert H. Perry was born about 1841 in Somerset County, the son of Samuel Perry and his first wife, Bethiah. The family lived in Salem in 1860.  He enlisted from Salem as a Corporal in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.   He was taken prisoner on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, VA, and  transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on June 15, 1864.  He married Irene Larrabee and farmed in Salem, Rangeley Plantation and Kingfield.  He died on April 14, 1916.  He and his wife are buried in the Mt. Abram Cemetery in Salem.

Freeman O. Perry was born in January, 1841, the son of Henry and Ruhamah (Beedy) Perry.  He lived with his parents on their farm in Sandy River Plantation in 1850 and in Letter E Plantation in 1860.  He enlisted from Letter E in Company G, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 28, 1861, and transferred to Company H on January 24, 1862.  The 14th Maine served in Louisiana, where it participated in the Port Hudson campaign.   In mid-1864 it was transferred to Virginia, where it was engaged in Sheridan's campaign in the Shenandoah Valley.  The 14th Maine lost 86 men in battle and 332 from disease.  Perry was mustered out with the regiment on January 13, 1865.   He married Mariah Soule, a daughter of George Soule, and their daughter Alice was born in 1867 in Madrid.  He applied for a pension in November, 1879.  On September 22, 1890, he married Lois Bubier, a daughter of Isaac Bubier.  In 1900, they lived in Avon with their daughter Olive, and Freeman was a farmer.  In 1920 they lived in Madrid with their daughter and granddaughter as well as Lois' mother.  Freeman Perry died on October 29, 1921.  His widow applied for a pension on November 14, 1921, and died in 1931.  They are buried in the Madrid Village Cemetery.

John D. Perry, 28, enlisted from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He was a laborer on the farm of Ebenezer Lakin in Farmington in 1850.  In 1870 he was a hostler at the Elm House in Farmington, and in 1880 he was a prisoner at the Kennebec County Jail in Augusta.  He died on January 1, 1882.

John W. Perry was born about 1842 in Somerset County, the son of Samuel and Bethiah Perry and brother of Albert H. Perry.  He lived with his parents in Salem in 1860.   He enlisted from Salem in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862, and died of disease on December 11.  He is buried with his family in the Mt. Abram Cemetery in Salem.

Reuben R. Perry was born about 1849, the son of Henry and Ruhamah Perry and brother of Freeman.  He lived with his parents in Letter E in 1860.  He enlisted as a substitute for Jacob Witham of Letter E in Company K, 15th Maine Infantry, on February 11, 1865, two months before the end of the war.  The 15th was organized at Augusta in December, 1861, and served in Florida and Texas for most of the war.  It was on duty in Georgia and South Carolina after the war until it was mustered out on July 5, 1866.   During its service, the regiment lost 5 men in battle and 343 men to disease.   Reuben Perry died in the Army on August 29, 1865, four months after the end of the war.  His mother applied for a pension based on his service in December, 1865, and his father applied in October, 1866.

Lewis B. Peterson was born in 1830, the son of George and Eunice Peterson and brother of Eunice.  He lived with his parents in Kingfield in 1850.  He enlisted from Freeman in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 22, 1863, and was discharged on May 22, 1865.  He may be the man who was a prisoner at the Maine State Prison in Thomaston in 1880.  He applied for a pension in 1883 and is listed in Kingfield on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died in 1898, and his wife Cynthia applied for a pension in that year.  He is buried in the West Kingfield Burial Ground with his parents and brother.  His wife is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Kingfield.

Rufus King Peterson was born in 1823 in Kingfield, the son of George and Eunice Peterson and brother of Lewis.  He lived with his parents in Kingfield in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from Kingfield in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1870 he was a laborer and lived with the family of Charles Pillsbury in Kingfield.  In 1880 he lived in Freeman with his mother, and he applied for a pension in 1885.  He is listed in Kingfield on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died on October 6, 1912, in Chelsea, MA, and is buried in the West Kingfield Burial Ground with his parents and brother.

Gilman F. Philbrick was born about 1843 in Maine, the son of Nathaniel and Sarah Gilman of Roxbury, and lived there with his parents in 1850.  He enlisted in Company B, 32nd Maine Infantry, on March 10, 1864.  He transferred to Company B, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1, 1864 and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  In 1880 he was a farmer and lived in Roxbury with three sons and his mother.  A pension application on behalf of Elias B. Philbrick, his son, was submitted in August, 1893.

Stephen Richard Philbrick was born about 1833, the son of Stephen and Hannah (Williams) Philbrick.  He married Sarah Marie Peasley about 1853, probably in Avon.  Their first two children were born in New Hampshire.  In 1860 Philbrick and his wife lived in Dallas Plantation with three sons, and he was a farm worker with no real estate or other assets.  He was drafted from Dallas, and  was mustered into Company H, 11th Maine Infantry on November 5, 1864.  The 11th Maine was organized in 1861, and by that time in 1864 the regiment was assigned to the trenches around Richmond.  It was present at the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.  Philbrick was discharged from the Army on May 30, 1865.  In 1870, he and his wife and five children lived in Rangeley, where he owned a farm valued at $150 and claimed an additional $500 in personal assets.  He continued to farm in Rangeley, and in 1880 he applied for a pension.  He died on January 1, 1917.  In 1920, his wife lived in Phillips with her daughter Amy and Amy's husband.  Philbrick and his wife are buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Rangeley.

Clarence B. "Chauncey" Phillips was born in 1844, the son of Davis and Allura (Stevens) Phillips.  He enlisted from Kingfield in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1910, Chauncey Phillips, single, lived alone on Carabasset Road in Kingfield.  He died on October 15, 1925, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Kingfield.

George W. Phillips born about 1845 in Maine, the son of Allen and Elizabeth Phillips.  He lived with his parents in Farmington in 1850 and Strong in 1860.  He enlisted from Strong as a Corporal in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862, and died on October 18 at Fort Carroll in Baltimore.

Isaac A. Phillips was born on November 24, 1830, the son of Jacob and Betsey (Lovering) Phillips.  A blacksmith and mechanic, he enlisted  from Kingfield as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and resigned on July 21, 1862.  One source states that he died of typhoid on June 7, 1862.

John F. Phillips was born about 1846, the son of John and Lydia Phillips of Avon.  He lived with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from Avon at 18 in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 24, 1864, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  In 1880 he and his wife Clara (Marston?) lived in Skowhegan with two children and his wife's mother and aunt.  He applied for a pension in 1890 and is listed in Skowhegan on the 1890 veterans schedule. 

Justus R. Pickard was the son of Thomas and Sarah Pickard, and lived with them in Madrid in 1850.  He enlisted at 24 from Madrid in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was promoted to Corporal in 1863.  He died of disease on April 9, 1863.  His mother applied for a pension based on his service in 1866.

Nathan Pickard was the son of Thomas and Sarah Pickard and a brother of Justus.  He lived there with his parents in 1850.  In 1860 he and his wife Sarah and their two daughters lived in Madrid with Daniel Pickard (probably his brother).  He enlisted at 30 from Madrid in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and died of disease on August 28, 1863.  His widow applied for a pension in February, 1864, and an application on behalf of a minor child was submitted in August, 1865.

Bradford Pickens, possibly the son of Elisha and Meroah Pickens of Wilton, lived there with the family of Amos Parker in 1850.  He enlisted at 24 from Wilton as a wagoner in Company M, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on January 2, 1864.  He died on September 17 at Barrancas, Florida, and is buried in the Barrancas National Cemetery (grave 5-0-407).

John Pickens (1824-1915) is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery.  He may be the coachman from Stoneham, MA, who served in the 59th and 57th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments 1864-1865.  He submitted a pension application in 1890.

Leonard H. Pickens, son of Elisha and Meroah Pickens, lived with his parents in Wilton in 1850.  He enlisted at 18  from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and was mustered out on September 16, 1864.

Wilson M. Pillsbury, possibly the son of John and Julia Pillsbury of Avon, enlisted at 23 on September 28, 1861, in Company H, 23rd Massachusetts Infantry.  He was wounded at New Bern, NC, on March 14, 1862, and died of wounds the following day.  His mother, Julia, submitted a pension application (date illegible).

James Pinkham was the son of  Curtis and Rebecca Pinkham of Industry, and lived there with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He served in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry.  He may be the man who lived in Washington, Knox County, with his wife Carrie after the war.

Orren G. Pinkham was born in 1843, the son of Ebenezer and Reliance/Relief Pinkham of Strong.  He enlisted from there in 2nd Maine Light Artillery, on November 30, 1861, and re-enlisted on December 5, 1863.  He was promoted to Corporal;  was wounded on July 28, 1864;  and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  He died in Strong in 1883 and is buried there in the Taylor Hill Cemetery.

Samuel Pinkham was the son of Curtis and Rebecca Pinkham and brother of Orren.  He enlisted at 19 from Industry in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on September 3, 1862, and was discharged on June 15, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1865.  He died in May, 1866, and is buried in the Ick Norton Cemetery in Industry.

Wellington Pinkham was the son of Curtis and Rebecca Pinkham and brother of Orren and Samuel.  He enlisted at 22 from Industry in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and died on May 23, 1862, at Meridian Hill, VA.

Harry S. Piper of Farmington enlisted in the Navy on April 7, 1861, and served for three years aboard the Flagship Minnesota and the Gunboats Victoria and Howquah.

Charles E. Plaisted, son of Ira and Olive Plaisted, was born in Maine in 1846 and lived in Phillips with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He died in 1863.  His parents moved to Lowell, Massachusetts by 1870 and his mother submitted a pension application from there (date illegible).  Plaisted is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips with his parents and sisters.

Elijah Freeman Plaisted was born in Jefferson, New Hampshire, the son of William and Nancy (Merrill) Plaisted.  In 1860 he was a physician and lived in Phillips with his wife Frances (Fanny) and three children.  He enlisted in the 28th Maine Infantry as an Assistant Surgeon on October 6, 1862, and was promoted to Surgeon in November.  He was mustered out with the regiment on August 31, 1863. He was a physician and surgeon in Farmington in 1870.  He died in 1872  and buried in Riverside Cemetery  in Phillips.

George W. Plaisted may have been the son of George and May Plaisted of Avon.  He enlisted at 18 from Phillips as a musician in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1, 1864, and was mustered out on July 15, 1865. 

Lafayette (also spelled Lafayett) Plaisted was born about 1848 in New Hampshire, the son of William and Sarah (Tucker) Plaisted.  He lived with his parents in Avon in 1860.  He enlisted at 17 from Phillips in Company A, 17th Maine Infantry, on December 9, 1863.  He was shot in the neck sometime in 1864, and transferred to Company G, 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, on December 15, 1864.  He was mustered out on September 1, 1866, and applied for a pension that year.  He married his second wife, Christiana, about 1877, and in 1880 he was a teamster and lived in Avon with her and his 5 year-old son Charlie.  He was listed in Avon on the 1890 veterans schedule and in 1910 he and his wife boarded with Warren Knowles in Avon.

Leonard F. Plaisted the son of William and Sarah (Tucker) Plaisted and a brother of Lafayette.  He enlisted at 21 from Phillips on August 18, 1862, in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry.  He was wounded on April 5, 1865, and was mustered out on June 4.  In 1870 he lived in Marine Mills, Minnesota, with the family of George W. Plaisted, possibly his older brother.  He married about 1872 and applied for a pension in 1880.  He and his wife Mary lived in Stillwater, Minnesota, and had seven children.  He died sometime after 1920.  Mary submitted an application from Colorado in 1926.

John K. Plummer was born in Maine in April, 1841, the son of Eliott and Elmira Plummer.  In 1860 he lived in Phillips with his parents and was a laborer on the farm of Benjamin Houghton in Weld.  The record is confused, but according to his statement on the 1890 veterans schedule, he served in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, from October 20, 1861, to November 28, 1863, and in Company B, 2nd Maine Cavalry from October 18, 1863, to December 6, 1865.  His pension application in 1892 lists service in both regiments.   In 1870 he was a farmer in Weld and lived with his wife Mary, their son William, and his parents.  He lived in Casco, Michigan, in 1890.  In 1900 he lived there with his second wife, Jennie (whom he married about 1872) and a grandson who was born in Michigan.  He and Jennie lived in Comstock Township, Michigan, in 1910.

Joseph L. Plummer may have been a brother of John K. Plummer.  He was born in May, 1832, and married about 1859.  In 1860 he was a farmer in Weld and lived with his wife Eleanor and their son. He was drafted from Madrid into Company A, 3rd Maine Infantry, on July 15, 1863.  He was transferred to Company F, 17th Maine Infantry on June 28, 1864, and to Company F, 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, on December 15. In 1870 he and his wife and daughter lived in Weld next to John K. Plummer.  He lived in weld in 1880, 1890 and 1900.  On the 1890 veterans schedule he listed only the 3rd Maine regiment but noted that he had been transferred twice and had also received a gunshot wound.  He applied for a pension in 1892 listing all three regiments.  His widow, Eleanor, applied for a pension in 1908.

Robert G. Pope was the son of Elnathan and Rebecca Pope and lived with his parents in Avon in 1850.  He enlisted in the Navy on February 26, 1862, and served for three years, nine months, aboard the steamers Connecticut and Estrella.  In 1870 he was a lime burner living in Fairfield, Ohio, with his wife Miranda and their son, Edmund, who died in 1877.  In 1880 Pope was an engineer and he and his wife lived on Chestnut Street in Boston.  He died on August 19, 1887, and is buried in the Blake Cemetery, Farmington Falls, with his wife and his parents.

John G. Powers was born in October, 1827, and the son (or grandson) of Hosmer and Thankful Powers of Wilton.  He lived with them in 1850.  In 1860, he and his wife, Jenny (Greenleaf) Powers, lived in Wilton, where he was a farmer.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was discharged for disability at New York City later that year.  On April 2, 1864, he enlisted as a Corporal in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1 and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  He applied for a pension in October, 1879.  He and his wife lived in New Sharon in 1900 and stated that she had not had any children.  Powers died on December 21, 1901, in East Wilton.  His widow, Mercy J. (probably the same woman as Jennie), applied for a pension in 1902.  They are buried in the East Wilton Cemetery.

Philander B. Powers was born about 1839, the son of Abner and Jane Powers and grandson of Hosmer Powers.  He lived with his parents in Wilton in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and died of disease in Wilton on August 26, 1863.

Warren G. Powers was born in February, 1841, the son of Abner and Jane Powers and brother of Philander.  He lived with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from Wilton as a Corporal in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was was shot in the right leg at Fredericksburg on December 13 and was hospitalized.  He was discharged on March 17, 1864, and applied for a pension that year.  In 1870 he was a farmer in Wilton and lived with his wife Olive and son Augustus.  In 1880 his mother and grandfather Hosmer Powers also lived with them.  He was listed in Wilton on the 1890 veterans schedule and in Wilton with his wife and two children in 1900.  In 1910 he was a widower and lived in Wilton with his son and daughter.

Alonzo Pratt according to one source was the son of Jesse and Amanda Pratt and was married in Farmington on March 16, 1864.  He enlisted at 21 from New Sharon in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and re-enlisted on December 28, 1863.  He was taken prisoner at Ground Squirrel near Spottsylvania Courthouse, Virginia on May 11, 1864, and died of wounds at Andersonville Prison on August 15 or 18, 1864.  He is buried at Andersonville (grave 5698).  His widow, Mary, submitted a pension application on January 13, 1865.

Benaiah W. Pratt was born on February 13, 1840, the son of Jeremiah, an innkeeper, and Sophronia Pratt of New Vineyard..  He enlisted from New Vineyard in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and re-enlisted on December 28, 1863.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1864 and was wounded at Malvern Hill, VA, on August 16, 1864.  He was discharged on June 5, 1865.  He applied for a pension that year.  In 1870 he lived with his parents and was a saw mill worker.  He married Flora Emily Handly of New Vineyard in 1874, and in 1880 they lived there with their two children.  In 1920 they lived on Falls Road in Farmington next to their son Archie and his family.  Benaiah and died on October 8, 1920.  He is buried in the New Vineyard Notch Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1921.

Charles S. Pratt was the son of James and Joanna Pratt and lived in Phillips with his parents in 1850.  In 1860 he was a laborer and lived with the family of David French in Phillips.  He enlisted from there at 19 in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He died of disease on February 14, 1863.

Enos T. Pratt was the son of James and Joanna Pratt and a brother of Charles.  He lived in Phillips with his parents in 1850 and was a laborer living with the family of Elbridge Dill in Phillips in 1860.  He enlisted from there at 23 as a musician in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He died of disease on January 30, 1863.

George W. Pratt, son of Jeremiah and Sophronia and brother of Benaiah, was born on October 8, 1838, in New Vineyard.  He lived in New Vineyard with his parents in 1860.  He was a seaman before he enlisted from Bangor in Company E, 2nd Maine Infantry, on May 2, 1861.  He is listed as deserting in June, 1862, though it has been suggested that he left to serve in the Navy.  He married Philena Kilkenney of Freeman in 1866, and worked in a shovel shop in New Vineyard.  In 1870 they lived in New Vineyard with their two year-old daughter, Emma.  His wife died in 1909 and he died on September 10, 1922.  They are buried in the New Vineyard Notch Cemetery.

Horace Pratt according to one source was born on July 18, 1834, in Phillips, the son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Cushman) Pratt.    He was married to Hannah Clifford.  He enlisted from New Vineyard in Company H, 5th Maine Infantry on July 21, 1861.  He was taken prisoner at Bull Run and confined at Richmond until paroled later that year.  He was killed at Rappahanock, VA, on November 7, 1863.  Hannah applied for a pension on March 28, 1864.

Jeremiah L. Pratt was born in 1817 in New Vineyard, the son of David and Elizabeth (Hackett) Pratt.  He enlisted from New Vineyard in Company A, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862, and was mustered out on June 4, 1865.  He was married to Sophronia Gay Luce and lived in New Vineyard, where he owned an inn and tavern, and worked as a farmer and blacksmith.  He applied for a pension in 1880 and died on July 17, 1889.  His widow applied for a pension that year.  Pratt is buried in the New Vineyard Notch Cemetery.

Oliver P. Pratt was born in Maine about 1844, and lived with the family of Otis McLaine in New Vineyard in 1850.  In 1860 he lived in New Vineyard with Daniel and Sally Pratt (who may have been his grandparents).  In September, 1862, he gave his age as 21 and enlisted from Farmington in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry.  He died in Frederick, Maryland, on November 17, 1862.

Samuel H. Pratt was the son of Sylvanus and Eliza Pratt and lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry  on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out with the regiment on August 31, 1863.  In 1870 he lived in Phillips with his parents, his wife Lizzie (who was born in Massachusetts) and their daughter Emma.  They lived in Phillips in 1880, and lived in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1890 and after.  Pratt applied for a pension in 1880 and Lizzie applied sometime after 1920 (date partially illegible).

Wilder Pratt, son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Cushman) Pratt, was born in Phillips on October 3, 1829.  He married Mary Winslow in 1857, and they lived in New Vineyard (Temple post office) in 1860.  He was drafted from Industry into Company C, 11th Maine Infantry, on July 21, 1863, and was absent on furlough when the regiment was mustered out on February 2, 1866.  His wife died in 1867 and he married Velzora Fales in Strong in 1868.  He was a farmer in Freeman by 1870 and moved to Farmington in 1890.  He and his wife died in 1928, and they are buried in the Tuttle Corner Cemetery in Freeman.

William Luce Pratt, the son of Noah and Mary (Norton) Pratt, was born on June 5, 1842.  He enlisted from New Vineyard in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 25, 1863.  He married Mary Ellen Carville in September, 1865, and in 1870 they lived in North Anson with two children.  In 1880 they lived in Strong with four children, and he was listed in Strong on the 1890 veterans schedule.  His first wife died in 1891.  Pratt married  Mrs. Emily Reed in Lewiston in 1913, and later married Hattie Newell.  He died in Portland on October 12, 1924.  He and Mary, his first wife, are buried in the McLain-Peabody Cemetery in New Vineyard.

Daniel Marshall Prescott was born on November 18, 1838, the son of Josiah and Thirza (Leavitt) Prescott of Farmington.  In 1850 he lived with his parents in Madrid.  He married Zilpha True in August, 1859, and in 1860 he was a millman in Presque Isle and he and his wife lived with the family of Francis Evelath, a physician.  Prescott enlisted from Presque Isle as a 1st Lieutenant in Company C, 15th Maine Infantry, on December 9, 1861.  He was promoted to Captain in 1862 but resigned because of illness on July 5, 1863.  He and died on November 17, 1870, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Farmington, with his wife and parents.

Edwin Augustus Prescott, 19 year-old son of Erasmus and Rosella (Dow) of Phillips, enlisted from there in Company K, 9th Maine Infantry on September 21, 1861.  He was killed on a skirmish line at Bermuda Hundred, VA, on May 18, 1864.  He is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington with his parents.

Evander S. Prescott was probably the son of Jesse and Agnes Prescott of Vienna, Kennebec County.  He enlisted at 26 from Wilton as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out with the regiment on August 31, 1863.  On December 11, he enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.  In 1870 he lived in Farmington with his wife Helen and worked in carriage manufacturing.  He applied for a pension in 1872.  He and Helen lived in Farmington with two children in 1880.  In 1910, he and his second wife Bertha had been married for two years and lived in Farmington.  He died in 1919 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Farmington, with his wives.

George C. Prescott was the son of John and Rhoda Prescott, and lived in Phillips with his parents in 1850 and he and his wife lived with them in 1860.  He enlisted at 35 from Phillips in Battery 5, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 19, 1864, and was mustered out on July 6, 1865.  In 1870, he and his wife Naomi and son George, who were born in Maine, lived in Lincoln, Wisconsin.  They were in LaGrange, Wisconsin in 1880 and 1890.  He submitted a pension application from Wisconsin in 1890 and Naomi applied as a widow from Wisconsin in February, 1894.

Horace Prescott, born about 1825, was probably the son of John and Rhoda Prescott of Phillips and a brother of Lewis.  In 1860, he and his wife Elizabeth lived in Melrose, Massachusetts, and he was employed in the manufacture of farm equipment.  He enlisted from Melrose on August 10, 1862, in the 9th Battery, Massachusetts Volunteers, and was mustered out on June 6, 1865, in Boston.  He and his (second?) wife, Eliza Ann lived in Phillips after the war, and he was a farmer.  He submitted a pension application from Maine in 1890 and died in 1905.  He is buried with his wife, Eliza Ann (1823-1893) in the Field Cemetery in Phillips.

Lewis Prescott was born about 1832, the son of John and Rhoda Prescott of Phillips.  In 1850, he was a farmer in Madrid.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 1st Maine Cavalry, on August 30, 1862, and was discharged on May 8, 1865.  After the war, he and his wife and children lived in Phillips, where he was a farmer.  He applied for a pension in 1885 and died on June 7, 1910.  He is buried in the Field Cemetery in Phillips with his wife, Eunice, who died in 1913 at the age of 80.

William Prescott was the son of John and Rhoda Prescott and lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850.  In 1860 he was a teacher and he and his wife Octavia lived with his parents in Phillips.  He enlisted from there at 22 on May 24, 1861, in Company I, 1st Massachusetts Infantry.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1862;  was listed as missing at Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863;  and was mustered out in Boston on May 25, 1864.

Joseph Harrison Presson, a Methodist Episcopal minister, was born in Freeman on February 15, 1816, the son of William and Judith (Merrill) Presson.  He married Mary E. Russell, who was born in Kentucky, in Warren, Ohio in 1835.  They lived in Franklin, Ohio, in 1840, and in 1850 they lived in Buena Vista, Illinois with four children.  He enlisted from Henderson, Illinois in Company A, 55th Illinois Infantry, on October 31, 1861.  He was promoted to Full Adjutant and resigned on March 5, 1862 (his son Joseph H. Presson served in the same regiment).  He and his family lived in Le Sueur, Minnesota in 1870;  in Sterling, Nebraska in 1880; and in Friend, Nebraska, in 1885.  He was listed in Peru, Nebraska on the 1890 veterans schedule, and he applied for a pension in 1890 from Nebraska.  In 1910 he was a widower living in Lincoln, Nebraska.  He died there on May 1, 1912.  Thanks to LuReen Brock for information on this family.

Uriah Proctor was born in Maine in 1839, probably the son of Christopher Columbus Proctor and his wife Mehitable.  He lived with them in Eustis in 1860.  He enlisted from Eustis in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 23, 1862, and was discharged on June 17, 1865.  He lived with his parents again in Eustis in 1870, when he was a student at Farmington Normal. In 1880 he was a farm worker and lived in Lewiston with his sister, Hannah Parsons, and her four children.  He submitted a pension application from Massachusetts in February, 1891.  In 1900 he was an unmarried shoemaker living on Hazel Street in Brockton, Massachusetts.

Joseph M. Pulcifer was born in Maine about 1835, the son of William and Eunice Pulsifer.  He lived with his parents in Chesterville in 1850.  He enlisted from Farmington as a Sergeant in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1870 he was a carriage maker and lived in Winthrop with his wife Harriet and two children.  In 1880 they lived in Medfield, Massachusetts, where he was a commercial agent and they operated a boarding house.  He applied for a pension from Massachusetts on November 22, 1890.

Winfield Scott Pullen was born in July, 1847, the son of Wellington and Sophronia Pullen.  He lived with his parents in Strong in 1860.  He enlisted from Strong in Company G, 14th Maine Infantry, on March 16, 1865, and was mustered out on August 28, 1865.  He applied for a pension in July, 1876 and was married about 1879, probably in Missouri.  He and his wife Lizzie lived in Galena Township, Missouri, in 1880 with their son Lonnie, and he was employed as a carpenter.  He was listed in Carterville, Missouri on the 1890 veterans schedule.  In 1900, he and his wife (listed as Eliza but the same person) lived in Barrett Heights, Joplin Township, Missouri with two sons.  His widow Elizabeth (same person) submitted an application for a pension in 1904 from Missouri. 

Frederick A. Purrington/Purinton enlisted at 18 from Farmington in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on March 22, 1865, and was listed as absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on August 28, 1865.  His widow, Jessie, applied for a pension on April 10, 1893, and listed service in the 13th U.S. Infantry as well as the 14th Maine.

Horatio N. Purrington was the son of Gideon Purrington, a shoemaker, and his wife Abigail, and he lived with them in New Sharon in 1850.  In 1860, he was a farm laborer and lived with the family of Seward Vining in Avon.  He enlisted at 24 from Avon in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 24, 1864, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.

Isaac B. Purrington (1822-1899) was a farmer in Jay in 1860 and lived with his wife Rebecca and their three children.  He enlisted from Jay in Company K, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out with the regiment on August 31, 1863. He lived in Jay  in 1880 and 1890, and died in 1899.  He is buried in the North Jay Cemetery.

Jacob Purrington was  the son of Gideon and Abigail Purrington and a brother of Horatio.  He lived with them in New Sharon in 1850.  He enlisted from Avon at 22 in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1864 and mustered out on June 4, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1879 and Harry Purrington submitted an application on behalf of a minor in 1891.

Leander Purrington was the son of Gideon and Abigail Purrington and a brother of Horatio and Jacob.  He lived in New Sharon with his parents in 1850. He enlisted at 18 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.   He also served in Company I, 16th Maine Infantry.   He enlisted on September 2, 1864, as a substitute for George Cothren of Farmington in Company I, 16th Maine Infantry.  He was discharged on May 23, 1865.  In 1870 he lived in Farmington with his parents and brother Harry and worked in a shoe factory.  In 1880 he and his wife Ella, who was born in Rhode Island,  lived on Chapel Street in Farmington and his mother lived with them.  He applied for a pension from Massachusetts in 1899, and in 1910 he and Ella lived in Lynn, Massachusetts.  They said on the Census that they had never had children.  They lived in Canton in 1920.

Almond H. Putnam was born in Massachusetts, the son of Elisha Putnam, a boot and shoe maker, and his  wife Mary.  He lived with his parents in Ashland, Massachusetts, in 1850, and in Chesterville in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Chesterville in Company A, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He enlisted again from Farmington in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on January 5, 1864, and was mustered out on June 17, 1865.  He married about 1879 and in 1880 he and his wife Catherine (Katie) lived in Westboro, Massachusetts, with their infant son Willis.  They lived in Westboro in 1880 and he applied for a pension from Massachusetts in August, 1894.  They were in Westboro in 1920.  Katie applied for a widow's pension from Massachusetts, on May 29, 1925.  She died in Rhode Island, where she was born, in 1927.

John Putnam, son of William and Eliza Putnam, lived with them in R3, Number 3 West Kennebago in 1850.  He enlisted at 21 from Dead River on June 4, 1861, in Company F, 3rd Maine Infantry.  He was promoted to Corporal that year;  was taken prisoner at Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863;  was promoted to Sergeant in June;  transferred to Company F, 17th Maine Infantry in December; was wounded in 1864;  and was discharged on December 1, 1864.   He applied for a pension in July, 1865.  He married Amanda C. White, and in 1880 they lived in Winthrop with her brother and his wife.  He died at the Insane Hospital in Augusta on February 10, 1897.

William F. Putnam was born in New Vineyard about 1842, the son of William and Eliza Putnam and brother of John.  He lived with his parents in Dead River in 1860.  He enlisted at 19 from there on June 4, 1861, in Company F, 3rd Maine Infantry. He was discharged on June 24. 1861 and submitted a pension application on December 9, 1861.  He was married twice, to Sarah E. White, and to Lucretia G. Osborne who survived him.  He is probably the William F. Putnam who was a single road laborer in Sanford in 1870 and who lived with his wife Sarah and two sons in Holbrook, Massachusetts, in 1880.  He died at Battle Creek, Michigan, on February 12, 1889.  His widow, Lucretia, applied for a pension from Massachusetts later that year.

John H. Quigley enlisted at 18 from Flagstaff Plantation in the 9th Unassigned Maine Company on January 1, 1865, and was mustered out in Richmond, VA, on September 5.  He was born in Georgiaville, RI, and died at the Soldier's Home in Bristol, RI, on January 20, 1925.  He may have been a substitute.  He is probably the unmarried farm hand born in Rhode Island of Irish parents who lived in Smithfield, Rhode Island, with the family of Edwin Harris in 1880, 1910 and 1920.

Alson H. Quimby (also listed as Nelson Quimby) was born on October 31, 1837, the son of Lemuel and Eliza (Mason) Quimby.  In 1850 he lived with his parents on their farm in Rangeley.  He was drafted  from Rangeley into Company A, 3rd Maine Infantry, on July 15, 1863.  The 3rd Maine was organized at Augusta on June 4, 1861, and was attached to the Army of the Potomac.  It was engaged in all of the significant battles of the eastern campaign from the siege of Yorktown in April, 1862, to Cold Harbor in June, 1864.  When it was mustered out in June, 1864, at the end of its three-year term, the 3rd Maine had lost 134 men in battle and 149 to disease.  Quimby, whose term had not expired, was transferred to the 17th Maine Infantry on June 28, 1864, when the 3rd was mustered out.   In 1870 Quimby lived next to his parents in New Sharon and owned a farm valued at $2000 as well as $925 in personal assets.  He married Georgiana Taylor in 1871. 

Daniel Reuel Quimby, son of Stephen and Abigail (Welts) Quimby, was born on August 10, 1825.  In 1850 he was a farmer and lived in Phillips with four of his brothers.  He married Julia Toothaker, who died in 1854, and then her sister, Ruth, who died in 1860.  At the time of the 1860 Census, Quimby lived in Phillips with the family of John Toothaker, the father of his two deceased wives.  On August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, and served until the regiment was mustered out on June 2, 1865.  He married Lucy A. Leavitt in 1866, and they lived in Phillips with their children in 1870 and 1880.  Quimby, who was known as "Devil Dan", died on February 1, 1882 and his  wife, Lucy, submitted a pension application in February, 1883.  She died in 1909.  They are buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips.

Orrin S. Quimby was born in Maine about 1844, the son of Orrison and Martina Quimby.  He lived with his parents in Farmington in 1850.  He enlisted from Avon in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was listed as hospitalized in Memphis, TN, on August 11, 1863, shortly before the regiment was mustered out.  On September 24, 1863, he enlisted in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, and served until June 16, 1865.  He submitted a pension application from California in 1892.

Luther Quint was born on April 4, 1841, the son of Joshua and Lucinda Quint of Lexington.  He lived there with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from there on November 5, 1861, in Company H, 1st Maine Cavalry, and was discharged on January 25, 1862.  On August 17, 1863, he enlisted in Company F, 11th Maine Infantry,  was promoted to Corporal in 1865, and was mustered out on February 2, 1866.  He married Betsey Gould and in 1870 they lived in Lexington with two young children.  They lived in Canada for several years - at least two children were born there and he filed a pension application from there.  In 1900 they were in New Portland.  Living with them were their son Joshua, daughter Edna and Edna's husband Arthur Norton, grandchildren Clarence and Edna Stansbury, and Quint's aunt Paulina Walker.  In 1910 they lived on the Kingfield Road in New Portland with son Samuel, his wife Josephine and their son Kenton.  Quint's first wife died in 1911 and he married Mary Elizabeth (Weymouth) Churchill.  He died on September 21, 1927, and is buried in the East New Portland Cemetery.  (Thanks to descendant Emily Quint for information on Luther)

Hiram Ramsdell, a 21 year-old from New Sharon, son of James and Nancy Ramsdell, enlisted in Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was wounded at Fredericksburg, VA, on December 13, 1862, and died of wounds in Washington, DC, on January 11, 1863.  He is buried in the Weeks Mills Cemetery in New Sharon.

James M. Ramsdell was probably the son of Albion and Charlotte Ramsdell.  They lived in Buckfield in 1850 and in Auburn in 1860, but one source says that Ramsdell was from Phillips.  He enlisted at 18 from Auburn in Company F, 13th Maine Infantry, on January 16, 1862.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864;  transferred to Company B, 30th Maine Infantry on January 1, 1865;  and was mustered out on August 20, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1882.

Edgar Randall enlisted at 21 from Wilton as a Sergeant in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 14, 1861.  He received a disability discharge on June 12, 1862, and applied for a pension in December, 1862.

William D. Randall was born in Augusta on January 7, 1837, the son of Asa and Celestia (Usher) Randall.  He enlisted on November 15, 1861, in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry.  He re-enlisted on January 1, 1864;  was promoted to Corporal and to Sergeant in 1864;  was wounded at Winchester, VA, on September 19;  transferred to Company A in 1865;  and was mustered out on April 18, 1866.  He was married to Sarah Foster and had a farm on Foster Hill in Freeman until they moved to Farmington in 1881.  He was listed in Farmington on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he said that he had received a gunshot wound in the thigh, a sabre cut on the arm and had had his foot crushed handling supply.  In 1910 he and his wife lived on Perham Street in Farmington.  Sarah died in 1921 and he died on October 1, 1927.  They are buried in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

George W. Ranger was born in New Hampshire about 1844, the son of Amos and Sarah, and lived with them in Stirling, Massachusetts in 1850.  He enlisted from Stirling in Company K, 53rd Massachusetts Infantry on October 17, 1862, and was mustered out on September 2, 1863 at Camp Stevens in Groton, Massachusetts.  On September 27, 1864, age 21, he enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery.  He was mustered out on June 17, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1886 listing service in Company K, 53rd Massachusetts Infantry as well as the 1st Maine LA.  He married in 1877 and 1910 he and his wife Mary lived in Farmington.  She had been married once before and reported that she had no children. He died in Farmington on March 17, 1911, and his wife applied for a pension later that year.

Hannibal Ranger probably was Reuben H. Ranger, son of Reuben and Mary Ranger of Wilton.  He was about 16 when he enlisted from Wilton as a musician in the 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on November 1, 1862.  On January 1, 1864, age 18, he enlisted in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry as a bugler and was mustered out  with the regiment on December 5, 1865.  He lived with Reuben Ranger in Wilton in 1880, and applied for a pension in 1881.  He died on April 30, 1886, and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery.  His widow, Emma F. Ranger, applied for a pension in June, 1886.

Orestes Ranger was the son of Reuben and Mary Ranger of Wilton and lived there with them in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Wilton in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864, and died of wounds on July 20 of that year.

Nathaniel Rawson lived in Township B, Oxford County, in 1850 with his wife Salonce (?) and daughter.  He enlisted at 40 from Upton in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 20, 1861, and died in hospital July 26, 1862.  A pension application on behalf of a minor child was submitted in 1865 by A. O. Goodwin, Guardian.

Abraham Reed, son of David and Huldah (Howard) Reed, was born about 1843.  He lived with his parents in Jackson Plantation in 1850 and in Eustis in 1860.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 26, 1862, and died of fever on January 30, 1863.

Alvin L. Reed, son of John and Eleanor Reed of Kingfield, enlisted at 22 from Dead River as a Wagoner in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He was discharged for disability on May 12, 1862.

Charles Reed was probably the son of Jonathan and Betsy Reed of Wilton.  He enlisted at 18 from Farmington as a substitute for Reuben H. Lord.  He was mustered into Company D, 15th Maine Infantry, on March 7, 1865, and died on September 21, 1865.

Charles L. Reed, 27, probably the son of Abigail Reed, enlisted from Phillips in Battery 5, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 19, 1864, and was mustered out on July 6, 1865.  He died in 1885 and is buried in the Village Cemetery, Madrid, with his wife, Mary W. Eveleth (1842-1923).

Eben Reed was born on September 6, 1837, the son of David and Huldah (Howard) Reed and brother of Abraham.  He lived with his parents in Jackson Plantation in 1850 and in Eustis in 1860.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 24, 1862.  He was transferred to Company A, 24th Veteran Reserve Corps on June 15, 1864, and was discharged on July 20, 1865.  He married Lanora Bemus at Flagstaff on July 22, 1866 and applied for a pension in 1867.  In 1870 He and his wife lived in Eustis Plantation with their son Fred.  In 1880 Lanora lived in Eustis with her parents and two children.  Reed was listed in Island Falls, Aroostook County, on the 1890 veterans schedule, and in 1900 lived there with his wife and daughter Abbie, 16, their only surviving child.  He died at Island Falls on April 14, 1903, and his wife applied for a pension later that year.  He and Lanora are buried in the Stratton Upper Cemetery in Eustis.

Elias Reed, 19, enlisted from Wilton in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was wounded July 1, 1863, at Gettysburg and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on July 11.  He applied for a pension on August 6, 1866.  He may be the man who was born in Vermont, lived in Farmington in 1870 and later lived in Lincoln with his wife Alice.

Elias H. Reed was born in October, 1843, at Mariah, NY, the son of David and Huldah (Howard) Reed and brother of Abraham and Eben.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 25, 1862.  He applied for a pension in 1869.  He was married Olive Wyman, who died in 1874. He lived in Eustis in 1880 and married his second wife, Lottie, about 1882.  They lived in Eustis in 1900 and in Salem in 1910.  In 1920, Reed was a widower and boarded in Madrid with Ernest and Annie Dunham.  He died in Salem on June 8, 1920, and is buried in the Mount Abram Cemetery there with Lottie.

Ephraim Reed enlisted at 21 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He is probably the farm laborer who lived in Farmington in 1870.

George E. Reed, the son of Stillman and Martha Reed, lived with them in Livermore in 1850.  He enlisted at 19 from Leeds in Company G, 1st Maine Cavalry, on October 19, 1861, and re-enlisted on February 1, 1864.  He was killed at Reams' Station, Virginia, on August 25, 1864, and is buried in the Hinkley Cemetery in Livermore with his parents.

John Reed, Jr. was the son of John and Eleanor Reed of Kingfield and a brother of Alvin.  He enlisted from Eustis Plantation at 25 in Company A, 20th Maine Infantry, on August 29, 1862, and was killed at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863.

Samuel Reed was born in July, 1839.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.  He lived in Wilton in 1870 with his wife and son, and lived in Farmington in 1880 and 1900.

Warren Reed, a 26 year-old from Farmington, enlisted on the quota of Wiscasset as a Bugler in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 8, 1863.  He died in Greenville, Louisiana, on August 3, 1864.

William O. Reed lived in Kingfield in 1860 with his wife Fanny and four children.  He enlisted at 29 from Kingfield in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He transferred to Company I the following day and deserted on November 27, 1861.

Joseph S. Redlon of Farmington enlisted at 18 from Porter in Company B, 29th Maine Infantry, on January 28, 1864.  He was discharged for disability on October 5, 1865.

John Reagan was born in Boston and enlisted at 19 from Flagstaff Plantation (on the quota of Kingfield) in Company F, 1st Maine Sharpshooters, on December 29, 1864.  He transferred to Company F, 20th Maine Infantry, on June 21, 1865, and is listed as absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on July 16.

Charles H. Rich enlisted at 28 from Strong in Company D, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1863.  He received a disability discharge on April 26, 1864; applied for a pension on May 2;  and died on July 5.  He is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong.

Ansel Richards was born on September 15, 1823, the son of Nathaniel and Jane (Carle) Richards.  He enlisted from Salem in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and received a disability discharge on April 8, 1862.  On December 16, 1863, he enlisted in Company K, 29th Maine Infantry.  He was discharged  for disability on May 14, 1865. 

Hobart Chandler Richards was born on July 17, 1829, the son of Nathaniel and Jane (Carle) Richards and brother of Ansel.  He lived with his parents in Salem in 1850.  He enlisted from there in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was discharged for disability on January 10, 1863.  He lived in Salem with his wife and mother in 1870.  In 1880 he and his wife lived in Salem with three children.  He was listed in Kingfield on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died in 1897 and is buried in the Mount Abram Cemetery in Salem with his wife, Velzora Ellsworth  Richards (1843-1910).

Irving/Ervin A. Richards was the son of Amasa and Jane Richards of Roxbury.  He enlisted at 21 from Roxbury in Company H, 23rd Maine Infantry, on September 29, 1862, and was mustered out on July 15, 1863. 

John King Richards was born on July 27, 1828 in Hollis, the son of John and Mary (Gray) Richards.  He married Elizabeth Winslow of Farmington in Boston, MA, in 1850, and worked as a brick mason in Saco, Bowdoinham and Freeman.  He enlisted from Bowdoinham in  Company F, 19th Maine Infantry, on August 25, 1862, and was mustered out on May 31, 1865.  Elizabeth died in 1871 and he married Ellen (Foster) Medora.  He died on April 5, 1905, and was buried with Elizabeth in the North Freeman Cemetery.  Their remains were moved to the Strong Village Cemetery in 1907.  Ellen died in 1934 and is buried there as well.

Liberty Richards was born on December 26, 1814, in Leeds, the son of Nathaniel and Jane (Carle) Richards and brother of Ansel and Hobart.  He married Abigail Baker in Weld on June 7, 1835, and they lived in Weld with seven children in 1850.  In 1860 they lived in Farmington, New Hampshire with four children.  He enlisted from there in Company C, 13th New Hampshire Infantry, on August 15, 1862, and died of disease at Fredericksburg, VA, on December 5, 1862.  His wife applied for a pension in June, 1863.

Prentice/Prentiss M. Richards was the son of Amasa and Jane Richards of Roxbury, and brother of Ervin. He enlisted from there at 29 in Company D, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was taken prisoner at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, and died on December 11.  His mother, Jane, applied for a pension in July, 1881.

Silas F. Richards, son of Liberty and Abigail (Baker) Richards, was born in Weld in 1845.  He was raised in Farmington, NH, and enlisted from there with his father in Company C, 13th New Hampshire Infantry, on August 29, 1862.   He was promoted to Corporal on May 1, 1864, and was wounded at Cold Harbor, VA, on June 1.  He was mustered out in Richmond on June 21, 1865.  He is buried in a family cemetery on Meaderboro Road in Farmington, NH.

Virgil P. Richards was the son of John and Louisa Richards of Roxbury and brother of Prentice.  He lived there with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from Roxbury in company H, 23rd Maine Infantry, on September 29, 1862, and was mustered out on July 15, 1863.  In 1870, he was a teacher living in Hamilton, California, with his wife Rosaline and son Virgil, who was born in October, 1868, in Maine.  In 1880 he and his wife and two children lived in Hamilton and he was a farmer.  In 1910 and 1920 he lived in Gridley, California
with his daughter, Flora.

Isaac F. Richardson, a gas fitter, lived in Roxbury, Massachusetts, with three young boys, probably his sons, in 1850.  He gave his residence as Phillips when he enlisted at 41 in the 1st Massachusetts Cavalry on December 22, 1863.  He was mustered out in Washington, DC, on June 26, 1865.  His pension application in 1885 also lists service in the Navy.  His son Henry lived with Solomon and Eunice Williams in Phillips in 1870.

Joel A. Richardson was the son of Samuel and Judith Richardson and lived with them in Temple in 1850.  In 1860 he was a farm laborer and lived with the family of Jeffrey Brown in New Sharon.  He enlisted at 19 from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He died at Hilton Head, SC, on January 1, 1862, and is buried at the Beaufort (SC) National Cemetery (grave 19-1623).  His mother submitted a pension application in April, 1867.

Joseph Richardson, 42, enlisted from Roxbury in Company B, 32nd Maine Infantry, on March 10, 1864.  He was wounded in 1864 and was discharged October 6, 1864.  He was listed in Mexico (Maine) on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he stated that he had received a gunshot wound to the left breast and was discharged on a surgeon's certificate.

Martin V. Richardson, son of David and Esther, was born in Belgrade and enlisted at 25 from Strong in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 2, 1863.  He died in the hospital on October 5, 1864, and is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong.  His widow, Nancy, applied for a pension in 1865.  In 1867, P.H. Stubbs, Guardian, submitted a pension application for a minor dependent.

Osmon Richardson was the son of Alvin and Eliza Richardson and lived with them in Jay in 1860.  He enlisted at 21 from Jay as a Sergeant in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He was wounded at Cold Harbor, VA, on June 3, 1864, and died of his wounds on August 24.  He is buried in the North Jay Cemetery.

Nathaniel H. Ricker was the son of Daniel and Caroline Ricker of Avon.  He enlisted from there at 21 as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.   On October 18, 1864, he enlisted from Avon as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company M, 31st Maine Infantry, and resigned on June 22, 1865.  In 1880 he and his wife Josephine lived in Galveston, Texas, with three sons born in Texas.  He was listed in Galveston on the 1890 veterans schedule and submitted a pension application from Texas in June, 1905.

Joseph E. Ridgeway, 29, enlisted from New Vineyard in Company A, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was discharged for disability on January 31, 1863, and died in Washington, DC, on February 15.  His mother, Hannah, applied for a pension in 1863.

Hosea P. Ripley of Canton married Vesta Bray Peterson in 1838 in Freeman.  He enlisted from there in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on December 28, 1863.  He was wounded at Saint Mary's Church, VA, on June 24, 1864, and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on June 15, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1865.  In 1880 he was a carpenter and lived in Lynn, Massachusetts with his wife, who worked in a shoe factory, and daughter Carrie.  Vesta applied from Massachusetts in 1900.

Anson Robbins was born in Wilton and lived there in 1860 with his wife Christina.  He enlisted from Wilton at 40 in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 14, 1861, and  deserted at Augusta some time in 1862.  In 1870 and 1880 he was a farmer in Wilton and lived with his wife Helena and their children.

Charles H. Robbins, 31, enlisted from Roxbury in Company H, 23rd Maine Infantry, on September 29, 1862, and was mustered out on July 15, 1863.

Levi B. Robbins was the son of Aquilla and Sarah Robbins.  He lived in Phillips with his parents in 1850 and with his father and brother in 1860.  He enlisted at 22 from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was listed as sick in Augusta on October 20, 1863 (two months after the regiment was mustered out).  After the war he was a farm laborer and apparently unmarried.  He lived in Phillips with the family of George Bachelder in 1870 and boarded with Joseph Church in 1880.

Alvin Robinson lived with his wife Julia and their infant daughter on the farm of Silas Dunbar in Canton in 1850.  In 1860 he was a painter and carpenter and they lived in Canton with their daughters Suella, 10, and Betsey, 5 (Betsey died in 1861).  Robinson enlisted from there at 36  in Company E, 5th Maine Infantry, on June 24, 1861.  He deserted in August, 1862, returned in September (estimated dates), and was discharged on March 18, 1863.  In 1870 he was a house painter and he and his wife lived in Canton with Harvey Ripley.  The cemetery record states that he died in 1877 (?-stone broken) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, "from the effects of sunstroke while on duty in the late war".  He is buried in the Hinkley Cemetery in Livermore with his wife, Julia, who died in 1906 at 78, and their daughter.

Charles A. Robinson, a 21 year-old clerk, gave his residence as Farmington when he enlisted in Company G, 1st Massachusetts Cavalry, on October 1, 1861.  He was wounded on November 3, 1862, at Snickers Gap, Virginia, and was discharged because of wounds at Boston on February 6, 1863.

David Robinson, a 19 year-old farmer from Kingfield, enlisted July 19, 1864, in Company F, 6th Massachusetts Infantry.  He was mustered out on October 27, 1864, in Readville, MA.

Samuel Robinson, 18, enlisted from Avon in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.

Thomas M. Robinson, a 23 year-old shoemaker, gave his residence as Farmington when he enlisted in Company G, 1st Massachusetts Cavalry, on October 10, 1861.  He was wounded at Aldie, Virginia, on June 17, 1863, and was discharged on October 31, 1864.

Ebenezer C. Rodbird was born in Wilton about 1837, the son of Thomas Rodbird (born Manchester, England) and his wife Susanna.  He enlisted from Wilton as a musician in the 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and received a discharge for disability in 1862.

Reuel H. Rogers, 19, son of Francis and Rhoda Rogers, was born in Industry and enlisted from there in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on December 26, 1863.  He was discharged on June 15, 1865.  He died on September 12, 1883, and is buried at the Center Meeting House Cemetery in Industry.

Charles B. Ross was the son of Valentine and Diantha Ross of Chesterville.  He enlisted at 18 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He applied for a pension on September 30, 1864, and died in Chesterville on October 23, 1864.

Daniel W. Ross, a  21 year-old Livermore resident, enlisted in Company C, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He re-enlisted January 1, 1861, and was promoted to Corporal in 1865.  He was listed as absent on furlough when the regiment was mustered out on  January 18, 1866.

Nelson Ross was the son of Daniel and Catherine (Rowe) Ross.  He enlisted at 18 from Phillips in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 14, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 1, 1864, and transferred to Company A.  He was wounded on October 19 at Cedar Creek, VA, and was listed as absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on August 25, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1865 and was listed in Lynn, Massachusetts on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he stated that he had received a gunshot wound.  His widow, Cynthia, applied for a pension in 1910.

Reuben W. Ross was the son of Elbridge Gerry Ross and a nephew of Samuel Ross.  He was born on September 19, 1842 in Rangeley.  In 1850 the family lived in Phillips.  By 1860 they lived in Rangeley and Ross was a laborer living with his parents.  He married Melissa Brackett, the daughter of James and Nancy (Bubier) Brackett, in 1863.  On December 11, 1863, he enlisted in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry.  He was mustered out with the regiment at Barrancas, Florida on December 6, 1865.   In 1870 he and his wife lived in Rangeley and he was a farmer with $150 in real estate and $150 in personal property.  When the 1880 Census was taken, he and his wife had six children at home in Rangeley.  Melissa died later that year.  Ross applied for a pension in January, 1882.  On August 21, 1884 he married Hannah Haley, daughter of John and Mary (Lowell) Haley and widow of John Wesley Raymond.  Hannah died in 1889.  Ross married 14 year-old Mathilda Campbell, daughter of Cyrus and Rose Ellen (Bubier) Campbell, on December 3, 1889, and fathered five more children.  He died on September 16, 1928 and is buried with his first wife and two of their children in the Wilbur Cemetery in Rangeley.

Samuel A. Ross was born in 1829, the son of Abraham and Abigail (Sedgeley) Ross.  His father died in 1838, leaving his mother as the head of a family of eight children.  By 1850 Ross was married to Hannah Dodge, daughter of a Rangeley farmer who is said to have been the area's first physician.  In 1860, Ross was a blacksmith in Rangeley with two small children.  He enlisted in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861, and is thought to have received some medical training in the Army.  He was discharged because of disability on March 8, 1864.   In 1870, Ross and his wife and young son lived in Rangeley and he was employed as a river driver.  In 1880 and afterward he described himself as a physician.  In 1887 he advertised as "S.A. Ross, M.D., Allopathic Physician and Surgeon" and had an office next to the Rangeley Lake House.  He died on September 23, 1909 and his wife died in 1914.  They are buried in Evergreen Cemetery and the graves of two of their sons are at the Schoolhouse Cemetery.

Allen Rowe was the oldest son of Asaph Rowe and was born in Madrid in 1834.  In 1850 he was a laborer living on the farm of Abner Toothaker in Rangeley, and in 1860 he was a laborer who lived on the Henry Kimball farm in Rangeley. He married Martha Boodry, daughter of Thomas Boodry, after 1860.  She died on July 22, 1863, giving birth to a son who died the same day.    On March 4, 1864, Allen Rowe enlisted from Rangeley in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry.  He died on July 1, 1864 in a hospital at Brashear City, Louisiana.  He and his wife are buried in the Nile Cemetery in Rangeley.

Ambrose Rowe, son of John and Catherine Rowe and a cousin of the Rowe brothers, was born about 1834.  In 1850, his parents lived in Dallas Plantation and Ambrose was a laborer on the farm of Abner Toothaker in Rangeley.  In 1860, his parents lived in Strong and he worked on the farm of  James L. Brackett in Dallas Plantation.  He enlisted from Dallas in Company B, 7th Maine Infantry, on August 21, 1861, and deserted sometime in 1863. On August 21, 1864, he was transferred to the 1st Veteran Maine Regiment.  He was detailed to the Ambulance Corps, and deserted in 1865.
In 1880, Ambrose lived in lived in Hudson, Penobscot County, with his wife Mary and their son Amaziah.  He was listed in Penobscot County on the 1890 Maine veteran's census and in Exeter, Penobscot County on the 1910 Census.

Eben Rowe, Allen's brother, was born on December 29, 1839, in Madrid.  In 1860, he was a laborer living on Edward Toothaker's farm in Rangeley. He enlisted from Rangeley in Company A, 20th Maine Infantry, and was mustered in at Portland on August 29, 1862.  The 20th Maine was assigned to the Army of the Potomac and participated in all of the major battles of the eastern theatre from Antietam in September, 1862, to the siege of Petersburg.  The regiment is best known for its dramatic stand on Little Round Top at Gettysburg in July, 1863, under the command of Colonel Joshua Chamberlain.  It was selected to receive the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.  The 20th Maine marched in the Grand Review in Washington on May 23, 1865, and was mustered out on July 16.  During its service, the regiment lost 147 men in battle and 146 to disease.
Eben Rowe was discharged from the Army on May 15, 1865. He married Florette Hoar in 1865, and in 1870 he was a farmer in Rangeley with real estate valued at $600 and $636 in other assets.  His wife died in 1873.  On April 26, 1878, Rowe married sixteen year-old Mary Ella McLaughlin.  In 1880 they lived in Rangeley and Rowe described himself as a laborer.  He was the Rangeley town treasurer in the 1880's and was elected Selectman.  He was part owner of the water mill in town and later of the steam mill at the foot of Allen Street.  He applied for a pension 1890 and died at his home in Rangeley on Easter Sunday, 1928. His second wife died in 1951 at the home of their son Olin in Rangeley.   Rowe and both of his wives are buried in Evergreen Cemetery.

Lewis Philippe Rowe, brother of Allen and Eben, was born in Madrid on March 12, 1841.  He enlisted from there in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862 but was discharged for disability (date not given).  He married Louise Plaisted on September 19, 1864.  In 1870 Lewis was a farmer in Madrid with his wife and three young children.  His wife died on September 8, 1874.  On February 4, 1876, Rowe married 16 year-old Sarah Beedy.  In 1880 they lived in Augusta with five children and he was employed as a carpenter.  He applied for a pension in 1878.  Lewis Rowe died on November 29, 1899, a year after his tenth child was born, and is buried in the Madrid Village Cemetery.  His wife applied for a widow's pension in 1900.

William T. Rowe was born on October 3, 1847, and was probably a child of Asaph Rowe and his first wife, and therefore probably a brother of Allen, Eben and LewisHe lived with Mary and William Toothaker in Rangeley in 1850 and in Phillips in 1860.  On December 19, 1863, claiming to be 18, he enlisted in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry.  He transferred to Company K, 20th Maine Infantry on December 15, 1864, and was mustered out with that regiment on July 16, 1865.  William Rowe submitted a pension application from Arizona on August 12, 1891.  In 1900, he was single and lived in Prescott, Arizona Territory.  In 1910 he lived on Ohio Street in Malibu, California.  He died in California on October 22, 1919.  

Winthrop A. Rowe was born on July 1, 1845, and was almost certainly a brother of William.  In 1850 he lived with William and Mary Toothaker in Rangeley and in 1860 he lived with them in Phillips.  On August 14, 1862 he enlisted from Phillips in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry.  The 16th Maine was organized at Augusta in August, 1862 and was in action a month later at Antietam.  It was attached to the Army of the Potomac, and was engaged in every significant battle of the eastern theatre through Five Forks in the last week of the war.  It was present at the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, and it marched in the Grand Review in Washington on May 23.  The 16th Maine lost 181 men in battle and 259 from disease. Rowe was mustered out with the regiment at Arlington Heights, Virginia, on June 5, 1865.  He submitted a pension application from Arizona on November 25, 1895.  In 1910 and 1920, he was a resident at the veterans home in Malibu, California.  
  
Melvin B. Rowe  was born in 1838, the son of Ebenezer and Hannah Rowe.  A bootmaker, he enlisted from West Boylston, MA, in Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry, on February 17, 1862.  He was wounded at the Wilderness on May 5, 1864, and transferred to Company K, 20th Massachusetts Infantry on July 12.  He was discharged on March 7, 1865.  He married Rosetta Lambert in 1866 and lived in Freeman before moving to New Vineyard by 1870.  He applied for a pension in 1888 and died in 1900.  He is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery.

John F. Royall was the son of Franklin and Polly Royall of Wilton.  He enlisted at 25 from there in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and was discharged on January 28, 1863.  In 1870 he was a mill worker and lived in Dexter with his wife Caroline (Carrie) and three children.  In 1880 he was a machinist and lived on Fletcher Street in Whittinsville (Northbridge) Massachusetts.  He stated that he was disabled because of rheumatism.  His two oldest children, Emma 16 and Edgar 13, worked in a cotton mill.  Royall applied for a pension in 1880 and his widow applied in 1882.

Vernon P. Ruggles enlisted at 35 from Farmington in Company D, 19th Maine Infantry, on August 13, 1863, and was discharged for disability on May 1, 1864.

Franklin P. Russell  was listed as a substitute for Abner Toothaker, Rangeley's wealthiest property owner.  He is said to have enlisted on August 5, 1863 but no record of service has been found.

Isaac Butterfield Russell was born on June 12, 1842, the son of James and Mary (Butterfield) Russell.  He lived with his parents in Farmington in 1850 and Temple in 1860.  He enlisted from Farmington as a Corporal in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 25, 1863.  He married Mrs. Nancy (McIntosh) Mitchell on November 24, 1868.  In 1870 he was a carriage maker and he and his wife lived in Avon.  He died on April 29, 1908, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

Isaac J. Russell was the son of Thomas Russell and lived with his father in Farmington in 1850.  He enlisted at 28 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He was listed in Lewiston on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Luther Russell was the son of Luther and Mary Russell of Phillips.  He lived there with his parents in 1850 and with his brother Ephraim in 1860.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and deserted on April 26, 1862.  He later reported that he "left the regiment to avoid giving testimony in a court martial" and that he was "relieved by order of the War Department in 1868".  He also stated  that as Lewis Greene he served from February 10, 1865, to February 10, 1866, in Company H, 7th Vermont Infantry.  In  1870, he was a farm laborer and lived in Victoria, Illinois, with his brother.  In 1880 he and his wife Margaret, who was born in Ireland, lived in Evart, Michigan, and he was a grocer.  He was listed in Evart on the 1890 veterans schedule, where the information about his desertion and Vermont service were recorded.

Thomas Russell, 23, enlisted as a substitute for Joel Wilbur of Phillips in Company F, 9th Maine Infantry, on August 3, 1863.  He died of wounds on June 11, 1864.

George D. Sanborn was born in Weld about 1826.  In 1850, he was an attendant at the Maine Insane Hospital in Augusta.  He was married about 1855, and in 1860 he was a carriage driver and lived in Wilton with his wife Lucinda and daughter Clara.  He enlisted from Wilton as a Corporal in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  He was promoted to Sergeant and on January 13, 1863, received a disability discharge.  In 1880 he lived in Malden, Massachusetts with his wife and daughter Maud, and was a hotel keeper at the Howard House.  He was listed in Malden on the 1890 veterans schedule.  In 1900 he and Lucinda and daughter Maud operated a boarding house on Clement Street in Malden.  He applied for a pension in 1903.

Thomas G. Sanborn, son of John and Nancy Sanborn, was born in June, 1839, and lived in Strong with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from there in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was taken prisoner at Chancellorsville, VA, on May 3, 1863.  On June 16, 1864, he received a discharge for disability resulting from being kicked in the back by a horse.  He submitted a pension application on July 16, 1864.  He lived in Strong with his parents in 1870 and with his mother in 1880.   He married about 1883.  He was listed in Strong on the 1890 veterans schedule. and in 1900 he lived there with his wife Genevieve, who was born in New Hampshire.  In 1920 he was widowed and lived in Wilton, one of 12 relatives living with Enoch Bridges.

Nathan F. Sargent was the son of Salmon and Alice Sargent of Madrid.  He was drafted from there at 22 into Company C, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 21, 1864.  He died of disease on June 5, 1865.

Samuel Saunders was born in February, 1843, the son of Joshua and Jane Saunders.  He lived with them in Waterford in 1850 and in West Falmouth in 1860.  He was described as being from Farmington when he enlisted at 19 from Falmouth in Company B, 25th Maine Infantry, on September 29, 1862  He was mustered out on July 10, 1863.  On December 11, he enlisted as a Sergeant in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry.  He was mustered out with the regiment at Barrancas, Florida, on December 6, 1865.  In 1880 he was an engineer on a steamer and lived in Deering with his wife, Clara, and three children.  He was listed in Deering in 1890 and applied for a pension in 1891 or 1892.  In 1900 he and his wife lived at #8 Saunders Street in Portland with four of their children.  Clara applied for a widow's pension in 1907.

Franklin Savage, 22, was drafted from Eustis Plantation into Company G, 11th Maine Infantry, on August 3, 1863.  He deserted on December 15, 1864, returned on February 15, 1865, and was discharged on May 23, 1865.  He married Amelia Ricker about 1866 and in 1870 they lived in Flagstaff with three children.  In 1900 they lived in Bigelow Plantation with their son Leon, his wife Merlin, and several nieces and nephews.  Savage died in 1916 and is buried with his wife,  who died in 1918, in Stratton Upper Cemetery in Eustis.

Isaac M. Savage, son of Isaac and Selima Savage, was born in February, 1841.  He lived in Kingfield with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from there in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1870 he was a bookkeeper and lived in Deering, New Hampshire with his wife, Jennie (also listed as Jane) and their only child, Goff.  They lived in Concord New Hampshire in 1880 and afterward, and Savage applied for a pension from there in 1895.

Philip L. Sawyer was the son of Jabez and Roxana Sawyer and lived with them in Sumner in 1850.  He enlisted at 18 from Avon in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He is probably the man who was  blacksmith and lived in Onawa, Iowa after the war with his wife Mary and their children.

Oscar Searles lived with the family of Samuel and Eleanor Hinkley in Strong in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Strong in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863.  He died in the regimental hospital on November 30, 1864, and is buried at the Barrancas (Florida) National Cemetery (grave 5-0-535).

William Sedgley was born on October 21, 1838, in New Portland, the son of Timothy and Sarah (Burbank) Sedgley.    He enlisted from Chicago on May 31, 1862, in Company D, 67th Illinois Infantry, and was mustered out on September 27, 1862.  He married Mary Jeanette Rand and they lived in Richland, Indiana, with three children in 1870.  He died on June 3, 1874.

James H. Seely, 21, enlisted from Strong as an artificer in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on November 30, 1861, and deserted on September 19, 1862.

Setiano Seppe, 23, enlisted as a substitute for Roscoe Whitney of Madrid in Company H, 15th Maine Infantry, on January 26, 1865, and was discharged on July 5.

Benjamin Sergeant enlisted at 21 from Avon in Company F, 7th Maine Infantry, on May 16, 1863, and deserted on May 20.

William H. Severy enlisted at 22 from Roxbury in Company F, 30th Maine Infantry, on February 2, 1864.  He was wounded at Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, on April 9 and was discharged because of disability on January 19, 1865.  He applied for a pension on November 6, 1865;  his widow, Lillian, applied in 1911.  He was perhaps the son of Aaron and Ann Severy of Dixfield.

Samuel Sewall was the son of Daniel and Martha Sewall of Farmington and lived with them in 1850.  He enlisted at 40 from Farmington in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was mustered out with the regiment on August 25, 1863.  In 1870 he was a farmer and he, his wife Susan, and his father lived in Farmington.  He and his wife lived there in 1880.  He applied for a pension in March, 1888.  Susan  applied for a pension as a widow in August, 1889, and was listed as his widow in Farmington on the 1890 veterans schedule.

George J. Sharp, 36, was drafted from Wilton into Company I, 3rd Maine Infantry, on August 15, 1863.  He transferred to the 17th Maine Infantry on June 28, 1864, and to Company H, 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, on August 15.  He was absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on September 1, 1866.

William Shattuck was the son of Lovell and Sarah Shattuck of Solon.  He enlisted at 21 from Solon (also listed as Salem) in Company D, 14th Maine Infantry on March 26, 1862, and was discharged on April 8, 1865.  In 1870 he was a blacksmith and lived in Solon with his wife Addie and a daughter.

Sylvan Green Shurtleff was born in December, 1837, the son of Sylvan and Lois  Shurtleff of Livermore.  In 1860 he lived with his parents and was a high school teacher.  He enlisted from Livermore as a Corporal in Company C, 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 1, 1864, and was promoted to Sergeant that year and to 2nd Lieutenant early in 1865.  He was wounded at Fort Gregg, VA, on April 2, 1865.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant that year and was mustered out on January 18, 1866.  He married about 1870 and was a farmer in Livermore after the war.  He and his wife Alferetta had three sons, Percy, Herbert and Cecil.  Shurtleff died on January 1, 1926, and is buried with his wife in the Twin Bridges Cemetery in Livermore.

William J. Silver was born in New York in February, 1838.  In 1860 he was a farm laborer and lived with the family of Henry Perry in Letter E Plantation.  He enlisted from Madrid in  Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863. In 1870 he was a sail maker and lived in East Boston, Massachusetts, with his wife Agnes, who was born in Nova Scotia, and three children.  They lived in Melrose, Massachusetts in 1880 and 1900.  He submitted a pension application in 1904 and died in Melrose on  January 1, 1919.  His widow Agnes applied later that month from Massachusetts.

Harvey S. Simmons served in the Navy and died on August 26, 1864 at the age of 27 on the USS J.S. Chambers.   He is buried in the Village Cemetery, Strong, with Alonzo Simmons, who probably was his father.

Aaron A. Simonds, 20, enlisted from Byron in Company K, 10th Maine Infantry, on October 4, 1861.  He was taken prisoner at Manassas, VA, and exchanged in 1862.  He was mustered out on May 7, 1863, and submitted a pension application from Massachusetts in November, 1890.

John Simons, 42, enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 7th Maine Infantry, on August 22, 1861.  His discharge date is uncertain.

Charles M. Skeetup (also spelled Skutup) was the son of Justus and Charity Skeetup and lived with them in Wilton in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from there in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861, and died at Augusta on February 2, 1862.

Justus Skeetup (also spelled Skeetop and Skutup) was born November 6, 1821 - his birthplace is listed as Temple on the 1860 Census while the Ne-Do-Ba Abenaki site says that he was born in Washington Plantation, the son of Mathias and Polly (Danforth) Skeetup, and may have been of Wampanoag descent.  He lived in Wilton with his wife Charity (Hardy) and two children in 1850 and in Wilton with his wife and seven children in 1860.  He enlisted at 43 from Wilton in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was listed as dying on July 30, 1865.  He probably died earlier than that - J. Adams, Guardian, submitted a pension application for a dependent minor on either January or July 21, 1865.

Charles C. Skillings was the son of John and Betsey (Pepper) Skillings.  He enlisted at 22 from Dead River as a Corporal in Company B, 7th Maine Infantry, on August 21, 1861.  He died of acute pneumonia in the hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, on November 1, 1862.

Charles S. Sleeper was born in August, 1823,  the son of James and Mary Sleeper.  He lived with them in Winthrop in 1860.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was discharged for disability on June 13, 1865.  In 1880 he and his wife Ellen lived in Franklin, New Hampshire, with five children.  He was listed in Franklin on the 1890 veterans schedule.  In 1900 he was a widower and lived with his daughter Fannie and her husband Calvin Glidden in Alton, New Hampshire.

Charles C. Small was the son of Jeremiah and Mary Small of Wilton.  He enlisted from Wilton at 23 as a Sergeant in Company I, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and transferred to Company C later that year.  He drowned on August 16, 1863. 

Charles R. Small enlisted at 22 from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He applied for a pension in November, 1875, and was listed in Parkman on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Daniel Small, the fourth son of James and Elvira Small, lived with his parents in Letter E in 1860.  He enlisted as a substitute for Orrin Hinkley of Madrid in Company E, 15th Maine Infantry, on March 13, 1865, shortly before the end of the war.  He was listed as absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on July 15, 1866.  His gravestone in the Madrid Village Cemetery states that he died in New York on November 13, 1865.

Joseph P. Small, the oldest son of James and Elvira Small of Letter E, was born about 1838.  He lived with his parents in Letter E in 1860 but also owned his own farm.  He enlisted from Letter E in Company K, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 21, 1861.  He died in October, 1862, "in Florida" and is buried in the Madrid Village Cemetery.

Joshua W. Small enlisted from Upton at 20 in Company D, 10th Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1862.  He transferred to Company D, 29th Maine Infantry on May 31, 1864, and was discharged on April 3, 1865.  He married Sarah Scribner and had two children.

William H. H. Small, the second son of James and Elvira Small, was born on June 28, 1840, and lived with his parents in Letter E in 1860.  He was drafted from Lewiston into Company B, 19th Maine Infantry, on July 15, 1863.  The 19th Maine was organized at Bath in August, 1862, and was attached to the Army of the Potomac.  In was engaged in battles including Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Cold Harbor and the siege of Petersburg.  The regiment marched in the Grand Review in Washington on May 23, 1865, and was discharged on June 7.  During its service, the 19th Maine lost 192 men killed or mortally wounded in battle and 184 to disease.  William Small was wounded in the right leg on October 14, 1863, at Bristol Station, Virginia.  He was wounded again at the Battle of the Wilderness on May 6, 1864, and was promoted to Corporal sometime that year.  On December 15, 1864, he transferred to the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, and he was mustered out with that unit on September 1, 1865.  He applied for a pension in January, 1866.  He was married to Mary Ellen Dolbier and lived in Madrid and Kingfield.  He died in Kingfield on May 7, 1914, and he and his wife are buried in the Sunnyside Cemetery there.

William H. Small, son of Edward and Betsey Small, was born in 1844 and enlisted from Jay in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1, and received a disability discharge on June 16, 1865.  In 1870 he was a tanner and lived in Sandy Creek, New York.  He married about 1882 and was in Jay on the 1890 veterans schedule.  In 1900 he was a tanner and lived in North Jay with his wife Ester (born in New York) and their four surviving children (three other children had died)  Small died on October 16, 1919, and is buried in the North Jay Cemetery.

Ozem Smart (also spelled Ozam) was the son of Josiah and Julia Smart.  He lived with his parents in Gardiner in 1850 and Farmington Falls in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Farmington in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on October 4, 1864, and was mustered out on June 17, 1865.  In 1870 he lived in Farmington with his parents and worked in a steam mill.  In 1880 he lived in Farmington with his wife, Emma.  He applied for a pension in September, 1893.  In 1900 he was a widower, worked as a hostler, and boarded with Amanda Stratton in Farmington.  

Abraham H. Smith, a 42 year-old farmer from Farmington, enlisted in Company H, 47th Massachusetts Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  He deserted from Camp Banks, New York, on December 17.  It seems likely that he was the son of William and Hannah Smith of Farmington Falls.  He was a wire worker and lived in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1850 and also with his wife Ann and daughter Isabel in 1860.  He was in New Vineyard (Strong post office) with his mother in 1870 and in Worcester again in 1880.

Charles A. Smith was the son of Curtis and Sarah Smith of Phillips and a brother of Leroy.  He enlisted at 18 from Phillips in Battery 5, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 19, 1864, and was mustered out on July 6, 1865.  He lived in Phillips with his parents in 1870 and with his mother, wife Clara and son Barney in 1880.  He was in Phillips on the 1890 veterans schedule and died on January 19, 1896.  He is buried in the Field Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife.

Charles Freeman Smith, son of Columbus and Susannah Smith, enlisted at 25 from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.   He was promoted to Ordnance Sergeant and was  mustered out on August 31, 1863.

Charles W. Smith, 21, enlisted from Roxbury, in Company K, 10th Maine Infantry, on October 15, 1861.  He was discharged because of disability in 1862.

David B. Smith, 21, enlisted from Avon in Company K, 10th Maine Infantry, on August 26, 1862.  He was wounded on October 19, 1864, and discharged on May 31, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1884.  His widow, Mariah, applied in July, 1926.  He may be the David B. Smith who lived with the family of Hiram Vining in Avon in 1850 and in Weld in 1860.

Dennis H. Smith was the son of George and Sarah Smith of Farmington Falls, and lived with them in 1860.  He enlisted at 19 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married about 1870 and lived in Farmington with his wife Mary in 1870 and with Mary and their only child Ida May in 1880.  He and Mary were in Farmington in 1910 and he lived there alone, a widower, in 1920.

George A. Smith, a 20 year-old from Phillips, enlisted September 7, 1861, in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, and was discharged on June 3, 1865.

George H. Smith of Farmington enlisted at 20 from Porter in Company C, 29th Maine Infantry, on January 29, 1864, and deserted on July 18, 1865.

George R. Smith was the son of Elijah Smith, Junior, and his wife Josephine.  He enlisted at 21 from Farmington in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861.  He died in Farmington on April 19, 1864, and is listed as being discharged due to disease the following day.

Henry H. Smith, son of Sylvanus and Jerusha, was born in November, 1838.  He enlisted from New Portland as a Corporal  in Company M, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on January 2, 1864.  He was promoted to Sergeant in 1864 and to QuarterMaster Sergeant in 1865.  He was mustered out with the regiment on December 6, 1865, at Barrancas, FL, and died on August 16, 1866.  He is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong.

Jasiel Smith, Jr., 43, enlisted from Wilton in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1, 1864, and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  He applied for a pension in September of that year and his widow, Mary, applied in 1878.

Jonathan Smith of Farmington enlisted at 30 on the quota of Harrington in Company G, 7th Maine Infantry, on October 4, 1862.  He transferred to the 1st Veteran Maine Infantry on August 21, 1864, and was mustered out on June 28, 1865.

Josiah T. Smith enlisted from Monmouth in Company G, 14th Maine Infantry, on January 18, 1862, and was mustered out on January 13, 1865.  He  is probably the Josiah T. Smith who lived with his wife Eliza on the farm of Francis Hall in Monmouth in 1860.  He also may be the Josiah T. Smith who lived in a tavern in Aroostook County in 1870 and who boarded with Olive Hall in Monmouth in 1880.  He died in 1902 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Rangeley.

Kennedy D. Smith was born in Maine about 1833.  In 1860 he was a laborer, and he and his wife Aphadilla and their two sons lived in Salem with the family of Benjamin Heath.  He enlisted from Salem in Company F, 10th Maine  Infantry on October 4, 1861, and was mustered out on May 7, 1863.  On November 13, he enlisted in Company K, 29th Maine Infantry as a substitute for James Goodwin of Farmington.  He  was accidentally wounded in 1864  and was listed as absent on furlough in 1865.  He farmed in Salem after the war.  He died on January 5, 1894, and is buried with his wife in the Stratton Upper Cemetery in Eustis.

Leroy A. Smith, son of Curtis and Sarah Smith, was born on November 6, 1839.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1860.  He enlisted from there as a Sergeant in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was mustered out with the regiment at Barrancas, Florida, on December 6, 1865.  He married Mary Ella Morrison, daughter of James and Mary Morrison of Phillips, and in 1870 they and their two children lived in Rangeley, where he had a farm valued at $350.  In 1880, he was a blacksmith in Rangeley.  He applied for a pension in 1890 and died on January 6, 1897.  His widow applied for a pension in April, 1897.  She died in 1916 and is buried with her husband and daughter in Evergreen Cemetery in Rangeley.

Morrill P. Smith, 37, enlisted from Wilton as a 1st Lieutenant in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861, and was discharged for disability on October 14, 1864.  He applied for a pension in 1865;  his widow, Susan R., applied from Massachusetts (date illegible).  Possibly the Morrill Parker Smith born December 28, 1825, in Dracut, Massachusetts.

Reuel Smith, 21, enlisted from Avon in Company K, 8th Maine Infantry, on October 1, 1862, and was killed at Ware Bottom Church, VA, on May 20, 1864.  He was probably the son of John and Sylvina Smith who lived in Fayette in 1860.  His mother applied for a pension based on his service, date illegible.

Samuel B. Smith, 40, enlisted from Farmington as a Corporal in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864, and served for 8 months.  Possibly the pauper who lived in Chesterville in 1860 with his wife Lucinda and three children.

Stephen F. Smith, a 27 year-old Dead River farmer, enlisted on January 28, 1864, in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery.  He died in New Orleans on November 1, 1864.

William R. Smith, 20, enlisted from Farmington as a Sergeant in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 25, 1863.  He was the son of Benjamin and Betsy Smith of Farmington.

Wilson C. Smith was the son of Samuel and Eliza Smith of Farmington.  He enlisted at 21 in Company F, 3rd Maine Infantry, on June 21, 1862.  He and transferred to the 17th Maine on June 28, 1864, 17th Maine Infantry on June 28, 1864, and was mustered out on June 4, 1865.

James Snowman was born in Maine  in December, 1822.  He and his wife Julia lived in Weld, where he was a farmer.  In 1860 they had six children living with them.  Snowman enlisted from Weld on August 18, 1862, as a Sergeant in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry.  He was mustered out on June 4, 1865.  In 1870 he and Julia lived in Weld with two of their children.  In 1880 he and Lydia, his second wife, lived in Rangeley with his son and five boarders.  He was listed in Rangeley on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he stated that he had been wounded in the hip.  In 1900 he was a widower and lived alone in Rangeley.  He died in 1905 and is buried in the Robertson Cemetery, Weld, with two wives and four children.

Joel S. Soper was born on October 20, 1845, the son of Orren and Dorothy (Spaulding) Soper.  He enlisted from Freeman in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was wounded in the thigh at Fredericksburg, Virginia, on December 13, 1862.  The leg was amputated but he died of the wound on December 26.  He is buried in the Freeman Ridge Cemetery in Freeman.

Augustus Soule, the oldest son of George and Sarah Soule, was born in 1845, and lived with his parents in Rangeley Plantation in 1860.  He enlisted with his father in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry on December 11, 1863, and  died of disease on May 19, 1864, in Greenville, Louisiana.  He is buried with his parents in Evergreen Cemetery, Rangeley.  His mother applied for a pension based on his service in August, 1869.

George Soule, the son of Samuel and Betsy (Dwelly) Soule, was born on April 6, 1818.  He married Sarah Doyen in Madrid on July 21, 1841, and in 1850 they lived in Sandy River Plantation with their three children.  At that time, Soule described himself as a hunter,  and he listed no real estate or other property.  In 1860 he was a farm worker in Rangeley Plantation with nine children and assets valued at $250.  He and his son enlisted from Rangeley in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, when he was 45 years old.  This regiment served in Louisiana and Florida for nearly two years.  During its service, 10 soldiers were killed or mortally wounded in battle and 334 men died of disease, the largest percentage loss to disease of any Union mounted regiment.  George Soule was mustered out with the regiment at Barrancas, Florida, on December 6, 1865.  Soule worked as a guide in Rangeley after the war.  In 1868 he built Camp Henry, a fishing camp, on Rangeley Lake near Oquossoc.  In 1870, he and his wife and three children lived in Rangeley.  He described himself as a fishermen's guide and reported owning no assets.  In 1874 he opened another camp at Haines Landing, a forerunner of the Mooselookmeguntic House.  He sold the Camp Henry property in 1878 and the Mountain View House, which he and his wife managed, was built on the site.  He also established a buckboard service between the lakes along the present Carry Road.  In 1880 Soule and his wife lived in Rangeley with three of their sons, and he described himself as a hotel proprietor.  He died on August 20, 1882, and is buried with his wife in Evergreen Cemetery in Rangeley.

John O. Soule was the son of Benjamin and Celia Soule who lived in Turner in 1850 and Phillips in 1860.  He enlisted from Phillips at 18 in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was listed as hospitalized in Mound City, Illinois on August 13, 1863, and was absent when the regiment was mustered out on August 31.  He married about 1874, and in 1880 he was a farmer and lived in Oakfield with his wife Maria and son Perley.  He applied for a pension in 1885.  He was listed in Patten on the 1890 veterans schedule, where it was noted that he had received a head wound and was "now mentally defective".  In 1900 he lived alone in Oakfield next to Benjamin Soule, probably his brother.  He married Amanda Stickney in Buxton on November 19, 1910, and they lived in Buxton in 1920.  Amanda applied for a widow's pension in September, 1925.

Reuel W. Soule was the son of William Soule, a "Christian clergyman", and his wife Rebecca.  The family lived in Weld in 1850.  Soule enlisted at 21 from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was promoted to Sergeant in November and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married about 1864 and in 1880 he was a boarding house operator and lived in Redfield with his wife Mary and sons Ulysses and Arthur.  He applied for a pension in 1886.  In 1900 he and his wife lived in Augusta.  Mary applied for a widow's pension in May, 1908.

Hiram B. Spencer was the son of James and Clarissa Spencer of Anson, and was married to Emily Niles of Freeman.  According to one source, he enlisted from Salem, Massachusetts, in Company H, 1st Massachusetts Cavalry, on September 25, 1861, and was discharged on November 11, 1864.  He and his wife and  children lived in New Vineyard after the war.  Emily died in 1889 and he died in 1895.  They are buried in the Burbank/Nile Cemetery in Freeman.

Hiram Sprague was a farmer and lived in Phillips with his wife Ann and their four children in 1850.  He was drafted at 44 from Madrid into Company C, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 20, 1864.  He died of disease on June 13, 1865.  There is a stone for him in the Madrid Village Cemetery but he is not buried there.

Theodore S. Sprague was the son of Samuel and Julia Sprague of Chesterville.  He enlisted at 19 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was discharged for disability on December 30.  On December 11, 1863, he enlisted in Company C, 2nd Maine Cavalry.  He died at Barrancas, Florida, on September 7, 1864, and is buried in the Barrancas National Cemetery (plot 5-0-427).

Miles Standish was born on May 18, 1844, in Mexico, Maine, the son of Ellis and Celia Standish who were in Flagstaff in 1850 and Eustis Plantation in 1860.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 7, 1864, and was mustered out on June 17 , 1865.  According to one source, he was married three times:  to Abbie Bemis, Clara Crittenden and Mary Arnold.  In 1870 he was a farmer and lived in Flagstaff with Abbie.  In 1880 he was a carpenter and boarded in Dodge Township north of the Arkansas River in Kansas.  He submitted a pension application from Kansas in 1897.  He married about 1897 and in 1910 he lived in Colorado Springs with his wife Mary, who was born in Connecticut.  They lived on North Kiowa Street in Colorado Springs, Colorado,  in 1920.  He died in Colorado Springs on January 26, 1922.

Gustavus A. Stanley was the son of Samuel and Phebe Stanley of Farmington.  He lived with them in 1850.  In 1860 he was a lawyer and lived in Chicago.  He was commissioned from Farmington as a Captain in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out with the regiment on August 31, 1863.  He enlisted from Farmington as a Captain in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.  He died in Pensacola, Florida, on January 16, 1884.

Isaac N. Stanley was born in October, 1841, the son of Solomon and Apphia Stanley of Kingfield.  He enlisted from there in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was promoted to Corporal  in November and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He was a farmer and lived in Kingfield after the war with his wife Minerva and their children.  He applied for a pension in 1880 and died on May 4, 1910.  He is buried with his wife in Sunnyside Cemetery, Kingfield.

James A. Stanley was the son of Samuel and Phebe Stanley of Farmington and a brother of Gustavus.  He was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He transferred to Company C, 31st Maine Infantry, in December and was discharged due to disease on January 1, 1865.  He applied for a pension on November 21, 1884.

Alvah H. Staples was born on December 29, 1844, the son of Alvah and Lydia (Burbank) Staples of Freeman.  He was living in Nashua, NH, when he enlisted in Company H, 4th Maine Infantry, on November 9, 1861. He received a disability discharge on December 7, 1862.  After the war he went west and was killed by Indians in Montana in September, 1867.

George Staples, 36, enlisted from Phillips in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on March 22, 1865, and was mustered out on August 28, 1865.

Hiram Staples was born on March 27, 1841, the son of Alvah and Lydia (Burbank) Staples of Freeman.  He was employed as a mechanic in East Douglas, MA, when he enlisted in Company A, 25th Massachusetts Infantry on September 14, 1861.  He was transferred to the U.S. Signal Corps on November 22, 1863.  He lived in Battle Creek, Michigan, with his wife Louise, who was born in Kentucky, in 1880 and 1900.  He died on November 28, 1904, in Battle Creek.

Hiram Staples, 19, enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 13, 1863.  On September 19, 1864, he enlisted in Battery 5, 1st Maine Light Artillery, and was discharged on July 6, 1865.  In 1880 he lived in Renovo, Pennsylvania with his wife, Olive, her parents and their son.  He applied for a pension in 1888 from Dakota and was in Richland County, North Dakota, on the 1890 veterans schedule.  In 1900, he was in Renovo again with his wife and their four surviving children.  She applied for a widow's pension in April, 1901, from Pennsylvania.

Jotham S. Staples, 39, enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 13, 1863.  He applied for a pension in 1893 from Maine.  His widow, Avilda, applied from Nebraska in 1908.

Isaac  S. Starbird, son of Moses and Sarah (Dolbier) Starbird, was born on February 18, 1840.  The family was in Freeman in 1850 and Palmyra in 1860.  He enlisted from Freeman on November 1, 1861, in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1862 and reduced to Private in July, 1863.  He was mustered out on November 25, 1864.  One source states that he died of wounds in 1864, but he applied for a pension in 1883.

Albert G. Starr enlisted at 28 from Wilton in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.

Alonzo Stephens of Farmington enlisted at 26 on the quota of Temple in Company H, 29th Maine Infantry.  He was mustered in as a Corporal on December 16, 1863;  was promoted to Sergeant in 1864;  and was discharged on May 21, 1866.

Gilbert Stetson was a farmer and lived in Phillips with his wife Nancy and their children in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted at 43 from Phillips in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and died on August 7, 1864, in New Orleans.

Jesse F. Stetson was the son of Jacob and Phebe Stetson and lived with them in Embden in 1850.  In 1860 he was a farm laborer and lived with the family of Ward Spooner in New Portland.  He enlisted at 24 from Kingfield in Battery 4, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 22, 1863, and died on June 30, 1864.

Calvin D. Stevens lived in Phillips with the family of Ezra Hampton in 1850.  He enlisted at 20 from Phillips on September 7, 1861, in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, and died on May 12, when the regiment was at Beaufort, SC.

Charles Stevens, 24, enlisted from Eustis Plantation in Company F, 8th Maine Infantry, on August 21, 1864, and was discharged on June 11, 1865.

Cyrus L. Stevens, son of Joseph and Roxana (Austin) Stevens, was born in Strong on December 28, 1841.  He enlisted from Freeman in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and was discharged on June 15, 1865.  He married Mary Jane Welch of Freeman in 1865 and was a farmer.  He died on February 4, 1909, and is buried with his wife in the West Freeman Cemetery.

David T. Stevens, son of Joseph and Roxana (Austin) Stevens, was born in May, 1840.  He enlisted from Strong in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, and died of wounds on June 26 at Hampton, VA.  He is buried in the Stevens Cemetery in Strong.

James Stevens, 24, enlisted on January 31, 1865, in Company C, 15th Maine Infantry as a substitute for Nathaniel Beal of Phillips.  He was absent, serving a sentence by General Court Martial, when the regiment was mustered out on July 5, 1866.

Jeremiah Cogwell Stevens was born on January 19, 1813, probably in Topsham, the son of Caleb and Sarah (Thomas) Stevens.  In 1850 he was an unmarried farmer living next to his parents in Township 1, Range 4 (Bingham Purchase).  He married Sophronia Williamson, who died in 1862 at the age of 38.  He gave his residence as Sidney when he enlisted in Company A, 20th Maine Infantry, on August 29, 1862.  He was mustered out on May 15, 1865.  He married Mrs. Lydia Whittier after the war.  In 1870 he was a farmer living alone in New Portland.  He is buried in the West New Portland Cemetery with his first wife.  His gravestone says that he died on April 3, 1880, at the age of 67, but he was listed in Madison on the 1890 veterans schedule.

John Stevens, 30, enlisted from Phillips in the 3rd Maine Infantry and transferred to Company H, 17th Maine Infantry, on September 26, 1862.  He was discharged on May 18, 1865.

Belcher Stoyell Stewart  was born on November 27, 1834, the son of John and Abby (Ridgway) Stewart.  He lived in Farmington with his parents in 1860.  He married Amanda Malvina Hayford on July 1, 1861.  He and enlisted from Salem in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and was discharged on February 14, 1863.  He applied for a pension in 1864.  In 1870 he and his wife lived in Farmington and he was a farmer.  He died on October 10, 1870.  Amanda applied for a pension in 1872.

Joseph R. Stewart was born in 1844, the son of Charles and Sarah (Howland) Stewart. In 1860 he was a farm laborer and lived with his widowed father and four younger siblings in Dallas Plantation.  He was drafted from there into Company D, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 20, 1864.  Stewart married Martha Jenkins in 1866.  In 1870 he was a shingle maker in Dallas, where he owned real estate valued at $50 as well as $150 in personal assets.  In 1880 he lived in Dallas with only his two year-old daughter, Emily.  He was listed in Avon on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he complained of "rupture and rheumatism."  Joseph Stewart died in 1896, and he and his wife are buried in the Wilbur Cemetery in Rangeley.

John H. Stickney was born in March, 1842, the son of William Stickney and his wife Clarissa, and the twin brother of William P.  He enlisted from Phillips on August 14, 1862, in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry.  He was discharged on June 5, 1865.  He and his wife Anna moved to Minnesota sometime between the time their daughter Cora was born in 1868 in Maine and their son William H. was born in 1869 in Minnesota.  In 1870 Stickney was a farmer and lived in Belle Plaine, Minnesota, with his wife and two children.  Another daughter, Hattie, who died in September, 1866 at the age of 9 days, is buried in the Weld Road Cemetery in Phillips.

William Stickney was born in Maine in November, 1809, and was the father of John H. and William P. Stickney.  He and his wife Clarissa and their children lived in Chesterville in 1850 and in Phillips in 1860. He gave his age as 44 when he enlisted from Phillips in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861.  He received a disability discharge on July 17, 1862, and applied for a pension in 1864.  He and his wife lived in Chesterville after the war.  Clarissa died in 1890 and he married again soon after.  He and his second wife Julia lived in Chesterville in 1900.  He died on June 27, 1903, and is buried in the Webster Cemetery, Farmington, with Clarissa.

William P. Stickney was born in March, 1842, the son of William Stickney and twin brother of John.  He 19, enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 22, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 1, 1864, was  promoted to Corporal in 1864, and was mustered out on July 13, 1865.  His first wife, Abbie, died in 1867 and is buried in the Weld Road Cemetery in Phillips.  He married again about 1869, and he and his wife Florence Levina were in Minnesota by 1876, when their daughter Flora was born.  In 1880 he was a carpenter and he and his wife lived in Minneapolis.  He submitted a pension application from Dakota in 1888 and was listed in Bath, South Dakota, on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He and his wife lived in Bath, South Dakota, in 1900 and 1910.  Levina applied for a widow's pension from South Dakota in 1929.  

Merritt W. Stiles, 21, enlisted from Roxbury in Company K, 10th Maine Infantry, on October 15, 1861, and was discharged because of disability on January 10, 1863.  He applied for a pension in 1884 and was listed in Westbrook on the 1890 veterans schedule.  His widow, Annie, applied for a pension in 1910.

Charles A. Stinchfield, 21, enlisted from Strong as a 1st Sergeant in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He died of disease on April 21, 1863.  He was probably the son of Jacob and Jane (Whitney) Stinchfield of Salem and Strong.

Frank H. Stinchfield, 18, enlisted from Farmington in Company B, 11th Maine Infantry, on November 8, 1861.  He transferred to Company G in September, 1862, and re-enlisted in January, 1864.  A local history states that he deserted on November 20, 1865, but the record lists him as absent, sick, in 1864 and mustered out on February 2, 1866.  He is probably the farm laborer aged 16 who lived in Farmington with the family of Benjamin Watson in 1860.

William Stinchfield, 22, enlisted from Farmington in Company G, 13th Maine Infantry, on February 17, 1862.  He transferred to the 30th Maine Infantry on January 1, 1865, and was discharged on February 17.  On the 1890 veterans schedule, he was a prisoner at the Cumberland County Jail in Portland.

Cornelius D. Stockbridge was the son of Edward and Sylvia Stockbridge and lived with them in Dixfield in 1850.  The service record is confusing.  He enlisted at 28 from Dixfield in Company K, 1st Maine Infantry on  May 3, 1861, and was mustered out on August 5.  On August 9, 1862, he enlisted again and with subsequent transfers is listed as serving in Companies A and K of the 10th Maine Infantry and in Companies A and F of the 29th Maine Infantry, with residences listed as Weld, Portland and Byron.  He was listed as absent, sick, in 1864, and was discharged on May 22, 1865.  His widow, by then Mary Rollins, was listed in Weld on the 1890 veterans schedule.  The schedule listed only his service in the 1st Maine but noted that he had been transferred twice.

Samuel F. Stoddard, Jr., of Farmington, enlisted in the band of the 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on November 1, 1862.  He enlisted on December 11, 1863, as a Sergeant in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, and was wounded at Mariana, Florida.  He transferred as a 1st Lieutenant to Company D, Coast Guards Infantry, on January 9, 1865.  He applied for a pension in December, 1865, listing only service in the cavalry.  He died in Minnesota on December 16, 1875.

Charles W. Stowers was the son of John Stowers, Jr., of Farmington.  He enlisted from Farmington in Company D, 15th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861, and died in New Orleans on August 17, 1862.  His father later submitted an application for a pension based on his service.

George W. Stoyell was the son of Aaron and Delfreday (Elfreda) Stoyell.  The family was in Farmington in 1860.  He enlisted from there in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on September 30, 1864, and was discharged on August 29, 1865.

William H. Stoyell was the son of Aaron Stoyell and a brother of George.  He enlisted at 24 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out with the regiment on August 31, 1863.  In 1910 he was a resident of the Veterans Home in Napa County, California.

Augustus G. Streeter was the son of William and Hannah Streeter of Strong, and lived with them in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted at 23 on the quota of Auburn in Company D, 29th Maine Infantry, on January 20, 1865, and was discharged on February 3, 1866.  In 1880 he lived in Strong with his wife Hannah, his son Willliam and his wife's mother Nancy Worth.  He listed his residence as Fairbanks on the 1890 veterans schedule, and he and his wife and son lived in Farmington in 1900.  He died on October 8, 1906, and is buried in the Gay Cemetery, Farmington, with his wife, who died in 1912.

Abraham B. Swain was the son of Asahel and Mehitable Swain, and lived with them in New Vineyard in 1850 and Avon in 1860.  He enlisted at 21 from Farmington in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was discharged due to disability on March 1, 1863.  In 1870 he was a miller and lived in Hanover with his wife Ellen (probably Ellen Chandler).  He may have been in Manchester, Wisconsin, in 1880.  In 1890 he lived in Arlington, South Dakota.  His widow, Abbie, submitted a pension application in 1904 from South Dakota;  the application was challenged from Maine by Ellen.

Alanson F. Sweet was the son of Alanson and Ruby Sweet of Avon and grandson of Timothy and Mercy.  He lived with his parents in Avon in 1850 and in Strong with his widowed mother in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Strong in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.

Samuel H. Sweet was the son of Loring and Elizabeth Sweet of Farmington.  He enlisted from there at 27 in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on October 1, 1862.  He died at Hilton Head, South Carolina, on November 12, 1863.

Timothy Sweet (Timothy Sweat on the service record) was the son of Alanson and Ruby and a brother of Alanson.  He lived in Avon with his parents in 1850, and he and his grandmother lived there with the family of Jesse Sprague in 1860.  He enlisted from Strong at 25 in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on November 30, 1861, and was discharged on June 19, 1862.  In 1870 he and his wife Eliza lived in Avon with their sons Fred and Willie.  He listed his residence as Strong on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Alonzo Sweetland was the son of Seth and Mary Sweetland.  He lived with his parents in Hallowell in 1850 and with his father and brothers in Farmingdale (Gardiner post office) in 1860.  He enlisted at 27 from Farmington in Battery 5, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 4, 1861, and was discharged because of disability on December 29, 1862.  He applied for a pension in 1864.  In 1870 he was a railroad engineer and lived in San Francisco with his sister Arabella and her husband Daniel.  In 1880 he was a carpenter and lived in Yakima, Washington.  In 1900 he described himself as a pensioner and lived in Lake County, California with Arabella, who was a widow.

David F. Tarr was probably the son of David D. and Lucinda Tarr who were in Kingfield in 1850, though the enrollment age of 29 is a better fit with David Tarr of Lewiston.  David F. Tarr was 29 when he was drafted from Kingfield.  He served as a Corporal in Company D, 8th Maine Infantry, from October 9, 1863, until he was mustered out on January 18, 1866.  He lived in North Anson with his wife Hannah after the war and died in April, 1890.  Hannah is listed as his widow on the 1890 veterans schedule and applied for a pension in May, 1890.

Hiram F. Tarr was born about 1835, the son of Mark and Sophronia Tarr of Carmel, Penobscot County.  In 1860 he lived with his parents and was a teamster.  He enlisted from Salem in Company K, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 13, 1863.  He was wounded in 1864 and lost his left arm.  He was discharged in December, 1864.  In 1870 he and his wife Abbie and their two daughters lived in Carmel, where he was a farmer.  He lived there in 1890.

Abel W. Taylor, Jr.,  was the son of Abel and Naomi Taylor of Roxbury.  He enlisted from there at 18 in Company C, 32nd Maine Infantry, on March 23, 1864.  He died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on April 25.  His mother applied for a pension in May, 1872.

Abraham T. Taylor was born on September 9, 1832, possibly the son of Richard Taylor of New Vineyard and Freeman.  In 1860 he was a farmer and lived in Strong with the family of Thomas Kennedy. He enlisted from Strong in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He was admitted to an insane asylum on July 9, 1863, and was mustered out on September 16, 1864.  He married Mary Brooks of Salem and they lived in Freeman in 1870.  His wife died in 1879.  He applied for a pension in November, 1883, and was listed in Freeman on the 1890 veterans schedule, where "insanity" is noted.  In 1890 and he lived in Freeman with his son Marshall and a "helper".  He was found to be insane in 1897 and Orren Brackley was appointed his guardian.  He died on September 12, 1909, and is buried in the West Freeman Cemetery with his wife.

Alfred Taylor was probably the son of Isaiah and Margaret Taylor of Kingfield.  He enlisted year-old from Eustis at 21 on August 29, 1862, in Company A, 20th Maine Infantry.  He was wounded at Gettysburg (loss of two fingers) on July 2, 1863, and hospitalized in Philadelphia on July 5.  He transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on March 16, 1864, and applied for a pension in May, 1866.  In 1870 he was a farm laborer and he and his wife Elmira lived with Miles Standish in Eustis Plantation.  In 1880 he was in Flagstaff with wife Nellie and three children, and he was listed in Flagstaff in 1890.  He died on August 19, 1894, aged 53, and buried in the Flagstaff Cemetery, Eustis, with his wife, Nellie, who died in 1904 at 59.

Alpheus B. Taylor, enlisted at 18 from Kingfield in the 1st Maine Light Artillery on March 5, 1864.  One source says that he never joined the regiment.  However, Alpheus B. Taylor applied for a pension in October 1888 citing service in the 1st Battery, 1st Maine Light Artillery, and on the 1890 veterans schedule Alpheus B. Taylor of Monmouth is reported serving (unit illegible) from March to November, 1864, and as having been shot in the leg and a prisoner at Libby Prison for 6 weeks.

Asa M. Taylor was born at Starks on September 8, 1842.  He enlisted from Dead River in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and was discharged on July 15, 1862.  In 1870 he was a farm laborer and lived with the family of Leonard Parsons in Eustis Plantation.  He married Laura Soule about 1874, and in 1880 they lived in Pittsburg, New Hampshire, with two children.  He applied for a pension from New Hampshire in 1881.  In 1900 and 1910 they lived in Mexico, Oxford County, with their children.  Taylor died in Mexico on September 1, 1918.

Constantine H. Taylor, 24, of Farmington was commissioned a 1st Lieutenant in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He was promoted to Captain in 1862; to Major in 1864, and to Lt. Colonel (Brevet) in 1865.  He was mustered out on August 1, 1865, in Petersburg.  He applied for a pension in 1880.

Daniel S. Taylor was the son of Eben and Eunice Taylor of Kingfield and brother of Eben.  He enlisted at 24 from Dead River in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and died on December 9, 1863.

Eben Farrington Taylor, son of Eben and Eunice Taylor and brother of Daniel, enlisted at 21 from Dead River Plantation in Company I, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 16, 1861, and transferred to Company G in 1862.  He died on August 15, 1863, of chronic diarrhea at Ship Island, Mississippi.  His father applied for a pension in 1874.

Howard W. Taylor, 22, was drafted from Byron into Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on July 28, 1863, and died in hospital on October 26.  His widow, Ruhannah, applied for a pension on April 2, 1864.

Rinaldo E. Taylor, 22, enlisted from Roxbury as a Sergeant in Company H, 23rd Maine Infantry, on September 29, 1862, and was mustered out on July 15, 1863.

Rufus Millard Taylor, son of Dennis and Joanna (Walker) Taylor, was born on December 30, 1843.  He lived on his parents' farm in Lexington in 1850, and in 1860 he was a laborer living with his parents in Sandy River.  He enlisted from Lexington in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864 and was promoted to Corporal in 1865.  He was mustered out on January 18, 1866.   Taylor married Laura Gile, daughter of William and Sarah Gile, on March 2, 1868.   He applied for a pension on April 27, 1876, and died on August 17, 1877. His widow applied for a pension on September 2, 1878, and died in 1919.  Taylor and his wife are buried in the Wilbur Cemetery in Rangeley.

William W. Taylor lived in Temple with his wife Irene and five children in 1850.  In 1860 he was a farmer and they lived in Avon.  He enlisted at 43 from Avon in Company K, 8th Maine Infantry, on October 4, 1862, and was discharged on June 11, 1865.  He and his family lived in Avon in 1870 and he was listed in Strong on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died in 1907 and is buried with his wife in the Village Cemetery in Strong.

David S. Thomas was the son of Peter and Mary Thomas, who were in Byron in 1850.  He enlisted at 18 from Byron in Company E, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was taken prisoner at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, and paroled.  He was mustered out with the regiment on June 5, 1865.  He applied for a pension on January 13, 1886.

Fernando M. Thomas was the son of William and Clarinda Thomas of Byron.  He enlisted at 20 from Byron in Company D, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1863;  re-enlisted on January 1, 1864;  transferred to Company C in 1865;  and was mustered out on April 18, 1866.  He and his wife Hattie lived in Byron in 1870.  He applied for a pension on January 19, 1874.  In  1880 he was a boat builder and he and his wife and two sons lived in Andover.  He was listed in Andover on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Isaac Thomas was the son of Eben and Mary Thomas of New Sharon.  His first wife, Minta, died in 1863.  He enlisted at 30 from Farmington in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on March 1, 1865, and was mustered out on April 18, 1866.  He was a farmer in New Sharon after the war and he and his second wife Melvina Elizabeth had several children.  He died in 1917 and is buried with his parents and wife in the Weeks Mills Cemetery in New Sharon.

James A. Thomas, a 26 year-old from Phillips, enlisted in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 27, 1864, and was mustered out on June 15, 1865.  He probably was the son of Freeman and Prudence (Russell) Thomas of Phillips.

Josiah A. Thomas, 23, enlisted from Farmington in Company D, 15th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861, and was mustered out on January 19, 1865.

Orrin W. Thomas (also listed as Oren) was the son of Freeman and Prudence Thomas of Phillips.  He enlisted at 25 from Phillips as a Captain in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was mustered out with the the regiment was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married Evelina Frances Craig and was a farmer in Phillips after the war.

Albert Thompson, 22, enlisted from Farmington in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1862; re-enlisted in December, 1863;  was promoted to Sergeant in 1865;  and was mustered out on August 1, 1865.  He was listed in Farmington (Temple Mills residence) on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he noted that he had received a gunshot wound to the right shoulder.

Andrew J. Thompson was probably the son of Aretus and Jane Thompson of Chesterville in 1850 and Farmington in 1860.  He enlisted from Farmington at 25 in Company F, 10th Maine Infantry, on October 4, 1861, and was mustered out on May 7, 1863.  He and his wife Lizzie and their children lived in Fayette after the war.  She applied for a pension as a widow in 1908.

Andrew J. Thompson was an unmarried eighteen year-old shoemaker in Waldo in 1850.  He married Lucinda Boodry, a daughter of Thomas Boodry, about 1854.  In 1860 they had two children and lived in Rangeley Plantation, where Thompson was a shoemaker and owned real estate valued at $500 as well as $350 in personal assets.  He enlisted from Rangeley in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 10, 1861, and died in New Orleans on December 7, 1862.  His wife died in 1904 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Rangeley.  Memorial stones for Thompson, his wife, and two of their children are at the Nile Cemetery.

Henry A. Thompson was born on February 5, 1835, at Mount Vernon.  He was the son of Preston and Mary Thompson and lived with them in Jackson Plantation in 1850.  In 1860 he was a farmer and lived in Eustis Plantation with his brother Preston and his family.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He was wounded at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863, and was mustered out on November 25, 1864.  He applied for a pension in 1867.  He and his wife Rose lived in Farmington, where he was a grocer and postmaster, in 1870 and 1880.  He was listed in Starks on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He married Mary Collins as his second wife.  He died at Starks on June 27, 1914.  Mary applied for a  pension on behalf of a minor child in 1915 and as a widow in 1916.  Thompson is buried in the Gay Cemetery in Farmington.

Jeremiah Thompson was from Farmington according to one source.  He enlisted at 35 from Presque Isle in Company E, 1st Maine Cavalry, on October 19, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal and to Sergeant, but was reduced to Private in 1864.  He was mustered out on November 25, 1864.   He may be the Jeremiah Thompson, son of Jeremiah and Abigail, who lived in North Anson and Kingfield before the war, died in 1870, and is buried in the East New Portland Cemetery.

Joel Thompson enlisted at 21 from Byron in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 20, 1861.  He died on January 19, 1862.  He may have been the son of Thomas and Hannah Thompson of Carthage.

John Thompson, a 19 year-old from Madrid, enlisted in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 8, 1862.  He was wounded at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863, and was absent when the regiment was mustered out on June 4, 1865.  He was probably the son of Bradford and Susannah (Huntoon) Thompson born March 29, 1843.

John C. Thompson was the son of Jacob and Mary Thompson of Strong.  He enlisted from there at 24 as a Sergeant in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was wounded at Fredericksburg on December 13 and was discharged on June 15, 1863.  On September 26, 1864, he enlisted in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  He died in 1914 and is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong.

Levi Moses Thompson was born on February 5, 1841, in Kingfield, the son of Zaccheus and Cynthia (Phillips) Thompson.  He enlisted from Lewiston in Company A, 29th Maine Infantry, on September 16, 1864, and was mustered out on June 5, 1865.  He married Alma Allura Phillips and farmed in Kingfield.  He applied for a pension in 1890 and is buried in Sunnyside Cemetery in Kingfield.

Otis S. Thompson was the son of Aratus and Jane Thompson of Chesterville and Farmington.  He enlisted at 20 from Farmington in Company E, 5th Maine Infantry, on June 24, 1861, and deserted on July 23.  A note in the record says "worthless".  He married about 1866 and in 1870 he worked in a hoe factory and lived in Auburn with his wife Lizzie and their infant daughter.  The family was in Jay in 1880.  In 1900 Thompson and his wife Lizzie were in Milton, New Hampshire with son Mark, daughter Lizzie and Lizzie's husband John Downs.

Rufus Ramsdell Thompson was born in Kingfield in 1835, the son of John and Mary (Ramsdell) Thompson.  He married Louisa Knapp in 1857.  He enlisted in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and died in Kingfield on medical leave on August 28, 1863.  He is buried in the West Kingfield Burial Ground.  His widow married Henry E. Carville and died in 1897.

Thomas W. Thompson, Jr., 29, enlisted from Byron in Company I, 29th Maine Infantry, on December 31, 1863.  He died of disease on May 17, 1864.  His father applied for a pension based on his service on September 6, 1866.

Warren F. Thompson was probably the son of Daniel and Elizabeth Thompson of Chesterville. He enlisted at 32  from Farmington as  a Sergeant in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in 1861 and to 1st Lieutenant in 1863.  He resigned on February 16, 1864, and died on September 13, 1866.

Charles F. Thurston was born November 12, 1847.  He enlisted at 18 from Monmouth in Company G, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 16, 1864.  He transferred to Company G, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1 and was mustered out on June 27, 1865.  He applied for a pension July 27, 1889.  In 1900 and 1920 he was unmarried and shared a house in Strong with Mirinda Thompson.  He died January 7, 1926 and is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong.

William E. Thwaits, 19, enlisted from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 9, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, and was mustered out on January 18, 1866.  He lived in Salado, Texas, in 1890 and submitted a pension application from Texas in 1896.  His widow, Margaret, applied from New Mexico in 1912.

Benjamin F. Tibbetts was the son of Benjamin and Miriam Tibbetts and lived with them in Industry in 1850.   He enlisted at 20 from Industry as a Sergeant in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863.  He died at Barrancas, Florida, on August 11, 1864.  His mother submitted a pension application in April, 1866.

Hiram H. Tibbetts, a 19 year-old from Madrid, enlisted in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 14, 1861, and was discharged on July 31, 1862.  He may have been the son of James and Rebecca Tibbetts of Litchfield.

John Tibbetts was the son of Benjamin and Hannah Tibbetts and he and his wife Lucinda lived with them in Carmel in 1850.  In 1860 he was a farmer and he and his wife and seven children lived in Avon.  He enlisted at 30 from Avon in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  On September 26, 1864, he enlisted in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  The family was in Avon in 1880 and he applied for a pension in July, 1880.  He was listed in Temple on the 1890 veterans schedule.

John Wesley Tibbetts, son of Ezra and Mary (Hoar) Tibbetts, was born on February 8, 1843.   In 1850, age 7, he lived with Thomas Allen of Rangeley.  In 1860 he was apprenticed to Cyrus Harden of Phillips, and lived with Harden's family.  Tibbetts enlisted from Rangeley in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on August 5, 1861, and was discharged for disability on December 7, 1862. On August 5, 1863, he enlisted again in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, this time as a substitute for Hiram Wheeler of Phillips.   He was mustered out with the regiment on January 18, 1866.  Tibbetts married Narcissus Jennings in Potter Valley, California, on July 18, 1874, and submitted a pension application from California in 1905.  In 1910 he lived in Butte Township, Siskiyou County, California.  He died in Mendicino, California, on February 22, 1923.

William H. Tibbetts, 38, enlisted from Farmington in Company K, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 25, 1862.  He was killed at Cold Harbor, Virginia, on June 3, 1864.

Albert Titcomb was born on March 15, 1823, the son of Stephen and Nancy (Haines) Titcomb.  In 1850 he listed no occupation, owned $2000 in real estate and lived in a hotel in Farmington operated by Samuel Stoddard.  In 1860 he was a farm laborer and lived in Farmington with the family of Jonathan Wright.  He enlisted from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1880 he was a laborer and boarded in Farmington with Betsy Coburn.  In 1900 and 1910 he was a laborer, apparently unmarried, and boarded with John Searles in Farmington.

Lemuel Tobey, 18, enlisted from Farmington in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and died of disease in New Orleans on February 25, 1863.  His mother Dorothy applied for a pension in 1865.  He was probably the man listed as Samuel Tobey, son of the widow Dorothy Tobey, on the 1860 Census for Farmington.

John Todd, 24, enlisted from Farmington as a musician in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He died in New Orleans on May 10, 1863.

Daniel H. Toothaker, son of Nathaniel and Sarah (Hoar) Toothaker, was born about 1841.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted from Phillips  in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married Rhoda Libby on October 13, 1864.  In 1880, they lived in Berwick with their three daughters, and Toothaker was a farmer.  He was listed in Berwick on the 1890 Veteran's Census, and in 1900 they were living there with their daughter, Grace.  Toothaker died on May 11, 1911, and his widow applied for a pension in June.  She died in 1923.

Ephraim Toothaker was born about 1844, the son of George and Eliza Toothaker.  He lived with his parents in Phillips in 1850 and in Strong in 1860.  He enlisted from Windsor, Vermont, in Company H, 1st Vermont Heavy Artillery, on December 7, 1863, and died of disease on August 21, 1864.  He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips with his parents.  His mother applied for a pension in September, 1869.

Ira D. Toothaker was born in Rangeley in 1837, the son of Elijah and Aurilla (Blethen) Toothaker.  He married Nancy Abbott, a daughter of John G. Abbott, on March 15, 1860.   They lived with his parents in Phillips in 1860, and later moved to Aroostook County.  He was drafted from Maysville into Company F, 11th Maine Infantry, on August 15, 1863, and died of wounds on September 21, 1864.  His wife applied for a widow's pension in December, 1864.  She died in April, 1921, in Orlando, Florida.

James R. Towle, a 21 year-old from Strong, enlisted on September 29, 1862, in the 4th Maine Light Artillery Regiment, and was discharged on April 17, 1865.

John T. Towle, 38, enlisted from Wilton in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He was wounded in the back by a shell on July 23.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1, and was discharged by order on May 31, 1865.  He lived in Wayne in 1890.  His widow, Eliza J., applied for a pension in 1899 from Maine.

Josiah Towle was born February 19, 1828, the son of Thomas and Matilda Towle of Enfield.  He was married about 1856, and in 1860 he lived in Enfield with his wife Eliza and three children.  He enlisted from Enfield on January 5, 1864, in Company C, 1st Maine Heavy Artillery.  He and his wife and six children lived in Enfield in 1860.  They were in Easton in 1880 with two daughters and his mother in law Hannah Gray.  They lived in Easton in 1890, when he noted on the veterans schedule that he had been wounded.  In 1900 he and his wife lived in Fourth Plain Precinct, Clark County, Washington, and a Josiah Towle, probably his son, lived nearby.  Towle and his wife lived in Fourth Plain in 1910.  He died in 1911 and is buried in Brush Plain, Washington.  

Elisha Towns was probably the son of Solomon Towns of Kingsbury.  In 1860, he and his wife Theodosia and two children lived in Hallowell, where he was a farm laborer and they operated a boarding house.  He enlisted at 27 from Wilton in Company E, 3rd Maine Infantry, on July 24, 1862, and transferred to Company I, 17th Maine Infantry, on June 28, 1864.  He submitted a pension application in 1866.  They lived in Norridgewock in 1870 and he was listed in Norridgewock on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Reuben A. Towns was the son of Solomon Towns of Kingsbury.  He lived in Hallowell in 1860 in a boarding house operated by Moses Hardy.  He enlisted at 20 from Wilton in Company E, 3rd Maine Infantry, on July 24, 1862.  He was wounded in 1863 and discharged for disability on February 18, 1864.  He applied for a pension in 1865 and his widow, Fannie, applied in 1910.

Charles Henry Townsend was born in 1847, perhaps the son of Josiah and Mary Townsend of Jay.  He enlisted in the 129th Ohio Infantry on July 7, 1863, and was discharged on March 8, 1864.  On May 2, 1864, he enlisted in Company C, 141st Ohio Infantry, and was mustered out at Gallipolis, Ohio, on September 3.  On October 10, he enlisted as a substitute in Company A, 65th Ohio Infantry, and was discharged on October 18, 1865.  He died on November 28, 1920, and is buried in the Flagstaff Cemetery in Eustis.

Nathan M. Townsend was the son of Josiah and Mary Townsend of Jay.  He enlisted from Jay in Company K, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He lived in Jay with his wife Abby in 1870 and lived there alone in 1880.  He died after 1890 and is buried in the North Jay Cemetery.

William A. Tracy, a 34 year-old Wilton resident, was drafted into Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on July 15, 1863.  He transferred to the 20th Maine Infantry on December 15, 1864.  He married Edna Huff, and in 1870 they lived in Wilton with two children.  He died on September 10, 1907, and is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1901.

Mark Trafton, 21, enlisted from Roxbury in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He re-enlisted on December 28, 1863, and deserted on April 4, 1864.  One source indicates that he also served in the 26th Massachusetts Infantry, so he may have been the Marian Bunker, aka Marcus T. Baker, aka Mark Trafton who applied for a pension from California in 1880.

Abraham B. Treferthen, 25, enlisted from Wilton in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was hospitalized at Alexandria, VA, in 1862 and was discharged on December 20.

William Trollop, 41, enlisted as a substitute for Josiah Greene of Farmington in Company E, 19th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1863.  He was wounded at the Wilderness on May 6, 1864, and transferred to Company E, 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, on December 15.  He was absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on September 1, 1866.

Dexter W. True, son of John and Martha True of Livermore, was a painter's apprentice and lived in Worcester, Massachusetts, with Arvied Cushman, a painter, in 1860.  He enlisted at 23 from Turner in Company I, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 22, 1863.  He was promoted to Corporal and to Sergeant in 1865 and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.  His wife, Celestia, died in 1869 at 23.  In 1870 he was a painter and he and his wife (?) Clara lived in Turner with two children.  He he died on November 23, 1876.  He is buried with Celestia in the Twin Bridges Cemetery in Livermore.  A pension application on behalf of a minor child was submitted in 1890.

Emmons T. True was born on October 21, 1837, the son of Amos and Elizabeth (Carver) True of Freeman.  He was employed as a watchman in Lowell, MA, when he enlisted in Company A, 2nd Massachusetts Infantry, on August 7, 1862.  He was mustered out on May 23, 1864.  In 1873 he married Nellie Heath of Worcester, Massachusetts, in Farmington.  He died in 1874 and is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong.

James D. S. True, a 20 year-old from Strong, enlisted as a substitute for Fuller Putnam of Freeman in Company G, 11th Maine Infantry, on July 29, 1863.  He died of disease on June 9, 1864.  His mother, Betty, applied for a pension (date not legible).  True is buried in the Village Cemetery, Strong.

John True, Jr., son of John and Susan True of Phillips, enlisted at 21 from there in Company E, 13th Maine Infantry, on January 23, 1862, and was discharged for disability on July 17, 1862.

William True, Jr. was born in Phillips on November 28, 1846, the son of William and Louisa (Pratt) True.  He enlisted at 18 from Avon in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  On December 11, he enlisted in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1865 and was mustered out on December 6, 1865, at Barrancas, FL.  In 1874 he went to California searching for gold, and after returning to Maine worked on the railroad and was a trapper in Dallas Plantation.   He was married to Addie Beedy.  He  applied for a pension in 1880 and died on February 17, 1916.   He is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Phillips.

Warren Tuck, 18, enlisted from Avon in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was killed on December 13 at Fredericksburg, VA.  His mother submitted a pension application (date illegible) from Dakota.

Augustus Tuck enlisted at 22 from Phillips in Company K, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 21, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 19, 1864;  was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant; and was mustered out on September 27.  Possibly the son of Samuel and Diadamia Tuck of Fayette.

Joseph Tufts, Jr. was the son of Joseph and Eliza Tufts of Kingfield. In 1860 he and his wife Sarah lived there with three young children.  He enlisted at 32 from Kingfield as a Sergeant in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry Regiment, and received a disability discharge on August 13, 1862.  He applied for a pension in 1863.

Albert R. Turner, 18, enlisted as a substitute for Joseph Fairbanks of Farmington in Company A, 1st Veteran Maine Infantry, on August 20, 1864.  He was absent, sick, when the regiment was mustered out on June 28, 1865.  He was listed in Berwick on the 1890 veterans schedule.

John C. Tuttle, the son of Archeleus and Sally (Winch) Tuttle, was born on January 25, 1814 in Freeman.  He married Betsey Burns in 1841 and was a laborer in Freeman.  He enlisted from Freeman in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was detailed to the Ambulance Corps in 1862 and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on June 15, 1864.  He is buried in the Tuttle Corner Cemetery, Freeman, with his wife, who died in 1879 aged 59.

John Franklin Tuttle was born on March 16, 1845, the son of Thaddeus and Hannah (Eldridge) Tuttle.  He enlisted from Freeman in Company A, 17th Maine Infantry, on October 31, 1862.  He was wounded at Orange Grove, Virginia, on November 27, 1863.  He was taken prisoner at Cold Harbor, Virginia, on June 5, 1864, and later exchanged.  He transferred to Company A, 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, on December 15, 1864, and was mustered out on September 1, 1866.  He married Rebecca Ann Furbish of New Vineyard in 1866 and lived in Presque Isle.

Thaddeus/Thadeous Tuttle was the son of Thadeous and Hannah Tuttle of Kingfield.  He enlisted at 19 from Kingfield in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and died at Tybee Island, GA, on May 21, 1862.

Thaddeus Tuttle of Farmington was mustered into Company E, 24th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and died in Bonnet Clare, Louisiana, on May 20, 1863.

Ebenezer Tyler  was born on June 28, 1833.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862, and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on June 15, 1863.  He married Harriet Blodgett of Phillips and was a farmer.  He applied for a pension in December, 1865.  He lived in Phillips and moved to Avon about 1880.  His wife died in 1895 and he married Mary A. (last name not known).  He died in 1916 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with his wives.

Nathan H. Tyler, son of Nathan and Ruth Tyler of Mason, enlisted at 19 from Avon in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 24, 1864, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  He lived with his parents in Northumberland, New Hampshire, in 1870.  He married about 1874 and submitted a pension application from New Hampshire in 1893.  In 1900 he lived on Knox Street in Lewiston with his wife Sara and son Albert.  In 1920 he was a widower and lived with his son in Lewiston.

Samuel S. Usher was listed as age 43 when he enlisted from Kingfield in Company K, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He received a dishonorable discharge on January 15, 1863.  He is probably the Samuel Usher (age 53 in 1860) who lived in Kingfield with his wife Emeline/Emily in 1850 and 1860, and in Turner in 1870.

Silas E. Usher, son of Abijah and Mary (Durell) Usher, was born in Kingfield on March 17, 1817.  He married Catherine Fuller in Jackson Plantation on August 27, 1848, and in 1860 they lived in Eustis Plantation (Kingfield post office) with seven children.  He enlisted from Dead River in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and transferred to Company B later that year.  He moved to Minnesota by 1864.  In 1870 he and his wife lived in Maple Ridge, Minnesota, with nine children, the four youngest born in Minnesota.  He died in Maple Ridge on August 9, 1881, and his wife died there in 1893.

Hiram C. Vaughan was the son of Alanson and Almira Vaughan of Farmington.  He enlisted at 24 from Farmington in Company K, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 17, 1861.  He was promoted to Hospital Steward in 1862 and discharged on July 15, 1862 (estimated date).  He was commissioned as a Captain in Company E, 24th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 25, 1863.  He enlisted in the Navy as an Assistant Surgeon in March, 1864.  In 1870 he was a life insurance agent and lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, with his wife Harriet and four servants.

Sylvester Vaughan was born on November 4, 1840, the son of Zephaniah and Clarissa (McLain) Vaughan.  He enlisted from New Vineyard on August 18, 1862, in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry and  was mustered out at Washington, DC, on June 4, 1865.  He married Sarah Soper in Salem in 1866.  He submitted a pension application in 1870 and died on January 23, 1918.  He is buried in the New Vineyard Notch Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1924.

Zenas Vaughan was born in Freeman on December 17, 1829, the son of Elias and Calista (Webster) Vaughan.  In 1855 he married Esther Putnam in Strong.  He enlisted in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in 1862, and promoted to Captain and transferred to Company M in June, 1863.  He was taken prisoner at Spottsylvania Court House, VA, in May, 1864, and held for 11 months.  After the war he owned a store and was Sheriff of Somerset County.  His wife died in 1897 and he died in Portland on August 18, 1908.

Reuben Viele of Farmington enlisted in Company K, 1st Maine Infantry, on May 3, 1861.  On October 4, aged 21, he enlisted from Lewiston as a Corporal in Company K, 10th Maine Infantry, and was mustered out on May 7, 1863.  He enlisted again, from Hallowell, as a Sergeant in Company K, 29th Maine Infantry, on November 13, and was discharged on May 20, 1866, having served a total of 4 years and 4 months.  Probably the Reuben Viell, a 61 year-old widower, who was a patient at the South Dakota Hospital for the Insane in Yankton in 1900.

Alonzo H. Vining was the son of John and Mary Vining of Avon.  He enlisted at 21 from there in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 14, 1861, and deserted on October 11, 1862.  He and his wife Mary and their daughters lived in Lowell, Massachusetts after the war.

Ephraim Bernard Vining was the son of Seward and Martha Vining of Avon.  He served in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, which was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He enlisted at 20 from Avon in Battery  2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 26, 1863, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  He married about 1875, and in 1880 he and his wife Amanda lived in Norway, Oxford County, with their three children.  He applied for a pension in 1886 showing both regiments.  In 1900, he was listed as "Elmer" and he and his wife and son lived in Strong.  They lived in Farmington in 1920.  Amanda applied for a pension as a widow in 1922.

James Vining was the son of John and Mary Vining of Avon.  He enlisted at 21 from there in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 14, 1861, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  He and his wife Nancy lived in Lowell, Massachusetts after the war.  He was listed in Lowell on the 1890 veterans schedule, and his wife Nancy is listed on the same schedule as the widow of Martin Richardson (see above) who enlisted from Strong in the same Battery and died in 1864.  In 1900, Vining was a widower and lived in Lowell with his daughter, Bertha, and her husband P. M. Lederman.

Ostinello Vining was the son of Nathaniel and Louisa Vining of Avon.  He enlisted at 20 from there in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on December 26, 1863.  He died in Washington, DC, on March 23, 1864, and is buried in the Pease-Thompson Cemetery in Avon.

Thomas Vining, Jr., was born on May 19, 1835, the son of Thomas and Jemima (Haines) Vining of Avon.  He married Releaf  Walker of Freeman in 1861 and was a farmer in Temple.  He enlisted from Avon in Battery 2, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on September 24, 1864, and was mustered out on June 16, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1890 and died in 1918.  His widow, Releaf, applied in 1919 and died in 1921. Vining is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips.

Eben F. Vose was the son of Hiram and Abigail (Otis) Vose.  He enlisted from Kingfield in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1863 and re-enlisted on February 1, 1864.  He transferred to Company A at some time and was mustered out on April 18, 1866.  He applied for a pension in December, 1866, and died in 1871.  He is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Kingfield.

Jesse Vose, Jr. was born in 1839, the son of Jesse and Martha (Dutton) Vose.  He enlisted from Kingfield as a Corporal in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry on November 15, 1861.  He died on July 21, 1862, in New Orleans, LA.

Andrew Jackson Voter was born on December 16, 1832, the son of Warren and Lucy (Corbett) Voter.  He enlisted as a substitute for Crispus Kinney of Farmington in Company G, 7th Maine Infantry, on August 19, 1863.  He transferred to the 1st Veteran Maine Infantry on August 21, 1864, and died of disease at Washington, DC, on June 10, 1865.

LaForest Voter was the son of Gilbert and Nancy Voter who were in Salem in 1850 and Madrid in 1860.  He enlisted at 20 from Madrid in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861, and was mustered out at Portland on December 7, 1864.  In 1870 he lived in Salem with his wife Laura and their children.  They were in Phillips in 1880 and  applied for a pension in that year.  They lived in Avon in 1900, Phillips in 1910 and 1920, and in Brewer in 1930.  He died on August 10, 1930, and Laura applied for a pension in September.  Voter  is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, who died in 1950.

Justin S. Voter was the son of Easty Voter, brother of Gilbert, and a cousin of LaForest and Warren.  He enlisted at 30 from Madrid in Company H, 9th Maine Infantry Regiment, on September 20, 1864, and was discharged on June 30, 1865.  In 1870 he and his wife and two young children lived in Madrid.  He died in 1885 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Phillips with his wife, Harriett Elizabeth (Luce) Voter, who died in 1921.

Warren S. Voter was the son of Gilbert and Nancy Voter who were in Salem in 1850 and Madrid in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Madrid in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1870 he was a laborer and he and his mother lived with the family of Ira Davenport in Phillips.  In 1880 he lived in Lewiston with his wife Lucie/Lucinda and their two young daughters.  In 1890 Lucinda was listed as his widow on the veterans schedule in Richmond.

Gardner/Gardiner B. Wade, 18, enlisted from Farmington in Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and was promoted to Corporal in 1863.  He was taken prisoner at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, and later exchanged.  He was wounded at Spottsylvania Court House on May 10, 1864, and died that day of his wounds.  He was probably one of the seven children who lived with Eliza Wade in Woolwich in 1850, and who lived with the family of Ishall Higgins in Starks in 1860.  His mother, E.E.W. Kelly, applied for a pension in 1864.

Daniel H. Wakefield was probably one of three sons living with Haseltine Wakefield in Gardiner in 1850 and probably was the young man convicted of larceny who was a prisoner at the State Reform School in Cape Elizabeth in 1860.  He enlisted at 18 from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 29, 1864, was promoted to Corporal and then to Sergeant in 1865, and was mustered out on January 18, 1866.  He applied for a pension in 1875 and was listed in Wiscasset on the 1890 veterans schedule.  His widow, Elizabeth, applied for a pension in 1906.

Ansel/Ansil Walker was the son of Isaac and Elizabeth Walker who were in Andover in 1850 and Wilton in 1860.  He enlisted at 20 from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He enlisted in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.  He lived with his parents in Wilton in 1870.  In 1880 He and his parents, his wife Olivia and their son lived in Wilton.  He was listed in Wilton on the 1890 veterans schedule.

James F. Walker was the son of Joseph and Mary Walker of Wilton.  He enlisted from there at 17 in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He died on June 24, 1862, at Hilton Head, South Carolina.

Robert Walker, Jr. was the son of Robert and Sarah Walker of Avon.  He lived with his parents in 1850 and was a laborer and lived with the family of John Sylvester in Avon in 1860.  He enlisted at 29 from Avon in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was discharged for disability on February 3, 1863.  In 1870 he worked in a railroad repair shop and he and his wife Keziah and three daughters lived in Farmington.  His widow, Keziah H. Booker, was listed in Brunswick on the 1890 veterans schedule.  

Ruvillo R. Walker, son of Jeremiah and Sally Walker, enlisted from Wilton at 18 in Company M, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on February 4, 1864, and died in the hospital on January 5, 1865.  He is buried in the East Wilton Cemetery.

William C. Walker was the son of Robert and Ruhamah Walker of Madrid.  He lived with his parents in 1850 and with his wife Hannah and two children in 1860.  He enlisted at 39 from Madrid in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.   He tried to reenlist at that time but was rejected.  He was later drafted into Company H, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 20, 1864, and was discharged on June 30, 1865.  He and his wife lived in Madrid in 1870 and in Phillips, where he was a carpenter, in 1880.  He was listed in Phillips on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died on January 7, 1914, and is buried in the Field Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, Hannah (1829-1923).

Benjamin Franklin Watson was the son of Benjamin Watson, a Farmington carriage maker, and his wife Sarah.  In 1860 he was a painter and he and his wife Julia lived in Farmington with Jonathan Russ.  Julia died in March, 1862.  Watson enlisted at 27 from Farmington as a Sergeant in Company G, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862.  He was discharged because of disability on January 4, 1863.  In 1870 he was a carriage maker and lived in Farmington with his wife Martena, their two sons, and her mother Affia Bradford.  Martena died in 1879, and in 1880 Watson lived in Farmington with his three children and mother-in-law.  He was listed in Farmington (Farmington Falls post office) in 1890.  In 1900 and 1910 he lived in Farmington with his third wife, Lena.  He died on April 3, 1918, and is buried in the Blake Cemetery, Farmington Falls, with his three wives and his parents.

Micah B. Weathern/Wethern, age 9, lived with the family of William Bailey in Farmington in 1850.  He enlisted at 21 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  He was discharged due to disability on January 10, 1863.

Moses Leroy Weathern/Wethern was the son of Susan Weathern of Farmington.  He enlisted from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and died of disease in New Orleans on April 18, 1863.  His mother applied for a pension in 1864.

Benjamin Webster was born on November 27, 1836, the son of Benjamin and Harriet Webster of Kingfield.  He enlisted from Range 3 Township 1 in Company F, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 20, 1864, and was discharged on June 11, 1865.  He is described by one source as having developed a paralysis in the service and as being "almost helpless for some thirty years".  He married Irena Mullen in 1864.  In 1870 he was a farmer with land valued at $1000 and lived in Eustis Plantation with Irena and two children.  She died in 1871 and he married her sister, Arabellia, in 1872.  They were divorced in 1877  and he married Eunice Carville in 1879 in Kingfield.  In 1880 he was a harness repairman and lived in Kingfield with his wife and three children.  He and Eunice lived in Kingfield in 1900.  He died in 1901 and she died in 1922.  He is buried in Sunnyside Cemetery in Kingfield.

Justus Webster was the son of Joseph and Betsey Webster who were in Jay in 1850 and Farmington in 1860.  He enlisted from Farmington as a Corporal in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861.  He was promoted to Sergeant in 1862 and mustered out on November 25, 1864.  In 1870 he lived in Chesterville with his wife Sarah, who died in 1891.  He married again about 1893, and lived in Chesterville with his second wife Della in 1900 and 1910.  He died in 1914 at the age of 74 and is buried in the Webster Cemetery, Farmington, with his wives and parents.

Luther W. Weed served as a private in the 14th Maine Infantry, but no enlistment information has been found.  The Luther W. Weed who lived in the area was born about 1849, the son of Joseph Weed.  He lived in Phillips with his father's family in 1870.  He married about 1870, and in 1880 he and his wife Lucy and son Richard lived in Avon.  He was listed in Rangeley on the 1890 veterans schedule but without any regimental or enlistment information.  Richard died before 1900, when Luther and Lucy lived in Stonington with an adopted son, Earl.  Weed and his wife lived in Strong in 1910.

Hialmer M. Welch, 19, enlisted from Flagstaff in Company B, 7th Maine Infantry, on August 21, 1861.  He was accidentally shot and killed on January 8, 1862.  He was the son of John Welch, Jr., who lived in Concord with his children in 1850.

George W. Welch was the son of William and Betsey Welch of Industry.  In 1860 he lived in Freeman with his wife Margaret, who was born in England, and their son Willie Nelson Welch.  He enlisted from Freeman at 21 in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31.  In 1870 he lived in Strong with Margaret and six children.  She and three of their children died between 1880 and 1890.  Welch married again about 1895 and lived in Farmington with his wife Ellen in 1900 and 1910.  He died on July 21, 1912, and is buried in the West Freeman Cemetery with his first wife and three children.  Ellen applied for a pension in November, 1912.

Isaiah Welch, 32, enlisted from Freeman in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on December 19, 1863, and was discharged on June 16, 1865.   He was the son of William and Betsey Welch of Industry, and a brother of George.  He and his wife Hannah lived in Freeman with their two sons in 1860.  He was a farmer in Strong after the war.  He died on June 8, 1915, and is buried in the Village Cemetery in Strong with his wife (1838-1917). 

John Q. Welch was the son of William and Betsey Welch of Industry and a brother of Isaiah and George.  He lived in Farmington when he enlisted on the quota of Boothbay in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on March 22, 1865.  He was discharged on June 12.  In 1870 he and his wife Susan and son Freddie lived in Strong with the family of James Skillings.  Susan died in 1872 and is buried in the West Freeman Cemetery with their infant daughter Susie.  In 1880 he lived in Jay with his wife Sarah and three sons.  He lived in Livermore Falls in 1890.

Joseph W. Welch was the son of Obed and Mary Welch, who were in Industry in 1850 and Wilton in 1860.  He enlisted at 22 from Wilton in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864, and transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1, 1864.  He was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  In 1880 he was a farmer and lived in Wilton with his wife Olive and seven children.  He died in 1884 and is buried in the Intervale Cemetery, Wilton, with his wife, who died in 1912 at 65.

Thomas C. Welch was the son of Obed and Mary Welch and a brother of Joseph.  He enlisted at 19 from Wilton in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He was taken prisoner at Poplar Spring Church, VA, on September 30.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1 and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  In 1880 he was a farmer and lived in Wilton with his wife Kisati and five children.  She died before 1900, when he was a widower and lived in Wilton with four children.  He lived in Farmington with a housekeeper in 1910.

Eben Decator Wellcome, son of Amos and Sarah (Jacobs) Wellcome, was born in Avon or Freeman before his family moved to Wisconsin.  He was married to Esther Herrick.  He enlisted from Oasis, Wisconsin, in Company L, 1st Wisconsin Cavalry, on November 25, 1863.  He was taken prisoner at Cleveland, Tennessee, on April 13, 1864, and died of diarrhea at Andersonville Prison in Georgia.  He is buried there in grave #1520.

Henry C. Wellcome was born in Freeman in 1834, the son of Mark and Eunice (Parker) Wellcome.  He enlisted from Markesan, WI, as a Sergeant in the 11th Wisconsin Infantry on September 20, 1861.  He was promoted to 1st Sergeant and then to 1st Lieutenant, and was mustered out on September 4, 1865.  He married Esther (Herrick) Wellcome, Eben's widow, and lived in Ripon, Wisconsin.

Moses C. Wells, 22, son of Moses and Nancy Wells, enlisted from Phillips in Company F, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 21, 1861.  He is listed as deserting on July 30, 1862.  He died on May 28, 1863 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Phillips.  His father applied for a pension in February, 1882.

Nathaniel P. Wells was the son of Moses and Nancy Wells of Phillips and a brother of Moses.  He enlisted at 19 from Phillips in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on September 29, 1864 and was discharged on August 29, 1865.  He lived in Fayette with his wife Lura in 1870 and 1880 and worked in a scythe factory.  He lived in North Wayne in 1890.  He and Lura, who had no children, lived in East Livermore in 1900, 1910 and 1920.

Amos Welts lived in Madrid with his wife, Emily, and two sons in 1860, when he owned a farm worth $1300.  He enlisted at 35 from Madrid in Company H, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 20, 1864.  He died of disease on March 30, 1865, and is buried in the Wilmington (North Carolina) National Cemetery, Section 2 Site 765.  Emily applied for a pension in June, 1865.

Jesse Wentworth, a 23 year-old Farmington resident, enlisted on November 1, 1861, in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry.  He was discharged for disability on November 22, 1862.  He died on August 24, 1867 and is buried in the Hunter Cemetery in Strong.  His widow, Elvira, applied for a pension.

Asa A. West, son of John and Arvilla West, was born in 1830.  The family was in Township B, Oxford County, in 1850.  Asa lived in Andover with his wife Matilda and one child in 1860.  He enlisted from Andover on January 6, 1865, as a Corporal in Company F, Maine Coast Guard Infantry, and was discharged on July 7 at Augusta.  In 1870 he lived in Andover with his wife Matilda and two children.  In 1880 he and his wife Maggie lived in Andover with three children.  He lived in Andover in 1890, when he reported on the veterans schedule that he had served in the unassigned infantry from December, 1864, to July, 1865, and had suffered a gunshot wound.  He applied for a pension in 1890 listing only service in the Maine Coast Guard.  In 1900 he was a widower and lived in Andover with his daughter Helen.

Leonidas West, Asa West's brother, was born on July 21, 1847.  He enlisted from Bethel in Company G, 12th Maine Infantry, on March 1, 1865, and was mustered out on April 18, 1866.  He married Valora Agnes Abbott of Upton in Lewiston on January 18, 1872.  They moved to Minneapolis that year.  In 1880 and 1900 he was a lumberman and they lived in Minneapolis with three children.  In 1920 they lived in Bodie, Washington, with their son Frank.  Valora applied for a widow's pension from Washington in 1932.

Lewis Weymouth (also listed as Louis) was born on March 8, 1837, in Freeman, the son of Simeon and Lucetta (Getchell) Weymouth.  He was a tailor and lived in Guilford in 1860, and he married Rachel Stevens there that year.  He enlisted from there in Company I, 22nd Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 14, 1863.  His wife applied for a widow's pension in October, 1863.

Rufus Weymouth lived in Freeman with his first wife, Hannah, and ten children in 1850.  He was a blacksmith and lived in New Sharon with his second wife Ann and two children in 1860.  He was probably 54 years old when he gave his age as 44 and enlisted from New Sharon in Company E, 14th Maine Infantry, on February 24, 1865.  He was discharged on August 28, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1865 and lived in New Sharon with his wife in 1870.  He died in 1877 and is buried in the Tuttle Corner Cemetery, Freeman, with his first wife, Hannah, who died in 1851 at 37.

William H. Weymouth (1843-1888) was the son of Tobias and Mary Weymouth of Webster.  He enlisted from there as a substitute in Company C, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 28, 1864, and was mustered out on January 18, 1866.  He died in 1898 and is buried in the Village Cemetery, Madrid.

Ezra Howard Wheeler was the son of Tobias and Jane Wheeler of Phillips.  He enlisted from there at 21 in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was wounded at Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863, and hospitalized.  He received a disability discharge (no date).  In 1870 he was a merchant and lived in Weld with his wife Amanda (Rowe) and daughter Mabel.  He lived in Salmon Falls, New Hampshire, in 1890 and noted on the veterans schedule that he had lost his right leg below the knee.  He died in 1908 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, who died in 1928.

Benjamin Wheelwright lived in Wilton on the farm of Ivory Hatch, who was probably his stepfather, in 1850.  In 1860 he was a laborer and lived in Belmont, Massachusetts, on the farm of Daniel Tainter.  He enlisted at 26 in Company G, 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, on August 22, 1864, and was discharged for disability at David's Island, New York Harbor, on June 29, 1865.  In 1870 he was a laborer and lived in Jay with the family of Cyrus Henderson.  He was married about 1878 and lived in North Jay in 1890.  He and his wife, Anna, lived in Wilton in 1900, and she applied for a widow's pension in October of that year.

Joel W. White is probably the man aged 48 who lived in Upton with his wife Deborah in 1860.  He enlisted from there (giving his age as 44)  in Company H, 14th Maine Infantry, on December 20, 1861 and was discharged on April 8, 1862.  He and Deborah lived in Mexico in 1870.  In 1880, White and his wife Dorcas lived in Peru.  She applied for a widow's pension in 1889 and is listed as his widow on the 1890 veterans schedule for Peru.  She reported at that time that he had received a discharge for disability because of injury to his left leg and stomach.

Benjamin F. Whitmore was probably the son of Benjamin and Martha Whitmore of Farmington.  He was a butcher in Boston, Massachusetts, when he enlisted in the 2nd Massachusetts Light Artillery on July 31, 1861.  He re-enlisted in 1864, was promoted to Corporal, and was mustered out on August 11, 1865.  In 1870 he was a carriage painter and lived in Farmington with his wife Emma and his father.  He applied for a pension in 1872.  He died on March 9, 1892, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Farmington, with Emma, who died in 1891.

Benjamin M. Whitney was 56 but gave his age as 44 when he enlisted from Phillips in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was dismissed by court martial on June 15, 1863.  He died in 1890 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, Susan (Wells) Whitney (1806-1902).

Edmund W. Whitney was born on July 19, 1840, the son of William and Elizabeth Whitney.  He lived in Farmington with his parents in 1860.  He enlisted from Farmington in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on March 1, 1862, and was discharged on February 28, 1865.  He married Mary B. Orr in Phillips and in 1880 they lived in Strong with their daughter Gracie.  He was listed in Strong (residence Fairbanks) on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He died on March 20, 1892, and his wife died in 1905.  They are buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Farmington.

Frank W. Whitney was the son of George and Violetta Whitney, and lived with his parents in Farmington Falls in 1860.  He enlisted at 21 from Farmington in Company E, 1st Maine Cavalry, on October 19, 1861, and died in Washington, DC, on April 15, 1862.

George A. Whitney of Farmington enlisted as a Musician in the 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on November 1, 1862.

John A. Whitney was the son of George and Eliza Whitney of Freeman.  He lived in Freeman with his parents in 1850, and with his wife Dorcas and daughter Nettie  in 1860.  He enlisted at 32 from Freeman in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He lived in Freeman after the war and was listed there but gave his residence as Strong on the 1890 veterans schedule.

John Drury Whitney was born on October 21, 1843, in Phillips, the son of Ebenezer and Dolly Whitney.  He enlisted in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry on October 13, 1862;  was promoted to Corporal in November;  and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married Eldusty Peary in 1870 in Strong.  A farmer and Methodist preacher, he lived in Freeman Center and later moved his family to Franklin, Massachusetts.  His wife died in 1935 and he died in Franklin, Massachusetts on March 18, 1936.

Marshall S. Whitney is listed as a Civil War soldier in Heywood's History of Upton, Maine.  No service record found.  He married Susan Libby of Sebago and in 1880 they lived in Upton with their three sons.  About 1890, he moved to Byron to prospect for gold.

Royal T. Whitney was a cabinet maker and lived in Phillips in 1860.  He enlisted at  28 from Phillips in Company B, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 22, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 1, 1864, and was mustered out on July 13, 1865.  He applied for a pension in July, 1886, and his widow Sarah submitted an application from Texas in 1899.

Enoch B. Whittemore/Whitemore, 26, enlisted from Upton in Company C, 20th Maine Infantry, on August 29, 1862.  He was listed as sick at Portertown Hospital and died at Citizens Hospital, Philadelphia, on November 22, 1862.  His first wife, Ellen, had died  in 1856, at the age of 19.  His widow, Ann S. W. Whittemore, applied for a pension in January, 1863.  Whittemore is buried in the Lincoln Plantation Cemetery, Wilsons Mills, with his first wife.  He may have been the son of Enoch Whittemore of Paris.

Isaac C. Whittemore, a 31 year-old carpenter from Somerville, MA, enlisted in Company F, 18th Massachusetts Infantry, on August 9, 1861.  He was wounded at Fredericksburg, Virginia, on December 13, 1862, and received a disability discharge at Point Lookout, Maryland, on April 5, 1863.  He was mustered into the Veteran Reserve Corps on November 11, and discharged for disability on May 20, 1864.  He died on April 10, 1865.  His widow, Maria J. applied for a pension that year.  Whittemore is buried in the Lincoln Plantation Cemetery in Wilsons Mills.

Joseph L. Whitten was the son of Issacher and Mary Whitten and lived with them in Farmington Falls in 1860.  He was a wool sorter in Lawrence, MA, when he enlisted in Company H, 4th Massachusetts Infantry on August 30, 1862.  He died at Baton Rouge, LA, on August 10, 1863, age 26, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Farmington.

Isaac Whittier enlisted from Salem at the age of 38 in Company F, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 21, 1861.  He re-enlisted on February 25, 1864, and was promoted to Corporal that year.  He was discharged on July 13, 1865.  Very likely the Isaac Whittier who lived in Charlestown, Massachusetts, with his wife Ellen and three children, and who is listed in Boston (but with no service information) on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Jason Wier enlisted at 35 from Montville in Company A, 7th Maine Infantry, on January 29, 1864.  He was listed as absent, sick, on the transfer of the regiment to the 1st Veteran Maine Infantry on August 21, but served a total of 1 year and 5 months.  One source lists him as being from Farmington, but he listed Montville as his residence on enlisting and lived there with his wife Marcia and their children after the war.  On the 1890 veterans schedule he stated that he received a gunshot wound to the hip and lost his right eye in the war.

Aaron Wight is listed as a Civil War soldier in Heywood's History of Upton, Maine, which says he was born in Newry.  On January 4, 1864 at the age of 43 he enlisted in Company I, 6th New Hampshire Infantry.  He died of disease on June 17, 1864, in Chester, PA.  His widow, Eunice, applied for a pension on September 12, 1864, and as Eunice Swan was listed in Milan, New Hampshire, on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Harris Wilbur, a 19 year-old from Phillips, enlisted December 11, 1863, in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, and was mustered out on December 6, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1887 and was listed in Richmond on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Daniel Wilcox was a farmer and lived with his wife Abigail and four children in New Vineyard in 1850.  He enlisted at 44 from New Vineyard in Company A, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862, and died at Belle Plains, Virginia, on April 24, 1863.  He is buried in the New Vineyard Notch Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1876 at 56.  A child, Cynthia Wilcox, applied for a pension in 1898.

Jonas/James H. C. Wilcox was the son of Daniel Wilcox (above) and his wife Abigail.  He lived with his family in New Vineyard in 1850.  He enlisted from there in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 11, 1864.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry on December 1, and was discharged on July 3, 1865.  In 1870, he lived in New Vineyard with three of his sisters and his younger brother, and he was listed in New Vineyard on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He is buried in the New Vineyard Notch Cemetery.  (Thanks to John Wilcox for information).

David M. Wiley was born in New Brunswick about 1833.  He enlisted from Letter C, Range 1, in Battery 6, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on August 25, 1862, and was discharged on June 17, 1865.  He was a farmer and lived in Littleton with his wife and children after the war.  He was listed there on the 1890 veterans schedule.  His widow Caroline applied for a pension in 1896.

Abel B. Wilkins was the son of Abel and Nancy Wilkins (and probably grandson of Abial Wilkins of Vermont).  He lived in Wilton with his parents in 1850 and with his wife Eliza in 1860.  He enlisted at 22 from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 15, 1862, and  died of disease on March 9, 1863.

Abial Wilkins was the son of Abel and Nancy Wilkins and twin of Abel.  He lived in Wilton with his parents in 1850 and was a laborer on the farm of Stephen Allen in 1860.  He enlisted at 22 from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and received a disability discharge on December 27.  In 1870 he and his wife Eliza and daughter Maud lived  in Wilton and he was listed there on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Henry L. Wilkins was the son of Abel and Nancy Wilkins and lived with them in Wilton before the war.  He enlisted at 20 from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 15, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He is probably the Henry Wilkins who lived in Gardiner after the war.

William W. Wilkins, 18, enlisted from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1863, re-enlisted in 1864, was promoted to Sergeant in 1865, and was mustered out on January 18, 1866.

Greenleaf/Greenlief  D. Willard was the son of Margaret Willard of Strong.  He enlisted at 22 from Strong in Company K, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was listed as sick at Alexandria, VA, in October, 1862, and was discharged for disability on February 18, 1863.  His widow, Abbie, applied for a pension (date illegible).

Nathaniel Willard was born in 1840 and may have been the son of Royal and Roxanna Willard of Orono.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He married Rhoda Ann Peary in 1866.  They lived in Avon in 1870 and in Bellingham, Massachusetts, in 1880.  He was listed in Freeman on the 1890 veterans schedule and he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary there on January 25, 1916;  at that time, they were planning to move to Weld with their son, George.  He and his wife lived on Main Street in Strong in 1920.  Willard died in 1932 and is buried in the West Freeman Cemetery with his wife, who died in 1921.

Moody C. Williamson, 19, enlisted from Kingfield in Company E, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and died at Beaufort, SC, on April 15, 1863.  He is buried at the Beaufort National Cemetery (Plot 1679).  His father, Sylvanus, applied for a pension (date illegible).

Isaac P. Wills may have been the son of John and Elizabeth Wills, who were at Belgrade in 1850 and Vienna in 1860.  He enlisted at 22 from Farmington in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1870 he and his wife Josephine lived in Anson with Hiram and Barbara Currier, who were perhaps her parents.  He was listed in Auburn on the 1890 veterans schedule.

James M. Wills and his wife Rosilia and their two children lived in Phillips in 1860.  He enlisted from there at 30 as a Sergeant in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was reduced in rank to Private at his request.  He died of disease on August 6, 1863. 

Alvin S. Wilson was born in Wilsons Mills.  He served in the 1st New Hampshire Cavalry and later enlisted at 21 in Company L, 1st Rhode Island Cavalry, on August 26, 1862.  He died of disease at Falmouth, Virginia, on January 23, 1864.

John Wilson was born in 1827 and married Rosannah Hodgmen, daughter of Ephraim and Esther, in 1849.  He was a farmer in Freeman before the war and enlisted from there in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862.  He was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He died on September 7 and is buried in the Mount Abram Cemetery in Salem.

Samuel B. Wing was a farmer and lived in Madrid (Phillips post office) with his wife Margaret, 18, and two young children in 1860.  He was drafted at 31 from Phillips on August 15, 1863, into Company H, 3rd Maine Infantry.  He transferred to the 17th Maine Infantry on June 28, 1864.  In 1870 he was a jeweler and lived in Turner with his wife Mary and five children.  They lived in Phillips, where was a farmer, in 1880 and he was listed there on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he stated that he had been shot in the right lung.  He was a widower and lived with his son Theodore in Phillips in 1900, and he lived in Wilton with his daughter and her family in 1910.  He died on November 2, 1910, and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Phillips, with his wife, Mary (1841-1892).

Steward Wing was born at Dead River on May 1, 1841, the son of Cyrus and Caroline Wing.  He married Clara Parsons about 1862.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Company D, 13th Maine Infantry.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1862 and to Sergeant in 1863.  He re-enlisted on February 2, 1864;  transferred to Company K, 30th Maine Infantry, on January 1, 1865;  and was mustered out at Savannah, GA, on August 20, 1865.  He applied for a pension in 1869 and he and his wife and three children lived in Dead River in 1870.  He was a hotel keeper and lived in Flagstaff in 1880.  He was listed in Norridgewock on the 1890 veterans schedule and lived there with his wife and children in 1910.  In 1920 he and his wife lived there with their daughter Georgie and her husband, Frank Eveleth.  He died at Norridgewock on July 25, 1923.

Enoch L. Winship was born in October, 1840, the son of Enoch and Sarah Winship of Phillips.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on August 14, 1862, and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on June 15, 1863 (estimated date).  He married Malinda Jurd in Saline, Missouri, on July 1, 1875.  In 1880 he was a blacksmith and lived in Sedalia, Missouri, with his wife, who was born in Missouri, and their year-old son William.  In 1900 they lived in Kansas City, Missouri, with son William and daughter Sarah - a third child had died.

Daniel Winslow was born about 1845, the son of Joseph and Mary Winslow of Wilton.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company E, 32nd Maine Infantry, on April 2, 1864.  He transferred to Company E, 31st Maine Infantry, on December 1, 1864, and was mustered out on July 15, 1865.  He lived in Hallowell in 1870 and was married for the first time that year.  He was listed in Bowdoinham on the 1890 veterans schedule and lived there in 1910 with his second wife, Harriet, whom he married about 1884, and son (or stepson) Chester.  In 1920 he was a widower and lived in Gardiner.  In 1930 he was an "inmate" at the National Veterans Home in Chelsea.

Levi H. Winslow was born in July, 1842, the son of Kernelm and Hannah Winslow who lived in Bath in 1850 and in Byron in 1860.  He enlisted from Byron in Company A, 12th Maine Infantry, on November 15, 1861.  He re-enlisted on January 4, 1864, and was mustered out with the regiment on April 18, 1866.  He was a minister and in 1880 lived in Strafford, New Hampshire with his wife Mary and daughter Melvina.  He was listed in Lisbon, Maine, on the 1890 veterans schedule.  He and his wife and daughter lived in Sutton, New Hampshire in 1900 and he and his wife lived in Farmington Township, New Hampshire, in 1910.

Amos G. Winter was born on March 6, 1843, in Freeman, the son of John and Betsey (Vose) Winter.  He enlisted from Lewiston in Company D, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was promoted to Corporal in 1863.  He was wounded at the Wilderness on May 5, 1864, and was wounded again on April 6, 1865.  He was mustered out at Washington, DC, on June 4, 1865.  He married Harriet Williamson on November 30, 1865.  He died on June 26, 1866, and is buried in the Freeman Ridge Cemetery, Freeman.  His widow married Ira Winter.

William C. Winter was born on April 1, 1841, in Freeman, the son of John and Betsey (Vose) Winter and brother of Amos  He enlisted from Lewiston in Company F, 1st Maine Infantry, on May 3, 1861, and was mustered out on August 5.  He enlisted on August 18, 1862, as a Sergeant in Company D, 17th Maine Infantry, and was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.  He died at Camp Pitcher, Virginia on  January 25, 1863, and is buried in the Freeman Ridge Cemetery, Freeman.

Charles C. Witham was born in 1837, the son of John and Ann Witham who lived in Woburn, Massachusetts, in 1850 and Portland in 1860.   He enlisted from Portland in Battery 5, 1st Maine Light Artillery, on August 28, 1862;  was listed as a bugler in 1863;  and was mustered out on July 6, 1865.  He married Mary E. Foster of Freeman in Lewiston in 1867.  He died in 1892 and she died in 1909.  They are buried in the North Freeman Cemetery.

John E. Witham enlisted from Salem at the age of 18 in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was killed at Petersburg on June 16, 1864.  He may have been the son of William and Abigail Witham of New Portland.

Joshua L. Witham, aka Charles H. Smith.  He was a farmer and lived in Cambridge with his wife Charlotte and three children in 1860.  As Joshua L. Witham, a 31 year-old resident of Dexter, he enlisted in Company G, 6th Maine Infantry, on February 2, 1862 - the record indicates that he  transferred to Company E, 7th Maine Infantry, on November 5, 1863;  transferred to the 1st  Veteran Maine Regiment on August 21, 1864;  and was dropped as a deserter on January 27, 1865.  However, as Charles H. Smith, a 34 year-old farmer from Wells, he enlisted in Company I, 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry, and was mustered in on February 10, 1863. His pension application in 1890 lists both names and service in both the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry and the 6th Maine.  He was a carpenter and lived in Madrid after the war.  He was listed there on the 1890 veterans schedule with both names and service records.  He died in November, 1890, and is buried in the Madrid Village Cemetery with his wife.

Otis Witham was a farmer and lived in Letter E (Phillips post office) with his wife Lucy and two children in 1860.  He enlisted at 44 from Avon in Company G, 30th Maine Infantry, on January 1, 1865.  He transferred to the Navy sometime that year.

Arthur I. Withey was born in Eustis on April 12, 1839.  He married Eveline/Evaline Parmenter about 1862.  He enlisted from Eustis Plantation as a Corporal in Company M, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on January 2, 1864.  He was promoted to Sergeant, reduced to Private, promoted again to Corporal and again to Sergeant in 1865.  He was mustered out on December 6, 1865.  His pension application in 1873 also lists service in the 26th Maine and the 6th Massachusetts.    In 1880 he was a merchant in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, and in 1900 he lived in Shakopee, Minnesota.  Lived in Los Angeles in 1910 and died there in 1918.

Ephraim W. Woodman enlisted on September 7, 1861, as a Captain in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, and was promoted to Major and  transferred to staff on December 14.  He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and was discharged on March 6, 1862.  He enrolled as a Colonel in the 28th Maine Infantry on October 6, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  He enlisted as a Colonel in the 2nd Maine Cavalry on December 18, 1863, and was mustered out with the regiment on December 6, 1865.

William Horatio Wood (also listed as Woods) was born in May, 1840, the son of William B. and Harriet Wood.  The family was in Kingfield in 1850 and in Farmington in 1860.  Wood enlisted from Farmington as a Corporal in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862.  He was listed as hospitalized at Warrington, Florida, on March 22, 1863.  He lived with his parents in East Livermore in 1870 and in 1880, when he listed his occupation as "retired merchant".  He was listed in Auburn on the 1890 veterans schedule, where he gave his rank as Sergeant and stated that he served the full nine months of the regiment's service.  He lived in Auburn with his mother in 1900 and on Haskell Street in Auburn with his sister Adelia in 1910.

Erasmus D. Woodward, 39, was born in Wilton.  He lived there with Timothy Woodward in 1860 and was probably the son of Timothy and his wife Jane.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company A, 8th Maine Infantry, on September 7, 1861, and was mustered out on September 16, 1864.  He applied for a pension in February, 1876, and was listed in Randolph, Massachusetts, on the 1890 veterans schedule.

Andrew K. Wormell was born in 1842, the son of Amos and Mary Wormell of Phillips.  He enlisted from Phillips in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862, and was discharged on May 19, 1863.  He married Sarah B. Foster of Freeman in November, 1866, and in 1870 was a shoemaker in Freeman.

Frank Wormell of Farmington enlisted in Company K, 31st Maine Infantry, on May 6, 1864.  He was taken prisoner at Petersburg on July 30 and was discharged for disability on June 13, 1865.  He applied for a pension in January, 1872.

Elbridge T. Worthley was the son of Melyard (?) and Hannah Worthley of Phillips.  He enlisted from Phillips at 22 in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was mustered out on August 31, 1863.  In 1910 he lived in Nevada County, California, with his second wife, Mary (who was born in Missouri), two of his sons and his brother Alfonso.  In 1920 he was a widower and lived in Nevada, California, with his son Charles, who was born in California.

Hollis Worthley, 23, the son of Joseph and Huldah, enlisted from Phillips in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was promoted to Corporal in 1863.  His gravestone in the Tory Hill Cemetery, Phillips, states that he died on August 31, 1863, which was the day that the regiment was mustered out in Augusta.

Alonzo T. Wright was the son of Josiah and Mary Wright of Weld.  He enlisted at 21 from Weld in Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 1, 1861, and re-enlisted on December 28, 1863.   He was wounded and taken prisoner at Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, on May 11, 1864.  There is a gravestone for him in Evergreen Cemetery in Phillips which says that he died on May 11, 1864.  He died at Andersonville Prison in Georgia on November 16, 1864, and is buried there in grave 12043.  His mother, Mary, applied for a pension in 1865.

Charles W. Wright was the son of Isaac and Patty Wright of Wilton and lived there with his parents in 1850 and 1860.  He enlisted at 42 from Wilton in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, on July 31, 1863.  He was taken prisoner at the Weldon Railroad in Virginia on August 19, 1864, and died on November 16 at Andersonville Prison in Georgia.

Ervin E. Wright, 19, son of Israel and Sarah, enlisted from Phillips in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry, on December 11, 1863, and died on September 3, 1864, at Barrancas, FL.  He is buried at the Bragg-Porter Hill Cemetery in Farmington.

Josiah Wright lived with the family of Daniel Young in Avon in 1850.  In 1860 he was a farmer and lived there with his wife Priscilla and three young children.  He enlisted from there at 28 in Company C, 9th Maine Infantry, on September 22, 1861, and was mustered out on September 27, 1864.  In 1890, his widow, Priscilla Wilbur, lived in Hallowell.

Brackett Allen Wyman was born on November 17, 1836, the son of Brackett J. and Sarah (Conant) Wyman.  His father died in 1854, and in 1860 he lived with his mother in Temple.  He enlisted from Avon in Company D, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 13, 1862, and was reported hospitalized at Memphis, TN, on August 11, 1863.  He married Mary Jane Humphrey on August 13, 1864.  In 1870, he was a farm laborer and they lived in Avon with their daughter.  He was listed in Temple on the 1890 Veteran's Schedule.  Mary Jane applied for a widow's pension in 1909 from Maine.

Eri W. Wyman was born on December 19, 1835, at Dead River.  He married Sally Merry, and in 1860 they lived in Dead River and he was a farm laborer.  He enlisted from Dead River in Company D, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 9, 1861, and was mustered out on January 1, 1865.  His pension application from New Hampshire (date illegible) also lists service in the 1st and 4th U.S. Veteran Volunteer Infantry.  In 1870 he was single and was a farmer in Dead River.  He married  Augusta Williams, and in 1880 he was a joiner and they lived in a hotel in Pittsburg, New Hampshire, with their daughter, Mary, age 9.  In 1900, Wyman and his wife lived in Lancaster, New Hampshire, with their son Forest.  The three of them lived in Guildhall, Vermont, in 1910 and 1920.    He died there on July 5, 1920.  There is a gravestone for him in the Flagstaff Cemetery in Eustis but he is not buried there.  

Jeremy P. Wyman, was the son of Jeremy L. and Mariah Wyman and lived with his parents in Strong in 1860.  He enlisted at 19 from Strong as a Corporal in Company G, 17th Maine Infantry, on August 18, 1862.  He was wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness on May 7, 1864, and died of wounds the following day.

Stephen B. Wyman, son of Stephen B. and Mary (Norton) Wyman, was born on October 28, 1847.  He lived with his mother in Eustis in 1860.  He enlisted as a substitute for Timothy Belcher of Farmington in Company K, 7th Maine Infantry, on August 8, 1864.  He transferred to Company K, 1st Veteran Maine Infantry, on August 21, 1864, and was mustered out on June 28, 1865.  He died on August 16, 1868, and is buried in the Flagstaff Cemetery in Eustis.

William P. Wyman was born in Flagstaff on June 28, 1843, the son of Stephen B. and Mary (Norton) Wyman.  He lived with his mother in Eustis and was a farm laborer in 1860.  He enlisted from Dead River Plantation in Company D, 13th Maine Infantry, on December 9, 1861, and was discharged for disability on September 9, 1863.   He may be the William P. Wyman who lived in Bartlett, New Hampshire, in 1880 with his wife, Mary, and four young children, all born in Maine.  Wyman applied for a pension in June, 1880, and listed service in the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry as well as the 13th Maine.  He married Alice Crocker in Farmington on March 5, 1892.  In 1900, he was a pensioner and he and Alice and their four young children boarded with the family of Thomas Hiscock in Farmington.  In 1910, he was a general store proprietor and lived on the Strong Road in Farmington with his 19 year-old wife Edith and six children.  He died on April 10, 1923. 

Isaac C. Yeaton was born about 1835, the son of John, a physician, and Eunice Yeaton.  He lived with his parents in New Sharon in 1850 and in Farmington Falls in 1860.  He enlisted from Farmington in Company E, 5th Maine Infantry, on June 24, 1861.  He was wounded at Spottsylvania Court House on May 10, 1864, and was mustered out on July 27.  He applied for an invalid pension on February 6, 1865, and listed service in Company B, 8th U.S. Volunteer Infantry as well as the 5th Maine.  In 1900, he and his 30 year-old wife, Kate, lived on Suffolk Place in Rockland with their 3 year-old daughter, Ethel.  Kate applied for a widow's pension on August 20, 1908.

Ward S. Yeaton was born in New Vineyard on March 15, 1826, the son of Jonathan and Mary (Watson) Yeaton.  He married Joanna Jenkins there on October 21, 1848, and in 1850 they lived in Plantation 4, Franklin County.  He enlisted from New Vineyard, enlisted in Company M, 1st Maine Cavalry, on February 14, 1864, and was discharged on June 20, 1865.  He was listed in Weld on the 1890 veterans schedule, and died in Temple on August 28, 1897.  His widow, Sarah, applied for a pension in December, 1897.

William Henry Yeaton was the son of John, a physician, and Eunice Yeaton.  He lived with his parents in New Sharon in 1850 and in Farmington Falls in 1860.  He enlisted at 21 from Farmington in Company H, 1st Maine Infantry, on May 3, 1861, and was mustered out on August 5.  On August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, 16th Maine Infantry, and was promoted to Corporal.  He was killed at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863.

Addison S. Young, was born about 1841, the son of John and Ruth Young, and he lived with his parents in Byron in 1850.  He enlisted from Byron in Company B, 29th Maine Infantry, on January 14, 1864, and was discharged on June 1, 1865. In 1870 he was a farmer living in Byron with his wife Sarah, a daughter and his parents.  In 1880 they had six children at home.  In 1910 he lived on Main Street in Mechanic Falls with a second wife, Laura, his adopted son Thomas, and a widowed stepdaughter, Elvie McCann, who was employed as a waitress.  The dates of pension applications from Young and from his widow are illegible.

Havannah Young was the son of Lucinda Young.  In 1850, they lived with the family of Richard Hollis in North Anson.  In 1860, he lived with Lucinda and her husband, George Welch, a shoemaker, in New Portland.  Havannah enlisted at 19 from New Portland in Company H, 1st Maine Cavalry, on November 5, 1861.  He died at home on August 14, 1863.  He is buried in the North New Portland Cemetery, where his gravestone says:  "He was in six hard fought battles and twenty six scrimmages".  His mother applied for a pension in 1866.

Henry Young was born about 1843, the son of James and Florilla Young of Byron.  He enlisted from Byron in Company H, 10th Maine Infantry, on October 4, 1861.  He transferred to Company K later that year and was mustered out on May 18, 1863.

Isaac D. Young was born in Wilton in June, 1842, the son of Aaron and Hannah Young.  He enlisted from Wilton in Company B, 28th Maine Infantry, on October 10, 1862, and received a disability discharge in New York City, date not specified.  After the war he and his wife Asenath lived in Jay, where he had a farm.  He died sometime after 1900.

James E. Young, was born about 1838, the son of James and Florilla Young of Byron.  In 1850, he was a farmer and head of the household, which consisted of his mother and brothers and sisters.  He enlisted from Byron in Company K, 5th Maine Infantry, on June 24, 1861, and was discharged due to disability on November 24, 1862.

Samuel Young, a 25 year-old from Lexington, enlisted in Company E, 7th Maine Infantry, on August 21, 1861.  He transferred to Company F in 1863 and was mustered out on August 21, 1864.  In 1870, he and his wife Lucinda lived in New Portland with two children.  He is buried in the North New Portland Cemetery.

Zachary J. Young enlisted from Wilton as a musician in the 8th Maine Infantry on September 7, 1861, and was discharged on November 1, 1862.

Maine history,  Maine genealogy, Civil War Soldiers,  Rangeley genealogy,  Rangeley history,  Franklin County Maine
 
 
 
 

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