The Age of Consent

EXT. COLLEGE CAMPUS - DAY

MAIN TITLES appear over a view of a university campus in the 
early 1930s, somewhere on the American east coast. Students 
sit on the grass talking, others stand around or walk to 
class.

					FADE OUT

FAST-PACED OPENING MONTAGE

FADE IN on a TITLE that reads "State College" superimposed 
on another view of the campus. Students walking, sitting, 
talking. 

					WIPE TO

TWO STUDENTS - a bored girl listens as a boy, apparently a 
drama student, reads melodramatically from a book:

			DRAMA STUDENT
	"There's nothing for me in life but roses, 
	dear."

					WIPE TO

WIDE-EYED GUY - speaks directly into the camera as women 
stand and walk by in the background, only their legs are 
visible and their skirts are awfully thin.

			WIDE-EYED GUY
		(dead serious)
	If you ask me, it's more important than 
	food and drink. 

He glances back at the women's legs.

			WIDE-EYED GUY
	Yes, sir. More important.

					WIPE TO

TWO STUDENTS - Grady, a goofy guy, lies in the grass with a 
girlfriend as she toys lovingly with his necktie. 

			GRADY
	I don't know just how to take you.

His girlfriend whispers to him exactly how he should take 
her and he looks shocked.

					WIPE TO

TWO STUDENTS - A plain, bespectacled girl sits and talks to 
a curvaceous friend who stands next to her. The curvaceous 
girl has a hand on her hips as they swivel back and forth 
with interest.

			BESPECTACLED GIRL
	What do you think he did? I said, don't 
	you EVER try that again!

					WIPE TO

MICHAEL HARVEY - a handsome young student who gapes 
openmouthed at a view of the campus fountain where a 
superimposed image of a woman's face appears. It's his 
girlfriend, BETTY CAMERON, and she smiles back at him 
before disappearing. A smiling Michael licks his fingers 
and turns a page in the textbook he's supposed to be 
reading.

					WIPE TO

TWO STUDENTS - Two boys sit at the base of a statue. One 
holds a report card, the other eats an apple.

			JUNIOR
	I haven't had a report card like this since 
	I left kindergarten. This is the dullest 
	college I've ever been to in 	my life.

			APPLE-EATER
	Why, Junior, how can you be so sacrilegious, 
	seated here beneath the statue of the 
	venerable and respected founder of this 
	great institution? 

We PAN UP QUICKLY to reveal the statue of a distinguished 
man with a bird sitting on top of his head.

			APPLE-EATER (o.s.)
	Why, I'm amazed at you, Junior. I'm 
	surprised. Astounded.

					WIPE TO

INT. CLASSROOM - DAY

A lecture in progress. The middle-aged PROFESSOR DAVID 
MATTHEWS addresses a mostly bored group of students. One 
passes a paper to another, a thin guy chews his pencil, 
another fellow fights to stay awake -- others take notes, 
listen with interest, etc. Among the students is Michael's 
girlfriend Betty Cameron who glances out the window and 
plays tic-tac-toe with herself.

			PROFESSOR
	But these alterations, we must assume, are 
	the consequence of chemical processes 
	which we still have to discover. In 
	cytomorphosis, then, which you will 
	remember is the term by which we designate 
	in biology the complete transformation of 
	the cells, we can distinguish four chief 
	stages. One, differentiation or embryonic 
	stage. Two, differentiation. Three,	
	degeneration. And four, death. Now, as I 
	was saying a few moments ago, not until 
	the protoplasm has grown sufficiently does 
	it acquire its characteristic color 
	through the formation of hemoglobin, thus 
	becoming a young red blood corpuscle. The 
	red blood corpuscles afford us an 
	excellent example of a complete 
	cytomorphosis.

The sound of a CAR HORN drifts in noisily from the window. 
The Prof and Betty, among others, glance at it. 

			PROFESSOR
	Now, we'll take example A. The simple 
	cells with a well-formed nucleus but with 
	little protoplasm.

CAR HORN again, distracting everyone. We CUT AWAY briefly 
to the street outside the building where DUKE GALLOWAY, a 
cocky, spoiled rich kid, stands next to his expensive 
automobile, pressing on the horn, unconcernedly. We CUT 
BACK to the classroom where the Prof shoots a dirty look in 
the direction of the noise even as he tries to continue.

			PROFESSOR
	B, the protoplasm grows...

CAR HORN again. The Prof points to the half-asleep student. 

			PROFESSOR
	Eh, do you mind...?

The guy behind him has to nudge him. He awakes with a start.

			HALF-ASLEEP
	Oh, no. No, sir.

			PROFESSOR
	I mean, er, do you mind closing the window?

Some of the other students chuckle at this.

			HALF-ASLEEP
	Oh, the window.

He rises and closes the window as the HONKING continues. 
We CUT TO Duke Galloway and his car:

EXT. STREET - DAY

Duke greets Michael Harvey who joins him.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Hiya, lad! 

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Hiya, Duke! Hey, why don't you toot that 
	thing under the dean's window? You'll get 
	more action.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Well, I would, only my date isn't with the 
	dean.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(off the car)
	This is a new one, isn't it?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Oh, just a little trinket that dropped out 
	of papa's pocket.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Gee, the old one was all right. This one 
	seems more like a hotel.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Yeah, only better. You don't have to 
	register.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Ah ha, is that all you think about?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Life, liberty and the pursuit of women. 
	That's my platf-- 

Duke stops when he sees two female students, a blonde and a 
brunette, walking arm-in-arm in his direction down the 
sidewalk.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(to Michael)
	Ah, romance rears its ugly head.

Duke, followed by a bemused Michael, walks to the sidewalk 
as the ladies approach and goes into a playful spiel:

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Goin' right out! Fuzzy Galloway's sight-
	seeing trips to all parts of the city! 
	Don't fritter away them golden hours of 
	youth! It makes 'em wild, it makes 'em 
	fret! 

But the ladies, undoubtedly knowing the Duke's reputation, 
walk right by without giving him a glance.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(cheerfully, to a 
		grinning Michael)
	Well, the Galloway approach system doesn't 
	seem to be workin' today. 
		(glancing off) 
	Uh oh, here come a couple o' quickies. Ya 
	wanna give 'em a demonstration?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Listen, I've got a connection to make.

Michael walks off as two more women approach and Duke greets 
them.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Hello, Toni!

			TONI
	Hello!

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(off the car)
	See what papa brought home? 

			TONI
	Mmm mm.

Toni and her friend check out the car.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(to Toni)
	Say, how 'bout burnin' up a little asphalt? 
		(Toni glances 
		at her friend) 
	Aw, never mind about her. She can sit in 
	the rumble seat and put a blanket over her 
	head.

The girls laugh.

			TONI'S FRIEND
	Not over my head!

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Aw, you'd look pretty good with a blanket 
	over your head.

As the girls laugh again, we CUT TO the nearby sidewalk 
crowded with students exiting class. Betty Cameron, books in 
hand, walks along, to be greeted by boyfriend Michael.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Hey!

			BETTY CAMERON
	Oh... hello, Michael.

She joins him but looks around a little self-consciously.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, how's your biology?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Well, you may not know it, but 
	cytomorphosis is a protoplasm that 
	isn't a nucleus.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Think of that!

The Professor walks past, chatting with a student, but takes 
a long look at Betty and Michael.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael, I thought you had a class 
	today.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I did but I cut it.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Oh, and I made another date. Well, 
	you see, I promised to help Grace over at 
	the house. She's boning for a quiz, you 
	know.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, that's all right. What time'll you be 
	through?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Well, I don't know. Uh, I'd better call 
	you. Where will you be?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well--

A passing friend of Betty's interrupts.

			BETTY'S FRIEND
	Hello, Betty! Duke said to tell ya he'll 
	meet you tonight at Toler's. The dean has 
	him on the carpet.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(nervous glance at Michael)
	Duke? Oh, yes. Thanks.

			FEMALE STUDENT
		(walks off)
	G'bye!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(upset)
	Oh, so you're running around with Galloway 
	now?

			BETTY CAMERON
	No, I'm not. I was just going to go for a 
	ride with him in his new car.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	So that's where you were yesterday and the 
	day before.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I just came from one lecture. I thought 
	you would've--

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Sorry, you don't need to explain.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm not explaining.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's all my fault. I was chump enough to 
	believe it was different between us.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Well, it IS different. Just because two 
	people like each other, there's no reason 
	for them to sit around and dry up. I'm not 
	my grandmother. I like to have fun. I'm 
	modern.

The Professor, standing nearby and listening to a student 
named Bob bend his ear, hears Betty's raised voice and 
glances over at her and Michael.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I don't see why you shouldn't go out with 
	Galloway if you want to. You're the only 
	one on the campus he's missed.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Can you think of any more insults?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Sorry, I'm fresh out. Well, good-bye. 
		(starts to go) 
	Been nice meeting you after all these 
	years.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	If you're ever in Chillicothe Falls, drop 
	in and see me. Smith's the name. You'll 
	find it under S in the phone book. Well, 
	good-bye again. Give your grandmother my 
	love and don't forget to brush your teeth.

Betty watches in shock as Michael moves off. The Professor 
and Bob end their conversation.

			BOB
	Well, good-bye, Professor.

			PROFESSOR
	Bye, Bob. 

Bob leaves as Michael stalks past the Prof.

			PROFESSOR
		(joining Michael)
	Hey, there, it's not polite to stalk past 
	a fraternity brother without speaking.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I'm sorry, I was thinking.

			PROFESSOR
	Good! What's on your mind? Studies?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, no, they're all right.

			PROFESSOR
	Financial troubles?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	No more than usual.

			PROFESSOR
	Hmm.

Michael and the Prof walk off. Betty, looking hurt and sad, 
watches them go before turning and walking off in the 
opposite direction. The Prof casts a backward glance at the 
departing Betty as he and Michael walk across a lawn, 
chatting.

			PROFESSOR
	Well, what is it? Maybe I can help you. We 
	had our problems when we went to school, 
	you know?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Yes, but things were different in those 
	days.

			PROFESSOR
	Oh, I don't know. We had the same campus. 
	And automobiles. And, if I remember 
	correctly, we had women also. They're 
	quite a problem, you know.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Yes, but girls are wilder than they were 
	then.

			PROFESSOR
	Mm, yes, I suppose so.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	They can smell a good time three blocks 
	away. And if a fella doesn't happen to be 
	fixed so that he can give 'em a good time, 
	they find it some place else.

Michael sits on some sort of large engraved bench and the 
Prof joins him.

			PROFESSOR
	Women have changed, haven't they?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Take Duke Galloway, for instance. Do you 
	know him?

			PROFESSOR
	Galloway? Galloway? Yes, yes.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	He's a likable fella. Lives his life as he 
	sees it. I don't suppose you can blame a 
	girl for running around with him if she 
	wants to.

			PROFESSOR
	Well, naturally, not.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	The trouble with most of us is that we 
	still have ideals.

			PROFESSOR
	Well, what's the matter with ideals? 
	They're all right, aren't they?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, I don't know. What ARE ideals? They're 
	just notions we get some place about 
	what's right and wrong. Pretty soon they 
	become part of you so that after a while 
	even though you believe something that's 
	wrong is right, you can't do it. That 
	doesn't PROVE that it's wrong. I guess 
	this all must sound very silly--

			PROFESSOR
	Not at all, not at all. I get your 
	viewpoint perfectly.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well ... 
		(checks wristwatch) 
	I've gotta be runnin' along. It's been 
	nice talkin' to you, Prof. 
		(rises) 
	You seem to understand things.

			PROFESSOR
		(rises)
	I think I do pretty well for an older 
	generation.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, I didn't mean--

			PROFESSOR
	Nonsense, Mike, nonsense. You've taught me 
	a great deal about the problems of modern 
	youth. We must see each other oftener. You 
	know, lots of times I become confused about 
	life and naturally I like to have someone 
	to talk things over with.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, well, thanks, Prof. See ya later.

			PROFESSOR
	So long, Mike.

Michael exits and the Prof, looking thoughtful, watches him 
go.

					FADE OUT

EXT./INT. TOLER'S - NIGHT

FADE IN on a sign reading TOLERS and PAN DOWN to the front 
door of the local greasy spoon where diners enter the 
building. Duke Galloway and a friend are out front looking 
over Duke's new car.

			DUKE'S FRIEND
	Well, there's one thing you gotta say 
	about it. It's a modest little job.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Oh, it'll have to do till the Depression 
	is over. Soon as I get around to it, I'm 
	gonna put a kitchenette in the back. And a 
	new wing goes in on this side, overlookin' 
	the park.

Michael pauses outside the front door to look at Duke who 
turns and sees him.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(to Michael)
	Well, if it isn't the Lone Wolf. Say, I 
	wish you'd train your women to be here on 
	time when I have a date with her.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I can lead 'em up to your trough but I 
	can't make 'em drink.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Aw, never mind! I'll-I'll attend to that!

Duke and his friend share a chuckle but a distracted Michael 
has already entered the building. Jazz MUSIC fills the air 
as DORA SWALE, the pretty but decidedly working class 
waitress/hostess/cashier, greets him cheerily as he walks 
past her.

			DORA SWALE
	Hello, pollywog!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(glum) 
	Hello, Dora.

Michael grabs a seat in a booth as Dora goes back to dealing 
with a young customer buying razor blades.

			DORA SWALE
	What do you care if they're sharp or not? 
	You can rub your beard off with a towel!

			CUSTOMER
	Wait till you start to shave! 

Michael tries to read a menu but is annoyed by the 
conversation drifting in from the booth behind him:

			GUY #1
	All right, all right. What ABOUT free 
	love?

			GAL #1
	There's nothing free about my love, Romeo. 
	Just remember that!

			GUY #1
	Are you for sale?

			GAL #1
	Let's broaden the conversation!

			GUY #1
	When I get on a subject, I like to stay 
	with it. Hey, how 'bout that butter?

Michael rises and carries his menu to another booth where he 
must endure another off screen conversation:

			GAL #2
	Stop it!

			GUY #2
	Huh huh, I gotta find out things for 
	myself. How do I know? You may be knock-
	kneed.

			GAL #2
	I thought you came to college to develop 
	your brain.

			GUY #2
	Aww, who cares about brains? I come from a 
	long line of people who work with their 
	hands!

Sound of the gal giving her guy a good hard SLAP.

			GUY #2
		(resigned)
	All right, all right. Whaddya wanna talk 
	about?

Gal #2 laughs at him.

			GUY #2
	That's not so funny.

Dora arrives to take Michael's order but she watches as he 
rises in disgust and heads for a more isolated booth. She 
glances knowingly at the off screen couple before following 
and catching up with him. 

			DORA SWALE
		(to Michael)
	Are you workin' out for the track team or 
	is this a new game?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I don't like free love with my meals.

Dora glances over at the booth behind Michael as yet another 
couple is heard from:

			GUY #3
	The trouble is with you, you're old-
	fashioned.

			GAL #3
	Maybe so but what was good enough for my 
	grandmother's good enough for me.

Gal #3 pushes her ice cream aside, grabs her purse and hat, 
rises and exits.

			GUY #3
	Well, I don't want to be honorable with ya 
	unless it's absolutely necessary.

			GAL #3
	I'll call ya up sometime when I break 
	training.

Gal #3 laughs and exits. Guy #3 watches her go, rises, and 
wanders off as Michael and Dora chat:

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Don't they ever talk about anything else?

			DORA SWALE
	What else is there to talk about? How 
	'bout somethin' to eat?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Aw, I don't know what I want.

			DORA SWALE
	Gimme three guesses.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Do people ever talk about marriage any 
	more?

			DORA SWALE
	Some of the older people.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Why don't YOU get married? What do you 
	hang around a dump like this for?

			DORA SWALE
	Scrambled eggs are nice.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	'Sides, none of my business, but you're a 
	good-lookin' girl.

			DORA SWALE
	You think so?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	And you're bright.

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, I get it. Bein' bright don't get you 
	nowhere. It's lookin' dumb. 'I first got 
	this job I used to go home nights and 
	study grammar. I thought it might help me 
	if I talked better. But after goin' out 
	with a couple of these apes around here, 
	I threw the grammar out the window and 
	went in for self-defense.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Why, after all, Creation didn't stop when 
	it made these gorillas. You ought to know 
	some nice fellows if--

			DORA SWALE
	Sure. You mean in my own class.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, well, I didn't mean--

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, it's okay. But, listen, precious, it 
	ain't much fun after workin' hard all day 
	an' goin' home nights and just goin' to 
	bed. But it's much better than sittin' 
	around the rest of your life, listenin' 
	to some iceman's helper yawn himself to 
	sleep.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Yeah, I guess you have it pretty tough at that.

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, I ain't complainin'. Not as long as 
	YOU think I'm good-lookin'.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	What's that got to do with it?

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, it just helps me go on.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Don't look at me. I'm gonna be a missionary.

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, you'd make a swell missionary.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	What do you mean by that?

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, you arouse my savage instincts. 

Michael grins but says nothing.

			DORA SWALE
	She hit you pretty hard, didn't she?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(she's struck a nerve)
	What do you mean?

			DORA SWALE
	How 'bout the chicken patties? We're 
	tryin' to get rid of 'em.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	All right. Wheel 'em in.

			DORA SWALE
		(hollers to the kitchen)
	Chicken patties for one!

Dora turns, gives Michael a look, then walks off, casting a 
backward glance at him as she goes. Michael, meanwhile, 
looks troubled.

We CUT TO Duke, leaning on his car outside, talking to his 
friend.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	So, I says to the dean, I says, if I can't 
	have a few liberties around here, I'm 
	gonna get myself another college.

Betty arrives and joins them.

			DUKE'S FRIEND
		(to Betty)
	Oh, hello.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Hello. Hello, Duke.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Oh! Well, take me home for two ninety-
	eight! 

Duke turns, grabs his friend's arm, pushes him away brusquely, 
causing him to exit the scene.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(to friend)
	I'm sorry ya gotta run along but I'll see 
	ya later. 

Duke turns back to Betty and opens the car door for her.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(to Betty) 
	Come on, let's give the wide open spaces a 
	treat.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Have you seen Michael?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Michael? Michael. No. Have you looked in 
	all the gutters?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Oh, Duke.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Come on, get in.

			BETTY CAMERON
	No, I'm afraid I can't go.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	What, a stand-up?

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm sorry. I've got some work to do.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Aw, you'll be over-educated.

			BETTY CAMERON
	No, really, I can't go.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Come on! Well, you can sit in it a minute, 
	can't ya?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Oh, well... just a minute then.

Betty climbs in the front seat and is instantly impressed 
by the luxury. Duke pushes down suggestively on the springy 
front seat. 

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	I want ya to try out the springs.

CUT TO inside Toler's, where Dora, grabbing silverware and a 
glass of water for Michael, has an exchange with the soda 
jerk:

			SODA JERK
	Where're ya goin' tonight, babe?

			DORA SWALE
	Same place you are -- only in a different 
	direction.

Dora pauses as she sees Betty and Duke just outside the 
front door. She smiles and glances around thoughtfully 
before returning to Michael's booth to set his place for 
him.

			DORA SWALE
	It's about time you gave that Cameron 
	cutie the air.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Why?

			DORA SWALE
	What she got that anybody else ain't got?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Aw, why talk about it? That's all over.

			DORA SWALE
	She's certainly giving that Galloway a 
	play.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Who said so?

			DORA SWALE
	What do you care? You ain't interested.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	That's right. But why drag Galloway into 
	it?

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, I just happened to see the two of them 
	out front. 
		(abruptly yells 
		to the kitchen) 
	How 'bout that patty?!

Just as abruptly, Dora walks off. Michael realizes she's 
tipping him off and glances toward the front door. After a 
glance in Dora's direction, he rises and heads off to 
confront Betty.

CUT TO Betty, sitting in the car, with Duke standing on the 
sidewalk making time.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Certainly has everything in it.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	All the comforts o' home except running 
	water. Turn that little knob, mother, and 
	hear funny noises.

			BETTY CAMERON
	How'd I miss that?

Betty turns on the car radio and we hear some hot jazz MUSIC. 
Betty listens to it happily as Duke runs his fingers 
suggestively across her shoulder. She glances at him, then 
suddenly notices Michael who stands outside the front door, 
staring at them. She laughs. Duke glances over and sees him, 
his hand still on her shoulder. Michael smiles.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(with a grin)
	Hello, Michael.

Michael joins them and they engage in an extended exercise 
in irony.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Well, where've ya been? We've been lookin' 
	all over for ya.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Still angry, Michael?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Michael! Have you been angry?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(hilariously polite)
	I hope you'll pardon the intrusion but 
	some of the denizens of this eating 
	emporium have recently been nauseated at 
	the spectacle of some of our younger people 
	necking in the street. So I've been asked 
	to recommend a more secluded spot -- out 
	on the Jericho Turnpike where one may 
	indulge in amorous display minus the 
	intrusion of prying eyes.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'll take the matter up with the board of 
	directors. Pardon me, please.

Betty cranks up the volume of the radio and the loud jazz 
covers up her brief consultation with Duke. Duke nods to 
whatever it is she's saying.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(to Michael)
	Thanks so much.

Betty shuts off the radio and climbs into the driver's seat. 
Duke joins her in the passenger seat.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(to Michael)
	Now, as I understand it, you go out to the 
	Jericho Turnpike and then...

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You turn left and you come to an old apple 
	tree bearing white blossoms.

Michael heads back toward Toler's.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(to Duke)
	Jericho Turnpike, turn left, old apple tree.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Ya can't miss it. It's right next to a pig 
	pen.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	If we see any of your relatives, shall we 
	give 'em a message?

Betty laughs a little too loudly at this. Dora pokes her head 
out the front door and calls to Michael.

			DORA SWALE
	You better hurry up, precious, your
	patties are getting cold.

Duke and Betty crack up at this.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(to Michael)
	You mustn't let your patties get cold!

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	You should've brought your mittens!

Duke and Betty laugh as they pull away and drive down the 
street with a roar. Michael, upset and embarrassed, watches 
them go, then goes back inside, slamming the door behind 
him.

CUT TO Duke and Betty in the car as she slams on the brakes.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	What's the matter?

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm mad. 

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	But you're not mad at me, are ya?

			BETTY CAMERON
		(gets out of the car)
	I'm going to give him a piece of my mind 
	while I'm in the mood.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Well, give him a piece of mine while 
	you're at it.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'll be right back.

Betty slams the car door and walks back toward Toler's. 
Duke calls after her:

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Hey, bring his head back on a platter!

QUICK DISSOLVE TO Michael eating his chicken patties as 
Betty approaches him. She pauses, gives him a good hard look, 
then sits across from him in the booth. Michael keeps on 
eating and drinking.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Where's your flaming Romeo?

			BETTY CAMERON
	If you must know, he's waiting for me 
	outside.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Better go and look after him. He's likely 
	to get asthma.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm here to demand an apology.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Sorry, I never apologize while I'm eating.

She pulls his plate away.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Well, you're GOING to apologize. 

He pulls his plate back.

			BETTY CAMERON
	You're as stubborn as a mule. 

She pulls his plate away again.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Are you going to apologize or not?

He pulls his plate back and rises, annoyed.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	If you want this booth, you can have it.

Michael carries his plate and utensils to another booth and 
sits. Betty watches him angrily, then rises and joins him in 
his new booth where he goes right on eating.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You in again?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Why do we have to quarrel all the time?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I'll ask the first cop I see.

			BETTY CAMERON
	There's no excuse for being rude about it. 
	I came down this evening to tell Duke I 
	couldn't go--

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I believe most of what you say.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Then you're going to apologize?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I doubt it.

She pulls his plate away.

			BETTY CAMERON
	You are.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Yeah?

He pulls his plate back.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'll ... stay here until you DO apologize.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	They'll probably find ya here when they 
	excavate this place a hundred years from 
	now.

Betty picks up a spoon and feeds herself a mouthful of his 
food.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Shall I order you another fork?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Oh, I rather like eating out of the same 
	trough with you.

He pushes the plate over to her.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	If you need this worse than I do, you can 
	have it. 
		(rises, throws 
		down napkin) 
	I came in here to take on a little 
	nourishment and you insist on making a 
	scene.

Betty puts down her spoon, rises, and confronts him nose to 
nose as they comically half-whisper at each other:

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm NOT making a scene!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You ARE making a scene!

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm NOT making a scene!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You ARE making a scene!

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm NOT!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You ARE! You're making a scene right now!

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm here to demand an apology.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, you're not gonna get one. Why don't 
	you go away from here?

			BETTY CAMERON
	What about my pride?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	What about your dignity?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Never mind my dignity. I'm gonna follow 
	you 'round till I DO get an apology.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, you are, are ya?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Yes, I am.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, that'll be interesting.

Michael turns and heads directly into the men's restroom, 
closing the door behind him. He moves to a mirror, takes a
comb out of his pocket, and fixes his hair.

CUT TO Betty outside. After glancing around to make sure 
she's unobserved, Betty barges into the men's room and shuts 
the door. Shocked, Michael looks around nervously.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Hey, you can't come in here!

			BETTY CAMERON
		(also nervous)
	You-you can't stop me.

He takes her by the shoulders and tries to hustle her out.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Haven't you got any sense?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Don't push me, you big gorilla.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Somebody might come in here.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I hope they do. I'll make you wish you 
	never talked to me the way you did.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	All right, but not here.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Do you believe I came down to tell Duke I 
	wouldn't go out with him?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I believe you came down to tell Duke 
	anything.

			BETTY CAMERON
	All right, then apologize.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	All right, I apologize. Now, come on, get 
	out o' here.

He pushes her to the door and tries to open it but she 
quickly shuts it.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, I've done everything you've asked, 
	haven't I?

			BETTY CAMERON
	You haven't kissed me.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I don't want to kiss ya.

She stares at him.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Do you promise to get out?

			BETTY CAMERON
	After you've kissed me.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, all right.

Michael gives her a kiss.

					QUICK CUT TO

UP THE STREET

A bored Duke, lying lengthwise in his parked car, his feet 
up on the driver's door. He glances in the direction of 
Toler's but no one is coming. A pair of women walk down the 
sidewalk on the other side of the street. Duke's head pops 
up as if he had antennae. He sits up in the driver's seat 
and HONKS his horn at them.

					CUT BACK TO

Michael and Betty in a clinch in the men's room. They break 
from what has become a passionate kiss, all their mutual 
hostility gone. 

			BETTY CAMERON
		(lovingly)
	You big brute. You've broken my shoulder 
	strap. Got a pin?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(gently)
	Where would I get a pin?

She pulls at his lapel to reveal his fraternity pin.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Well, how 'bout that one?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(stunned)
	You mean it?

She takes the pin from him.

			BETTY CAMERON
	What do you think?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I think you'd better get out of here.

He gives her another kiss. They break slowly and, as Betty 
exits, the two rapt lovers try to maintain eye contact for 
as long as possible.

Meanwhile, out in the diner, a drunken freshman wobbles into 
view.

			UPPERCLASSMAN
		(walking by)
	Steady there, freshman, you're goin' 
	around a curve!

The freshman waves him off dismissively then, heading for 
the men's room, hesitates at the sight of Betty emerging and 
closing the door behind her. She is so completely wrapped up 
in attaching Michael's pin to herself so that she fails to 
notice the drunk.

			FRESHMAN
		(to Betty)
	Excuse me, I'm all turned around.

The freshman turns and heads into the ladies' room opposite. 
After a pause, we hear women scream and diners look in the 
direction of the noise as the startled freshman stumbles out. 
The diners laugh at him as Betty walks out of the building.

					FADE OUT

FADE IN
INT. MICHAEL'S FRAT HOUSE - NIGHT

Michael and his frat brothers sprawl across a communal, 
dormitory-like room. Some study textbooks. One guy busily 
grooms himself in front of a mirror. Another is sprawled 
stomach-down across his bed, playing solitaire on the 
floor. Michael lies in his own bed and polishes his shoes
throughout the entire scene: 

			GROOMER
	So, long about two o'clock, the caps 
	started blowin' off. Boy, sound like 
	machine gun fire. We went down to look, 
	there wasn't even a single whole bottle 
	left. Eighteen gallons. Boy, I set down 
	and had myself a good cry.

			STUDENT AT DESK
	I don't like to change the subject but 
	just what IS a hypothesis?

			CARD PLAYER
	A hypothesis ... is a pig-like animal with 
	a very large mouth. 

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	They inhabit fraternity houses.

			STUDENT IN CHAIR
	Sometimes you find 'em under rocks.

			STUDENT AT DESK
	You apes are gonna revolutionize education.

Grady, the goofy guy, enters wearing a bathrobe and 
looking peeved.

			GRADY
	Who's got my polka-dot drawers?!

			CARD PLAYER
	Why, I saw a crowd of people wearing 'em 
	on the campus this morning.

			GROOMER
	Why lie to him? I saw 'em on a pink 
	elephant last night. When I woke up this 
	morning, the elephant was gone.

			GRADY
	Well, whoever belongs to these doll's 
	pants can have 'em.

Grady tosses a rolled up pair of panties onto a bed and 
turns to exit. 

			CARD PLAYER
	Say, did you happen to look on the 
	flagpole?

Grady stops to turn back and give him a look as the others 
laugh. An effeminate frat brother, wearing polka-dot shorts, 
pauses outside the door.

			POLKA DOT
		(to Grady)
	Oh, hello.

The Polka Dot pansy walks off down the hall.

			GRADY
	Hey, you!

Grady exits, chasing after the guy with his shorts. More 
laughter. Duke enters and addresses the assembled multitude.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Say, when is that committee meeting for 
	the dance tomorrow night?

			GROOMER
	Why, you're right on time. That meeting 
	was last night.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Oh, yeah? Well, listen you guys, I'm 
	puttin' in first bid for the parking space 
	next to the fountain. There's gonna be a 
	lot of excited women chasing me tomorrow 
	night and I want some place handy to cool 
	'em off. 
		(to Student in Chair) 
	What are you readin' -- Mother Goose? 
		(reads over his shoulder) 
	"The biological urge, as manifested in 
	early youth, is fraught with great danger." 
		(to a freshman)
	Hey, freshman, shall I read it out loud?

The freshman turns out to be the wide-eyed guy from the 
opening montage who looks up from his studies to stare at 
Duke.

			CARD PLAYER
	Better keep it quiet -- he's too young to 
	know about life.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Aw, never mind, dear. When you get to be a 
	big boy, mother'll explain everything. And 
	until then, don't let any of the other 
	little boys teach ya anything.

			WIDE-EYED GUY
		(sullenly)
	Conversation was all right until you came 
	in here.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Well, let's change the subject. How 'bout 
	free love?

			CARD PLAYER
	How 'bout free-wheeling?

Wide-eyed Guy goes back to his reading. Duke plops down in a 
chair next to Michael.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	I hope you mugs are bringin' a lot o' nice 
	wrens for me tomorrow night.

			GROOMER
	Who you bringin', Duke?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(as much to Michael as anyone)
	Oh, I'm playin' the field. There's one 
	little number, though, that's been pinin' 
	away for me a long time. She's engaged to 
	some boob, too. But you know old Galloway 
	-- he follows 'em right up to the altar.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	How can you expect women to resist your 
	charms when you can't do it yourself?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Oh, well, you can't blame 'em much at that.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Not much.

					DISSOLVE TO:

INT./EXT. THE DANCE - THE NEXT NIGHT

Tuxedoes and evening gowns. Duke and Betty slow dance to 
some rather tame MUSIC from a band. Michael, dancing with a 
big-boned girl who seems to have fallen asleep on him, 
watches jealously. Duke runs his fingers along Betty's 
shoulder.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Are you trying to brush something off my 
	shoulder?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Aw, it's religious fervor. I'm feelin' for 
	your wings. Say, you're touchy. You know, 
	you'd be much nicer if you'd loosen your 
	morals.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'd be much more comfortable if you'd 
	loosen your grip.

Duke maneuvers Betty closer to Michael and his partner. Duke 
sees that Michael can overhear and starts in again on Betty.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Just because you're wearin' some flathead's 
	pin there's no reason you should get morbid. 
	You're not married yet.

Michael scowls.

			BETTY CAMERON
	You ever try dancing with your feet?

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	You know, these college engagements don't 
	last. Statistics prove that only one out 
	of every nine hundred and seventy-eight 
	and two-thirds ever reach a legal 
	culmination.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Which proves that nine hundred seventy-
	seven and two-thirds have been wrong up 
	till now.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Oh, on the contrary. It proves that it's 
	cheaper to buy milk ... when you can't 
	afford coffee. 
		(to Michael, with mock surprise) 
	Hello, precious!

			BETTY CAMERON
	Hello, Michael.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Hello, Betty.

Duke dances away with Betty. Michael is anchored to his 
deadweight partner. The MUSIC ends, the dancers stop, break 
and applaud politely. Michael and his partner exchange 
pleasant nods and grins but as soon as her back is turned, 
Michael silently signals to his friend Steve who sits on 
the sidelines smoking a cigarette. Michael flashes a dollar 
at him and gestures for him to dance with his partner. Steve 
gestures, "Who, me?" and waves him off. Michael stands there 
holding up the cash. Steve signals he wants five dollars and 
Michael agrees. Steve puts out his cigarette as the MUSIC 
for the next number begins. Michael resumes dancing with his 
partner as Steve joins them.

			STEVE
	Mind if I cut in?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	No. How are ya, Steve? 

Michael shakes hands with Steve -- passing him the cash in 
the process.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(to the girl)
	Thank you. 
		(to Steve)
	Thank you.

Steve starts dancing with the girl as Michael walks off.

			STEVE
		(to the girl)
	Been watching you all evening. You're 
	really a divine dancer. I hope this dance 
	is as profitable to you as it is to me.

Michael exits the building, giving a friendly wave to Grady 
and his date as they pass, and joining the Professor who 
stands outside smoking a pipe.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Ain't you dancing tonight, Prof?

			PROFESSOR
	No, I only do the waltzes.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	What a night.

			PROFESSOR
	Bracing, isn't it?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's weakening.

			PROFESSOR
	I insist that it's bracing.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's all a matter of age.

			PROFESSOR
	See here, young man, I'm beginning to 
	dislike that word.

The Prof walks off and Michael follows. They sit and chat:

			PROFESSOR
	Well, do things seem any brighter than 
	they did a day or so ago?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I'll say. Did they hold fraternity dances 
	in your day?

			PROFESSOR
	Yes, indeed.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I don't suppose things have changed much 
	at that.

			PROFESSOR
	No, not much. Only we used to "spark" 
	instead of "neck."

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You know, Prof, I've been thinking things 
	over and I've just about decided to chuck 
	it all.

			PROFESSOR
	What? Give up school? Your career?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Aw, I'm not so hot about it anyway and ... 
	why, I've been thinking that I might like 
	to get married.

			PROFESSOR
	But you've only got two years to go. I 
	know that seems like a long time but it's 
	not so long if you really want what you 
	came here for.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I do want it, Prof, but what good is 
	education if it interferes with your 
	happiness? There are other things, too. I 
	wouldn't mind waiting for them if I could 
	just be sure that they'd still be there 
	when I got through. That nothing'd change.

			PROFESSOR
	I remember I nearly made the same mistake 
	you're about to make.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Were you in love, too?

			PROFESSOR
	It's possible, you know. I was your age 
	once. I wanted to get married. I remember 
	it seemed very difficult to us at the 
	time. There were summer nights, the lilacs 
	were growing ... and we had the same moon.

The Prof is interrupted by two faculty members exiting the 
building together. One is an attractive, middle-aged woman 
named BARBARA. The other, a slightly older man who wipes 
his brow with a handkerchief.

			OLDER MAN
	Well, I'm afraid that some of my new steps 
	are a little bit old-fashioned.

			BARBARA
	As a dancing partner, I'm going to 
	recommend you to all the girls present.

			OLDER MAN
	How do you mean that?

			BARBARA
	Well, we won't go into that, if you don't 
	mind.

The Prof, pipe in mouth, watches the two silently from a 
distance until Michael draws him back into conversation.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	But what happened?

			PROFESSOR
	Hm? Oh, nothing. Nothing. I guess that's 
	just it. Nothing.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	She married someone else?

			PROFESSOR
	No, no, no, no. She's teaching.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Did you have a fight or something?

			PROFESSOR
	No, no, no. Nothing like that.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, what - ? Why -?

			PROFESSOR
	Well, you see, she thought-- Uh, that is, 
	that is, we thought it'd be best for me to 
	finish. That is, she wanted me to have the 
	thing I set out for, my degree. We, uh, 
	well, we both wanted things to be right. 
	But that isn't the point I'm trying to 
	bring out. The point I'm trying to bring 
	out is that people mustn't be hasty. 

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, what you're saying is the very thing 
	that--

			PROFESSOR
	You don't understand WHAT I'm saying. How 
	do I know if we'd been married, we might 
	have been very unhappy?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Wouldn't that have been better than to 
	have missed it altogether?

			PROFESSOR
		(testily)
	See here, young man, I'm a professor of 
	biology. I won't be misinterpreted.

The Prof and Michael rise as Duke and Betty join them.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(to Michael)
	Well, precious, here's the body but the 
	soul belongs to me.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(to Betty, taking her hand)
	Think you'll ever get over it?

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'll never dance with him again unless he 
	wears boxing gloves.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Now, don't forget that blue number.

Betty waves dismissively at Duke as he walks away. The Prof, 
seeing Michael and Betty holding hands, realizes that 
three's a crowd:

			PROFESSOR
		(self-consciously)
	Well ...

Michael and Betty watch the Prof walk off and join Barbara 
and her older male companion as a stream of students file 
out of the building and into the night.

			PASSING STUDENT
		(to a friend)
	That sure was a warm orchestra.

			BARBARA
		(to the Prof)
	Well, David, you've been avoiding me all 
	evening.

			PROFESSOR
	Hm?

			BARBARA
	Surely you must have one more dance left 
	in your system?

			PROFESSOR
		(ironic)
	Why, I've spent the whole evening looking 
	forward to a hot waltz.

Michael and Betty smile at one another and walk off, arm in 
arm.

			BARBARA
		(to the older man)
	You mustn't blame David for his lack of 
	enthusiasm. Twenty years ago when we were 
	students together-- I mean, ten years ago, 
	his agility wasn't entirely confined to 
	his mind.

			OLDER MAN
	I can imagine.

			BARBARA
	Was it, David?

			PROFESSOR
		(lost in thought)
	Huh? No, I was what you call a "hot-cha."

Barbara laughs and squeezes his arm. 

Meanwhile, Michael and Betty, like other couples leaving the 
dance, walk hand in hand, on the campus. MUSIC drifts in as 
they find a quiet, grassy spot under a tree. Betty sits and 
slowly, lovingly pulls Michael down beside her. But he's 
pensive and sits slightly apart from her.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Mike, sit over here. Why are you so solemn?

Michael moves closer and Betty puts her head on his shoulder.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Gee, it's great being engaged to a boy 
	like you.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I'm in love with you. For your mind, 
	partly.

They kiss deeply as Betty runs her hand over his cheek.

			BETTY CAMERON
	And I love you for your curly whiskers. 
	Gosh, I can't wait to hear you shave.

Michael gives her a look, then kisses her even more 
passionately, easing her backward to the grass. They break. 
Betty, a little overcome, looks away.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Darling, let's not wait. Why don't we 
	chuck it all? Let's get married.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(looks at him)
	Michael! 

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I know a guy out in California who'll get 
	me a job any time I want it. We can't go 
	on like this. Why-- Betty, we're crazy.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Mike, you don't mean you'd quit school, 
	give up everything you worked for so hard?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, what do they mean compared to you?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Oh, don't think I don't want to -- as much 
	as you do -- but I couldn't. Oh, Michael, 
	it's so important. Later on, you'd never 
	forgive yourself. You'd blame me. And 
	you'd have a right to if I let you give
	up everything for me.

Michael breaks away slowly and sits up, grim. Betty joins 
him, worried.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael, are you afraid it won't last?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You know better than that. But two years 
	just waiting, why-- How do I know? Maybe 
	it WOULDN'T last.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I heard about a guy today--

			BETTY CAMERON
	What does it matter about anyone else? I 
	won't change. And I won't let you change --
		(pressing herself to him) 
	-- if I have to use every feminine wile I 
	know about.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(eases her slightly away)
	Please, darling. No telling what might 
	happen.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Do ya love me?

Michael presses his lips to her forehead. Suddenly, they 
embrace and kiss hungrily. Finally, they break and Betty 
stares at Michael intently. He lowers his eyes uncomfortably.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(quietly)
	Let's go home.

Michael rises, takes Betty's hand and helps her up as we

					DISSOLVE TO

EXT. BETTY'S SORORITY HOUSE - LATER THAT NIGHT

A car pulls up with Michael at the wheel and Betty's head on 
his shoulder. He kills the engine. Slowly, never taking his 
eyes from her, he rises, helps her out and walks her to the 
front steps where they stare intently into one another's 
eyes.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Good night, dear.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Good night, honey.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Promise me you'll think it over. It's so 
	important. Why, Michael, later on it may 
	affect our whole lives.

Betty kisses him impulsively and hurries up the steps to the 
front door. She puts the key in the lock, then turns to look 
back at a glum Michael. She smiles and hurries back down to 
him, kissing him repeatedly.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(whispering)
	Oh, Michael. Michael. Michael. Michael.

Finally, she tears herself away. Michael watches her rush up 
the steps, unlock and open the door and blow him a last kiss 
before disappearing into the building. The door closes 
behind her and Michael walks slowly and sadly back to his 
car, gets in and starts the engine, casting an occasional 
look back at the sorority house.

					DISSOLVE TO

INT. TOLER'S - MIDNIGHT

The sound of the car engine blends with that of a soda 
fountain at Toler's. Close up of a glass being filled
with fountain water.

			MICHAEL'S VOICE
	Make it good and cold, huh?

A soda jerk fixes a drink for Michael who sits at the counter 
in the nearly deserted eatery. We glimpse Mr. Toler himself 
working on the books in the background. The soda jerk stirs 
Michael's drink with a spoon and serves it up.

			SODA JERK
	Cold it is.

Michael drinks up as the jerk wanders off. Dora, the 
no-nonsense waitress, now dressed to go home, pauses to 
smile at Michael.

			DORA SWALE
	Hello, precious. 

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You still here?

			DORA SWALE
	It's only twelve o'clock. I've the rest of 
	the night all to myself.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Banking hours.

			DORA SWALE
	Uh huh. 
		(off his tuxedo)
	My, but you look cute in that monkey suit. 

Michael gives her a long look. She lets him look.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Thanks.

			DORA SWALE
	You don't feel like walking, do you?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	No.

Dora starts for the door, disappointed but not defeated. She 
turns back to Michael and tries again:

			DORA SWALE
	It's not safe for a girl to be alone on 
	the streets after midnight. 

Michael understands the proposition but doesn't respond. 
Dora turns to go.

			DORA SWALE
		(pleasantly)
	Good night, Mr. Toler.

			TOLER
	Good night, Dora.

Dora heads out the door as Michael thinks it over. He slowly 
turns his head in her direction - and sees her smiling at 
him through the glass door. He watches as she turns and 
takes a step or two onto the sidewalk before pausing to 
adjust her garter, hoisting her skirt up far enough to 
expose a considerable amount of leg. She straightens her 
skirt and gives Michael a last glance before sashaying down 
the street. Michael looks around. No one has noticed Dora's 
discreet flirtation. Slowly, he rises, goes to the door, 
exits and follows her.

				DISSOLVE TO

EXT. SWALE HOUSE - LATER THAT NIGHT

Michael and Dora walk hand in hand up to the front porch of 
a plain little house off campus.

			DORA SWALE
	Well, this the Swale mansion.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's quite a cute place.

			DORA SWALE
	Sure, it has doors and everything. Wanna 
	come in?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(starts to go)
	Oh, I guess I hadn't better.

			DORA SWALE
		(draws him back)
	Aw, come on in a minute. I may be able to 
	scare up some liquid excitement.

Dora winks and goes to the front door. Michael follows 
tentatively.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	How 'bout the family?

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, don't worry about that. My old man 
	works nights. I hardly ever see him.

Dora has unlocked the door and opened it and turned on an 
inside light. Michael checks his wristwatch.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's gettin' pretty late, don't you think?

			DORA SWALE
	Aw, come on in.

Dora takes him by the hand and leads him inside. 

INT. SWALE HOUSE - CONTINUOUS

Dora and Michael enter the mostly darkened home.

			DORA SWALE
	It's not so bad after the first shock. 
	Don't mind the mess, I fired the servants 
	this morning.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, that's all right. You should see our 
	joint some time.

Dora puts on a light -- the place is a mess. She goes to an 
old-fashioned iron stove and pulls out a half full bottle of 
liquor.

			DORA SWALE
	Here's Pop's dynamite. He hides it in the 
	stove so I can't find it. 

Michael chuckles.

			DORA SWALE
	Well, all we need now is a little time.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, do you suppose it's all right?

			DORA SWALE
	Sure, it's all right. It's half gone. The 
	old man wasn't blind the last time I saw 
	him.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I mean, do you suppose he'd have any 
	objection?

			DORA SWALE
	No, he won't know the difference. Now, you 
	hold the baby while I get the glasses. 

Dora places the bottle in Michael's hands but pauses.

			DORA SWALE
	My, what's all the trembling about? 

Michael chuckles nervously. Dora leads him over to a 
cluttered table and puts the bottle on top.

			DORA SWALE
	You'd better come over here and just watch 
	it 'cause that's all there is, there ain't 
	no more. I'll be right back.

Dora hustles out of the room as Michael looks around 
restlessly and takes a seat.

				CUT TO

INT. BETTY'S SORORITY HOUSE - AROUND THE SAME TIME

Barbara, the faculty member seen earlier with the Prof, 
wears a robe and sits at a dressing table in her room, 
fixing her hair. There's a KNOCK at her door.

			BARBARA
	Yes?

Betty enters, also in a robe, her hair down.

			BETTY CAMERON
	May I come in?

			BARBARA
	Yes, do.

Betty closes the door and joins Barbara.

			BETTY CAMERON
	What do you think?

			BARBARA
	I don't know. What DO I think?

Betty sits beside Barbara who continues to fix her hair.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm in love.

			BARBARA
	Well, I can hardly believe it.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Were you ever that way?

			BARBARA
	Well, don't I look human?

			BETTY CAMERON
	I mean, were you ever engaged?

			BARBARA
	For years.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Aw, don't joke. I want to ask you something. 
	Suppose a man had spent all his life 
	planning to be something big and then he 
	met a girl and wanted to give it all up 
	and get married. Do you think the girl 
	should let him?

Barbara looks stricken.

			BARBARA
		(quietly, defensively)
	You haven't any right to ask me questions 
	like that.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm sorry, Barbara.

Betty, realizing she's hurt Barbara somehow, looks away. She 
sees a couple of framed photographs on the dressing table, 
pictures of a much younger Barbara and the Prof in their 
college days.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Wha--? Isn't this you?

			BARBARA
		(nods)
	Mm hmm. Taken right here on the campus.

			BETTY CAMERON
	What a funny dress. Why-- That's Professor 
	Matthews. 
		(sudden realization)
	Was it--? It wasn't David?

			BARBARA
		(reluctantly)
	There's a lot of things I keep hidden, 
	Betty. I was rather like you, afraid of 
	responsibility. And so we waited. And 
	after a while, it--

			BETTY CAMERON
	Can't believe that of David.

			BARBARA
	Oh, it wasn't is fault. It wasn't anyone's 
	fault. It happened so gradually, we - we 
	didn't even see it go. We just looked 
	around for it one day and it - it wasn't 
	there. 
		(voice breaking with emotion)
	Oh, well, you can't run the race over 
	again, you know.

Betty suddenly realizes the answer to her question and beams.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Gee, you're a peach. May I use your 
	telephone?

			BARBARA
		(confused at her response)
	Why, certainly.

Betty rises and hurries over to a bedside telephone as 
Barbara wipes her eyes. Betty sits on the edge of the bed 
and dials. Barbara grasps the situation.

			BARBARA
	And you can tell him for me, young woman, 
	he's got to let you spend more time on 
	your English or I'm going to flunk you.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(all smiles)
	No, you're not. I'm gonna get married!

					CUT TO

INT. MICHAEL'S FRAT HOUSE - CONTINUOUS

The telephone RINGS in the darkened room where Michael's 
bed is empty. None of the half-asleep frat brothers care to 
answer it.

			FRAT GUY'S VOICE
	Aw, dry up!

Someone hurls a shoe at the phone and knocks it over. It 
stops ringing.

					CUT TO

INT. SWALE HOUSE - AROUND THE SAME TIME

A radio plays some blaring HOT JAZZ -- it sounds like an 
uptempo version of "St. Louis Blues" -- as Dora and Michael, 
drunk on bootleg hooch, slow dance into view. Michael's 
jacket is off and Dora is pressed tight to him as they 
wobble unsteadily, the camera jerkily following them. They 
kiss. Their dialogue is slurred and some of it is hard to 
understand:

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Turn off the heat, baby, I haven't got 
	fire insurance.

			DORA SWALE
		(chuckles)
	Neither have I.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(mumbles)
	No firm'd take it - it's too big a risk.

			DORA SWALE
	What?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's too big. Too big a risk.

They laugh. Michael exhales.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Boy, that engine sure packs a wallop.

			DORA SWALE
	Old man got it off a fire boat.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Got it off just in time. Burn up the boat.

			DORA SWALE
	Let's have another.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Where is it?

			DORA SWALE
		(points with her elbow)
	It's over there.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Over there?

They try to dance over to the bottle but end up falling onto 
a sofa. Michael is on his back and Dora lies on top of him. 
They crack up with laughter. They look at one another, grow 
serious and start to kiss. We pan across their outstretched 
bodies and over to the radio, still playing.

					DISSOLVE TO

The same radio, a few hours later. No music.

			RADIO ANNOUNCER
	At the sound of the gong, it will be 
	exactly four A.M. -- WJJ signing off. Good 
	morning, folks.

We hear the sound of the gong as we

					DISSOLVE TO

INT. SWALE HOUSE - EARLY MORNING

Dora has her arms around Michael. His head is in her lap. 
They're both asleep. Sunlight streams in. They awake, break, 
and struggle to sit up, groggy.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Is that day breakin' or my head crackin' 
	open? Oh, I feel terrible.

Dora again puts her arms around Michael.

			DORA SWALE
		(lovingly)
	Is that the way I affect you?

Michael slowly grabs his jacket, rises, rubs his head.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I'm gonna get out of here.

The two stand together and look at one another. Dora moves 
closer to him.

			DORA SWALE
	Are you sorry?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	'Bout what?

			DORA SWALE
	You know.
		(kisses him)
	You're sweet.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Sure.

Dora straightens Michael's untied bow tie as he starts to 
put on his jacket. Suddenly, he pauses and stares at 
something off screen. Dora slowly registers his surprise and 
she turns to see what he's staring at. We pan quickly to the 
opposite side of the room where Dora's father, MR. SWALE, 
stands grimly glaring at them. We move in for an intense 
close-up as Mr. Swale, never taking his eyes from the couple, 
picks up a telephone.

			SWALE
		(darkly)
	Give me the police station.

					FADE OUT

FADE IN

A door marked: ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY.

					DISSOLVE TO

INT. ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE - LATER THAT DAY

Assistant D.A. GIFFORD sits at his desk opposite the Prof.

			GIFFORD
	According to the report of the officer who 
	made the arrest, the boy's charged with 
	seduction of a minor. That's pretty 
	serious, Professor, do you understand?

			PROFESSOR
	I talked to the boy, Mr. Gifford, and I'm 
	convinced he doesn't remember clearly just 
	what happened. Now, I know the lad. I've 
	been his confidante. He's a boy of high 
	ideals. And I can't stand by and see his 
	life ruined by some circumstance over 
	which he had no control.

			GIFFORD
	Well, I've sent for the boy. The girl and
	her father are outside. Sometimes these 
	matters can be settled without resort to 
	law. 
		(into an intercom)
	Send in Mr. Swale and the young lady with 
	him. 
		(to the Prof)
	You must understand, Professor, that 
	while I'm not always in sympathy with 
	certain laws, nevertheless, it's my duty 
	to enforce them.

An aide escorts Dora and her father into the office, then 
exits. Swale pushes Dora into the room. Her self-confidence 
has vanished and she is now as timid as her father is 
hostile and blustering.

			GIFFORD
		(to the Swales)
	Will you be seated, please? 
		(introductions)
	Mr. Swale, Mr. Matthews.

			PROFESSOR
	How do you do?

			SWALE
	How do you do? 

Dora sits. 

			SWALE
		(to the Prof)
	Are you his lawyer?

			GIFFORD
	No, Mr. Matthews is a professor at the 
	state university.

			SWALE
	Oh, so you're a college professor? So, 
	you're the guy that teaches them--

			GIFFORD
	Just a moment, Mr. Swale. Mr. Matthews' 
	visit here is purely a friendly one.

			SWALE
	Well, I'm a taxpayer--

			GIFFORD
	I understand that.

			SWALE
	Nobody's gonna put nothin' over on me!

			GIFFORD
	Calm yourself, Mr. Swale. Will you sit 
	down, please?

Glaring, Mr. Swale sits next to Dora who is virtually 
cowering. Gifford presses a button on his intercom and, a 
moment later, the aide escorts Michael and his guard into 
the office. He still wears his tux but now without the tie. 
The Prof looks at him. Michael lowers his eyes in 
embarrassment. Dora glances at him sadly. The guard and the 
aide exit, closing the door behind them.

			GIFFORD
	Have a seat, young man.

Michael sits in a chair by the desk.

			GIFFORD
	Do you know this young lady?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Dora? Yes, sir.

			GIFFORD
	Where'd you meet her?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	In Toler's. She's a waitress over there.

			PROFESSOR
	Tell Mr. Gifford just what happened last 
	night.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Well, I went into Toler's after the dance 
	and Dora was there and she was just going 
	home so I walked home with her. And we had 
	a couple of drinks and ... well, what 
	happened after that I guess everybody 
	knows about. I don't remember much myself.

			SWALE
		(rises, angry)
	Oh, you don't remember, eh?!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(evenly)
	No, sir, I don't.

			SWALE
	Well, you can't get away with that!

			PROFESSOR
	Please, Mr. Swale, be reasonable.

			SWALE
	I'll be reasonable but I know the law! And 
	he's going to marry my daughter or go to 
	the penitentiary!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Marry?!

			SWALE
	That's what I said, marry!

			PROFESSOR
	But, Mr. Swale, marriage isn't going to 
	help the situation.

			SWALE
	Oh, you think he's too good for her, eh?! 
	She ain't been to college, is that it?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	But, Mr. Swale, it wouldn't be right. We 
	don't love each other.

			SWALE
	Oh, you don't love each other, eh?!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Do we, Dora?

Dora looks up fearfully at her father, then lowers her eyes. 

			SWALE
		(bitterly, to Michael)
	You're a fine guy to be talkin' about 
	what's right. If I'd've known last night 
	what kind of a snake you was, I'd've taken 
	the law into me own hands and there ain't 
	a jury in the country would've convicted 
	me. Well, you're going to marry her, you 
	contemptible little--

			GIFFORD
	That isn't necessary, Mr. Swale.

			PROFESSOR
	Now, Mr. Swale, if he's all that, would 
	you still have your daughter marry him?

			SWALE
	Well, what else could she do?

			PROFESSOR
	It's a terrible pity, Mr. Swale, that 
	things happened the way they have. But how 
	would it make things right to force them 
	to marry just because the social system 
	ignores the natural impulses of the young?

			SWALE
	So that's it, eh? So that's what you teach 
	'em in college? Well, what about the 
	sanctity of the home? What about the 
	marriage laws?

			PROFESSOR
	Mr. Swale, marriage wasn't intended to 
	ruin peoples' lives -- it was intended to 
	bring them happiness.

			SWALE
		(ranting)
	What do I care about her happiness? I'm 
	a-thinkin' about what's right and what's 
	wrong. I've tried to be decent about this 
	thing. I don't want to drag my daughter's 
	name in the gutter. And if you want to, 
	we'll let the newspapers decide whether 
	it's right for a low dog to come into a 
	man's house and ruin his daughter's 
	honor! And while we're about it, we'll 
	have 'em print the kind of stuff that's 
	being taught up at the university. Boys 
	and gals learnin' that morals is all 
	wrong, that church is all wrong, and that 
	they don't have to marry!

			PROFESSOR
	Oh, Mr. Swale, you misunderstood.

			SWALE
	Oh, no, I didn't! I ain't been to college 
	but I understand the English language. 
	And what's more I'm gonna put him where he 
	belongs. I'm gonna put him into the 
	penitentiary. Come on, Dora.

Swale takes Dora's hand, she rises obediently, and they 
head for the door. Michael rises and stops them.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Please. Wait a minute. 

			SWALE
	Oh, so it's different now, eh?

			PROFESSOR
		(rises)
	Michael, be careful.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(to the Prof)
	This is my affair. I can't drag you into it. 
		(to Swale, after a 
		glance at Dora)
	I'll marry her.

			SWALE
	That's more like it.

			DORA SWALE
	But, Michael - !

			SWALE
		(harshly, to Dora)
	You keep out of this. I know what's best 
	for you.

Dora lowers her eyes.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	How soon do I have to marry her?

			SWALE
	You'll marry her right away or take the 
	consequences.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Will tonight be all right? I've got some 
	things to do.

			SWALE
	How do I know you won't run away?

			GIFFORD
	I'll be responsible for the boy, Mr. Swale.

			SWALE
	Oh, well, that's different. The word's as 
	good as a bond with me. Here, give me your 
	hand. 
		(shakes Michael's hand, sternly) 
	My daughter comes from good people, son. 
	And I ain't such a bad guy when you get to 
	know me. 

The Prof looks disturbed at all this.

			SWALE
	Well, I'll see ya at my house tonight. 
	Come on, Dora.

The Swales head out the door. Swale pauses and turns back to 
Michael.

			SWALE
	And, remember, I don't want no tricks.

The Swales exit. Michael slumps back into his chair. The 
Prof joins him and puts a comforting hand on his shoulder.

			PROFESSOR
	Sorry, Michael.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's all right, Prof. It's just life, I 
	guess, and I gotta go through with it. 
	Anyhow, what difference does it make now?

			PROFESSOR
	You poor kid.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(slowly, haltingly, with emotion)
	Betty. Who's gonna tell her? I guess I'd 
	better do it myself. I couldn't let her 
	hear it from anyone else. Only, you'll 
	stick by me till this thing's over, won't 
	ya? I gotta have somebody.

Michael lowers his head and sobs.

					FADE OUT

FADE IN
EXT. CAMPUS - LATER THAT DAY

Campus bells RING the hour. Voices of laughing, talking  
students. Pan down from tall trees to Michael sitting alone 
and forlornly below on the large engraved bench seen earlier.

			BETTY'S VOICE
	Michael! Yoo hoo! Michael!

Michael looks up. Betty enters scene, deliriously happy, and 
joins him on the bench, putting an arm around him.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I got your message and I'm all out of 
	breath, I ran all the way. Oh, let me look 
	at you. Where've you been? Don't ever stay 
	away so long again.

Betty gives him a hug and presses her face to his.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(extremely uncomfortable)
	Betty, wait.

			BETTY CAMERON
	No, I won't. Oh, when I think of what we 
	nearly missed, it frightens me. Oh, 
	Michael, we're never going to wait for 
	anything again. State College is going to 
	lose two of its brightest pupils. 
		(a faraway look in her eye) 
	California. Mr. and Mrs. Michael Harvey. 
	Mr. and Mrs. Michael Harvey. Mr. and Mrs.--

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(abruptly rises)
	STOP IT! STOP IT!

Betty watches, confused, as Michael stalks away from her. 
She slowly rises, follows and joins him. Somehow she senses 
that he's about to give her the worst possible news.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(bitterly)
	There'll be a Mrs. Michael Harvey, all 
	right, but it won't be you. 

A long pause. Betty can't believe it. She sits on the bench, 
stunned, horrified. Michael sits beside her.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	It's too late after all, you see? I gotta 
	marry someone else.

They both have tears in their eyes.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Don't look at me like that. It's true. It 
	happened last night. I gotta marry her or 
	go to jail. Seems there's a law that says 
	somethin' like that. So, you-- Please, 
	don't. You're better off without me anyway. 
	I'm no good or I couldn't've done a thing 
	like that. 

			BETTY CAMERON
	You can't marry anyone else. I won't let 
	ya do it. We'll run away. We'll do 
	something.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(shakes his head)
	It's too late.

			BETTY CAMERON
	It's NOT too late. It's my fault as much 
	as yours. I should have been with you.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Oh, no, you shouldn't. A guy's gotta 
	behave according to the textbooks his great-
	grandfather wrote. And nothing ever comes 
	true. Nothing at all.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I guess it - it doesn't.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Nothing ever comes true.

Michael rises and starts to leave but Betty clutches at his 
hand.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael! Don't leave me! Oh, please don't 
	leave me!

But Michael feels he has no choice -- he pulls free and 
walks away without looking back. Betty, trembling on the 
bench, breaks down completely. She leans her head back and 
sobs uncontrollably.

On the opposite side of the street, Duke Galloway pulls up 
and parks his fancy car at the curb. He sees Betty seated on 
the bench and waves to her but she is too far gone to see 
him. He blows his HORN a few times. Still no response. 
Concerned, Duke climbs out and slowly crosses the street to 
join her. 

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Snap out of it! 
		(sits beside her)
	Say, have you and that ape been fightin' 
	again? Why do you hang around those 
	irritating guys? 
		(puts his arm around her)
	Take Doctor Galloway, for instance. The 
	answer to a maiden's prayer, soothing 
	syrup for unhappy females. 

But Betty is inconsolable. Duke realizes this is no mere 
love spat. He withdraws his arm.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Well, I musta said the wrong thing. Say, 
	what's the matter with ya?

			BETTY CAMERON
	Nothing. 
		(bitterly)
	'Cept I just got a kick in the shins for 
	trying to be decent.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Well, now what I been tellin' ya? Bein' 
	decent doesn't get ya anywhere.

			BETTY CAMERON
	You're right.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Sure, I'm right.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Okay. If other people can go to the Devil, 
	I guess I can, too.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(uncertainly)
	Well, sure.

			BETTY CAMERON
		(rises)
	Let's get away from this campus. Let's do 
	things! Let's go places! Let's drink! 
	Let's do everything that's bad!

During this outburst, Duke rises and takes her in his arms, 
comfortingly.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Oh, say, now, listen. You HAVE been hit 
	pretty hard.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Maybe I have. I tried being good and 
	everything turned out wrong. Maybe if I 
	tried being bad for a while things'll be 
	different.

Betty buries her face in Duke's shoulder. He can't believe 
what he's hearing.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Look at me. Look at me. 

Duke forces Betty to look at him.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	You couldn't be bad if you wanted to.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Yes, I could.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	No, ya couldn't.

			BETTY CAMERON
	I could.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Listen, silly. People have to be born bad. 
	All you need is a lot o' fresh air. I'll 
	tell ya what we'll do. We'll go for a 
	long ride out in the country. We'll go so 
	fast, it'll make your head spin. I'll buy 
	ya a glass of milk or something, we'll sit 
	under the trees and just talk things over. 
	In the morning, you'll be a new woman. 

Betty reluctantly smiles at Duke's line of patter.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	There ya are! It smiles! It's alive! It's 
	the Galloway System! 

Duke puts an arm around Betty and leads her away.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Makes 'em wild, it makes 'em frantic! 
	Soothin' soothin' system. Fresh air, 
	crackers and milk. Never fails, man or 
	beast, choose one and choose them all...

As they exit, we pan up to the tall trees and hear the 
campus bells RING again, along with Duke's voice as we

					FADE OUT

FADE IN
INT. SWALE HOUSE - EVENING

Michael and the Prof sit glumly at the Swales' cluttered 
table. Michael stares into space. The Prof sits unhappily 
with arms crossed. Swale himself stands in the background, 
puffing on a cigar and talking into the telephone.

			SWALE
	Yeah. ... Oh, it was, eh? ... Yeah, one-
	nineteen North Beaumont. Yeah-ha! Well, 
	you know how these kids are. ... Well, 
	well, get over as soon as you can, will ya? 
	... Yeah, goodbye! 

Swale hangs up, addresses the two seated men.

			SWALE
	Yeah, that was Judge Mitchell. He'll be a 
	little late. I hope you don't mind. Yeah, 
	the Swales and Mitchells have known each 
	other for years. That's why I thought it'd 
	be nice to have him for the ceremony. Yeah, 
	the Swales is one of the oldest families 
	in this neck of the woods.

			PROFESSOR
		(not interested)
	Oh, is that so?

			SWALE
	Yeah, my grandfather settled here way back 
	in the seventies. 
		(opens a family album) 
	Here, here, would you like to look at this?

			PROFESSOR
	No, thank you.

Swale looks at the Prof, then at Michael who continues to 
stare into space.

			SWALE
		(to the Prof)
	Will you have a cigar?

			PROFESSOR
	No, thank you.

			SWALE
	Well, would you like a little drink?

			PROFESSOR
	No, thank you, Mr. Swale. You see, I, too, 
	am a respectable citizen.

			SWALE
	Well, I didn't mean anything.

			PROFESSOR
	I understand perfectly.

Swale looks up and his face brightens as he sees Dora enter 
timidly. Lacking a real wedding gown, she wears an all-
white outfit. The men rise. Swale looks very proud. Dora 
smiles hopefully at Michael, trying to make the best of a 
bad situation.

			DORA SWALE
	Hello, Michael.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Hello, Dora.

Swale joins Dora and takes her hand.

			SWALE
	Well ... She certainly looks great, even 
	if she IS my daughter. 

Swale laughs. Dora sits on the sofa and her father joins her.

			SWALE
	Well, we got a car waitin' outside, ready 
	to take to the station. All we need now is 
	Judge Mitchell and everything'll be set. 

Michael turns away and moves to stare out of a window.

			SWALE
	Yeah, I believe in doing things right. 
	She's me only daughter, you know. Heh, heh. 
		(looks at Dora happily)
	Well, well, well. 
		(puts an arm around her)
	So you two kids are going to live in 
	California?

			DORA SWALE
	How far IS California?

			SWALE
	Oh, er, used to know. 
		(to Michael)
	Say, how far is it, son?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	What?

			SWALE
	California.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(sadly)
	It's a very long way.

			SWALE
	Yeah, I used to know but I forget.

			PROFESSOR
		(sharply)
	It's three thousand miles.

			SWALE
	Three thousand miles? Yeah, yeah! Of 
	course, that's it!

			DORA SWALE
		(astonished)
	That IS a long ways.

			SWALE
	Yeah, California, eh? You know, I think 
	there was a branch of the Swale family 
	settled out there way back in forty-nine. 

Phone RINGS. Swale rises.

			SWALE
	That's probably Judge Mitchell again. 
		(crosses to phone, picks up) 
	Hello!? ... Eh? ... Oh! ... Yeah. ... 
	Yes, he's here. 
		(to the Prof)
	It's for you, Professor. They seem pretty 
	excited.

The Prof moves to the phone. Michael and Dora look on with 
concern.

			PROFESSOR
		(into the phone)
	Hello? ... Where? 

We FLASH to Barbara speaking urgently into a phone in a 
hospital waiting room. Medical personnel are visible in the 
background behind her.

			BARBARA
	It happened a half an hour ago on the 
	Jericho Turnpike. Oh, it's very serious. 
	Please hurry.

CUT BACK TO the Prof.

			PROFESSOR
	All right. 

The Prof hangs up, tense. He rejoins the others.

			SWALE
	What's the trouble?

			PROFESSOR
	There's been an accident. Do you mind 
	driving us to the emergency hospital?

			SWALE
	Well, what's happened? Somebody hurt?

			PROFESSOR
	It's pretty serious.

			SWALE
	Well, yes, but, er - what about Judge 
	Mitchell?

			PROFESSOR
	Mitchell will have to wait.

			SWALE
	Well, I know but, now, wait a minute--

The Prof moves to Michael and puts a hand on his shoulder.

			PROFESSOR
	You'd better come along, Michael.

Michael and the Prof head out the front door. Swale and Dora 
follow.

			SWALE
	Now, wait a minute there! Say, look, see, 
	Mitchell was to be here in a few minutes. 
	Why don't--?

					DISSOLVE TO

INT. EMERGENCY HOSPITAL - MINUTES LATER

An aide opens the door to a waiting room and points the way 
for Michael and the Prof who are trailed by Dora and her 
father.

			AIDE
	Right in that door there.

Michael and the Prof enter the waiting room and peer through 
a glass door into the emergency room. Barbara, crying, 
emerges from the room and joins them.

			PROFESSOR
		(to Barbara)
	How are they? What does the doctor say?

			BARBARA
	Duke's very badly hurt.

Michael enters the emergency room and is horrified to see 
Betty lying half-conscious on a nearby bed. He joins her, 
kneeling at bedside.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(passionately)
	Betty ... Betty ... Betty ...

Betty nods, opens her eyes, sees Michael. She is weak but 
clearly glad to see him.

			BETTY CAMERON
	Michael ... Poor Michael. 

The Swales, watching from the doorway, realize the seriousness 
of Michael and Betty's relationship. 

			BETTY CAMERON
	Duke, how is he? Is he all right? He was 
	only trying to help me, make me forget.

The Swales exchange unhappy glances.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Betty, are you all right?

			BETTY CAMERON
	I'm all right ... now.

The doctor attending Duke confers with the Prof.

			DOCTOR
	Are you Professor Matthews? 
		(the Prof nods)
	He wants to talk to you.

The Prof moves to the bed where Duke lies, head bandaged. 
Meanwhile, Betty has lost consciousness. The doctor joins a 
tearful Michael and helps him to his feet. 

			DOCTOR
		(gently, to Michael)
	Come on. Come on. She's all right. What 
	she needs is a little rest. 
		(looks in Duke's direction)
	You'd better go over and cheer him up.

The doctor gives Michael a supportive pat on the arm. Michael 
recovers, wipes his eyes and moves to join Duke who is in bad 
shape but still able to talk weakly with the Prof.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Hiya, Prof.

			PROFESSOR
	Hello, Duke.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	W-Well, I'm on my way, I guess, huh?

			PROFESSOR
	Why, no, Duke, you're going to be all right.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(grins)
	Thanks for lyin'. 
		(turns his head to Michael)
	Hello, Mike.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Hello, Duke.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	How's Betty?

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	She's all right. She's fine.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	She's a swell kid. Why don't you marry the 
	girl, ya ape? 
		(turns his head, to Prof)
	You ought to make him get married, Prof. 
	They're so lovesick, it's silly. 

The Swales overhear this as they look on sadly. Duke sees 
Swale standing with Dora.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Who is that guy in the dark suit? The 
	undertaker? Tell him to wait outside. 

Already uncomfortable, Swale takes this as a cue and exits.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(grins)
	Duke makes 'em all wait. Is that right, 
	Dora? 

Dora tries to offer a reassuring smile but must turn away in 
silent tears. Handkerchief to her eyes, she follows her 
father out.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Well, Prof, I guess I was geared for a 
	short sprint. Hm, short and merry, that's 
	Galloway. Well, it was a great show. Lots 
	of laughs. I may have missed somethin' but 
	I don't think so.

			PROFESSOR
	Most of us miss something, Duke.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	Maybe we find out about it too late, huh, 
	Prof? 

Duke weakly pulls his hand out from beneath the bedcovers 
and offers it to the Prof.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
	How 'bout the ol' grip, kid? 

The Prof takes his hand.

			DUKE GALLOWAY
		(to no one in particular)
	Well, go buy a light suit and get 
	yourselves some sex appeal.

We pan off Duke's grinning face to his hand which falls 
limply out of the Prof's and on to the bed. The Prof looks 
down at the hand then glances at Michael who raises his 
eyebrows. They realize that Duke is dead. Barbara wipes her 
nose with a kerchief and turns her back to the bed. The Prof 
rests Duke's hand across his torso and looks over at the 
doctor who joins a nurse in examining the body. The Prof, 
after a look back, escorts Barbara out of the emergency 
room and into the waiting room. Michael remains for a moment, 
watching the medical personnel fuss with Duke.

The Prof leads a sobbing Barbara into the waiting room -- 
where Swale stands and Dora sits crying in a chair -- and 
beckons a nurse to look after her. The nurse puts a 
comforting arm around Barbara.

			NURSE
	Come with me, dear. There, there.

Barbara and the nurse exit. The Prof stands at the door and 
peers into the emergency room. 

			DORA SWALE
		(to the Prof)
	He ain't ... dead, is he? 

Without looking at her, the Prof nods.

			DORA SWALE
	So that's what it's like. Gee, life's 
	pretty lousy, ain't it?

Swale puts a comforting hand on his daughter's shoulder.

			SWALE
	We ain't the ones to say what's right and 
	wrong.

			DORA SWALE
		(jumps up, angry)
	Who knows what's right and wrong? A swell 
	kid like that who wasn't doing anything 
	but trying to make somebody else happy! If 
	there was a right and a wrong, why wasn't 
	he taken while he was breakin' a 
	Commandment instead of while he was tryin' 
	to help somebody? Is that wrong? To try 
	and make somebody else's load lighter? 
	Tell me that!

			SWALE
	We ain't the ones to say about these 
	things, Dora.

			DORA SWALE
	Then why does everybody do it? "Don't do 
	this! Don't do that! This is right! This 
	is wrong!" How do they know what's right 
	and wrong?! How does anybody know?!

			SWALE
	You don't have to take their word for it, 
	Dora. I've always tried to teach you 
	what's right and wrong.

			DORA SWALE
	Yes, that's just it! You've always tried 
	to teach me what you think is right and 
	wrong! What if YOU'RE wrong? Where's MY 
	comeback?! I listened to ya this morning 
	and I listened to y'all layin' out my 
	life for me, just because I did something 
	wrong! Didn't seem wrong to me. But even 
	if it was wrong, if the only thing that's 
	gonna make me right is to steal something 
	that doesn't belong to me, then I don't 
	wanna be right!

Dora turns her back on her father and walks to the emergency 
room door. She looks in and sees Michael keeping vigil at 
Betty's bedside.

			DORA SWALE
		(quietly, to the Prof)
	Tell Mike it's all right. I ain't gonna 
	marry him.

			SWALE
	Dora!

			DORA SWALE
	Oh, Pop! You wouldn't love me any more if 
	I was Mrs. Michael Harvey than if I'm Dora 
	Swale. In fact, you'd love me less because 
	you wouldn't respect me. How could anyone 
	respect me? 

Dora looks in Michael and Betty's direction. 

			DORA SWALE
	That's the only beautiful, clean, kind 
	love in the world. I've learned that much 
	and you didn't teach it to me. 
		(takes her father's hand)
	Oh, Pop, I promise to be the kind of a 
	girl you want me to, if you'll only give 
	me a break and come home once in a while. 
	Come on, Pop.

Dora starts to lead her father out of the waiting room. The 
Prof puts a hand on her shoulder.

			PROFESSOR
	You're a swell girl, Dora.

			DORA SWALE
	Aw, save that chatter for them apes of 
	yours.

The Prof watches as Dora and her father exit, hand in hand.

					DISSOLVE TO

EXT. TRAIN YARD - DAY - WEEKS LATER

An old, tiny white high-heeled shoe on a railroad track. 
Pan up from the shoe, along the white ribbon that ties the 
shoe to the rear car of a passenger train where Michael 
and a fully recovered Betty pose goofily for a picture. The 
Prof stands on the station platform next to Barbara who 
tries to snap a picture with a clunky old camera. Michael 
and Betty crack up with laughter and can't hold the pose.

			BARBARA
	Oh, hold still. 

The two manage to hold the pose long enough for Barbara to 
take the picture. The tragic mood of the preceding scenes is 
gone -- everyone is in an upbeat mood.

			BARBARA
	There! I'm gonna put this snapshot on my 
	dressing table to remind me of a very 
	foolish girl. Understand, Betty?

			BETTY CAMERON
	I understand.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	You mean to imply that my wife is foolish?

			BARBARA
	I haven't mentioned any names.

			PROFESSOR
	Well, Mike, I hope you realize you've got 
	to go through life without a diploma.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I'll try and bear up under it.

			PROFESSOR
	And probably all your children will turn 
	out to be college professors.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	I don't care as long as they're Betty's 
	and mine.

Calls of "All aboard!" signal the imminent departure of the 
train. The foursome exchange farewells and handshakes: 
"Ooh! Goodbye!" "Goodbye!" "I'll miss you." 

			PROFESSOR
	Lots of luck to you both!

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	Hey, Prof!

			PROFESSOR
	What?

Michael kisses Betty on the cheek.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
	What's the Latin name for that?

			PROFESSOR
	Oh, that's just another manifestation of 
	the chemical process known as 
	cytomorphosis!

The train begins to pulls out. The foursome wave goodbye to 
one another.

			MICHAEL HARVEY
		(calls to the Prof)
	It's all a matter of age!

Barbara and the Prof watch with hopeful faces as the train 
recedes. Barbara absentmindedly slips her arm into his. He 
gives her a look, then nods at her. She smiles at him.

And they watch the train CHUG away toward the horizon.

					FADE OUT

1