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Directly from the Cage:

Out of the Nest

 

 

 

Housing

 

Cage:
    The cage size depends on the species of bird you have, and how many you are planning to keep. When choosing a cage, avoid wooden cages as it won't last long. The bird will chew right threw through them. Cages made out of metal or chrome are easier to maintain and clean. A cage with a bottom grill is recommended as some birds like to chew on the type of bedding/substrate you use and will help keep the bird out of his debris. If you plan on keeping more then 5 birds, I would recommend that you built a aviary outside for your birds, to provide as much space as possible.

Budgie Cage:
    Budgie Cage For a single budgie, a cage approximately 15 inches long, 18 inches wide, and 13 inches high, would be the minimum. For two budgies, double the size, for three, triple it, and so forth. The bigger the cage you can provide, the better. Keep in mind the bar spacing as well. The bars should be spaced out no wider then 1/2 inch apart.

Cockatiel Cage:

Cockatiel Cage For a cockatiel, the minimum size cage dimensions can be 26 inches high, 20 inches wide, and 20 inches long. This would be the minimum size, and even this I consider pretty small. The bigger the cage, the better. The cage bars need to be heavy parrot wire, and the spacing can be farther apart.

 


Perches:
       The bird's cage should consist of at least a couple perches of different size to prevent the bird from getting sore feet. You have a choice of getting plastic or wooden perches. Plastic perches are easier to clean, but wooden perches come closer to the real thing.Also, wooden perches help in keeping your bird's claw at a nice trim. Its your call. NOTE: When cleaning a wooden perch, use sand paper. Try not to get the perch wet.

                               Multi Branch Perch


Food/water Cup:
         This is self-explanatory. You can get cups that fasten from the inside of the cage, or the outside of the cage. Be sure to clean the water cup each day, as sometimes it grows algae on the sides and that must be cleaned off.

                               Seed/Water Cup


Toys:
      Your bird cage should have a few toys, to keep your bird entertain. You may think about investing on a small play-set for your bird, if not, be sure to put in a few toys in your bird cage. Some birds get attached to their toys, such as my Rambo and Barbudita, so if you want to have a "person" bird, don't over do it with the toys. If you plan on teaching your bird tricks, training it to speak, or your in the process of taming him, such as hand training, then I recommend you don't put in a mirror in the cage. Good toys to use are: Ladders, mirrors, swings, bells, chew toys for larger birds (I.E. cockatiels, small parrots, parrots).

                       toys.jpg (7276 bytes)

 

 

 

 

 

 


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