The Love Expert


T:	THIS IS THE AGE OF SPECIALISTS. 

T:	AND NO ONE NEED HOPE FOR A CAREER WHO DOES NOT SPECIALIZE ON SOMETHING.

T:	EVEN IN A MODERN YOUNG LADIES' BOARDING SCHOOL ONE WILL FIND THE SPIRIT 
	OF EFFICIENCY.

T:	FOR INSTANCE, THERE IS THE ATHLETIC GIRL.

1.	GYMNASIUM. (Fade in) Girl exercising with pulley weights, dumb-bells, 
	etc. Finally runs, jumps on trapeze and begins to do her stunts there. 
	(Fade out.)

T:	THEN THERE IS THE INTELLECTUAL TYPE, WHO VIGOROUSLY EXERCISES HER MIND. 

2.	CLASS ROOM. Girl in spectacles at a blackboard with a book in her hand, 
	working out a problem in geometry.  (Fadeout.)

T:	AND SO OUR HEROINE, BEING THOROUGHLY UP TO DATE AND HAVING CHOSE LOVE 
	AS HER CAREER, SPENDS HER TIME IN BECOMING AN EXPERT IN HER LINE.

3.	THE GIRLS' BEDROOM. The room is the typical college dormitory room and 
	contains three beds.  In one of the beds is Babs, dressed in negligee
	and studying a little diary.  She reaches underneath the mattress and 
	takes out a couple of books, one "Poems of Passion," by Ella Wheeler 
	Wilcox, and the other "What a Woman of Fifty Ought to Know."

INSERT BOTH BOOKS.

 	She finally chooses "Poems of Passion" and begins to read, and we 
	insert particularly violent passage and show Babs thrilled to ecstasy 
	over it.

4. 	HALLWAY OF SCHOOL. One of the teachers enters and rings a signal bell, 
	or simply show the bell with a hand pulling a chain to ring it twice.

5. 	GYMNASIUM. Athletic girl stops exercise and runs out of the room.

6.	CLASS ROOM. The intellectual girl quickly finishes her work and leaves.

7.	GIRLS' BEDROOM. Babs still in bed, reading and making a note in her 
	little diary. The athletic girl runs in, sees Babs in bed, goes to her 
	and says: 

SP:	"YOU SHOULD BE UP DOING YOUR EXERCISES." 

	Babs looks at her, smiles pleasantly and says: 

SP:	"I AM."

	Athletic girl looks at her questioningly, and then the intellectual 
	girl enters and goes to the other side of Babs, and looks at her, 
	shaking her head in a deprecating way.  Babs looking at them with a 
	challenge, puts down her book and turns to the athletic girl and says:

SP:	"YOU THINK THAT EXERCISING YOUR BODY IS THE ONLY THING IN THE WORLD." 

	Then she turns to the intellectual girl and says: 

SP:	"AND YOU THINK YOU ARE SMART BECAUSE YOU SPEND ALL YOUR TIME EXERCISING 
	YOUR INTELLECT." 

	The two girls look at Babs and at each other askance. Babs, clasping 
	the book to her breast, looks at them and says:

SP:	"I AM EXERCISING THE MOST IMPORTANT THING OF ALL -- MY EMOTIONS." 

	The two girls look at her and shake their heads to indicate that she is 
	a hopeless case.  Then Babs, in defense of her argument, takes from 
	under her pillow a picture of John Barrymore in the costume of "The 
	Jest."  She holds it out to the athletic girl and says: 

SP:	"LOOK AT THIS AND TELL ME WHAT YOU THINK OF IT." 

	Athletic girl takes it, looks at it critically and says: 

SP:	"RATHER UNDEVELOPED FIGURE." 

	and hands it back. Babs looks at her in disgust. She then holds the 
	picture out to the intellectual girl, asking her what it means to her. 
	The intellectual girl takes it, looks at it critically, and says: 

SP:	"WHY, IT IS THE LEADING CHARACTER IN SEM BENELLI'S DRAMA OF THE ITALIAN 
	RENAISSANCE PERIOD."
 
	She hands it back to Babs, who looks at her in disgust and says:

SP:	"I KNEW IT, I KNEW IT; YOU'RE NOT HALF ALIVE, EITHER OF YOU!" 

	They look at her resignedly and she declares that they are not either 
	of them half alive, that they have no red blood in them at all, and 
	then says: 

SP:	"NOW SEE WHAT IT DOES TO ME."

	She puts the photograph on her knees in front of her and gazes at it, 
	takes a hand of each of the girls and puts it on her chest, sighs, 
	closes her eyes, and her chest heaves up and down violently, she 
	getting a tremendous thrill out of the picture.  The two girls look at 
	her in absolute wonder.  She throws up her hands, then looks at them in 
	a superior sort of way and says:

SP:	"NOW WHICH OF US IS GETTING THE MOST OUT OF LIFE?" 

	The athletic girl laughs at her, and the intellectual girl shakes her 
	head, raising her eyes to Heaven. Babs grabs them by the hand and pulls 
	them down on the bed beside her and then she looks from one to the 
	other and says:

SP:	"BOTH YOU GIRLS EXPECT TO GET MARRIED, DON'T YOU?" 

	The athletic girl nods her head quickly, positively. The intellectual 
	girl says of course, that she supposes it will come in the natural
	course of events. Babs turns to the intellectual girl and says: 

SP:	"YOU WILL BE BORING YOUR HUSBAND TO TEARS WITH YOUR HIGH BROW STUFF."

	Then she turns to the athletic girl and says: 

SP:	"AND YOU WILL BE RUNNING YOURS RAGGED WITH YOUR ATHLETICS." 

	She then picks up her little diary, runs the leaves over with her 
	thumb, holds it up for the girls to see, and says:

SP:	"BUT WITH WHAT I HAVE LEARNED I WILL BE GIVING MINE A THRILL EVERY DAY 
	OF HIS LIFE." 

	The athletic girl laughs at her, but she is very fond of her, for all 
	that; she leans over and gives her a slap on the shoulder, and the 
	intellectual girl smiles in a superior way at this incorrigible person.
 
8. 	HALLWAY OF SCHOOL. Bell again rings, this time three times.

9.	GIRLS' BEDROOM. Three girls hearing the bell are frightened to death 
	because they are going to be late, and all rush out to go into their 
	classes. (Fade out.) 

T:	THE TIME CAME WHEN BABS HAD TO GO HOME TO HER CRUEL STEPFATHER AND 
	BEGIN HER SEARCH FOR A MATE. 

10.	EXTERIOR OF A NEW YORK HOUSE. Car drives up, and Babs gets out and goes 
	toward the house.

T:	Introducing Babs' father, John Hardcastle. 

11.	LIBRARY IN HARDCASTLE'S HOUSE. Old Hardcastle is sitting at a desk 
	going over a lot of bills. He looks up as if he had heard a door-bell
	ring, finishes his little job with the bills and then comes up and goes 
	out toward the hall. 

12.	HALLWAY OF HARDCASTLE'S HOUSE. Babs is just entering, followed by the 
	chauffeur with her bags.  Maid leads the chauffeur upstairs with the 
	bags, and father enters from the library. The father is a hard, 
	uncompromising, sanctimonious sort of man, with very little humanity, 
	but strong on religion and conscience. Babs runs to him in a friendly 
	way and kisses him; he simply allowing her to do so.  She starts to 
	lead him into the library, but he stops her and says:

SP:	"YOU GO RIGHT UPSTAIRS AND GET READY FOR LUNCH. MY JUNIOR PARTNER IS 
	COMING, AND I WANT YOU TO MEET HIM." 

	Babs is quite interested at the thought of a man coming to lunch, wants 
	to know all about him, whether he is good looking, and so on. Father is 
	not much interested in his looks, but he says to her: 

SP:	"HE IS A FINE YOUNG MAN, AND IT WOULD GRATIFY ME IF YOU TWO COULD BE 
	GOOD FRIENDS." 

	Babs is quite excited at this, and says: 

SP:	"YOU MEAN YOU WANT ME TO FALL IN LOVE WITH HIM?" 

	Father is taken back by her suddenness and does not quite know what to 
	answer, but at length says that it would not displease him at all if 
	she did. She, all athrill, runs upstairs. Father shakes his head 
	looking after her, realizing that he has something on his hands in her, 
	then goes back to the library.
                                                      
13.	BABS' BEDROOM. Housemaid is there unpacking Babs' bags and she takes 
	from one of them several books on sex, eugenics, passionate poetry, 
	etc., including Babs' diary. The maid nearly loses an eye looking at 
	these books. Babs rushes in, runs over to where the maid is, digs out 
	her diary, sits down, opens it to a page which reads: 

INSERT--PAGE IN BABS' HANDWRITING. 

T:	"HOW TO TELL WHEN YOU ARE IN LOVE."
 
	1.  Find some excuse to hold the man's hand--physical contact is 
	necessary. 

	2  Then note: 
		(a) If your pulse beats faster. 
		(b) If your heart throbs harder. 
		(c) If you blush.

	If none of the above symptoms appear, he is not the man.
 
	She finishes reading the excerpt, runs over to where the maid is, picks 
	out a dress, tells the maid she will wear that one, and the maid starts 
	to help her to change. (Fade out.)

T:	LUNCH TIME. THE JUNIOR PARTNER.

14.	LIBRARY OF HARDCASTLE. Hardcastle and Thompson are standing at the 
	fireplace talking. Iris in first on the junior partner. Open iris 
	revealing Hardcastle standing beside him. Babs enters from the hall and 
	goes to the father, who introduces her and the man. She holds out her 
	hand, and the man takes it very gingerly and drops it again.  This does 
	not please her at all, and she grabs his hand and holds it, looking 
	into his eyes. Then she quickly puts her other hand over her heart, 
	finds there is nothing doing then puts her hand to her face and finds 
	there is no blush. Then draws away her hand from the young man and 
	feels her pulse, finds no response there.  Then, having lost all 
	interest, she walks away and leaves the young man flat. Meanwhile the 
	father has watched this proceeding, at first with embarrassment and 
	then with alarm and chagrin, and when Babs walks away from the young 
	man the father is quite incensed. Just then the butler enters and says 
	that luncheon is served, and the father escorts the young man out 
	toward the hall, and the young man precedes him as he goes toward the 
	door. The father stops, goes to Babs, jerks her to her feet, shakes his 
	finger at her, telling her to behave herself and be nice to this young 
	man.  Babs gets up listlessly and without any interest at all goes with 
	her father out to lunch.  (Fade out.) 

T:	WHEN THE JUNIOR PARTNER HAD GONE, OLD HARDCASTLE SPOKE HIS MIND. 

15.	BABS' BEDROOM. (Fade in.) Babs is sitting by the window, listlessly 
	looking out.  Her father enters, goes to her, stands over her 
	accusingly, and says: 

SP:	"I'D LIKE TO KNOW JUST WHY YOU BEHAVED AS YOU DID BEFORE YOUNG 
	THOMPSON." 

	Babs looks up, sighs, shakes her head, and says:

SP:	"I'M SORRY, DAD, BUT I COULDN'T GET A TUMBLE OUT OF HIM." 

	The dad is horrified, shocked beyond words, says she ought to be 
	ashamed of herself to be so vulgar minded.  She sighs and shakes her 
	head, and her father says this young Thompson is a very fine young 
	fellow, worth a dozen of her, and it is a disgrace that she should 
	treat him so. She shakes her head as much as to say she can't help it.  
	He means nothing to her. Then the dad looks at her sharply and angrily, 
	and says: 

SP:	"VERY WELL, YOUNG LADY.  BUT YOU SHALL NOT SEE ANOTHER MAN IN MY HOUSE 
	OR OUT OF IT UNTIL YOU CHOOSE TO BE NICE TO MY FRIENDS FIRST!" 

	Babs is alarmed at this, jumps up, runs to her father, and says:

SP:	"OH, DAD, HAVE A HEART." 

	But he says no, not a single man; puts her away from him and starts out 
	of the room. At this point the maid enters with a card and gives it to 
	the father.  He looks at it.

INSERT--CARD, which has the name of the Reverend Doctor Vale on it.

	The father considers a moment, as this Dr. Vale is certainly a man, and 
	he has just told Babs she shall see none. But at last he indicates  
	that of course she has to see he Minister, you can't put him in the 
	category with other men anyway, and  he goes back to Babs. He hands her 
	the card, and says:
 
SP: 	"THERE'S ONE MAN I WANT YOU TO SEE." 

	She looks at the card, then up at him questioningly, and he says:

SP:	"PERHAPS DR. VALE CAN GET YOU OUT OF THIS UNFORTUNATE STATE OF MIND YOU 
	SEEM TO BE IN." 

	He indicates he would like to have her go down to see him at once, and 
	he leaves the room, the maid remaining. Babs looks at the card again, 
	and her interest is aroused in this man. She immediately starts to perk 
	herself up in front of the mirror and asks the maid if he is good 
	looking.  The maid says he is a peach.  Babs is very much excited, dabs 
	on a little extra rouge and powder, fixes her hair and then consults 
	her diary.
 
INSERT--PAGE OF DIARY, which reads:
 
	HOW TO TELL WHEN YOU ARE IN LOVE.
  
	1.  Find some excuse to hold the man's hand--physical contact is 
	necessary. 

	2  Then note: 
		(a) If your pulse beats faster. 
		(b) If your heart throbs harder. 
		(c) If you blush.

	If none of the above symptoms appear, he is not the man.
 
	With a little thrill she puts the diary down, takes another quick look 
	in the mirror and goes out of the room.  After she has gone, the maid, 
	curious to know what is in this book, picks up the diary and begins to 
	study it.
 
16.	HALLWAY, HARDCASTLE HOUSE. Babs goes down the stairs, all excited and 
	thrilled with expectation, goes over  to the entrance to the library 
	and looks in.

17.	LIBRARY, HARDCASTLE HOUSE. Doctor Vale, from Babs' angle. She sees only 
	his back, as he is standing facing the wall, looking at a picture or 
	something.
 
18. 	HALLWAY, HARDCASTLE HOUSE. Babs, looking at the minister's back. He 
	looks pretty good from that view, and she, quite excited, leaves the 
	hall and enters the library.
 
19.	HARDCASTLE HOUSE. Babs crosses the room, approaches Dr. Vale and calls 
	him by name.  As he turns she stretches out her hand to him, but you 
	see as he turns that his right hand is in a sling and in his left is a 
	book and also some tracts, so that neither hand is free for her to get 
	hold of.  He is a good looking chap, and when she sees his face she is 
	quite thrilled; but as she gets he fact that neither hand is available 
	for her test, she is very much dismayed.  He smiles at her and says:
 
SP:	"YOU'LL HAVE TO EXCUSE ME. I MET WITH A SLIGHT ACCIDENT." 

	She is very sympathetic and asks him to sit dawn. She leads him to a 
	couch and they both sit. He starts to unfold the tracts with his left 
	hand and she tries to find some excuse to take hold of his hand.  He 
	has a little trouble opening the things with his left hand, and she 
	starts to help him, arranges the tract for him, and is just placing her 
	hand on his when he realizes the light isn't good there, gets up and 
	leaves her, much to her chagrin. He goes to the window and sits with 
	his back to the light so he can read better.  Then he says to her:

SP:	"I SHOULD LIKE TO INTEREST YOU IN OUR WORK OF RECLAIMING THE BACK-
	SLIDING CHRISTIANS OF CZECHO-SLOVAKIA." 

	She looks at him dubiously at first and then perks up as if she had an 
	idea, smiles, looks over and says: 

SP:	"DO YOU KNOW WHAT I THINK WE OUGHT TO DO WITH THOSE PEOPLE?" 

	He is quite interested, says no, what is her idea. She rises, goes over 
	to him, looks him squarely in the face a moment and then says:

SP:	"I THINK WE SHOULD TAKE THEM BY THE HAND AND LIFT THEM UP!"
 
	She then grabs his left hand, pulls him to his feet, holds his hand and 
	goes on expatiating on what they should do. Gradually she loses 
	interest in the Czecho-Slovaks and concentrates her mind on herself and
	the minister. Still holding his hand with her right, she puts her left 
	hand over her heart. No response. She then puts her hand to her face. 
	No blush. She then takes her other hand away and feels her pulse. There 
	is no result. The minister all this time is looking at her, wondering 
	what the devil is the matter with her. She leaves him cold, goes back 
	and sits on the sofa. He looks at her questioningly, not knowing what 
	sort of crazy creature she is; but he has a duty to perform, so he sits 
	again and begins to read his tract. She, sitting on the couch, almost 
	turns her back on him, sighs and yawns. The minister then goes on 
	reading from his tract. 

INSERT--What the minister is reading:

		"What are we of the Western World to do about these back-sliders. 
	 	Shall we leave the Czecho-Slovaks to their fate?" 

	He goes on reading. She sighs, gives him a dirty look and then with her 
	hand covering her mouth from him, says:

SP:	"OH, FEED 'EM RAT POISON. I DON'T CARE." 

	The minister goes on reading, and Babs sits perfectly disconsolate, 
	realizing this is the only man she is going to have a chance at. (Fade 
	out.) 

T:	FOR A WHOLE WEEK THE LIFE OF BABS WAS A MANLESS WASTE--AND THEN A GOOD 
	KIND DOCTOR ORDERED HER FATHER TO PALM BEACH FOR THE WINTER. 

20.	HALLWAY, HARDCASTLE HOUSE. (Fade in.) Hardcastle comes downstairs, 
	followed by the butler carrying his traveling bag.  (The butler hands 
	the bag and another bag which is in the hall to a handsome chauffeur 
	who takes them out to the front of the house.)  The butler then gets 
	Hardcastle's overcoat, hat and gloves and starts to help him put them 
	on.
 
21.	BABS' BEDROOM. Babs is there with the maid, finishing packing her 
	traveling bag and getting on her things. She is all excitement. She 
	finishes her preparations and runs out of the room, followed by the 
	maid carrying the bag.
 
22.	HALLWAY, HARDCASTLE HOUSE. Father has his coat, hat and gloves on and 
	is waiting impatiently, looking at his watch. Babs comes down the 
	stairs followed by the maid with the bag. The father tells her they are 
	very late and will have to hurry. The father grabs her bag and they 
	rush out of the house. 

23.	EXTERIOR, HARDCASTLE HOUSE. As Babs and her father come from the house, 
	Babs stops and looks, startled and interested.

CLOSE UP--Handsome chauffeur, waiting; at an open car. Babs stops her father 
	and asks who that is. The father says:

SP:	"THAT'S THE NEW CHAUFFEUR." 

	And hurries her down the steps. 

T:	TOO GOOD TO BE OVERLOOKED.

CLOSE UP--Chauffeur waiting at the car. Hardcastle and Babs approach the car. 
	The chauffeur puts the bag in the tonneau, and as they start to get in 
	Babs says to her father:

SP: 	"IT IS SO COLD, DAD, WOULD YOU MIND IF I SAT UP IN FRONT?" 

	The father impatiently says no, no, go ahead, climbs in the back seat 
	and sits down. The chauffeur helps Babs into the front seat, she giving 
	him the eye, and then he runs around and takes his seat beside her. The 
	father leans over and says to the chauffeur: 

SP:	"CUT THROUGH THE PARK, JAMES, WE'RE VERY LATE." 

	James says, "Yes, sir," and starts the car down the street, across 
	Eighth Avenue and enters the park. 

CLOSE UP--Babs and the chauffeur. She keeps looking greedily at him. He is 
	such a handsome devil that she feels she must try her system on him. At 
	length she snuggles over close to him, sneaks her hand up on his, as he 
	is holding the wheel, tells him she is crazy to learn to drive. As she 
	holds her hand over his tightly, she puts her other hand over her 
	heart. There is no response. She then puts her hand to her face. No 
	blush. Then she looks over at the chauffeur.
 
CLOSE UP-Chauffeur's chest heaving, and the wheel wiggling in his hands.

CLOSE UP--Chauffeur's face suffused with red. Cut back to Babs who looks at 
	him wide eyed, so astounded she forgets to take her hand away. The car 
	meantime all over the road.
 
CLOSE UP--Father jumping up in alarm to admonish her and tell the chauffeur 
	to be careful.
 
CLOSE UP--Babs screaming with fright as the car jumps off the road and she 
	lunges forward.
 
LONG SHOT--with the car bumped into a tree. Babs is thrown forward and the 
	old man also thrown forward. The chauffeur is just recovering himself. 
	The chauffeur jumps out of the car and runs around to the front. The 
	old man gathers himself together and also jumps out and looks at the 
	car. He then goes to Babs, shakes his finger at her and says: 

SP:	"I SAW YOU! IT WASN'T HIS FAULT AT ALL. JUST FOR THAT YOU DON'T GO TO 
	PALM BEACH." 

	Babs is terribly distressed at this, says she didn't do a thing. The 
	father says it is no use telling him, that he saw, and that she is a 
	wicked hussy and--

SP:	"I'LL SEND YOU UP TO YOUR AUNT EMILY BOWDITCH IN BOSTON!" 

	Babs is dismayed at this, begs him not to do it, says that she wants to 
	go to Palm Beach; but he is obdurate and says no, she can't go. He 
	can't handle her and her aunt's is the only place where she can be kept 
	out of mischief. She pleads with him not to do it, but he says he will. 
	He tells her to get out of that seat and get into the back seat with 
	him, which she very reluctantly does. By this time the chauffeur has  
	finished examining the car, found there isn't much damage. He gets back 
	in his seat, and the father tells him to go back home. He turns the car 
	around and they start back. As they start back cut in-- 

CLOSE UP--Hardcastle giving her the devil, telling her he is going to send 
	her to Boston that very night and write her Aunt Emily to keep a sharp 
	eye on her and keep her out of mischief.  Babs is terribly disconsolate.
   	(Fadeout.) 

T:	SO BABS GOT SHIPPED OFF TO BOSTON, OF ALL PLACES IN THE WORLD FOR A 
	LOVE SPECIALIST.
   
		(Illustrate this title with an exterior of old-fashioned Beacon 
		Street Boston house.) 

24.	EXTERIOR AUNT EMILY'S HOUSE. (Fade in.) A Boston taxi drives up. Babs 
	and Aunt Emily get out. The taxi driver has a fine set of whiskers, and 
	when Aunt Emily pays him, Babs gives him a dirty look. Babs and Aunt 
	Emily go into the house, carrying the bags.

25.	HALLWAY, AUNT EMILY'S HOUSE. Aunt Emily and Babs:enter, carrying the 
	bags, Babs very sad. A maid takes their bags and starts upstairs with 
	them. They start to take off their things. 

T:	AUNT EMILY'S MENACE CONSISTED OF A CHOICE ASSORTMENT OF MEN FOR BABS TO 
	PICK FROM.

26.	AUNT EMILY'S LIVING ROOM.

LONG SHOT--showing three men, two playing chess, one looking on at the game 
	and another reading. 

T:	EMILY'S BROTHER--JOB BOWDITCH. 

CLOSE UP--JOB playing chess, studying chess board. 

T:	HER COUSIN--BOWDITCH.

CLOSE UP--Seated opposite Job, also studying board. 

T:	HER UNCLE--JONAH BOWDITCH. 

CLOSE UP--JONAH is also sitting, playing the game. 

T:	HER SECOND COUSIN--THOMAS BLEEKER, A PROFESSOR OF BOTANY AT HARVARD. 

CLOSE UP--Professor reading book.

LONG SHOT--Aunt Emily brings Babs into the living room, introduces her to 
	each one of these people.  Each one shakes her hand, but she doesn't 
	even go to the trouble to see if there is any response; but looks at 
	them all in a perfectly resigned, discouraged sort of way. Then Aunt 
	Emily takes her out of the room and into the hall.

27.	HALLWAY, AUNT EMILY'S HOUSE. Aunt Emily and Babs enter and go up the 
	stairs, after picking up their wraps.

28. 	AUNT EMILY'S LIVING ROOM. The three fellows at the chess table are 
	discussing the girl. One thinks she is a very nice looking girl. The 
	old uncle nods his head and says:

SP: 	"YES, BUT SHE DOESN'T LOOK MUCH LIKE THE BOWDITCHES." 

	They both agree this is a great lack in her and go on with their game.

29. 	BEDROOM. AUNT EMILY'S. The room is severely furnished and gloomy. Babs 
	and her aunt enter and go toward the bed where the maid has opened her 
	bags. Babs puts down her hat and coat and then goes over to her aunt. 
	She shows interest as she takes hold of her aunt's hand and sees on it 
	an engagement ring.
 
INSERT--the hand with the engagement ring.
 
	Babs looks at the ring with breathless interest then at her aunt and 
	says:

SP: 	"YOU'RE ENGAGED, AREN'T YOU, AUNT EMILY?" 

	Her aunt says she is in a very matter of fact way. Babs goes into 
	ecstasies over the ring and wants to know all about it, asking who he 
	is. Aunt Emily says:
 
SP:	"JAMES WINTHROP, THE MANAGER OF YOUR FATHER'S BRANCH OFFICE HERE." 

	Babs has heard her father speak of him and is greatly thrilled and asks:

SP:	"WHEN ARE YOU GOING TO BE MARRIED?"

	The aunt shakes her head and says they haven't quite decided yet. Babs 
	says: 

SP:	"WHEN DID HE ASK YOU?" 

	The aunt thinks a long while, figures it out, and finally says:

SP:	"ABOUT SIX YEARS AGO." 

	Babs is flabbergasted at this and nearly falls over backward. She says, 
	"What did you say?" The aunt says, "Yes, it is about six years ago."  
	Babs is completely bowled over by such a situation and says: 

SP: 	"YOU'VE BEEN ENGAGED FOR SIX YEARS AND DON'T KNOW WHEN YOU'RE GOING TO 
	BE MARRIED?" 

	The aunt says yes, it's true. There is nothing unusual about it. Babs 
	thinks it is very unusual and wants to know why they haven't been 
	married before. The aunt says:

SP:	"YOU SEE, MY DEAR, HE HAS A FAMILY."

	At this Babs is thrillingly shocked, and looking around to see that no 
	one is listening, she whispers: 

SP:	"WHOM DID HE HAVE IT BY?" (or "Who is the mother of them?") 

	The aunt is horrified at Babs' insinuation and says: 

SP:	"MY DEAR, YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND. HE HAS TWO SISTERS AND AN OLD AUNT WHO 
	RAISED THEM."
 
	"Oh"--Babs loses her thrill and takes in what Aunt Emily is talking 
	about, but can't understand what that has to do with his marrying. The 
	aunt says: 

SP:	"OF COURSE WE CAN'T MARRY UNTIL THEY ARE OFF HIS HANDS." 

	Babs is more puzzled yet over this state of affairs. The aunt shakes 
	her head, smiles indulgently and says:

SP:	"YOU KNOW, MY DEAR, IN BOSTON A MAN DOESN'T MARRY UNTIL HIS FAMILY ARE 
	MARRIED OR DEAD." 

	Babs is utterly disgusted with such a condition and loses all interest 
	in her aunt's affair. She picks up her bag from the bed and puts it 
	over to one side. The aunt asks her if she will go down stairs. Babs 
	says no, she is very tired and thinks she will go to bed. The aunt says 
	all right, she can do just as she likes and then says:

SP:	"I'M TAKING A RIDE THIS EVENING WITH MY FIANCE. I'LL LOOK IN ON YOU 
	WHEN I GET HOME." 

	Babs says all right. Her aunt goes out. After she has gone Babs looks 
	about the room, lonely, disconsolate and chagrined over the whole thing 
	and finally breaks down crying. (Fade out.) 

T:	THAT NIGHT WHILE ALL BOSTON LAY WRAPPED IN SLUMBER--OR, IN OTHER WORDS, 
	ABOUT TEN O'CLOCK. 

30.	BABS' ROOM. AUNT EMILY'S. (Fade in.) 
	Babs is sitting at the window, looking out, very sad and disconsolate. 
	At length she makes up her mind that she won't stay in this terrible 
	place, looks about the room, gets up with determination, gets her bag 
	and starts to pack it.
 
TITLE--INTRODUCING JIM WINTHROP. 

31.	BOSTON PARK.

CLOSE UP--Aunt Emily and Jim riding along in an inexpensive car, Aunt Emily 
	sitting very stiffly, and Jim giving all his attention to his driving.  
	At length Aunt Emily turns to him and says:

SP:	"I'M WORRIED ABOUT THAT LITTLE NIECE OF MINE. SHE'S SO TERRIBLY 
	ROMANTIC." 

	Jim looks at her sort of quizzically and then as he turns away, says:
 
SP:	"SHE'LL GET OVER THAT." 

	She nods her head and says yes, she supposes it is an attribute of 
	youth, and he says yes, it's folly and no one with any character or 
	intelligence ever gives up to it. The aunt seems a bit satisfied and 
	relieved as they drive on.
 
32.	UPSTAIRS HALLWAY, AUNT EMILY'S. The door to Babs' room opens slowly and
 	cautiously. Babs, with her hat and coat on, carrying her bag, pokes her 
	head out, looks about very cautiously and sneaks down the stairs.

33.	EXTERIOR, AUNT EMILY'S. Car with Aunt Emily and Jim driving, draws up 
	in front of the house. Jim gets out and helps Aunt Emily out, and they 
	go up the steps.
 
34.	DOWNSTAIRS HALL, AUNT EMILY'S. Babs, tip-toeing down the stairs, hears 
	somebody coming up the steps, starts to run back but realizes she 
	hasn't time. She quickly chucks her suitcase behind something, takes 
	off her hat and holds it behind her just as the door opens and Aunt 
	Emily and Jim enter. Babs tries hard to hide her confusion.  Her aunt
	greets her and says:
 
SP:	"WHY, BARBARA, I THOUGHT YOU'D BE ASLEEP BY THIS TIME!" 

	Babs hedges and stalls, and the aunt says: 

SP:	"I'M GLAD YOU'RE UP, HOWEVER. YOU CAN MEET MY FIANCE, MR. WINTHROP." 

	Babs, with her hat hid behind her, is very much embarrassed, bows to 
	him and does not offer to shake hands and says good night and starts to 
	edge up towards the stairs. The aunt, after putting her hat and gloves 
	on a side table, says, "Jim, will you come into the parlor," and she 
	goes into the parlor. By this time Babs has backed away over to the 
	stairway, still with her hat behind her, and as she comes to the 
	stairway she stumbles and falls over the steps.  Jim runs to her to 
	help her up. He takes her hand, puts his arm about her and lifts her to
 	her feet. Babs suddenly realizes that something is happening to her, 
	looks sharply up at him and holds on to his hand tighter. Then she 
	looks down at her heart.
 
INSERT--Babs' chest heaving up and down rapidly.
 
	She then looks up, puts her other hand to her face. 

INSERT--CLOSE UP--Babs' face tinted pink. 

	She then looks up at Jim.  Babs smiles up at him in a weak manner and 
	slowly lets go his hand, but the two stand looking into each other's 
	eyes.  He is astonished, but unmoved.
 
35.	LIVING ROOM, AUNT EMILY'S. Aunt Emily has taken the flowers from her 
	belt and put them in a vase full of water. She then looks up and calls:
 
SP:	"JIM."

36. 	LOWER HALL, AUNT EMILY'S. Jim and Babs stand looking at each other just 
	as before, and the aunt's voice brings Jim down to earth. He says good 
	night and leaves her, going toward the living room still wondering. 
	After he has gone Babs looks after him, feels her heart, which is still 
	beating rapidly, then feels her pulse, and sighs ecstatically. She then 
	looks over toward the parlor and becomes a little grave.

37.	LIVING ROOM, AUNT EMILY'S. Jim joins Aunt Emily. She now has the 
	flowers arranged in a vase which she places on the table, and says to 
	him: 

SP:	"IT WAS SO NICE OF YOU TO BRING ME THESE FLOWERS."

	Jim nods his head. She goes and sits before the fire, and he sits
	dazedly in a chair some distance from her, still wondering about the 
	girl. He scratches his head and shows he has run up against something 
	he doesn't understand.

38.	LOWER HALL, AUNT EMILY'S. Babs, looking towards the living room, slowly 
	realizes the tragedy of her situation. At last the great love of her 
	life has come and it is for the man who is tied.  She slowly puts on 
	her hat, goes and gets her bag, and starts to tip-toe out. She gets to 
	the door, stops, looks tragically back toward the parlor, squares her 
	shoulders, opens the door very quietly, and holding it open, she feels 
	her heart which is still beating. Then a sudden realization comes that 
	she can't leave this man. She closes the door very softly, sighs in a 
	tragic manner, then throwing off her feeling of duty toward her aunt 
	and succumbing to the overpowering influence of love, she slowly starts 
	upstairs as in a daze. (Fade out.)
 
T:	THE NEXT MORNING BABS FACES A DOMESTIC PROBLEM THAT WOULD HAVE MADE 
	IBSEN GREEN WITH ENVY. 

39.	LOWER HALLWAY, AUNT EMILY'S. (Fade in.) Babs comes thoughtfully and 
	sadly down the stairs. She goes to a little table on which is a picture 
	of Jim, picks it up, looks at it and sighs, then looks at picture of 
	Aunt Emily in similar frame, with a heavy heart, and then walks down to 
	the entrance to the living room and looks in.

40.	LIVING ROOM, AUNT EMILY'S. Sitting at a table is her aunt with 
	Professor Bleeker. The aunt and the professor are dissecting the 
	flowers that Jim gave her the night before, having a very interesting 
	botanical discussion over them.

41. 	LOWER HALLWAY, AUNT EMILY'S. Babs looks at them in amazement for some 
	time, finally realizes what they are doing, and a look of hope comes 
	into her face, but she can't believe it's true, and goes into the 
	parlor to her aunt.

42. 	LIVING ROOM, AUNT EMILY'S. Babs comes to her aunt and the professor and 
	looks amazed at what they are doing, and then says to her aunt: 

SP:	"AUNTY, ARE YOU CUTTING UP THE FLOWERS THAT HE GAVE YOU LAST NIGHT?" 

	The aunt looks up and says yes, and the professor says:

SP:	"THEY'RE VERY INTERESTING SPECIMENS." 

	Then they go on examining the flowers with their heads together. Babs 
	looks up, draws back a few paces from them, looks up and says to 
	herself: 

SP:	"SHE'S NOT IN LOVE WITH HIM AT ALL." 

	Then she looks back at her aunt and the professor. The professor looks 
	at his watch, says he must get to his class, rises and starts for the 
	door. He shakes hands with Babs in an embarrassed sort of way. Then he 
	turns to Emily, takes her hand to say good-by and Babs, suddenly 
	getting an inspiration, runs to them, grabs their hands and holds them 
	together. Then she quickly looks from one to the other. 

CLOSE UP--Professor blushing and his chest heaving. 

CLOSE UP--Aunt Emily blushing and her chest heaving. 

	Babs, fully satisfied, lets go, and the professor, overcome with 
	confusion, bolts out of the door. Babs watches the professor go. Aunt 
	Emily goes to Babs and scolds her, telling her she should not behave in 
	that way. Babs turns to her, throws her arms about her and kisses her.  
	She then runs over to where they had been dissecting the flowers. She 
	shakes her head ruefully over this desecration, picks up one that is 
	left whole, holds it to her heart and sighs. She then runs to her aunt 
	and embraces her again and says:

SP:	"HOW MANY SISTERS HAS JIM WINTHROP?" 

	The aunt, putting her away, not quite approving of this action of hers, 
	says he has two. Babs then says:

SP:	"AND THEY MUST BOTH BE MARRIED OFF BEFORE HE CAN MARRY?" 

	And the aunt very stiffly says yes, they must, that is the custom in 
	Boston. Babs then says: 

SP:	"WE MUST MARRY THEM OFF AT ONCE."

	The aunt asks her what she means. She says they must get the two 
	sisters married so Jim can marry. The aunt shakes her head rather 
	dubiously and says: 

SP:	"THE TWO WINTHROP GIRLS DON'T CARE MUCH FOR MEN." 

	Babs is surprised at this, says they should be taught better. The aunt 
	thinks this is rather hopeless, but Babs says, "It is simply a Boston 
	habit and they must be gotten out of it." Aunt Emily is still doubtful, 
	but Babs says she knows she can put it over. Aunt Emily turns to her 
	and says:
 
SP: 	"BESIDES, THERE IS AUNT CORNELIA." 

	Babs says, "Oh, Lord, I forgot all about her." Then she asks Aunt Emily 
	if Aunt Cornelia has any interest in men.  Aunt Emily shakes her head 
	and says she is too old to think of marriage. Babs doesn't think age 
	always counts, however, and something has certainly got to be done.  
	Finally she says to Aunt Emily:

SP:	"YOU TAKE ME TO SEE THEM, AND I'LL GIVE THEM THE ONCE OVER. SOMETHING 
	HAS GOT TO BE DONE." 

	The aunt protests, saying she is satisfied with things as they are now 
	and she doesn't want to rush things with the Winthrop family, and Babs 
	says:
 
SP:	"IF YOU WON'T TAKE ME, I'LL HAVE TO GO ALONE." The aunt protests 
	against this, says no, no, she mustn't do it. Babs says that she is 
	going to do it. "Now, are you going with me or are you not?" The aunt 
	finally acquiesces very unwillingly, and Babs says all right, now she 
	is satisfied and drags her off. (Fade out.) 

T:	BRINGING US TO THE WINTHROP HOME. 

43.	PORCH OF WINTHROP HOUSE.  (To be built in studio in connection with the 
	hallway.)  (Fade in.) Babs and her aunt come up the steps, go to the 
	door, and Babs is about to ring the bell or knock when the aunt stops 
	her and tries to dissuade her from her wild scheme, but Babs says no, 
 	she will not be stopped, and knocks on the door. The aunt is very much 
	upset by her obstinacy and continues to argue with her but to no use, 
	Babs is determined to go on. At length the maid opens the door and 
	admits them. 

44.	WINTHROP HALL. The maid admits Babs and her Aunt Emily. The aunt is 
	visibly worried about Babs. The aunt tells the maid they have called to 
	see the Misses Winthrop, and the maid shows them into the drawing room.
 
45.	WINTHROP DRAWING ROOM. The maid shows in Babs and her aunt. The aunt is 
	seated and Babs starts to look about the place.  She finally sees a
 	pipe on the desk, looks around stealthily to see that her aunt isn't 
	watching, then picks it up, clasps it to her chest and says: 

SP:   "HIS!" 

	And she holds it to her chest romantically. 

45 1/2.
	HALLWAY, WINTHROP HOME. Dorcas is coming down the stairs and going 
	toward the parlor with a big book under her arm.

46.	WINTHROP DRAWING ROOM. Babs hears Dorcas coming, tries to put the pipe 
	quickly into her waist but can't find a place to put it in and finally 
	quickly jams it in her stocking, just as Dorcas comes in the room.
	Dorcas is dressed in a prim little Boston dress with horn-rimmed 
	glasses and long hair done in a bun. Babs looks over and brightens up 
	at the sight of her. Dorcas goes over to Aunt Emily and greets her with 
	a chaste kiss. Aunt Emily introduces her to Babs. Babs goes right to 
	her and gives her a good thorough once over, standing off and looking 
	at her from head to foot. Then she says to Dorcas:

SP:	"MY DEAR, I THINK YOU'RE DARLING!" 

	She then looks over at her aunt and gives her the Indian sign that this 
	is going to be easy. She turns and again looks over the utterly 
	flabbergasted Dorcas, takes off her glasses, fixes her hair a little 
	more fluffy, then looks at the glasses and says: 

SP:	"DO YOU HAVE TO WEAR THESE?" 

	Dorcas, who is utterly at sea regarding this creature, nevertheless has 
	too good manners not to be polite, and says:

SP: 	"THE OCULIST SAID IF I WORE THEM DURING MY YOUTH I SHOULD PROBABLY NOT 
	HAVE TO WEAR ANY IN MY LATER YEARS." 

	This is a poser for Babs. She looks around at her aunt questioningly, 
	then back at Dorcas and slowly passes back the glasses and says:

SP:	"YOU'D HAVE A MUCH BETTER CHANCE WITH THE MEN WITHOUT THEM." 

	Dorcas, realizing now what she is getting at, freezes her with a look 
	and says:
 
SP:	"I HAVE NO INTEREST IN MEN."

	Babs is surprised at this and asks if this is really so. Dorcas says 
	yes, she has no interest whatever in men. Then she asks Babs to sit 
	down and she goes herself to sit down. Babs goes over and sits by her 
	aunt and glancing back at Dorcas whispers to her aunt:

SP:	"I'VE GOT TO GET SOME PEP INTO THIS ONE." 

	Dorcas, seated, opens the book she has been reading and says:

SP:	"I'VE JUST BEEN READING WILLIAM JAMES ON PRAGMATISM." 

	Babs looks at her quizzically and then over at her aunt, and her aunt 
	nods her head as much as to say, yes, you should take an interest in 
	such things. At this point Matilda enters. She is a genuine old maid 
	with a blue nose and eye glasses. She must have thin legs and a fat 
	chest. She carries a reticule on her arm with some knitting. She greets 
	Aunt Emily with a chaste kiss and is introduced to Babs. Babs looks at 
	her a little doubtfully, as Matilda is pretty much of a sight, very 
	thin and anemic. Matilda then sits, asking them to do the same. Babs 
	looks at her aunt, shakes her head a little doubtfully, then goes to 
	Matilda, who is now knitting, and sits near her. Babs looks her up and 
	down out of the corner of her eye and then says: 

SP:	"DO YOU KNOW ANY NICE MEN?" 

	Then Matilda, not taking in what she said, the subject being so foreign 
	to her, asks her what she said, and Babs says:

SP:	"DO YOU KNOW ANY MEN AT ALL?"

	Matilda is"ore surprised, wants to know what she means, what she is 
	talking about, and Babs explains she wants to know whether she has any 
	beaux, any admirers. Matilda smiles patronizingly and then says:

SP:	"NO, MY DEAR, I NEVER THINK OF MEN. I HAVE OTHER THINGS TO DO." 

	And she goes on with her knitting. Babs looks her over from head to 
	foot, shakes her head in a rather discouraged way, looks over at her 
	aunt, and gives her the high sign that this is going to be rather 
	difficult. The aunt nods her head as much as to say, "I told you so."
	Babs sighs and looks over at Matilda again, shaking her head in a 
	discouraged way. 

	At this point Old Aunt Cornelia enters. Cornelia is an old, 
	aristocratic looking bird of about 62 but looks 80.  She carries a cane 
	and an ear trumpet. She is a very disagreeable old party, and everybody 
	hates her. The old lady comes to Aunt Emily who rises to greet her.  
	Aunt Emily starts to shake her hand, but Cornelia grabs her hand away, 
	sticks her trumpet in her ear and wants to know who that person is.

	Babs looks at her in utter astonishment. This is the finish. She stands 
	open mouthed while Emily greets Cornelia. Emily then introduces Babs to 
	Cornelia. Babs comes over to her, shakes the old lady's hand, raises 
	her eyes to heaven in utter despair, turns to the old lady and yells in 
	her ear trumpet and says: 

SP:	"HOW LONG HAS IT BEEN SINCE YOU HAD A THRILL?"
  
	The three women are all scandalized and jump to their feet in amazement.
 	The old lady doesn't think she has heard right and asks Babs to repeat. 
	Babs is about to yell it again into her ear trumpet when her aunt comes 
	to the rescue and takes up the conversation, thrusting Babs aside and 
	saying something to the old lady in her ear trumpet.
  
	They all sit down. The maid brings in tea. Emily now sits by Babs in 
	order to keep her in order, and Babs, shaking her head discouraged, 
	looking from Matilda to Cornelia, turns to her Aunt Emily and says:

SP:	"IT CAN'T BE DONE." 

	The aunt hushes her, tells her to be careful what she says. And as the 
	maid is serving tea (Fade out). 

T:	BRINGING US TO THE END OF TEA TIME. 

47.	WINTHROP DRAWING ROOM (Fade in). Aunt Emily and Babs, having finished 
	their tea, are just about to leave. They rise and start to bid the 
	others good-by. As they are doing so--

48.	WINTHROP HALL. Jim enters, hangs up his hat and goes into the drawing 
	room.
 
49.	DRAWING ROOM, WINTHROP HOUSE. Emily and Babs are about to leave as Jim 
	enters. He greets Emily very courteously and then goes to Babs who 
	takes his hand and looks right up into his face and bats her eyes at 
	him. He, looking at her inquiringly for a moment, turns away from her.  
	He then hands a little box of candy to Aunt Cornelia. She thanks him 
	rather sharply and starts to eat it. Babs grabs Jim by the arm and 
	says: 

SP:	"COME OVER HERE. I WANT TO TALK TO YOU." 

	He is utterly flabbergasted, and doesn't know what the devil to do, 
	looks back toward Emily, but Babs drags him over to the corner, sets 
	him down on a little sofa and sits beside him. Meanwhile the old lady 
	is selfishly champing on her candy and the other three women are in a 
	little group by themselves trying to cover up the awkward situation. 
	Babs on the sofa with him looks at him soulfully and says: 

SP:	"DON'T YOU JUST LONG TO BE MARRIED?" 

	He is surprised at such a question, doesn't quite know what to say, but 
	glances over toward Aunt Emily, and then says yes, he supposes it must 
	be a very happy state. Babs, clasping her hands, looks up into his face 
	and says:
 
SP:	"JUST THINK WHAT IT MEANS TO FIND YOUR MATE!" 

	He is rather shocked by this child's talk, looks at her, asks her what 
	she means by this. She says, "Yes, your mate."  He, a little 
	embarrassed, looks around at Emily again, says, Yes, yes, he supposes 
	it is an awfully fine thing. And she, realizing he is not enthusiastic 
	over Aunt Emily at all, is greatly encouraged. She puts her hand on his 
	arm, glances over at the family and then says:
 
SP:	"DO YOU REALLY HAVE TO WAIT UNTIL YOUR FAMILY MARRY OR DIE OR 
	SOMETHING?" 

	This is getting on firm ground for him, and his embarrassment leaves 
	him immediately, and he asserts his attitude very strongly, nodding his 
	head: 

SP:	"I PROMISED MY MOTHER ON HER DEATH BED I WOULD NOT MARRY UNTIL THE 
	FAMILY WERE SAFELY SETTLED IN LIFE." 

	She wants to know why this is, why he has to remain single just because 
	his family do. He looks at his family, then smiles upon her and says: 

SP:	"THEY NEED ME, YOU KNOW."

	Babs wilts a little at this and sighs, realizing the enormous task she 
	has on her hands. Then she braces herself, for hard as the job is, she 
	is going to do it. Suddenly a thought comes to her. She gets up, goes 
	over to Cornelia, who is still eating her candy, leans over and yells 
	in her ear trumpet: 

SP:	"YOUR HEALTH ISN'T VERY GOOD, IS IT?" 

	Cornelia snappily shakes her head, says, No, been failing terribly all 
	winter, getting worse every day, no appetite and can't sleep. This 
	gives Babs new confidence. She shakes the old lady's hand good-by. She 
	then says good-by to the two girls turns and throws one dazzling look 
	back at Jim who comes to them, bids the two ladies good-by and they all 
	go out in the hall. (Fade out).

T:	BABS HAD TO DIG INTO THE ARCHIVES TO GET DATA FOR THE DIFFICULT PROBLEM 
	AHEAD OF HER.
  
50.	BABS' ROOM, AUNT EMILY'S. (Fade in.) Babs is sitting with a lot of 
	books in her lap and about her. She is reading "The Psychology of Sex," 
	by Havelock Ellis, and suddenly comes to a passage that seems to 
	interest her.
 
INSERT--PASSAGE, which says that people in Southern climates are more 
	susceptible to the influence of love than they are in the colder North.

	Babs gets an idea from this, thinks a moment, says "Southern climate?" 
	to herself, and then she gets a scheme and says: 

SP:	"PALM BEACH!"

	She thinks a moment longer and her scheme matures in her mind. She 
	jumps up, grabs her coat and hat and runs out. (Fade out.)

T:	TO BRING BABS TO TELEGRAPH OFFICE. 

51.	INTERIOR TELEGRAPH OFFICE. (Fade in.)
	Babs enters, gets a telegraph blank and writes a telegram.

INSERT--HER HAND WRITING THE TELEGRAM. 

	MR. JAMES WINTHROP, 
	250 Washington St., 
	Boston, Mass.

	COME DOWN TO PALM BEACH AT ONCE. MUST SEE YOU ON IMPORTANT BUSINESS. 
	BRING MY DAUGHTER AND YOUR FAMILY WITH YOU AND WE WILL COMBINE 
	PLEASURE WITH BUSINESS AND HAVE A LITTLE HOLIDAY.

					JOHN HARDCASTLE. 

	She gives the telegram to the clerk, digs into her purse for the money 
	to pay for it. (Fade out.) 

51 1/2.	
	LOBBY. Count sees Hardcastle in Palm Room and exits to same.

T:	SHOWING BABS' FATHER AT PALM BEACH. 

52.	SUN PARLOR OR SMOKING ROOM AT PALM BEACH HOTEL. (Fade in.) Hardcastle 
	is sitting there smoking and reading the newspaper when Thompson enters 
	and sits beside him. They start talking.  At this point the Count 
	enters, a social parasite, lounge lizard type of run-down aristocrat. 
	He sees Hardcastle, comes up and warmly shakes him by the hand, 
	Hardcastle being very unresponsive.  The Count says:
 
SP:	"I HAVE JUST ARRIVED. IS YOUR CHARMING DAUGHTER HERE?" 

	Hardcastle says No, she is not and he doesn't expect her. The Count is 
	very disappointed as he had hoped to find her here. Hardcastle says he 
	is very sorry that he is disappointed. The Count, after stalling a 
	moment, leaves. The Junior partner, looking after him, turns to 
	Hardcastle, shakes his head and says:

SP:	"BAD LOT, THAT BOY." 

	Hardcastle nods his head, saying he knows just how much of a rotter he 
	is. He then says: 

SP:	"I'M GLAD I LEFT BABS AT HOME. HE'S BEEN PURSUING HER FOR HER MONEY."

	The Junior partner is shocked at this and tells him to keep him out of 
	the way, he's a bad boy and it doesn't do any woman any good to be seen 
	with him. The dad says he knows it, and he is going to see to it that 
	she sees nothing of him.

	At this point Hardcastle says, "Oh, I got a telegram from Winthrop last 
	night," reaches in his pocket and pulls it out. Thompson looks at it.

INSERT--TELEGRAM, saying:
 
	MR. JOHN HARDCASTLE, 
	HOTEL, 
	PALM BEACH, FLA.
  
	YOURS RECEIVED. LEAVING FOR PALM BEACH TOMORROW.
  
	Hardcastle asks Thompson if he sent for him. Thompson says No. Then 
	Hardcastle says he didn't either. They are both puzzled.

53. 	LOBBY OF PALM BEACH HOTEL. Babs ushers in her gang of trained 
	Bostonians.  Aunt Cornelia is leaning on the arm of Jim and Matilda and 
	is just about all in. They take her over and put her in a chair. 
	Dorcas, Jim and Matilda all stay with her, greatly concerned over the 
	old lady's condition. Babs goes to look for her father. When she is 
	gone the old lady begins to complain, says she knew it would kill her, 
	this terrible trip, drat that girl anyhow, and she drops her head back 
	as though she were going to faint. Dorcas takes a little bottle of 
	smelling salts out of her reticule and holds it to the old lady's nose.
 
54.	SMOKING ROOM OR SUN PARLOR  Hardcastle and Thompson are still there. 
	Babs rushes in to them.  They are both amazed to see her, particularly 
	her father. Babs says, "Didn't you know we were coming?" He says, 
	"No--who?" Babs says, "Why, Mr. Winthrop, his two sisters, Aunt 
	Cornelia and I." The father is flabbergasted at this, says he certainly 
	had no such idea. Winthrop wired he was coming, but he didn't expect 
	the rest of them. Babs says, "Why, father, that's surprising. We've all 
	come to have a little holiday, and you must be nice to everybody. You 
	must go into the lobby now and welcome them." The father gets up in 
	absolute despair and allows Babs to lead him out of the room, followed 
	by the junior partner.

55.	LOBBY OF HOTEL. Jim, Dorcas and Matilda lift the old lady up from the 
	chair and start to lead her over to the stairs, but she hasn't gone far 
	when she completely collapses in a fit and insists that they put her 
	down.  This happens just as  Babs enters with her father and Thompson. 
	There are hurried greetings, and the father is concerned about the old 
	lady. They put the old lady in an easy chair and again supply the 
	smelling salts and a glass of water. The old lady recovers enough to 
	say:

SP: 	"YOU MIGHT AS WELL TAKE ME TO A HOSPITAL. THIS IS THE END." 

	They try to persuade her not to, but she is very petulant and insists 
	on going to the hospital.  Babs runs out to the hotel clerk and asks if 
	there is a hospital near. He tells her there is a sanitarium about two 
	blocks away. She runs back to the people and tells them there is a 
	sanitarium near at hand, and Jim, Hardcastle and Thompson take the old 
	lady off to the sanitarium, Jim and Hardcastle carrying the chair with 
	her in it and Matilda fussing about them. This leaves Babs with Dorcas 
	and the Thompson gentleman. They talk together a moment about how sad 
	it would be if the old lady should die. Then Babs looks at Dorcas and 
	Thompson, stands off, leaving them together and  says:

SP:	"HOW CUTE YOU TWO LOOK TOGETHER." 

	Thompson looks at Dorcas out of the corner of his eye and, being a 
	gentleman, doesn't like to say just what he thinks. Babs also looks her 
	over, sees there isn't much chance as things are, and Thompson then 
	bids them good-by and leaves them flat. Both girls look after him. Babs 
	turns and looks at Dorcas, and appraises her. She then indicates she 
	has come to a decision, puts her arm in Dorcas' and leads her out 
	toward the elevator. (Fade out.)

T:	THAT NIGHT.

56.	BABS' AND DORCAS' ROOM AT PALM BEACH. (Fade in). Dorcas is asleep in 
	bed in a terrible looking night gown, ruffled all up around her neck 
	and down to her wrists. Babs looks at her, makes sure she is asleep, 
	touches the ruffles of the night gown and shudders. Then she goes and 
	gets Dorcas' terrible looking bag, takes all her clothes from a chair, 
	where they are neatly laid out, dumps them into the bag. She then 
	closes the bag and rings the bell for the boy. She looks again at 
	Dorcas, sees her glasses on a little table beside the bed, takes the 
	glasses, opens the bag and drops them in gingerly. She then closes the 
	bag again. She then takes another look at Dorcas, sizes her up, makes 
	up her mind, runs to the dresser, gets a pair of scissors, goes back, 
	picks up Dorcas' braid, and snips it off just enough to bob her hair.

57.	HALLWAY, OUTSIDE BABS' ROOM AT PALM BEACH. A bell hop enters and knocks 
	on the door. 

58.	BABS' ROOM, PALM BEACH. Babs is putting Dorcas braid in the bag, hears 
	the boy, quickly closes the bag and runs to the door, looking anxiously 
	at Dorcas for fear she will wake up. She gets to the door, opens it and 
	tells the boy to wait a minute. She then runs to the dresser, gets 
	money out of her purse and runs back to the door. She gives the boy the 
	money, then hands him out the bag and says: 

SP:	"TAKE THIS OUT AND CHUCK IT IN THE OCEAN." 

	The boy is surprised, doesn't know what to say, wants to know why. She 
	tells him not to ask any questions, to go on and drop it in the ocean. 
	The boy looks at the money in his hand, says all right, and goes out.  
	Babs turns, looks over at Dorcas, smiles, sighs contentedly as if she 
	had accomplished something. She then begins to undress herself. (Fade 
	out.) 

T:	THE NEXT MORNING THE SALUBRIOUS AIR OF PALM BEACH AND BABS' PERSUASION 
	LEAD DORCAS TO ACCEPT THE SITUATION. 

59.	BABS' AND DORCAS' ROOM, PALM BEACH. (Fade in.) Babs and Dorcas in front 
	of the dresser, fixing her up, and she looks pretty good.  Babs is 
	putting a last little trim on her hair and has one of her dresses on 
	her, dabs her face up a little with powder and rouge and then turns her 
	around to look in the glass. Dorcas is surprised at her appearance and 
	not at all displeased, turns to Babs smilingly and says she is quite 
	pleased with herself, and Babs says: 

SP:	"NOW, DORCAS, THAT JUNIOR PARTNER OF DAD'S IS A PEACH AND HE TOLD ME ON 
	THE SIDE THAT HE IS MAD ABOUT YOU." 

	Dorcas doesn't believe this and thinks she is being kidded, but Babs 
	assures her it is true and says, "Come on now, you must meet him," and 
	leads her out of the room.

60.	HOTEL PORCH, PALM BEACH. Matilda is sitting on the porch, knitting.  
	Presently she starts to look about and breathes in the air. Jim comes 
	out on the porch, starts to speak to her and comments on the beautiful 
	climate, breathing in deeply and saying he feels ten years younger. 
	Matilda agrees with him in everything he has said.

	At this point Babs enters with Dorcas and both Jim and Matilda are 
	surprised at Dorcas' transformation. Babs edges up near Jim and asks if 
	he doesn't think Dorcas looks nice. Jim says it is amazing, that this 
	climate has worked fast on her.  Dorcas say that Babs gave her the 
	dress, and Jim is very grateful to her for making her look so pretty.  
	He takes her hand, which gives her another thrill. He then says he is 
	just off to the sanitarium to see Aunt Cornelia, and he leaves, Babs 
	looking after him. At length, while Matilda continues to look over 
	Dorcas admiringly, Babs comes to herself, remembers her mission and 
	goes to the door and looks into the lobby, where she sees Thompson 
	getting a cigar or something.
 
61.	HOTEL LOBBY, PALM  BEACH. (Scene from Babs' angle.) Thompson is at the 
	cigar counter buying some cigars.

62.	HOTEL PORCH, PALM BEACH.  Babs, looking at Thompson, then glances back 
	at the two girls and goes into the lobby.
 
63.	LOBBY HOTEL, PALM BEACH. Babs enters and goes to Thompson, who greets 
	her very courteously and Babs tell him she has something secret to tell 
	him. He wants to know what it is, and she whispers in his ear:

SP:	"DORCAS TOLD ME THAT SHE IS PERFECTLY MAD ABOUT YOU." 

	Thompson looks at her out of the corner of his eye, indicates nothing 
	doing with that little frump, and Babs then tries to tell him that 
	Dorcas wasn't dressed when he saw her, she was all mussed up from the 
	trip. He must see her this morning and see what a difference there is.

64.	PORCH, PALM BEACH.  Matilda is through looking Dorcas over and they 
	look about for Babs, see she has gone and start for the lobby together. 

65.	HOTEL LOBBY, PALM BEACH. Babs is still trying to persuade Thompson that 
	Dorcas is a peach, but he is rather incredulous when Dorcas and Matilda 
	enter from the porch, Matilda goes up into the lobby and Dorcas stands 
	inside the door looking for Babs. Thompson gets a flash at her and 
	looks at her in astonishment at the transformation.  Babs notices
 	this, looks over and sees he is looking at Dorcas. She then asks him if 
	she hasn't told the truth. Thompson can't believe this is the same girl 
	he saw last night, but Babs assures him that it is and tells him he 
	must go over to her and leads him over towards Dorcas.
   
	At the same time Dorcas notices them and starts toward them. They meet 
	in the middle of the lobby, and it is very evident that Thompson is 
	quite smitten with the girl. He greets her heartily and she, very coyly 
	and demurely, greets him. Then Babs, who is greatly pleased over her 
	success, says: 

SP:	"NOW YOU TWO GO TAKE A NICE LONG WALK." 

	And engineers them toward the door and out. Babs looks after them, 
	sighs in satisfaction, and at that moment the Count comes to her. She 
	turns, surprised to see him, greets him in a friendly way, and he falls 
	over himself, tells her that her father told him yesterday she wasn't 
	there.  She tells him she wasn't then. Of course the Count is delighted 
	to see her. As he is talking to her, she suddenly thinks about Matilda, 
	gives the Count a good once over, decides that she will try him out on 
	her. She then looks around and locates Matilda, who is sitting just 
	beginning to read "The Restless Sex," by Robert Chambers. Babs drags 
	the Count over to Matilda and introduces them, Matilda greeting him 
	quite coyly. She then says to Matilda:

SP:	"WOULDN'T YOU LIKE TO TAKE A LITTLE WALK WITH THE COUNT?" 

	Matilda is quite coy about it, says she wouldn't mind if the Count 
	would like to. But the Count isn't at all strong for walking with 
	Matilda, which he shows very plainly. Then he pulls himself together 
	and politely says he is sorry but he has an engagement this morning,  
	and he leaves them flat, much to Matilda's mortification. Babs tells 
	her not to mind. Matilda again sits down and starts to read her book. 
	Babs stands away from her and gives her a good looking over. She then 
	shakes her head in a rather discouraged way and then an idea comes to 
	her. She brightens up and goes over to the desk, gets hold of the clerk 
	and says to him:

SP:	"ARE THERE ANY BLIND MEN IN THIS HOTEL?" 

	The clerk thinks a minute and says No. Babs is disappointed. Then the 
	clerk suddenly thinks of somebody and says, "Wait a minute--"
 
SP:	"THERE'S OLD MR. SMITHERS. HE GOT SUN STRUCK LAST WEEK AND HE HAS TO 
	WEAR A BANDAGE OVER HIS EYES."

	Babs brightens up, thinking this man might do. She then turns to the 
	clerk and says: 

SP:	"IS HE MARRIED?" 

	The clerk smiles at the idea of this old bird being married and shakes 
	his head No.
   
	Babs asks where he is, and the clerk says he is usually out sitting 
	under the trees about this time, and takes Babs over toward the door, 
	and looks out. 

66.	IN FRONT OF PALM BEACH HOTEL. (From Hotel door.) Show Smithers sitting 
	in a wheel chair out under the trees.

67.	PORCH HOTEL, BY PILLAR, PALM BEACH. The clerk points him out to Babs 
	and tells her that's the man. Babs thanks him very much and the clerk 
	goes back to the desk. Babs considers her plan for a moment and then 
	rushes out.

68.	FRONT OF PALM BEACH HOTEL. Smithers sitting in his wheel chair with his 
	eyes bandaged. Babs rushes in to him, looks him over a second and then, 
	says:

SP:	"WHY, MR. SMITHERS, HOW DO YOU DO. YOU DON'T REMEMBER ME I SUPPOSE." 

	Smithers doesn't recall her voice, but he is very polite and says he is 
	glad to see her. She takes hold of his hand and shakes it. Then either 
	standing by him or sitting beside him, she tells him that she is sorry 
	to hear of his accident but he looks fine otherwise, and he says Yes, 
	he feels great. This Southern air is a wonderful thing for him. He 
	beats his chest to show how strong and fine he is getting, and she 
	can't restrain herself from laughing at him, but he thinks she is 
	laughing with him and begins to laugh too. She controls herself and 
	smiling to herself she pokes him in the ribs and says:

SP:	"YOU LUCKY DOG. YOU HAVE MADE A TERRIBLE HIT WITH THE MOST POPULAR GIRL 
	DOWN HERE." 

	At this the old man perks up considerably. It is the first time he has 
	made a hit with anybody, and he wants to know all about it, who the 
	girl is; Babs says:
 
SP: 	"IT'S MATILDA WINTHROP. THE MEN ARE ALL MAD ABOUT HER, BUT SHE CAN'T 
	SEE ANYBODY BUT YOU." 

	The old bird is up in the seventh heaven of delight at this. He wonders 
	how he could have made an impression with a bandage over his eyes. Babs 
	says that doesn't matter with this girl.  She sees deeper than that and 
	she's just simply nuts about you, and by the way--
 
SP:	"HOW LONG ARE YOU GOING TO KEEP THAT ON?" 

	He feels the bandage over his eyes, very much disgruntled that he has 
	to have it on at all and at length says:
 
SP:	"THE DOCTORS SAY I CAN TAKE IT OFF IN ABOUT A WEEK." 

	Babs is a little dismayed at this, thinking she has only a week to 
	work. Then she turns to him quickly and says:

SP: 	"YOU'D BETTER MEET HER QUICK."

	She turns around and looks toward the hotel and sees Matilda with a 
	book under her arm walking away in the opposite direction. She thinks 
	at first she will go after her and call her back, then changes her 
	mind, turns the old man's wheel chair around and rushes him like mad 
	after Matilda.
   
	She pushes him along clear past Matilda, then stops, puts him under a 
	tree and runs over to Matilda. She tells Matilda she wants her to meet 
	a grand man, grabs her and pulls her over to Smithers. (There must be 
	another wicker chair of some kind near where she stops or a bench.) She 
	pulls Matilda over to old Smithers, talking as she goes, and introduces 
	them. Matilda is flabbergasted, doesn't how what the devil to make of 
	it, and Babs whispers in her ear that he asked to meet her. Matilda is 
	terribly embarrassed, doesn't quite know what to make of it; but Babs  
	quickly dumps Matilda down in the chair or bench near the old man, who 
	is smiling happily, but Matilda doesn't know what to do. She starts to 
	protest faintly, but Babs tells her no, stay right there, everything is 
	all right. She then leans over and whispers in Matilda's ear.

SP:	"HE ISN'T MUCH TO LOOK AT, BUT WHEN YOU GET HIM ALONE IN THE DARK YOU'D 
	BE SURPRISED." 

	Matilda is dumbfounded at this, doesn't know what she is talking about 
	at all, but Babs tells her to talk to the old man, be friendly with 
	him. The old man leans over and talks to Matilda, and Matilda to be 
	decent and courteous to him, and Babs stands behind them with a "Bless 
	you, my children" attitude. She then sneaks off and leaves them alone. 
	The old man begins to get very flirtatious with Matilda and she begins 
	to become coy, and as they are becoming more and more interested in 
	each other (Fade out).

T:	BRINGING US TO THAT NIGHT. 

69.	PRETTY SPOT IN PALM BEACH. (Fade in.) Babs and Jim are walking along.  
	Babs asks him to sit down beside her and he does so. She looks at him 
	and sighs. He is more or less unmoved. At length she says:

SP:	"IF BY ANY CHANCE DORCAS AND MATILDA GOT MARRIED YOU COULD MARRY, 
	COULDN'T YOU?" 

	He looks at her in slight surprise and shakes his head No and says:

SP:	"THERE WOULD STILL BE AUNT CORNELIA. I COULDN'T ASK A WIFE TO LIVE IN 
	THE HOUSE WITH HER." 

	Babs agrees with that, and then asks if he saw her today and how she 
	was. He says:

SP:	"THE TRIP WAS PRETTY HARD ON HER."

	Babs of course is greatly interested, then of course very sorry. Jim 
	shakes his head sadly and says: 

SP:	"I'M AFRAID THE OLD LADY IS NOT LONG FOR THIS WORLD." 

	Babs almost gasps in delight, and then covers up her real feelings with 
	a show of sorrow. Then, looking about romantically, turns to him and 
	says: 

SP:	"ISN'T THE MOON WONDERFUL?"

	He looks about also and says:
 
SP: 	"YES, AND THE AIR AND THE FLOWERS." 

	She perks up at this, realizing that she is unconsciously making an 
	impression. She thinks a second, then turns to him and says:

SP: 	"I SUPPOSE IF AUNT EMILY WERE HERE YOU AND SHE WOULD BE SITTING OUT 
	HERE SPOONING. WOULDN'T YOU?" 

	He smiles at this in an indulgent way. Babs thinks a minute and says:

SP: 	"I HATE TO HAVE YOU MISS ANY FUN. SUPPOSE YOU IMAGINE I'M AUNT EMILY." 

	She takes his arm, puts it around her waist, snuggles down on his 
	shoulder and goes on talking right up into his face. He is gradually 
	coming to the realization that this is a dangerous thing. He begins to 
	look worried and finally he puts her arm away gently and says, "I've 
	got to go back to the hotel," and gets up. She says, "What is the 
	matter," and he says: 

SP:	"I JUST HAPPENED TO THINK I HAVEN'T WRITTEN EMILY SINCE WE HAVE BEEN 
	DOWN HERE." 

	Babs shows joy at this and jumps up and says: 

SP:	"OH, WELL, THEN OF COURSE WE MUST GO BACK TO THE HOTEL." 

	And they go off toward the hotel. (Fade out.)

T:	TO THE EFFECT THAT BABS' PLANS WENT ALL RIGHT FOR A WHILE UNTIL ONE 
	DAY--
 
70.	HOTEL LOBBY, PALM BEACH (Fade in). Thompson, the Count and Dorcas are 
	sitting together. Dorcas is carrying on a grand flirtation with the 
	Count which makes Thompson very jealous. Babs enters the group and the 
	Count immediately turns to her. Dorcas turns to Thompson and begins to 
	talk to him and he shows his relief that the Count is off her trail.  
	Suddenly Babs looks up and sees Mr. Smithers with the bandage off his 
	eyes, talking with the clerk, asking where Miss Matilda Winthrop is.  
	Babs is startled and frightened and quickly runs to Smithers, leaving  
	the Count flat. She turns Smithers around, and we see that he can't see 
	very well yet as he has to squint through his eye lids. She says to 
	him:
 
SP:	"MR. SMITHERS, ARE YOU WELL ENOUGH FOR THAT?" 

	He tells her yes the doctor said he could take the bandage off. His 
	eyes are well enough. Babs, frightened, says to him:

SP: 	"HAVE YOU PROPOSED TO MATILDA YET?" 

	He says No, he hasn't, that he is looking for her now, and the clerk 
	says she is out there and he points to the front. He then leaves Babs.  
	She makes a futile effort to stop him, but he goes right on out, and 
	she looking after him terrified, turns to the clerk and says:

SP:	"WHERE IS MISS WINTHROP?" 

	The clerk points out toward the beach and says:
 
SP:	"SHE WENT OUT ON THE BEACH FOR A SWIM." 

	Babs grabs her hair in despair, says: 

SP:	"SWIMMING, GOOD HEAVENS!"

	and rushes out the door.
 
71.	BEACH. Matilda, dressed in a frightful bathing suit, and looking like 
	nothing human, is jumping about in about two inches of water. Smithers 
	comes out on the beach and squints about, looking for her but he is 
	unable to see her.
  
	Babs rushes down the beach from the hotel and comes up to Smithers, 
	looks about anxiously and asks if he has seen Matilda. He shakes his 
	held No, he hasn't been able to find her. Babs then notices his 
	handkerchief sticking out of his pocket, pulls it out and says:

SP:	"I JUST MET YOUR DOCTOR AND HE TOLD ME YOU SHOULDN'T BE OUT IN THE SUN 
	WITHOUT A BANDAGE." 

	She wants to put the bandage on his eyes, and he protests and says, 
	"Why, what's the matter?" She says:

SP: 	"YOU'RE LIKELY TO SEE SOMETHING THAT WILL HURT YOUR EYES." 

	And she insists on putting the handkerchief on his eyes. She ties it 
	firmly and then says: 

SP:	"NOW YOU KEEP THAT ON; I'LL FIND MATILDA." 

	She then takes him and sets him down somewhere on the beach and then 
	tells him to sit there, that she will go and get Matilda and then says:
 
SP:	"YOU BETTER PROPOSE TODAY. I DON'T THINK IT'S SAFE TO WAIT ANY LONGER." 

	He asks if she means there are other men pursuing Matilda, and she nods 
	her head and says: 

SP:	"YES, EVERY MAN ON THE BEACH IS LOOKING AT HER." 

	She then tells him to wait right there and she will go and get Matilda. 
 	She runs out, grabs Matilda, pulls her out of the water, turns on her 
	angrily and says:

SP: 	"HOW MANY TIMES HAVE I TOLD YOU NOT TO GO IN SWIMMING?" 

	Matilda is a little pettish at this, pulls herself away and says, "I 
	don't see any reason why I shouldn't." Then Babs points to her legs and 
	says: 

CLOSE UP--LEGS.
 
SP:	"THERE ARE TWO PERFECTLY GOOD REASONS WHY YOU SHOULDN'T." 

	She then tells her if she isn't careful she will lose Smithers. Matilda 
	is a little hurt, but still has to swallow her medicine. Babs tells her 
	now to come on over and see him, she has his eyes covered up now and he 
	is sitting over on the beach, and she leads Matilda over to Smithers.

  	By this time Matilda is mollified and is in a good frame of mind again. 
	She sits down by Smithers, who takes hold of her hand. Babs smiles at 
	them maternally and turns to go to the hotel. Just at this moment Jim 
	comes down the beach from the hotel and is about to break into the 
	party when she stops him, hushes him, tells him not to disturb these 
	two. He wants to know why, and Babs whispers to him, "They want to be 
	alone." He looks and slowly begins to comprehend the situation. He is 
	overcome with surprise at Matilda doing a thing like this, but finally 
	sees that it is a very fine thing and smiles on them. Babs looks up 
	into his face and says: 

SP:	"ISN'T LOVE WONDERFUL?"
  
	He looks down at her and gets a little thrill and says, "It is indeed." 
	He is so dumbfounded he stands gaping at them, and Babs takes him 
	gently by the hand and leads him away. They go to wheel chair or 
	another set and continue.  (Fade out.) 

T:	THAT NIGHT BABS' PLANS GOT A HORRIBLE SET BACK.

72.	HOTEL LOBBY, PALM BEACH. (Fade in.) Babs and Jim enter stairs in 
	evening dress and Dorcas runs to them from the direction of the ball 
	room.  She is all out of breath and excited, and says to them, "Oh, did 
	you hear what's happened?"

SP: 	"DID YOU HEAR ABOUT AUNT CORNELIA"

	Babs and Jim startled, say No, and Dorcas points over to the ball room, 
	tells them to come on and leads them toward the ball room, and they go 
	in. 

73.	BALL ROOM, ADD SMITHERS AND MATILDA. A lot of people are dancing and
	among them  is Cornelia, dancing with Thompson. She hasn't her cane, 
	but she still carries her ear trumpet. They are just hitting it up, 
	Thompson almost exhausted. His collar is soaking wet and is lying 
	around his neck like a wet rag. His hair is also wet. Babs stands 
	looking at them utterly aghast, she is absolutely amazed and 
	thunderstruck at the transformation.  Jim is really pleased, and says 
	to Babs: 

SP: 	"ISN'T IT WONDERFUL?" 

	Babs looks away to hide her real feelings--then looks at Jim with a 
	forced grin. Show another flash of the old lady and Thompson dancing, 
	the old lady sees a girl shimmy--watches her a moment--then does it
 	herself. Show a flash of the coon orchestra, with a man playing the 
	"Vamp" on the trombone, and rolling his eyes. Then another flash of the 
	old lady shimmying and Thompson dancing. Then cut back to Babs raising 
	her eyes to Heaven, shaking her head in absolute despair, saying: 

SP:	"THIS IS TOO MUCH!"

	Dorcas asks if she ever saw anything like it. Babs says No, she never 
	did, and Jim is greatly pleased. 

	The dance stops now and Cornelia sees Babs and Dorcas and Jim and 
	rushes over to them, followed limply by Thompson. Cornelia joins them, 
	fresh as a daisy, takes her handkerchief and just dabs a little bit of 
	perspiration from her face and coming to Babs, grasps her by the hand 
	and says: "You are a dear--" 

SP:	"YOU DEAR CHILD, IT WAS YOU WHO URGED ME TO COME DOWN HERE." 

	Babs looks at her as if she would like to kill her, but the old lady 
	doesn't notice this, but turns away to Dorcas and says:

SP:	"ISN'T IT FINE, DORCAS, THE PALM BEACH AIR HAS COMPLETELY CURED ME. I 
	COULD LIVE FOREVER DOWN HERE." 

	Babs again gives her the icy stare and glances over at Thompson, who  
	looks at her discouraged and completely wilted. She then turns to 
	Cornelia and says:

SP:	"I THINK YOU'D BETTER GO BACK TO BOSTON." 

	The old lady says No, sir, nothing doing, she's having too good a time. 
	She's going to stick. At this point the band starts up again, the old 
	lady looks around at Thompson, who looks scared to death, and grabs 
	Dorcas and beats it--she then turns to Jim, grabs him and starts in to 
	dance with him. Babs motions to go ahead--she doesn't mind. The Count 
	comes up and asks Babs if she will dance with him, but she is too 
	depressed to do any dancing and says almost in tears she never wants to 
	dance again and goes off sadly, followed by the Count. 

	Show a bit of the people dancing. 

CLOSE UP--OLD LADY AND JIM.
   
	Smithers and Matilda enter ball room and watch people dance.

74.	PALM ROOM. Babs enters terribly depressed, followed by the Count. She 
	sits on a bench, and the Count, very sympathetic, sits beside her. He 
	puts his arm gently about her shoulder and says: 

SP:   "WHY IS LITTLE BABS SO SAD?" 

	She tries to keep herself together, but it is impossible to do so, 
	finally she breaks down crying and puts her head down on the bench for 
	lack of something better to lean on--the Count leans over her. As she 
	is sitting thus crying, her father enter. He sees them and comes over 
	to them and starts to berate the Count and her for such conduct in a 
	public place. The Count starts to give him an argument, but the old man 
	orders him away, and the Count, after a little protest, bows very 
	stiffly and goes. After he has gone, her dad turns on Babs and says:

SP:	"WHEN WILL YOU REALIZE THE VALUE OF A WOMAN'S REPUTATION?" 

	She is bored to death with this talk and has enough trouble of her own 
	and is choking down the tears as her Dad goes on berating her, telling 
	her that this man is a crook and a man of terrible reputation and that 
	he has compromised more women than any other man in New York and--
 
SP:	"HE'LL GET YOU INTO A COMPROMISING POSITION AND THEN YOU'LL HAVE TO 
	MARRY HIM!" 

	Babs says that is utterly ridiculous. She wishes he would stop talking 
	such nonsense, and leaves him, going over to another spot where she can 
	look into the ball room. The Dad follows her right along and continues 
	his harangue saying he is not talking nonsense, he means exactly what 
	he says. That when a woman is compromised there is only one thing to do 
	and that is to marry the man. As her Dad goes on giving her the devil, 
	Babs looks out toward the ball room and sees--

75.	BALL ROOM. Cornelia hopping about with Jim. 

76.	PALM ROOM.  As Babs watches the old lady, and as her father continues 
	giving her the devil, we see a scheme forming in the mind of Babs. At 
	length she turns on her Dad and says:
 
SP:	"DAD, IF YOU COMPROMISED A WOMAN, WOULD YOU THINK YOU HAD TO MARRY HER?"
 
	Her Dad says Yes, he most certainly would consider it his duty. She 
	asks him if he is perfectly sure and he says he certainly is and there 
	could be no possible question about it. She says very well, that's what 
	she wanted to know, turns and looks back toward the ball room. Her 
	father goes on telling her the serious matter it is and how serious he 
	considers these things.
 
CLOSE UP--Babs looking out on the ball room, smiling to herself and covering 
	her smiling face from her dad. (Fade out.)

T:	BY ELEVEN O'CLOCK AUNT CORNELIA HAD WORN OUT THE MALE MEMBERS OF THE 
	FAMILY AND HAD STARTED IN ON THE OTHER GUESTS.
 
77.	BALL ROOM. (Fade in.) Show Aunt Cornelia dancing around with an extra 
	man. At the Palm Room entrance Babs is standing with a bundle under her 
	arm, also her vanity bag, hoping that Aunt Cornelia is soon going to be 
	tired out.
 
78.	SUN PARLOR. Jim, collar wilted, hair mussed up, etc., is sitting with 
	Thompson in the same condition, drinking to refresh themselves. Old 
	Hardcastle is sitting there smoking and talking to them. Thompson says 
	that Aunt Cornelia is certainly an extraordinary case of rejuvenation 
	and Jim shakes his head and says he thinks she is, that she nearly wore 
	him out. The old man smiles and says he thinks she is the most 
	extraordinary woman he ever saw. Thompson looks up and asks if he 
	danced with her. The old man says No, he doesn't dance but he thinks it 
	is a very fine thing to see an old lady renew her youth in that way, 
	etc., etc.

79. 	BALL ROOM. The dance ends, and Aunt Cornelia joins Babs at the Palm 
	Room entrance. The man who has been dancing with her is panting with 
	exhaustion, bows, and leaves her in the Palm Room. 

80.	CORNER OF BALL ROOM. Babs brings Cornelia in, puts her on the bench or 
	chair there, takes her little vanity bag and shows Aunt Cornelia in the 
 	mirror how mussed up she is and then says to her, "I must fix you up." 
	She then takes out her powder puff and removes Aunt Cornelia's 
	spectacles or glasses and starts to fix Aunt Cornelia up, as she does 
	so, carelessly dropping the glasses on the floor. 

QUICK CLOSE UP--GLASSES DROPPING TO THE FLOOR AND BABS' HEEL QUICKLY SMASHING 
	THEM.

	Of course Babs is greatly perturbed at having dropped the glasses, and 
	Aunt Cornelia also. Babs leans over quickly and picks up the pieces and 
	is very apologetic to the old lady, telling her she will get her some 
	new ones in the morning. The old lady says:

SP:	"BUT I CAN'T SEE TO GET TO MY ROOM." 

	Babs grins diabolically at this and says, "That's all tight, auntie, 
	I'll take you to your room and put you to bed." The aunt says all 
	right, all right, and they go off toward the lobby, Babs taking her 
	bundle. 

81.	LOBBY, PALM BEACH. Cornelia and Babs enter. Babs leading her along. She 
	leaves her a moment, runs to the clerk and says:
 
SP:	"I'D LIKE THE THE KEY TO MY FATHER'S ROOM." 

	The clerk takes a key from the rack and gives it to her. She returns to 
	Cornelia and they start upstairs. (Quick Fade out.)

82.	HOTEL HALLWAY, OUTSIDE HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. (Quick Fade in.) Babs with 
	her bundle and her vanity bag and the old lady enter. They go to 
	Hardcastle's room and Babs unlocks the door and they enter.

83.	HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. The door opens and Babs leads in Aunt Cornelia, Babs 
	still carrying her bundle and vanity bag. The old lady flops down in a 
	chair and says she is tired, and Babs says to her, "You get right into 
	bed; I'll help you undress."  Then Babs opens the closet door and, 
	hidden by the closet door, she opens the bundle quickly, watching Aunt 
	Cornelia, and takes from the bundle Aunt Cornelia's night gown, tooth 
	brush, hair brush, comb, etc. The night gown is a terrible looking 
	thing and makes Babs shudder. She puts the brushes and things on a 
	little table and goes to the old lady with the night gown, makes her 
	get up and starts to undress her, grinning diabolically. The old lady 
	turns to her and says:

SP:	"YOU'RE SO GOOD TO ME, BARBARA!"

	And Babs nods her head and says:
 
SP:	"YOU DON'T KNOW THE HALF OF IT, DEARIE." 

	She goes on undressing her. (Fade out.) 

	TITLE TO DENOTE LAPSE OF TIME. 

84.	HALL OUTSIDE HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. Babs is there waiting around a corner.  
	She pokes her head out, watching for her Dad to come. At length he 
	comes along. She hides behind the corner, and her father unlocks the 
	door and goes into his room. Babs then runs out from her hiding place, 
	down the hall toward the lobby.
 
85.	HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. Cornelia is asleep in the bed in the alcove,
	unnoticed by Hardcastle, who starts to undress.
 
86.	SUN PARLOR. Seated about a table are Dorcas and Thompson, Matilda and 
	Smithers and Jim. Babs rushes in to the crowd, and they all look up 
	surprised, and she says, "What do you think?" They all look at her 
	questioningly and she says:
 
SP:	"AUNT CORNELIA AND FATHER ARE UP IN HIS ROOM TOGETHER!" 

	They are all stunned by this information and they look at each other 
	and Babs in amazement. Then she says:
 
SP:	"THEY'VE BOTH BEEN ACTING VERY QUEERLY TONIGHT." 

	Dorcas thinks a minute and then it suddenly comes to her. She turns 
	sharply and says:
 
SP:	"WHY, THEY'RE MARRIED, OF COURSE."

	And Babs says, "Do you suppose they are?" Then Jim, thinking a second, 
	says:

SP:	"HE WAS SINGING HER PRAISES HERE A HALF-HOUR AGO." 

	Babs is delighted at this. Thompson then says: 

SP:	"CAN YOU BEAT THAT OLD BIRD PUTTING ONE OVER ON US LIKE THIS?" 

	And goes on to say he thinks they are married because Mr. Hardcastle 
	has always admired Cornelia, and says:

SP:	"LET'S GIVE THEM A CHARIVARI!"

	And they all agree to this, but Jim and Matilda with a little 
	reluctance. They all get up from the table and start away, one taking  
	water bottle and a fork or knife to hammer on it; Thompson picking up a 
	ukulele from a bench, another taking a plate and a spoon and another 
	the little push bell on the table, and all start for the lobby, picking 
	up the Count on the way.

87.	HARDCASTLE'S ROOM.  Hardcastle is in his pajamas and is doing his 
	exercises before going to bed. He finishes the exercises and then goes 
	over to the bed, turns down the covers and discovers Cornelia. He is 
	absolutely amazed at the sight, thinks there is something the matter 
	with him, bats his eyes, looks about the room, then looks back at her. 
	He then looks about the room again to see that he is in his own room, 
	puts his hand to his head, wondering how the devil she got there. He 
	looks down at his pajamas, realizes the position he is in, rushes for 
	his clothes and starts to put his pants over his pajamas as if he were 
	going to beat it out of the place as fast as he can.

88.	HALL OUTSIDE HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. The charivari party, carrying their 
	implements, and headed by Babs come along. They come to the old man's
	door. Babs knocks on the door as the cue and they all start to hammer 
	the things they have, Thompson playing the ukulele.

89.	HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. Hardcastle by this time is dressed in his trousers, 
	coat and hat and is gathering up his shoes and other things under his 
	arm when he hears this terrible racket. He is scared to death, not 
	knowing what the devil they are going to do to him. He is transfixed 
	and stands there frightened for a moment.
 
90.	HALL OUTSIDE HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. The charivari party, pounding on their 
	implements and Thompson playing and singing a serenade. Various doors 
	along the hall open and people in night clothes stick their heads out 
	wondering what the devil it's all about. Babs stops the racket for a 
	moment, knocks on the door and says:
 
SP:	"DAD, IT'S BABS. I WANT TO SEE YOU A MOMENT." 

	And she goes on knocking on the door. 

91.	HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. His heart almost stops beating at hearing Babs'
	voice, and realizing the situation he is in; he thinks the only thing 
	to do is to brazen it out, speak to her and get rid of her. So he 
	buttons his coat up around his neck, puts on his hat, hides the things 
	he has in his arms and presently goes to the door, trying to make a 
	bluff that he isn't undressed. He goes and opens the door. As he does 
	so the charivari crowd all begin their racket again and Hardcastle 
	steps back amazed. Just at this moment the clerk and the house 
	detective come running down the hall from the lobby, and people in the 
	other rooms stop them and tell them to stop that racket. They run down 
	to Hardcastle's door and tell the people they will have to stop this 
	and begin to chase them out of the hall. They all run away except Babs 
	who jumps into her father's room quickly and shuts the door and locks 
	it. 

92.	HARDCASTLE'S ROOM. The old man, still trembling in his boots and 
	wondering, says to Babs: 

SP:	"WHY, BABS, WHAT DOES ALL THIS MEAN?" 

	Babs looks him over from head to foot accusingly, goes over to the bed, 
	turns down the covers and looks at the old lady, the father scared to 
	death. Then she goes back to her father, shakes her head at him in an 
	accusing way and says: 

SP:	"THEY FOUND OUT SHE WAS HERE AND IN ORDER TO SAVE YOU I TOLD THEM YOU 
	WERE MARRIED." 

	The old man is aghast at this, says he isn't married to her. He doesn't 
	know anything about it. Babs shakes her head unbelievingly, shakes her 
	finger at him, saying you sly old fox, and then straightens up and says:

SP: 	"AND AFTER THE LECTURE YOU READ ME TONIGHT ABOUT A WOMAN'S REPUTATION!" 

	The father chokes and spits and is embarrassed, can't speak, and 
	finally says:

SP:	"I DON'T KNOW HOW SHE GOT HERE." 

	Babs looks at him incredulously, shakes her head and says:

SP:	"YOU TELL THAT TO THE MINISTER TOMORROW."

	And He says, "Minister, what do you mean?" Babs straightens up to her 
	full height and dignity and says:

SP:	"DO YOU MEAN TO SAY YOU'RE NOT GOING TO MARRY THE GIRL?"
 
	The father is utterly aghast, says "Why should I marry her! I knew 
	nothing about her being here. I came in my room and found her in my 
	bed." And in the middle of all this tirade Babs stops him with an 
	imperious gesture, then drops her hand and she sadly shakes her head 
	and says:

SP: 	"IT'S ALWAYS THE WOMAN WHO PAYS." 

	The father wakes up, says No, no, he doesn't want to get her into 
	trouble. He wouldn't for anything compromise a lady. Babs says, "Very 
	well, then the only thing for you to do is to marry her tomorrow." Then
 	the father swallows a large lump and says, "Isn't there any other way?" 
	Babs shakes her head No, there is no other way. Then the father,  
	stupefied, not knowing what the devil to do, says, well, all right, he
 	will marry her. Babs then pats him on the shoulder as a good boy. Then 
	he says, "Well, what am I going to do now?"  And Babs thinks a minute 
	and says:
 
SP:	"YOU GO STAY IN MY ROOM; I'LL STAY HERE, TONIGHT." 

	Her father says all right, and Babs gives him the key to her room, and 
	they bundle up his things under his arm, and she takes him to the door; 
	and just as he is going out, she stops him and says: 

SP:	"BUT REMEMBER TOMORROW MORNING YOU MAKE AN HONEST WOMAN OF OUR 
	CORNELIA." 

	And he, dull and stupefied, says, "All right, I will, I will," and goes 
	out of the room. Babs takes out some snap shots of Jim from her vanity 
	bag. 

INSERT--PICTURES OF JIM TAKEN IN VARIOUS PLACES IN PALM BEACH.

	Babs kisses each one of them ecstatically, holds them to her heart, 
	sighs, satisfied that she has won her last battle. (Fade out.)

93.	HOTEL LOBBY. Babs and Jim walk down the lobby. Over in one corner are 
	Matilda and Smithers; Smithers whispering sweet nothings in Matilda's 
	ear, and Matilda coyly blushing. Babs points them out to Jim, and he 
	looks at them, smiles and sighs. They go out toward the ball room.

94. 	BALL ROOM. Guests are dancing. Among them is old Hardcastle and 
	Cornelia, who are shimmying around and having the time of their lives. 
	Jim and Babs enter, look at the dancers and finally spot father and 
	Cornelia. Babs looks up at Jim and says, "Aren't you happy?" Jim shakes 
	his head and smiles and sighs again. They then go out toward the palm 
	room. 

95.	PALM ROOM. Dorcas and Thompson are seated in a secluded nook. Thompson 
	has his arm about Dorcas. Jim and Babs enter and are starting through 
	the palm room when Babs sees Thompson and Dorcas and stops him. They 
	stand and watch them, Thompson and Dorcas not seeing them, and Thompson 
	leans over and kisses Dorcas. Babs takes him by the hand and leads him 
	quickly away. (Fade out.) 

96.	EXTERIOR, HOTEL--SOME PRETTY SPOT. (Fade in.) Babs and Jim enter, both 
	very thoughtful. Babs looks up at Jim, bats her eyes right at him and 
	says:

SP: 	"ISN'T IT WONDERFUL WHAT LOVE HAS DONE FOR THEM?" 

	He sighs and says, "Yes, it is wonderful indeed." Babs looks up at him 
	and then looks away and says: 

SP:	"NOW THAT THEY ARE ALL OFF YOUR HANDS, YOU CAN MARRY, CAN'T YOU?" 

	She looks back at him for his answer and he slowly shakes his head No. 
	Babs is dumbfounded and wants to know what he means. She is quite 
	worried. He takes a ring from his vest pocket, looks at it and says:

SP:	"EMILY SENT BACK MY RING A WEEK AGO." 

	Babs heaves a sigh of great relief, as if to say, "Oh, that's the 
	reason you can't marry." She looks at the ring, then up at Jim and asks 
	if he cares. He shakes his head and says:

SP:	"I'M AFRAID I NEVER LOVED EMILY.'

	Babs thinks a moment,then says to him: 

SP:	"WHAT'S TO PREVENT YOU FROM MARRYING SOME ONE ELSE?" 

	Jim shakes his head, says "No;" he then says: 

SP:   "THERE IS ONLY ONE WOMAN I COULD CARE FOR IN ALL THE WORLD." 

	Babs looks up at him greedily, hoping that he will say she is the one. 
	He looks down at her, smiles indulgently and says:

SP:   "I'M ONLY A POOR, HARD-WORKING BUSINESS MAN WHAT HAVE I TO OFFER HER?" 

	Babs says, "But if you have love to offer her, what else could she 
	want?" He shakes his head as if to indicate hat isn't enough and says: 

SP:	"I'VE BEEN A FOOL EVEN TO THINK OF HER IN THAT WAY." 

	Babs is beginning to be a little bit worried and doubtful as to whether 
	it is she or not. She finally brings herself to the point of asking, 
	and looking right in his face, says: 

SP: 	"IS IT I THAT YOU LOVE?" 

	Jim looks at her, steels himself, turns away and squares his shoulders 
	as though to fight the thing through at whatever cost and says: 

SP:	"NO."

	Babs turns away to leave him, finally thinks of a scheme, and, turning 
	to him, says:
 
SP:	"IF YOU CAN HOLD MY HAND AND SAY IT IS NOT I, I WILL BELIEVE YOU." 

	Jim steels himself, and puts out his hand. She comes, takes it in hers, 
	holds it to her chest and looks at him:

CLOSE UP--JIM'S CHEST HEAVING UP AND DOWN AND THE COLOR COMING INTO HIS FACE.
 
	Babs, absolutely triumphant, looks up at him and says:

SP:	"NOW, TELL ME THAT YOU DON'T LOVE ME." 

	Jim makes a brave start and says, "I--I--I--" and fails completely--
	grabs her in his arms and gives her a good smack.  (Fade out.)
 
 



Screenplay by Anita Loos and John Emerson
1