FAMILY TIPHIIDAE - Flower Wasps
 
 
 
 
 

 

FAMILY TIPHIIDAE - Flower Wasps

Species in this family are parasitic wasps which there larvae parasite on soil insects such as burrowing beetles larvae and mole crickets. The female Flower Wasps has to burrow through the soil to find the host and lay an egg on it. The female legs are modified for digging and her wings are lost. 
 
However, she, like the male wasp, are feed on nectar and has to visit the flowers. Wingless is a big disadvantage. They evolved a mating behaviour which the male help the female. Their mating time is very long. It is common to see a male Flower Wasp carrying a wingless female, with tail to tail attached, flying between flowers. The transportation is part of the mating procedures.
Female flower wasps will sting if disturbed.
 

 
Yellow Flower Wasp
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Agriomyia or Hemithynnus sp., winged male 20mm, windless female 15mm
We took those pictures when the winged male carrying the non-winged female flying between grasses while they were mating. More information and pictures please check this page.
  
 
Black Flower Wasp
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Agriomyia sp., winged male 20mm, windless female 10mm
It is common to see a male Flower Wasp carrying a wingless female, with tail to tail attached, flying between flowers. On Dec 2006, we saw a male Flower Wasp it was searching for something under a dry leaf. It found a female. Please check this page for more information.
 
 
Flower Wasp
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Photo: Tony Nye, Acacia Ridge
Catocheilus sp., (synonym : Hemithynnus sp.), wingless female body length 20mm                   
Tony Nye in Acacia Ridge sent us this picture. This is a wingless female Flower Wasp. Notice its strong legs which evolved for digging in soil. Flower wasps are parasitic wasps which there larvae parasite on soil insects such as burrowing beetles larvae and mole crickets. The female Flower Wasps burrow through the soil to find the host and lay an egg on it.
 
 
Flower Wasp
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Photo: Keith Power, Toowoomba
Tachynomyia adusta, Thynninae male. 
Here we would like to thank Professor Denis Brothers sending us email advised that this wasp is in the TIPHIIDAE family. We had wrongly identified it is a Tachyphron aculeatus. 
Reference: 
1. Tachyphron aculeatus - - Insects of Townsville, Australia, Graeme Cocks, 2004.
 
 
Unknown Black Wasp with yellow antenna
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? sp., body length 20mm
This wasp is commonly seen searching on tree trunk. It is black in colour with yellow antenna. 
 
 

 
Here we would like to thank Graham Brown again for sending us emails to correct some of our mistakes in this page.

Reference:
1. Insects of Australia, CSIRO, Division of Entomology, Melbourne University Press, 2nd Edition 1991, pp 977.
2. Insects of Australia and New Zealand - R. J. Tillyard, Angus & Robertson, Ltd, Sydney, 1926, p293. 

 
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Up ] FAMILY POMPILIDAE ] Family Mutillidae ] [ FAMILY TIPHIIDAE ] FAMILY SCOLIIDAE ] FAMILY VESPIDAE ] FAMILY SPHECIDAE ] Other Predatory Wasps ]

 

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Last updated: July 27, 2007.
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