Judgment of the Storm


SUBTITLE 1:--(FADE IN ON)
 
		The Heath farm on the outskirts of 
		the college town of Darienne.
 
1.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARM:
 	This is a long shot of the Heath farm taken 
	from the field which Dave Heath is engaged 
	in plowing.  To make this farm yield enough 
	to clothe and feed a large family requires 
 	unremitting toil on the part of Dave, who so
	far has kept the farm in good condition. Dave 
	halts the plow, takes off his hat and mops his 
	brow.
 
2. 	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	This room is a combined living and dining room. 
	The furniture is of a kind that ordinarily 
	would be found in a house situated on a farm 
	which only continued labor could make pay.  
	Although the furnishings are of the ordinary 
	kind, yet everything is kept spick and span.  
	The table is already set for the noonday meal.  
	In a corner of the room, between two windows, 
	sits Mrs. Heath with her work-basket in her 
	lap.
 
SUBTITLE 2:--Mrs. Heath,--Claire McDowell
 
3.	CLOSE UP ON MRS. HEATH:
 	Mrs. Heath is sorting out some handkerchiefs 
	and places them in a workbasket which she puts 
	to one side.  Then she resumes work on a 
	sweater she is making for John Trevor, a senior 
	in the college at Darienne and one of Mary 
	Heath's greatest admirers. Mrs. Heath is a 
	kindly woman but has a high sense of duty.  If 
	at times she seems unreasonably stern, it is 
	only because of this inborn idea of duty, as 
	she sees it.
 
SUBTITLE 3:--Her daughter, Mary--Lucille Ricksen
 
4.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY--HEATH KITCHEN: 
	Mary is standing near the window by the kitchen 
	sink, cutting bread for the noonday meal.  She 
	is a very winsome girl of about eighteen years 
	of age, with lustrous brown eyes and curly hair 
	which hangs down her back in wavy ringlets. 
	Suddenly Mary looks up from her task and 
	gazing intently off scene toward the door which 
	joins the living room and the kitchen, sees--
 
5.	CLOSE SHOT ON TABLE AND CHAIR--HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	The family fox terrier, in search of food, has 
	cautiously climbed up on a chair and now slowly 
	raises its head above the level of the table. It 
	looks about the table longingly and then, 
	apparently unobserved, proceeds to investigate 
	matters a little more closely.
 
6. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARY--HEATH KITCHEN: 
	Into Mary's eyes comes an amused twinkle as she 
	closely watches to see what the dog is about to 
	do.  Although her attention is riveted on the 
	dog, she continues to slice the bread slowly.
 
7.	CLOSE SHOT ON TABLE AND CHAIR--HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	The dog, now thinking that it is not being 
	observed, puts its paws up on the table and 
	sniffs around for something to eat.  It now 
	puts its muzzle on the table cloth as if trying 
	to overturn one of the dinner plates to see if 
	anything is hidden there.
 
8. 	HEATH KITCHEN:
 	Mary takes down a dish towel which hangs on a 
	nail above the drain board of the sink and, 
	smiling, quietly tiptoes out of the kitchen, 
	prepared to surprise the still unsuspecting dog.
 
9. 	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Shooting toward corner of room where Mrs. Heath 
	is still seated, working on John's sweater and 
	tipping in the table and the chair upon which 
	the dog stands. As Mary enters on tiptoe, Mrs. 
	Heath quickly looks up but Mary puts her 
	fingers to her lips--warning her mother not to 
	make any noise.  Still moving noiselessly, Mary 
	maneuvers herself into a position directly back 
	of the chair where she can not be seen by the 
	still unsuspecting dog. Suddenly she seizes the 
	back of the chair and shakes it violently, 
	dumping the dog off on the floor.  As the dog 
	springs down, Mary strikes at him with the dish 
	towel, thus adding to his confusion as he 
	hurriedly exits from the scene.
 
10. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARY--LIVING ROOM: 
	Mary stands there looking at the fast vanishing 
	dog.  At first she tries to look serious as 
	though the dog were a grave offender; but then 
	the humor of the affair strikes her, and she 
	begins to smile good naturedly. Allow for 
	action here so as to bring out the fact that 
	Mary is a sweetly sympathetic girl, with an 
	eye open to the amusing things in life.
 
11. 	WINDMILL IN HEATH FARMYARD:
 	This windmill is in the Heath farmyard about 
	fifty feet or so from the farmhouse, and is 
	built above one of the out buildings which is 
	almost completely covered with vines.  From the 
	ground to the little platform just beneath the 
	vanes of the windmill runs a ladder, formed by 
	nailing cross cleats to one of the timbers 
	supporting the mill.  Paul and Patsy, the Heath 
	twins, enter the scene, running from the 
	farmhouse to the foot of the ladder, prepared 
	to climb to the platform.  At the time there is 
	not sufficient breeze blowing to turn the mill 
	so that the blades are immobile. As usual, Paul 
	and Patsy are on mischief bent--although they 
	are continually in some sort of trouble, yet 
	they are greatly loved by all the members of 
	the Heath family who seem destined to forgive 
	one childish prank just in time for the twins 
	to launch themselves into another.
 
12.	CLOSE SHOT ON TWINS--WINDMILL:
 	Paul and Patsy have now come to the foot of the 
	ladder, preparatory to climbing to the platform 
	high above their heads.  Their eyes shine with 
	roguishness, for they know that they have been 
	forbidden to climb this ladder.  This adds zest 
	to their enterprise. Now with Paul in the lead 
	they begin to climb, Patsy bravely following 
	her daring little brother.   They struggle 
	upward from one cleat to another for the cleats 
	are some distance apart, and it is no easy 
	matter for the twins to stretch their little 
	legs so far. However, undeterred by such a 
	minor difficulty as this they continue to climb 
	higher and higher.
 
13. 	WINDMILL IN HEATH FARMYARD:
 	The twins continue to climb upward, never once 
	glancing down at the ground which is getting 
	further and further away, adding greatly to 
	their peril should they, by any chance, slip 
	and fall.  Paul, being a boy, is a much better 
	climber than his sister, Patsy; but the little 
	girl is dressed in a suit of rompers and these 
	do not interfere with the free movement of her 
	little legs as she follows her brother with a 
	grim determination.
 
14.	CLOSE SHOT ON WINDMILL PLATFORM:
	Paul slowly comes into the scene and, clinging 
	to one of the cleats of the ladder with one 
	hand, pushes open the trapdoor with the other.   
	After some difficulty,  he succeeds in pulling 
	himself through the opening in the platform and 
	then leans down to assist Patsy, grabbing her 
	by the seat of the breeches portion of her 
	rompers.  Soon they are both safe on the 
	platform.
 
15.	SIDE PORCH--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Mary comes to the door, looking for the twins 
	to wash them for the noonday meal. Now she 
	comes to the porch and, seeing some cute little 
	chicks huddled together there, stoops down and 
	picks up one of them.
 
16.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY HOLDING CHICK:
	A very pretty shot of her here as she holds the 
	chick in both her hands.  She looks at it 
	whimsically and then smiles at the helpless
 	little fluffy thing.   Now she snuggles it close
 	to her neck.   Hold sufficiently long to get
	over the idea that Mary is a very kindhearted 
	girl with a wholesome sympathy for the helpless 
	and for those in trouble.  This will help to 
	make clear her attitude toward John Trevor 
	later in the story.
 
17. 	CLOSE SHOT ON WINDMILL PLATFORM: 
	Paul is now standing up while Patsy is seated, 
	intently watching her heroic little brother. 
	Paul now goes over to one side of the platform 
	and, clinging to the vanes of the windmill with 
	one hand, bravely, though recklessly, stands on 
	one foot on the platform's edge. Patsy seems 
	much impressed with the "stunt" of her little 
	brother but is content to remain seated where 
	it is a good deal safer.
 
18.	WINDMILL IN HEATH FARMYARD:
	This is a still longer shot of the windmill, 
	taken so as to tip in a large part of the yard. 
	Paul is still balancing on one foot on the edge 
	of the platform.  Patsy, still seated, is 
	admiring him.
 
19.	CLOSE SHOT ON WINDMILL PLATFORM: 
	Paul still balancing on one foot and having 
	noted the impression for bravery that he has 
	made on Patsy says, rather contemptuously:
 
SUBTITLE 4:--"Aw, that's nothing--I'll show you 
		a good trick."
 
	(Scene 19 continued.)  Now Paul puts his hands 
	upon the platform's edge and prepares to stand 
	on his hands.  Patsy is greatly excited and 
	tries to grab him by the leg, but Paul is 
	determined to show her "his good trick."  After 
	several attempts which result in failures, he 
	finally succeeds in standing on his hands.  His 
	position is an extremely perilous one and 
	little Patsy is rightly worried.
 
20.	BACKYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
 	Mary is discovered near the back door of the 
	farmhouse, looking anxiously across the fields 
	for the twins.  The noonday meal is nearly 
	ready; the twins have not had their faces and 
	hands washed, and she can find them no place 
	although she has hunted high and low for them.
 
21.	CLOSE SHOT ON WINDMILL PLATFORM:
	Not satisfied with having accomplished the 
	trick of standing on his hands, Paul now tries
 	to stand on his head.  After two failures,
 	he succeeds; but in doing so he spins around 
	on his head, loses his balance and drops over 
	the side of the platform.  By a near miracle he 
	manages to catch hold of the edge of the 
	platform as he falls.  Hanging by his hands,
 	he is not able to draw himself up to the 
	platform again, but at last succeeds in getting 
	a foothold on one of the cleats of the ladder.
 
22.	WINDMILL IN HEATH FARMYARD:
	Mary is now standing in the backyard near the 
	windmill, still looking for the missing twins.  
	Paul is still hanging by his hands to the edge 
	of the platform, and seems on the verge of 
	losing his hold and falling to the ground.  
	Suddenly Mary's attention is attracted to the 
	children above her.  She turns quickly and 
	looks up.
 
23.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY--SOFT EDGED CIRCLE:
 	Mary looks up toward the windmill platform and 
	is terrified when she sees the predicament in 
	which Paul has got himself.  For a moment she 
	does not know what to do.  Her mouth is open 
	and her eyes staring in the shock of her 
	discovery.
 
24.	BACKYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
 	Mary starts toward the ladder and begins to 
	climb to rescue her little brother.  Moments 
	seem like hours now as she fears that Paul's 
	strength will give out, forcing him to let go 
	his hold on the platform.
 
25.	CLOSE SHOT ON WINDMILL PLATFORM:
 	Patsy, greatly alarmed at Paul's perilous 
	position, has come to his aid and, with all the 
	strength at her command, is trying to help him 
	back to the platform.  First, she tries to pull 
	him to safety by his hair.  Now she seizes one 
	of the suspenders of his jumpers; and, what 
	with her pulling and Paul's struggles, the 
	little boy at last manages to drag himself over 
	the platform's edge to safety.  Paul has had a 
	narrow escape, but does not seem to realize it.  
	To him it is all in a day's play.
 
26. 	CLOSE SHOT OF MARY--LADDER:
	As she looks up and sees that Paul is again 
	back on the platform, Mary stops climbing up 
	the ladder. With a sigh of relief, she calls to 
	them,  telling them to come down immediately.
 
27.	CLOSE SHOT ON WINDMILL PLATFORM: 
	Paul is much more afraid of Mary's wrath than 
	he is of falling off the windmill platform. 
	When he hears her call and realizes that she is 
	coming up the ladder to get him and Patsy, he 
	makes haste to remove the trapdoor so that they 
	can descend.  Patsy starts to crawl through the 
	opening.
 
28. 	CLOSE SHOT ON MARY--LADDER:
	Mary climbs up another cleat of the ladder, but 
	now comes to the realization that the twins are 
	well on their way to safety and that they are 
	no longer in need of her assistance; so she 
	stands there, watching them to assure herself 
	that they will come down all the way to the 
	ground and not take a sudden whim and climb 
	back to the platform again. Having got them 
	started to safety, she intends to wait and see 
	that they arrive safely.
 
29.	CLOSE SHOT ON WINDMILL PLATFORM:
 	Patsy carefully descends the ladder. As soon as 
	she has released her hold on the upper cleat, 
	Paul climbs through the opening in the platform 
	and, being careful not to step on Patsy's hands, 
	slowly makes his way down the ladder.
 
30. 	SMALL BRIDGE OVER CREEK:
 	This is an ordinary wooden bridge spanning a 
	small creek near the Heath farm--such a bridge 
	as would be found in the country where the load 
	would never exceed horses or light wagons.  The 
	bridge has no side rails, but the planking is 
	fairly heavy.  Seated on the bridge, with his 
	feet dangling over the side and with a can of 
	angle worms at his side, is one of the 
	neighborhood boys, fishing in the stream with 
	some home-made fishing tackle.
 
31.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BRIDGE:
 	The boy is holding his fish pole with both 
	hands, intently watching the water and hoping 
	that some unwary fish will soon take the hook.  
	So intent is the boy on his fishing that he 
	does not hear Bob Heath as the latter 
	approaches on his bicycle.
 
32. 	SMALL BRIDGE OVER CREEK:
 	The boy is still sitting on the bridge, fishing, 
	when Bob Heath, coming home to the noonday meal 
	from the college in Darienne, starts to ride
	noiselessly across the bridge on his bicycle.
 
33.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BRIDGE:
 	As Bob rides by, he takes one foot off a pedal 
	of his bicycle and, without stopping his wheel, 
	kicks the can of angle worms into the creek. 
	The boy hears the splash, quickly turns, sees 
	who his tormentor is, and realizes that all 
	fishing is spoiled for that day.
 
34.	SMALL BRIDGE OVER CREEK:
 	Bob continues across the bridge on his way home. 
	The boy gets to his feet and calls after Bob, 
	telling him what he thinks of the trick Bob has 
	played.
 
SUBTITLE 5:--Bob Heath, the Spoiled and Pampered 
		Younger Brother.--George Hackathorne.
 
35.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
 	On the further side of the bridge, Bob stops 
	his bicycle and calls out to the boy, telling 
	him to forget it--to keep things out of the way 
	if he does not wish to get them kicked into the 
	water.  As Bob talks he smiles maliciously.  It 
	is no concern of his if he kicked over the can 
	of angle worms.  What does he care for fishing, 
	anyhow!  Allow for sufficient action here to 
	show that Bob is not only selfish and 
	inconsiderate of others but is malicious too.
 
36.	CLOSE-UP ON COUNTRY BOY:
 	The boy is very angry but realizes that he can 
	do nothing to Bob as the latter is so much 
	bigger and stronger than he is.  Tears start to 
	come into his eyes as he looks angrily off 
	scene at the disagreeable Bob.
 
37.	SMALL BRIDGE OVER CREEK:
 	Bob, well satisfied with the fact that he has 
	spoiled the boy's fishing and has hurt his 
	feelings too, continues on his way home.  The 
	boy, with tears in his eyes, turns away and 
	sorrowfully walks across the bridge toward 
	home, in a direction opposite to that taken by 
	Bob.
 
SUBTITLE 6:--Dave Heath, the oldest son, whose long 
		days of hard work make it possible to 
		keep the family together--Bruce Gordon
 
38.	MEDIUM SHOT OF DAVE AND PLOW HORSES: 
	Dave has brought his plow horses to a stop and 
	stands in the partly plowed field, mopping his 
	brow with a handkerchief.  Now he wipes off the 
	sweat band of his battered felt hat preparatory 
	to putting it on his head again and going to the 
	farmhouse for the noonday meal.  Dave is a 
	strong manly fellow of about twenty-five years 
	of age.  The lines in his face show that he is 
	possessed of considerable character, and is 
	accustomed to hard work on the farm.  This work 
	he does uncomplainingly as upon his shoulders 
	rests almost the entire burden of making the 
	farm pay enough to feed and clothe them all and 
	to keep Bob in college.   That he is perhaps 
	imposed upon at times has never occurred to 
	Dave, as he is only too glad and willing to 
	sacrifice himself for the benefit of others.
 
39.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE:
 	Shooting from the country road that runs past 
	the front of the house.  This shot shows nearly 
	all of the house, the picket fence and the gate 
	which is now open.  Through the gate now come 
	some chickens, hurrying to get out of the way 
	of Paul and Patsy.  The twins are not chasing 
	the chickens, but are fleeing from Mary who is 
	trying to get her hands on them to wash them 
	for the noonday meal.  From the haste with 
	which the twins flee, one might think that they 
	were hurrying to escape some dire punishment 
	for having climbed up the windmill; but the 
	only punishment for them is having their faces 
	and hands washed. Just as in the case of all 
	small children, this is a real punishment for 
	they see little necessity in getting washed up 
	only to get dirty again.
 
40.	SIDEYARD HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Bob has already entered and is riding along on 
	his wheel.  Suddenly he loses control of the 
	bicycle and falls to the ground.  To add to 
	his confusion and disgust, some geese, waddling 
	along hurriedly to escape the twins who are 
	still fleeing from Mary, almost walk over him 
	in their mad haste.  As Bob falls, the 
	packages which he has been carrying under his 
	arm are scattered in the barnyard.
 
41.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB--SIDEYARD:
 	Bob is tangled up with his bicycle and is lying  
	almost flat on the ground.  The frightened 
	geese hurry to escape from the twins; and even  
	the chickens become so excited that they begin 
	to fly over Bob, covering him with dirt.  
	Presently Bob manages to sit up; and, as soon 
	as the dust has cleared, looks around him, with 
	intense disgust written all over his face.  
	Bob's position is not a dignified one, and he 
	feels this fact keenly.
 
42.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
 	While the twins stand and look at Bob, 
	wondering whether to continue their flight or 
	to watch Bob, Mary comes running into the scene, 
	goes to him, and begins to help him get on his 
	feet again.
 
43.	ANGLE BY BARN:
	Dave enters with the two horses he has been 
	using on the plow, having unhitched them to let 
	them rest during the noon hour.  One of the 
	horses enters the barn.  Dave leads the other 
	forward by the reins toward the barn door.
 
44.	HEATH KITCHEN:
 	Mrs. Heath is busying herself near the stove,
 	finishing her preparations for the noonday meal.  
	The twins, led by Paul, enter.  Paul stands 
	talking to his mother, while Patsy goes to her 
	and clings to her skirts.
 
45.	ANGLE BY BARN:
 	Near the barn door Dave stands by the side of 
	the horse, preparatory to leading it into its 
	stall in the barn.  He is facing the horse and 
	does not see Mary who comes running into the 
	scene and goes to where he is standing.
 
46.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DAVE AND HORSE:
 	Shooting toward barn door.  Dave is adjusting 
	the horse's harness when Mary enters scene.  As 
	she gets close to Dave, she gives a leap; and, 
	throwing her arms around his neck, lifts 
	herself off of the ground.  Now she releases 
	her hold around Dave's neck, faces him, and 
	starts to put her arms around his neck again.
 
47. 	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE AND MARY:
 	Mary's arms are around Dave's neck.  Together 
	they stand there looking happily in each 
	other's eyes.  Now Dave places his hands under 
	Mary's arms and begins to lift her, to seat her 
	upon the horse's back.
 
48. 	CLOSE SHOT ON DAVE AND HORSE: 
	Dave lifts Mary up and puts her on the horse's 
	back; then, taking off his hat, stands there 
	and looks at her with a good natured smile.  
	Allow sufficient footage to show that brother 
	and sister are held together by a close bond of 
	sympathy and understanding.
 
49.	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE:
 	Dave's face is wreathed in smiles as he looks 
	up at Mary.
 
50. 	CLOSE SHOT ON DAVE AND HORSE: 
	As Mary holds out her arms to him, Dave reaches 
	up and lifts her down from the horse. For a 
	moment they stand there; and then Mary, 
	laughing, playfully punches Dave in the ribs 
	and runs out of the scene.  Dave smiles at her 
	as she goes and then leads the horse into the 
	barn.
 
51.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
 	The disgruntled Bob leans his bicycle against 
	the side of the house, then comes back and 
	picks up the packages which he had dropped in 
	his fall.  Bob is in a disagreeable humor on 
	account of the accident which befell him--a 
	more disagreeable humor than usual, although at 
	no time has he been in a particularly agreeable 
	frame of mind.
 
52. 	SIDE PORCH--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
 	Tipping in bench, pump and wash basin. A towel 
	is hanging from a nail driven into the side of 
	the house.  Dave enters, hangs his hat on a 
	nail near towel, pumps water into the basin 
	from a small head pump and is about to wash up 
	for the noonday meal when the disgruntled Bob 
	enters from the opposite side.  As Dave always 
	listens good-naturedly to all of Bob's 
	complaints, Bob is accustomed to pour all his 
	trouble into Dave's ear.
 
53.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	Looking thoroughly disgusted with things in 
	general, Bob stands there and watches Dave.
 
SUBTITLE 7:--Selfishly accepting as his due the 
		sacrifices his mother and Dave are 
		making for his education.
 
	So thoroughly is Bob wrapped up in his 
	selfishness that he cannot appreciate the fact 
	that what is being done for him is a sacrifice 
	indeed.  He really feels that he is entitled to 
	a great deal more than he is actually getting, 
	and that his life is a very hard one.
 
54.	SIDE PORCH--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
 	Dave stands watching Bob as the latter comes 
	toward him, knowing that Bob has something 
	about which he wishes to complain.  Bob walks 
	close to Dave, prepared to impress him with 
	the weight of his remarks.
 
55.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DAVE AND BOB: 
	The disgruntled Bob stands there, petulantly 
	complaining of his hard lot in life.  Dave 
	listens to him patiently.
 
56.	CLOSE SHOT ON MARY AND TWINS--HEATH KITCHEN:
 	This is a cute little shot of Mary as she 
	washes Patsy's face and then Paul's.  Like most 
	young children, the twins do not like to have 
	their faces washed but realize that they have 
	to submit to the inevitable.  Mary is in a 
	good-natured mood as she is very fond of her 
	little brother and sister.
 
57. 	CLOSE SHOT ON DAVE AND BOB:
 	While Bob continues to talk, Dave smilingly 
	places his hand on Bob's shoulder as much as to 
	say, "Well, Bob, old man, don't take things so 
	much to heart."
 
58. 	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	This shot shows the door leading into the 
	kitchen, and also that leading to the side 
	porch.  The twins are already seated and Mary, 
	on the opposite side of the table, busies 
	herself arranging the knives and forks.  Mrs. 
	Heath comes from the kitchen, carrying in her 
	hands a plate of meat which she places on the 
	table.  Bob enters from side door, still 
	carrying the packages which he had dropped in 
	the side yard.  Mrs. Heath goes to meet him as 
	he enters.
 
59.	ANGLE BY SIDE PORCH:
	Dave has finished washing his face and hands 
	and now throws the water out of the small
	tin basin he has been using.  Replacing the
	basin, he rolls down his sleeves preparatory to 
	entering the house.
 
60. 	MEDIUM SHOT ON GROUP--HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Shooting toward the side door through which Bob 
	has just entered. Mary, with her hand resting 
	upon the back of one of the chairs at the table, 
	looks at Bob as his mother talks to him.  As 
	Mrs. Heath continues to talk, Bob turns and 
	looks at Mary, his face wearing a scowl.  Dave 
	is seen coming toward the side door.  Mrs. 
	Heath says:
 
SUBTITLE 8:--"John's sweater is done.  You can take 
		it back to college with you, Bob."
 
61.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH AND BOB: 
	As Mrs. Heath speaks title, Bob turns and looks 
	sharply at Mary off scene.  On his face there 
	is a look of grim determination.  Perhaps he 
	can take John Trevor's sweater; but he is 
	positive that he will do nothing of the kind. 
	He does not intend to become anybody's errand 
	boy.  Bob turns, looks at his mother, and says:
 
SUBTITLE 9:--"Aw, let Mary take Trevor's sweater--
		she's stuck on him, I'm not."
 
 	(Scene 61 continued.)  As Bob says this in a
	disagreeable tone, Mrs. Heath, realizing that 
	he is selfish, though not fully understanding 
	why, looks at him wonderingly.  Then she 
	places her hand on his shoulder affectionately 
	and tries to coax him back into a better mood, 
	but her effort has little effect on Bob.
 
SUBTITLE 10:--John Trevor--Lloyd Hughes.
 
62.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN--CLASS GAME:
 	This shot shows the athletic field of the 
	college in Darienne.  John's shirt is torn 
	almost to rags and his hair is disheveled, but 
	he still holds down on the ground the college 
	boy with whom he is contending in the class
 	games.  John looks up and smiles.  He is having 
	a fine time, is thoroughly in earnest, and 
	shows that he is a clean, good-natured young 
	fellow.
 
63.	MEDIUM SHOT ON CLASS GAME:
 	This shot shows a struggling mass of collegians 
	engaged in the class game.  John starts to pick 
	up one of the boys out of the melee and to carry 
	him off the field which has been marked out for 
	the contest.
 
64. 	CLASS GAME:
 	This is a long shot of the class game. The 
	contest still goes on furiously.  John has
	picked up in his arms his particular opponent 
	for the moment and is carrying him off the 
	field.
 
65.	CLASS GAME:
 	A still longer shot of the class game.  John 
	carries his opponent outside the space marked 
	off for the game and lays him on the ground.  
	The referee stands near at hand ready to 
	announce the winner of the contest.
 
66.	GRANDSTAND--COLLEGE:
 	A flash of the college girls and boys as they 
	rise from their seats and start to cheer.
 
67.	CLASS GAME:
 	The referee raises his hand to announce that 
	John's side has won the game. The victorious 
	boys gather into a group and cheer at the 
	referee's decision.
 
68.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Dave, having entered the living room, goes to 
	the twins and kisses them fondly, then helps 
	his mother to a chair before he himself sits 
	down.  Mary takes Bob's hat and places it on a  
	chair to one side; while Bob, still looking 
	sour, goes to the opposite side of the table 
	and sits down.  Allow sufficient footage to 
	show sharply the contrast between Dave and Bob
	--the one of an affectionate disposition and 
	content with even his hard lot of life; the 
	other, selfish in the extreme, and lacking any 
	real affection.
 
69.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Shooting from across the country road which 
	runs in front of the Heath farmhouse. Martin 
	Freeland enters in his classy roadster, stops 
	the car in front of the gate, climbs out of the 
	car, and enters the farmyard.  Martin has money, 
	is well dressed, and appears to be satisfied 
	with himself.
 
70. 	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	This shot includes the side of the table where 
	Mrs. Heath and the twins are seated and shows 
	Mary, whose place is at the end of the table 
	nearest the door and with her back towards it.  
	Martin comes on the side porch, stops for an 
	instant, then opens the screen door and enters.  
	He really feels so much superior to all of them 
	in a way that he does not consider it necessary 
	to remove the cap he is wearing.  Having said 
	"How do you do," Martin stands to one side of 
	the door, with his back resting against the 
	wall.  As he enters, Mary turns and looks at 
	him in a rather disinterested way.  Although he 
	is rich and one of her most persistent suitors, 
	Mary does not like him--she merely tolerates 
	him through force of necessity.  Martin is very 
	friendly with Dave and Mary; on this account, 
	she could not snub him were she so disposed.
 
SUBTITLE 11:--Martin Freeland, whose infatuation for 
		Mary, and jealousy of John Trevor, keeps 
		him hanging around the small town of 
		Darienne.--Philo McCollough
 
71.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
 	Martin is laughing and talking.  Finally he
	removes his cap, folds his arms with an air of 
	self-assurance and says:
 
SUBTITLE 12:--"I was just driving by. Anyone going to 
		town?"
 
	(Scene 71 continued.)  Martin finishes title 
	and looks out of the corner of his eye toward 
	Mary. His invitation is apparently a general
	one, but it is Mary whom he wishes to ride into
	town with him.
 
72. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
 	Mary, none too pleased at the prospect of 
	riding into Darienne with Martin, looks at him 
	for a moment and then turns her head away and 
	looks down at the table, trying to think of 
	some excuse to offer him.
 
73. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
 	A flash of Martin as he stands near the door 
	smiling, waiting for Mary to make up her mind 
	to accept his invitation.
 
74.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Mrs. Heath has heard Martin's invitation, but 
	has not noted the fact that Mary does not care 
	to accept it.  Mrs. Heath gets up from her chair 
	and goes to where Martin is standing.  As she 
	approaches, Martin moves forward slightly to 
	meet her.  Mrs. Heath says:
 
SUBTITLE 13:--"Mary's going--she'll be glad of the
		lift."
 
	(Scene 74 continued.)  Having spoken this title,  
	Mrs. Heath turns and exits into the kitchen.   
	Martin comes over to the chair where Mary is 
	seated, rests his hand familiarly on the back 
	of the chair and awaits her decision.
 
75. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary, still looking down at the table and 
	thinking of some excuse to offer Martin, finally  
	looks up, turns her head toward Martin and says:
 
SUBTITLE 14:--"Don't bother about me.  I'll ride 
		Bob's bicycle."
 
 	(Scene 75 continued.)  As she says this she
	continues to look at Martin, hoping that he will 
	not press his invitation.
 
76. 	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	Bob is about to take a bite of bread when he 
	hears Mary speak the above title.  He looks 
	sharply in Mary's direction, a disagreeable 
	scowl wrinkling his forehead.
 
77.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
 	Mary turns her head and looks toward Bob to see 
	what effect her remark has had upon him.  
	Although she knows Bob only too well to believe 
	that he will let her use his bicycle, yet she 
	is not positive that he will not consent to its 
	use in the circumstances.
 
78. 	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	The selfish Bob is disgusted to think that Mary 
	could have even thought of such a thing. If she 
	goes, it will have to be with Martin. Bob says 
	in no uncertain tones:
 
SUBTITLE 15:-- You WILL not! Do you think I'm going 
		to walk back?"
 
 	(Scene 78 continued.)  As he says this Bob's
	face is clouded with displeasure.  He does not 
	understand how Mary could be so selfish in a 
	matter of this kind--the very idea of having 
	to walk anywhere is repellent.
 
79. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
 	Martin still stands there smiling facetiously. 
	He is very glad that Bob has adopted such an 
	attitude.  Mary will either have to walk or go 
	with him in the roadster if she wants to go at 
	all.
 
80. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
 	Mary stares at Bob for a moment--it is beyond 
	her comprehension why Bob is so consistently 
	selfish and disagreeable.  Then she turns and 
	looks at Martin in a helpless sort of way.  
	Although she does not want to go with him, she 
	sees nothing else to do.
 
81. 	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Mrs. Heath enters to Mary and tells her to go 
	take off her apron and put on her hat. Martin, 
	seeing that he has an unwitting ally in Mrs. 
	Heath, takes hold of Mary's chair to draw it 
	away from the table as she gets up.
 
82.	CLOSE SHOT ON MARY AND MARTIN--HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Martin leans down and urges Mary to hurry and 
	get fixed up to go.  Reluctantly Mary rises 
	from her chair.
 
83. 	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Mary exits from scene to go to her room. Dave, 
	having finished his meal, gets up from the 
	table and starts toward Martin.
 
84. 	MARY'S ROOM:
 	This shot shows the doorway, a dresser, and a 
	table on which is a lamp of the Rochester 
	burner type.  Mary enters through doorway, 
	stands near dresser, and begins changing her 
	dress.
 
85. 	MEDIUM SHOT ON DAVE AND MARTIN--HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Dave now stands talking to Martin.  The latter 
	says to him:
 
SUBTITLE 16:--"I'm driving to New York tomorrow--
		want to go?"
 
 	(Scene 85 continued.)  Martin's invitation is a 
	genuine one.  He is very fond of the hard 
	working Dave.  Dave smiles at Martin and says:
 
SUBTITLE 17:--"I'd be glad of the chance.  I've got 
		to go sometime this month."
 
86. 	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	As Dave finishes the above title, Martin shows 
	that he is very glad because of Dave's decision 
	to accompany him.
 
87. 	CLOSE SHOT ON MARY--HER ROOM: 
	Mary, in her room, has taken off her apron and 
	put on her hat. She opens the door and exits.
 
88.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Dave goes to the twins, wipes off their faces 
	with a napkin and starts to feed Patsy. Mary 
	enters, kisses her mother good-bye, and exits 
	with Martin through the door leading to the 
	side porch.  As they go, Dave waves his hand to 
	Martin, assuring him that he will be on hand to 
	go to New York on the morrow.  Bob, not having 
	finished lunch, is still sitting at the table.  
	He does not indicate the slightest interest in 
	anything that is taking place,  being too self-
	centered and selfish to devote any real thought 
	to the affairs of others--unless in the way of 
	complaint.
 
89.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Shooting across the roadway as in the previous 
	scene.  Martin and Mary come from house, climb 
	into the roadster to drive into Darienne.
 
90.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DAVE AND BOB: 
	Dave has moved a chair close up to Bob's and 
	now sits there talking to him.  Bob is  
	scowling; but Dave is looking at him good-
	naturedly, waiting to hear what he has to say.  
	Although Bob is not actually interested in 
	Mary's affairs, yet he feels that they form a 
	good basis for a protest.  As he is in a mood 
	to find fault with anything, he might as well 
	choose this subject as any other. Bob says 
	gravely as if he were announcing something of 
	vital importance:
 
SUBTITLE 18:--"Do you know that Mary sees John every 
		time she goes to the college?"
 
	(Scene 90 continued.)  Dave turns his head and 
	looks off scene, smiling. To him, Bob's question 
	sounds very funny. Bob is merely trying to make 
	a mountain out of a mole hill. Dave knows that 
	Bob has been in a very disgruntled mood ever 
	since he fell off his bicycle, and is seizing 
	upon this subject simply because he wants to 
	protest about something.  Dave's usual method 
	in handling Bob when he gets off on a streak 
	of this kind is to laugh at him, but in a good-
	natured way. The now laughing Dave turns and 
	looks at Bob, then he says genially:
 
SUBTITLE 19:--"What of it?  John sees Mary every time 
		he comes out here."
 
 	(Scene 90 continued.)  Bob can find no ready
	answer to Dave's counter question but is
	satisfied that he is in the right, as usual. The
	conditions seem to him to be entirely different, 
	but Dave refuses to believe that they are so 
	essentially different, as to warrant a protest 
	on the part of anyone.  Bob is not wholly 
	satisfied that Dave cannot see things in the 
	same light as he does and continues to argue 
	the matter with Dave, who does not believe 
	there is anything to argue about.
 
91.	COLLEGE GROUNDS:
	This is a long shot of the college grounds, 
	showing the college building in the background 
	and trees in the foreground.  Mary and Martin, 
	in the latter's roadster, drive into the scene.   
	Martin stops the car, and Mary starts to get 
	out to deliver the sweater to John Trevor.
 
92.	GATEWAY TO COLLEGE GROUNDS:
	This shot shows the entrance to the college
	grounds.  To the right appears the brick
	wall which surrounds the grounds.  A short 
	distance from the base of this wall is a ledge 
	upon which one may stand and look over the wall.  
	John Trevor comes running into scene, goes 
	through the gateway and looks off scene where he 
	sees--
 
93.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARTIN'S ROADSTER:
 	Mary has just descended from the car. She 
	thanks Martin for bringing her to town and 
	then exits from scene, carrying a knitted 
	handbag in which is the sweater intended for
	John.  Martin very formally touches his hand 
	to his cap as Mary leaves, but is none too 
	pleased with the thought that she is leaving 
	him and going to see John Trevor. As the two 
	young men are rivals for Mary's hand and 
	apparently she thinks more of John than she 
	does of him, Martin not only does not like 
	John but is intensely jealous of him.
 
94. 	GATEWAY TO COLLEGE GROUNDS: 
	John, standing near gateway, sees Mary coming 
	and hastens to climb on the ledge of the wall 
	so that he can see her as she approaches, and 
	surprise her as she comes through the gateway.
 
95.	CLOSE SHOT ON WALL:
 	Shooting from outside the college grounds 
	toward the wall. Slowly John's head appears 
	above the top of the wall as he watches Mary
	coming up the brick walk which leads to the 
	gateway.
 
96.	BRICK WALL OUTSIDE OF COLLEGE GROUNDS: 
	Mary is coming up the walk, carrying the 
	knitted handbag which contains the sweater.
 
97.	CLOSE SHOT ON WALL:
	John smiles with delight as he sees Mary 
	coming up the walk.
 
98.	GATEWAY TO COLLEGE GROUNDS:
	John has lowered his head so that Mary cannot 
	see him but still stands on the ledge, awaiting 
	her approach.  Mary enters scene and comes to 
	gateway, wondering why John is not there to 
	meet her as usual.  As she starts to pass 
	through the gateway, John springs down from the 
	ledge and runs out through the gateway to meet 
	her.
 
99. 	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN AND MARY: 
	Mary is greatly surprised when John comes to 
	her so quickly.  John laughs at her confusion 
	then, taking her hand tenderly in his own, says:  
	"Come on, let's go over there," and leads her 
	out of the scene.
 
100.	WALL OF COLLEGE GROUNDS:
 	This shot shows an archway, in front of which 
	is a tree with a twisted trunk.  John and Mary 
	enter scene through   archway and come to the 
	tree in the foreground.  Both are a trifle ill 
	at ease; but they are thoroughly in love with 
	each other, and this fact renders them 
	unnecessarily conscious of each other's 
	presence.
 
101.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND MARY:
	John has his arm resting against one of the
	trees; Mary is standing near the other.  John
	is in a very happy frame of mind and looks 
	devotedly at Mary as he says:
 
SUBTITLE 20:--"Mary, my mother has come back
		from Europe.  She arrived in New
		York today..."
 
102.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
 	As he says this, John's face fairly radiates 
	happiness.
 
103.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
 	Mary looks up at John and smiles because he is 
	so happy.
 
104.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John, wondering how Mary will receive the rest 
	of the information he has to impart, looks at 
	her questioningly as he says:
 
SUBTITLE 21:--"... and tomorrow, I'm going home."
 
	(Scene 104 continued.)  As he says this, John 
	plainly shows the enthusiasm with which the 
	idea has imbued him.  He is thinking solely of 
	the fact that he is to see his mother again 
	after a long absence.  This fact for the time 
	being has made him forget that his going home 
	will deprive him of his pleasure in seeing Mary
	so often.
 
105.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary is smiling as John says the above title 
	but soon its full import begins to dawn upon 
	her.  She bites her lips; and the expression of 
	happiness, that was on her face but a moment 
	ago, changes to one of sadness. Now she realizes 
	that after today it may be a long time before 
	she will see John again.
 
106.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John looks at Mary, sorry because a look of 
	sadness has come into her face, yet secretly 
	pleased that she loves him so dearly that she 
	is sad when he is about to go away and leave 
	her, if only for a little while.
 
107.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN AND MARY: 
	Mary vainly tries to conceal her emotion. Her 
	lips quiver and she struggles to keep back the 
	tears.  Then, lest John see how sad she feels 
	at the thought of losing him, she turns and 
	exits from the scene.  With sober eyes, John 
	watches her go, wondering just what he should 
	do in the circumstances.
 
108. 	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
 	With sober face John watches Mary go and then 
	bursts into a low laugh.  Of course, he will 
	come back soon to see her again.  She must not 
	take this coming separation so much to heart.  
	On this last day together, Mary must cheer up 
	and rejoice in the happiness which is to come 
	to him on the morrow.
 
109. 	WALL ON VERANDA--COLLEGE GROUNDS:
 	This wall is a low one at the end of a veranda
 	of one of the college buildings.  Upon the
 	end of the wall there is a large concrete base,
 	placed there for ornamental purposes.  Mary
 	comes to the wall and stands there with bowed 
	head.  Her heart is heavy at the thought of 
	losing John, if only for a little while. John 
	quickly comes to her side and tells her not to 
	feel sorry as he will surely return soon to see 
	her  again.  Placing his hands under Mary's 
	arms, he lifts her up and seats her upon the 
	wall. She places the sweater to one side and 
	looks at him attentively, as he takes from one 
	of his pockets a letter he has that day 
	received from his mother. Taking the letter 
	from the envelope, he gives the letter to Mary 
	to read.
 
110.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
 	Mary reads the letter and shows that she is 
	glad of the happiness that is to be John's. To 
	her the letter speaks of the great love of 
	mother for son and she rejoices in the fact 
	that John has a mother of whom he can feel so 
	proud.
 
111.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND MARY:
 	Mary has finished reading the letter and looks 
	up at John; the light of devotion shining in 
	her eyes.  The reading of the letter has made a 
	great impression upon her, and she feels more 
	proud than ever of the handsome boy standing 
	beside her.  Surely, with such a lovely mother, 
	a son must be more than worthy of the love of 
	any girl whom he sees fit to choose as his 
	partner in life.  Looking devotedly at John, 
	Mary says:
 
SUBTITLE 22:--"Your mother must be lovely."
 
	(Scene 111 continued.)  As she says this, she 
	returns the letter to John who replaces it in 
	the envelope.
 
112.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN: 
	John looks up from the letter and vainly tries 
	to find words to tell Mary how wonderful his 
	mother is.  Then he says feelingly:
 
SUBTITLE 23:--"I want your brother Dave to meet my 
		mother."
 
	(Scene 112 continued.)  As he says this title, 
	he is a trifle embarrassed as to how he shall 
	express the other thought he has in mind. 
	Finally he looks earnestly at Mary and says:
 
SUBTITLE 24:--"When he sees how wonderful she is, I 
		know he'll let you visit us ...."
 
113.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MARY:
	As he says the above title, he pauses as if not 
	knowing what else to say; but Mary can read in 
	his face just what he wishes to express to her, 
	and cannot just now for lack of words. Demurely 
	she turns her head aside as John comes closer 
	to her, and then says to her earnestly:
 
SUBTITLE 25:--"... If you want to, Mary..."
 
	(Scene 113 continued.)  Mary turns her head and 
	smiles delightedly at John, telling him that 
	there is nothing else on earth that would give 
	her greater pleasure than going to visit him 
	and his mother.
 
114.	WALL OF VERANDA--COLLEGE GROUNDS:
 	Mary takes the sweater from the knitted handbag 
	and holds the sweater up in front of John, who 
	shows how delighted he is with the gift.
 
	(FADE OUT)
 
115. 	(FADE IN ON)
 
SUBTITLE 26:--To John, his mother had been abroad 
		for three years ....
 
	This title LAP DISSOLVES OUT into the following:
 
SUBTITLE 27:--To those who "knew," Helene Trevor had 
		never left the city.
			--Myrtle Stedman (FADE OUT)
 
116.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE:  (FADE IN)
	Helene is seated in a lounging chair in her 
	magnificently furnished apartment, reading a 
	letter she has this day received from her 
	dearly loved son, John. 

	INSERT: "Darling Mother:

		No one in this world is happier 
		than I am. It seems like an eternity 
		since I've seen you, instead of three 
		years. I can hardly wait to be with 
		you tomorrow."
 
117.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	Helene continues to read the letter; then, as 
	she glances up, her face softens with emotion 
	as she thinks of the fine, manly boy with whom 
	she parted three years before. As she again 
	begins to read the letter, her face lights up 
	with happiness at the thought that tomorrow 
	will see their reunion. If only conditions in 
	her life were different, she could feel far 
	happier.  As she thinks of these conditions, 
	her face grows wistful and a pathetic look
	comes into her eyes.
 
SUBTITLE 28:--Just around the corner from Mrs. 
		Trevor's apartment is one of the city's 
		hidden Temples of Chance, known as 
		"Helene's."
 
118.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
 	This luxuriously furnished establishment is well 
	filled with men and women, most of them in 
	evening clothes.  Night has come and the games 
	are already in progress.  Some of the guests 
	move around among the tables and some of them 
	are seated, intent upon the games which they 
	know, down deep in their hearts, they cannot 
	possibly beat.  The lure of gambling has them 
	all in its grip.  To and fro move some Chinese 
	servants with noiseless tread, ready to serve 
	refreshments to any who may wish them. The 
	gambling den is a great money-maker, and can 
	well afford to cater to its patrons.  Food and 
	drink cost but little in comparison with the 
	vast amount of money that is taken in nightly.
 
119.	HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	Shooting toward one of the alcoves of the 
	apartment.  Helene comes into the alcove, where 
	there is a telephone concealed in a handsome 
	cabinet.
 
120.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE--TELEPHONE CABINET:  
 	Helene sits in a chair in front of the cabinet 
	from which she takes a telephone.  Having got 
	the number she requested, she says:
 
SUBTITLE 29:--"Tell Keenan I want to speak to him." 

	(Scene 120 continued.)  After she says this, 
	she sits there quietly, the telephone held 
	close to her ear, waiting for Keenan to answer.
 
121.	CLOSE SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE:
 
SUBTITLE 30:--Jim Keenan, manager and part owner of 
		"Helene's."
 
 	This shot shows a desk and a chair in foreground 
	and door to right.  Keenan enters through 
	doorway, closes the door behind him, and picks 
	up the telephone receiver from the desk where it 
	had been left by the attendant who answered the 
	phone.
 
122.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE--TELEPHONE CABINET:
	Helene, talking over telephone, says:
 
SUBTITLE 31:--"I'll want to see you for a few minutes."
 
 	(Scene 122 continued.)  As she says this, she 
	waits to hear what Keenan has to say.
 
123.	CLOSE-UP ON KEENAN:
	Keenan talks into phone. As the games are in 
	progress and he wishes to be in the main room 
	while they are going on, he is slightly annoyed 
	at the fact that Helene has called him up. He 
	asks her if his visit is a matter of any 
	importance; and, when she states that it is, he 
	agrees to come over at once.
 
124.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE--TELEPHONE CABINET: 
	Helene hears Keenan agree to come over at once.  
	She hangs up the receiver. 

125.	CLOSE SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE: 
	Keenan, having hung up the telephone receiver, 
	takes his hat and coat from a hat-rack in rear 
	of the desk and, with his coat slung over his 
	arm, exits on the side opposite the door 
	through which he entered.
 
126.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE--TELEPHONE CABINET:
	Helene replaces the telephone in the cabinet 
	and momentarily sits there thinking.  She has 
	made up her mind what she intends to do but 
	rather dreads the ordeal of her coming 
	interview with Keenan.
 
127. 	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN--COLLEGE ROOM: 
	John is in the throes of packing up his things 
	preparatory to going to New York on the morrow. 
	The room is a typical college boy's room with 
	pictures and pennants on the walls. John comes 
	to table in foreground on which there is a 
	framed photograph of his mother, takes up the 
	photograph in both his hands and looks at it 
	affectionately.  His face radiates happiness at 
	the thought that on the morrow he will see his 
	dearly beloved mother again.
 
128.	CLOSE-UP ON FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH OF HELENE:
	A flash of Helene's framed photograph.
 
129.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN--COLLEGE ROOM: 
	John raises photograph quickly to his lips and 
	kisses it fondly, his face radiant with joy. 
	Then takes the photograph toward dresser in 
	back-ground.
 
130.	JOHN'S ROOM AT COLLEGE:
	Shooting toward dresser in background. John 
	goes to dresser with photograph and for a 
	moment stands there, wrapped in thought.
 
131.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE AND KEENAN: 
	Keenan has arrived at Helene's apartment and is 
	standing near her as he asks her why she had 
	sent for him in such haste.  He is not in a 
	good humor at having been called away from the 
	gambling den and is inclined to be pugnacious--
	more so than usual.  Helene notes Keenan's ill-
	humor but is determined to go through with her 
	plan at all costs. Finally she says:
 
SUBTITLE 32:--"I loathe this gambling business--I want 
		to sell out!" 

	(Scene 131 continued.)  As she says this, 
	Keenan looks at her in sharp surprise and 
	adopts a belligerent attitude toward her. Her 
	proposition is a new one and he does not 
	understand the motive behind it.  Pointing to 
	himself, he says in a sarcastic tone:
 
SUBTITLE 33:--"How about me--how about paying back 
		the rest of the money your husband 
		borrowed to start the business?" 

	(Scene 131 continued.)  He does not care 
	particularly about keeping her in the gambling 
	business against her will, but wants to be 
	assured that he will get every dollar coming to 
	him.  As he speaks the above title, Helene 
	slowly turns her head away and says:

SUBTITLE 34:--"I have sent for my boy, I wanted him--
		it's been three years--now I'm afraid 
		he'll find out the truth."
 
	(Scene 131 continued.)  As Helene says this, 
	her face twitches with her intense emotion--
	the business to her has become a nightmare; and 
	now she is in mortal terror lest John discover 
	the source of her income and cast her out of 
	his life forever.  She realizes only too well 
	how low in his estimation she would sink should 
	he discover that he has been living off the 
	misery of others.  Almost brought to the point 
	of tears by her emotion, she slowly exits from 
	the scene, leaving Keenan gazing after her 
	intently, undecided just what to do.
 
132.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DOORWAY--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Helene goes to doorway and stands there, her 
	head bowed down, wondering if Keenan will agree 
	to the rupture of their business relations or 
	whether he will insist upon her going on as in 
	the past.  If Keenan refuses to let her sell 
	out, the future looks dark indeed.
 
133.	CLOSE-UP ON KEENAN: 
 	For a moment Keenan stands and watches Helene, 
	then he exits toward the doorway where she is 
	standing.  Perhaps he can argue her out of the 
	idea she has in mind.
 
134.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DOORWAY--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Keenan enters to Helene. He is still not at all 
	pleased with the idea that she wishes to 
	withdraw from partnership in the gambling den.  
	Finally Keenan says:
 
SUBTITLE 35:--"The business has bought his clothes--
		Kept him in college--but now that he's 
		educated you want to get out!"
 
135.	CLOSE-UP ON KEENAN:
	Keenan speaks the above title in a tone of 
	bitterness and sarcasm, watching Helene 
	closely to see what effect it will have upon 
	her.  He cannot understand her attitude at all
	--to him the whole idea is merely the whim of a 
	woman.
 
136.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	As Helene hears Keenan's cutting remark, her 
	face grows sad to think that circumstances ever  
	forced her into becoming Keenan's partner in 
	the nefarious business. She says wistfully:
 
SUBTITLE 36:--"Sometimes I think John would rather 
		have had me--than the money."
 
 	(Scene 136 continued.)  Although she says this 
	as though some doubt existed in her mind yet, 
	deep within her heart, she knows that John 
	would far rather have never had a dollar than 
	to have had an abundance derived from a 
	gambling hell.  The thought of this makes her 
	hang her head in shame.
 
137.	CLOSE-UP ON KEENAN:
	For a moment, Keenan looks thoughtful as if 
	weighing things in the balance.  Perhaps after 
	all it will be just as well if Helene does sell 
	her interest in the gambling establishment to 
	one of his choosing, since she seems determined 
	to sell out anyhow.  Finally he says to her:
 
SUBTITLE 37:--"What you say goes--but it'll take a 
		couple of weeks to straighten things out."
 
138.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DOORWAY--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	Since he has committed himself to the 
	proposition of her selling out, Keenan assures 
	her that he will have little difficulty in 
	finding a purchaser for her interest in the 
	place--it is only a matter of time.  Having so 
	assured her, Keenan exits, leaving Helene 
	standing there, wishing that somehow she might 
	sell out that very night.  But she realizes 
	the impossibility of this and turns her head 
	sadly to one side. (FADE OUT) 

		End of Sequence
 
SUBTITLE 38: (FADE IN ON) 

		The Homecoming
 
139.	OUTER DOOR OF HELENE'S APARTMENT: 
	This shot is taken from within the apartment, 
	through an alcove which leads into a small 
	reception hall in which, on a pedestal, there
	is a bust of Pan and his pipes.  John has just
	arrived, overcoat and grip in hand, and is
	being met by Helene's butler.  The butler
	takes John's grip, hat, and overcoat, and
	having told him that he will at once announce 
	his arrival, leaves John standing in the 
	alcove and looking around, with admiring eyes, 
	at the luxuriousness of his mother's apartment. 
	His face lights up with gladness as he thinks of 
	the joy of his homecoming, and he can scarcely 
	wait until his beloved mother appears to greet 
	him.
 
140.	CLOSE SHOT ON DRESSING TABLE--HELENE'S ROOM:
 	Helene is seated in front of dressing table. 
	The maid finishes arranging Helene's hair and 
	then moves toward the door which shows in 
	background, as she hears the butler knock. 
	The maid opens door and the butler announces 
	to Helene that John has come.  Helene gets up 
	from the bench in front of the dressing table 
	and smiles happily at the thought of the great 
	joy in store for her.
 
141.	JOHN'S SUITE OF ROOMS--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Shooting from farther side of living room of 
	John's suite so that door to bedroom shows in  
	background.  The butler enters, places grip 
	temporarily on a chair, and then exits into 
	bedroom to hang up John's coat and hat.
 
142.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ALCOVE--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	Shooting from alcove so that reception room of 
	Helene's apartment shows beyond alcove. John's 
	back is turned toward camera as he looks toward 
	reception room, awaiting the coming of Helene.  
	Presently he sees her approach and moves 
	forward to meet her.
 
143. 	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
 	John's face lights up with joy as he sees his 
	mother coming.  Exclaiming "Mother!" he starts 
	to hold out his arms to her as he moves forward 
	to greet her.
 
144.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE: 
 	For a moment Helene stands in reception room,
	overcome with emotion as she sees her beloved 
	boy.
 
145.	RECEPTION ROOM--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Shooting through reception room toward alcove.
	Helene has her back to camera; John is facing 
	it.  Both mother and son now stretch out their 
	arms to each other as they move forward.
 
146.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	They gradually walk toward each other, and are 
	soon clasped in each other's arms.
 
147. 	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	John and his mother stand there, clasped in 
	each other's arms.  Then for a moment they
	gaze happily at each other.  Hugging his mother 
	tight in his strong arms, John kisses her 
	fondly.  Then, as they stand there looking 
	rapturously into each other's eyes, Helene 
	says:
 
SUBTITLE 39:--"How you have grown!"
 
	(Scene 147 continued.)  As she says this her 
	face lights up with admiration for the handsome, 
	manly-looking boy before her.  John is a trifle  
	embarrassed but soon finds his voice, and says 
	laughingly:
 
SUBTITLE 40:--"A fellow does grow, some in three 
		years!"
 
	(Scene 147 continued.)  As he says this, they 
	both laugh gaily; and John, wholly carried away 
	by the happiness of this reunion, cannot resist 
	the desire to hug his mother close to his 
	breast again. (FADE OUT) 

		End of Sequence
 
SUBTITLE 41. (FADE IN ON:) 

		The promised visit to meet John's mother.
 
148.	EXTERIOR APARTMENT BUILDING:
	Shooting from street so as to show the entrance 
	to the apartment building, which is the one 
	where Helene lives.  Dave and Martin enter in 
	the latter's roadster.  Martin stops the 
	machine in front of the building, and Dave 
	partly rises in his seat.
 
149.	CLOSE SHOT ON DAVE AND MARTIN:
	Dave starts to climb out of car, then pauses 
	and says to Martin:
 
SUBTITLE 42:--"Come on! I promised John I'd stop and 
		meet his mother."
 
	(Scene 149 continued.)  Martin looks at Dave, 
	agrees to go in, gets out of car, and together 
	they walk toward entrance to the apartment 
	building.
 
150.	RECEPTION ROOM--HELENE'S APARTMENT: 
	John and Helene come to table in foreground and 
	stand there talking.
 
151.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	Still talking, John and Helene stand near table.
	Helene points out to John some of the objects 
	lying on the table.
 
152.	MEDIUM SHOT ON OUTER DOOR--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Shooting from hall way of apartment building 
	toward the outer door of Helene's apartment. 
	Dave and Martin enter scene.  Dave starts to 
	knock on door, but Martin points out the bell
	which Dave now rings.  The butler comes and 
	opens the door.  They tell him who they are.  
	As the butler asks them to step in, they 
	remove their hats and enter the small 
	reception hall.
 
153.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE:
 	John and Helene are still talking when John's 
	attention is attracted by the entrance of Dave 
	and Martin.  Turning his head and looking off 
	scene, John sees--
 
154.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ALCOVE--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	The butler is escorting Dave to foreground, 
	followed by Martin.  Dave stands in alcove, 
	smiling as he sees John.
 
155.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	John tells his mother who the visitors are and 
	then starts forward to meet them.
 
156.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ALCOVE--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	As John enters scene, Dave starts forward to 
	meet him with outstretched hand.  They shake 
	hands cordially.
 
157.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE:
	Helene, looking off scene, stands watching group 
	in alcove.
 
158.	CLOSE SHOT ON ALCOVE--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	For a moment John stands talking, telling Dave 
	how glad he is to see him. Then, with his hand 
	affectionately holding Dave's arm, John leads 
	him forward.  Dave, dressed in clothes such as 
	a farmer boy in his circumstances in life might 
	wear, is visibly impressed with the 
	magnificence of what he sees and is slightly 
	embarrassed.
 
159.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE:
	Helene awaits their approach as John leads Dave 
	forward by the arm.  Martin follows slightly in 
	the rear.  As John and Dave come to where 
	Helene stands, John says proudly:
 
SUBTITLE 43:--"This is Dave Heath.  He's my best 
		friend and--he's Mary's brother."
 
160.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE, JOHN, AND DAVE:
 	John stands there smiling genially as Helene 
	shakes hands cordially with Dave, telling him 
	of the genuine pleasure she feels in making 
	his acquaintance.  Martin, having followed 
	Dave, is waiting close by to be introduced to 
	John's mother, but does not appear in scene.
 
161.	MEDIUM SHOT ON GROUP--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	As Helene finishes shaking hands with Dave, 
	John introduces Martin who bows very 
	ceremoniously.
 
162.	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE AND MARTIN:
	Martin is still bowing, his hand on vest of
	dinner suit.  Martin now moves closer to
	Helene, looking off scene at her intently.
 
163.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE:
 	Helene is still smiling a welcome to John's 
	visitors when Martin moves forward and looks 
	searchingly into her face.  John moves out of 
	scene to talk to Dave.  Martin says to Helene 
	pointedly:
 
SUBTITLE 44:--"Haven't I met you before?"
 
 	(Scene 163 continued.)  As this title is shown, 
	there DISSOLVES INTO it a roulette layout. The 
	rake of a croupier reaches out and draws in the 
	chips which are seen lying on the table.
 
164.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE AND MARTIN: 
	Martin still looks at Helene searchingly. 
	Helene is embarrassed at his question and 
	momentarily turns her head away, as if to 
	gather her wits together.  Not to be so easily 
	trapped, she turns, looks Martin straight in 
	the eye; and, although stammering slightly in 
	her confusion, says:
 
SUBTITLE 45:--"I--I think not. I've been abroad for 
		three years."
 
	(Scene 164 continued.)  As she finishes title, 
	Martin again looks at her sharply.  He does not 
	believe her at all.  Then he turns his head to 
	one side and smiles sardonically as John enters 
	scene, and starts to talk to him. John's 
	approach has relieved the tenseness of a very 
	embarrassing moment.
 
165.	ANGLE OF RECEPTION ROOM--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Shooting toward a divan which appears in the 
	background.  John asks them all to come and sit 
	on the divan. As John starts to lead Helene 
	away, she turns toward Martin, telling him to 
	help himself to the cigarettes lying on the 
	table near him.
 
166.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE AND MARTIN: 
	As Helene starts to move away, she suddenly 
	stops and looks at Martin over her shoulder. 
	Her mind is greatly agitated at the thought 
	that Martin has actually recognized her for 
	what she is.  She looks at him intently,
	wondering what he intends to do.  Martin
	turns to table to get a cigarette, and does 
	not see Helene's questioning look.
 
167.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE AND MARTIN:
	Helene starts to move toward divan in rear, 
	where John and Dave are already waiting. As 
	soon as she is seated on divan, John and Dave 
	sit down beside her.  Martin lights a cigarette 
	and turns to watch her as she moves toward 
	divan.  In his own mind he is almost certain 
	that he knows who she is and where he has seen 
	her.  Now Martin turns and walks toward where 
	the others are seated.
 
168.	MEDIUM SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE:
	Keenan's desk is in the foreground.  He is 
	seated behind it talking earnestly to a 
	prospective purchaser of Helene's interest in 
	the gambling den.  This man is familiarly 
	seated on the corner of Keenan's desk and is 
	deliberating whether to buy or not.  Keenan 
	continues to argue the matter and says:
 
SUBTITLE 46:--"This is a good chance for you--
		Helene's anxious to sell out."
 
	(Scene 168 continued.)  As the man hears this 
	subtitle, he indicates that perhaps the 
	proposition would be an agreeable one to him 
	provided Keenan continued as manager.
 
169.	CLOSE SHOT ON OUTER DOOR -- HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Martin and Dave are just leaving. John has 
	accompanied them to the door.  As they pause in  
	hallway, John cordially shakes Dave's hand, 
	expressing the wish that he will see him again 
	soon.  Martin places his hand on Dave's 
	shoulder, urging him along: as there is much 
	that he wishes to show him. Many are the 
	interesting sights that he must see before his 
	return to Darienne.  As Martin and Dave exit 
	down the hall, John stands for a moment, 
	watching them go, and then re-enters the 
	apartment.  Because of his interest in Mary,  
	John also feels a vital interest in Dave.   
	Allow sufficient footage here to emphasize  
	contrast between the parting of John and Dave, 
	and the tragic scenes that are enacted later--
	when John discovers his friend Dave stretched 
	out dead on the floor of the gambling den, the 
	unwitting victim of an assassin's bullet.
 
170.	EXTERIOR APARTMENT BUILDING--NIGHT:
	Dave and Martin have already come from the 
	apartment building and are seated in Martin's 
	roadster, prepared to drive around and see the 
	town. Martin starts car and they drive away.
 
171.	CLOSE-UP ON DIVAN--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	John and Helene are discovered on divan, 
	talking.  Clasping his mother's hands in his
 	own, John sits there telling her about much of 
	his college life during the past three years 
	and waiting, in a rather embarrassed manner, 
	for his mother to broach the subject of Mary--
	the subject nearest his heart.  Like most 
	young men in love, he is very anxious to get
	his mother's approval of the girl of his 
	choice; but is waiting for Helene to lead up 
	to this subject.
 
172.	EXTERIOR CAFE--NIGHT:
	Dave and Martin enter in roadster.  As Martin 
	stops the car in front of entrance to 
	restaurant, Dave alights. Then Martin drives 
	the car out of scene to park it farther up the 
	street.   Dave starts to follow, thinking that 
	Martin is about to leave him to enter cafe 
	alone; but Martin re-enters scene and joins 
	Dave.  As they stand together on the sidewalk, 
	Martin says:
 
SUBTITLE 47:--"This is the classiest cafe in town."
 
	(Scene 172 continued.)  As Martin speaks this 
	title, they move toward entrance of cafe and 
	enter.
 
173.	LOBBY OF CAFE:
	Shooting from front of lobby toward small 
	hallway which joins lobby and main dining room.  
	Dave and Martin enter and move to rear.  Dave  
	is overjoyed to think of the wonderful sights 
	he is to see under Martin's guidance, and is 
	slightly embarrassed but much impressed with 
	his surroundings. As they move to rear, Dave 
	almost knocks over a miniature ship which is 
	on a table in middleground.  Martin is 
	thoroughly at home in this cafe; but to Dave 
	it is all new, and he is manifestly out of 
	place.  As they reach rear of lobby, one of 
	the head waiters joins them, and invites them 
	to come in dining room for dinner; but Martin 
	indicates that they have only come to look, 
	and will dine later.
 
174.	DINING ROOM OF CAFE:
	Shooting from rear of dining room toward stage 
	in foreground.  A large crowd of diners is 
	present.  The curtain rises and the cabaret
	entertainment is about to begin.
 
175.	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE AND MARTIN:
	They are standing in rear of lobby from which 
	they can look into dining-room, and see stage 
	upon which the cabaret entertainment is about 
	to take place.  As the curtain raises, Dave's 
	eyes open wide with interest in what he sees.  
	Martin, accustomed to this sort of thing, 
	smiles indulgently at his friend's evident 
	interest.
 
176.	DINING ROOM OF CAFE:
	Down a ramp constructed on the stage, a girl 
	comes sliding on a sled.  Then a troop of 
	cabaret girls come dancing on the stage, which 
	is covered with imitation snow to represent a 
	winter scene, the girls being dressed in fur 
	trimmed short dresses.  The scene is one of 
	gaiety and merriment.
 
177.	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE AND MARTIN:
	Dave is entranced. He turns to Martin and tells 
	him how interesting it all is.  Martin smiles 
	as he is used to cafe scenes of this kind.
 
178.	DINING ROOM OF CAFE:
	The girls on the stage pick up imitation
	snowballs and begin to throw them at the 
	diners.
 
179.	LOBBY OF CAFE:
	Dave is anxious to go into the dining-room 
	where he will be closer to the scenes of 
	gaiety; but Martin says no--there are many 
	other places he wishes to show him.  As they 
	stand there some of the imitation snowballs 
	come rolling in at their feet.
 
180.	DINING ROOM OF CAFE:
	The girls and the men diners are having a 
	wonderful time throwing imitation snowballs 
	at each other.
 
181.	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE AND MARTIN:
	Dave is more excited than ever and wants 
	Martin to go into the dining-room, so they can 
	take part in the festivities; but Martin demurs
	and says:
 
SUBTITLE 48:--"We'll come back  later--I've many more 
		places to show you."
 
	(Scene 181 continued.)  Dave is disappointed 
	because Martin wants to go but the latter is 
	insistent.
 
182.	LOBBY OF CAFE:
	Martin takes Dave's arm, tells him to come 
	along, and together they start to move toward 
	front of lobby.
 
183.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	John and Helene are still seated on divan,
	talking.  Helene looks at him devotedly and
	says: 
 
SUBTITLE 49:--"Tell me about--Mary."
 
 	(Scene 183 continued.)  John is slightly 
	embarrassed and does not know just how to 
	begin; but, knowing that he has a most 
	sympathetic listener, promptly gets over his 
	embarrassment and launches himself 
	wholeheartedly into telling Helene all about 
	the girl of his heart.
 
184.	EXTERIOR GAMBLING DEN--NIGHT: 
	Shooting from sidewalk toward entrance of 
	gambling den.  Dave and Martin enter scene and 
	stand on sidewalk near entrance. Martin says:
 
SUBTITLE 50:--"I want you to see this place.  It's 
		the biggest gambling house in the city." 

185.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DAVE AND MARTIN--NIGHT: 
	Dave and Martin are still standing on the 
	sidewalk near the entrance to the gambling
	den as Martin speaks the above title.  
	Together they start to walk toward the 
	entrance.
 
186.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	Still seated on the divan, John is telling his 
	mother all about Mary.  Helene sympathetically  
	puts her arm on John's shoulder, assuring him 
	of the great pleasure she feels because he has 
	learned to love so worthy a girl.
 
187.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	Shooting from front of main room toward archway 
	in rear.  The scene is one of great animation.   
	Men and women players are present in 
	considerable number, and the games are in full 
	swing.  Dave and Martin enter foreground and 
	move to rear, Dave much interested in the 
	novelty of the sights he is witnessing.  Having 
	led a life of toil far from the whirl of the 
	city, he had never even dreamed that such a 
	place as this was in existence.
 
188.	CLOSE SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE: 
	Keenan is discovered at telephone, talking to 
	Helene.
 
189.	ALCOVE IN HELENE'S APARTMENT: 
	Shooting toward telephone cabinet in background.  
	Helene is seated in front of cabinet, answering 
	phone.
 
190.	CLOSE SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE: 
	Keenan, talking in phone, says:
 
SUBTITLE 51:--"Can you come over at once--I have a 
		buyer for the place."
 
191.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	Helene protests against coming over just then, 
	as she does not want to leave John. She asks 
	Keenan if he cannot conduct the negotiations.
 
192.	CLOSE SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE: 
	Keenan, still talking over the phone, says 
	decisively:
 
SUBTITLE 52:--"He insists on seeing YOU."
 
	(Scene 192 continued.)  Keenan indicates that 
	there is nothing else for her to do but come 
	over and conduct her own negotiations, if she 
	still  desires to sell her interest in the 
	place.

193.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	Helene does not want to go at that time but 
	sees no way out of going.  She hangs up the 
	receiver, replaces the phone in the cabinet, 
	and sits there momentarily thinking up some 
	excuse to offer John to account for her going 
	out at that time unaccompanied.
 
194.	ROULETTE WHEEL AND TABLE:
	The wheel is spinning and the banker stands 
	watching to see into what numbered pocket the 
	ball will fall.  At one end of the table upon 
	which are painted the numbers corresponding to 
	those on the wheel, stands The Waster, a 
	dissolute young man.  Seated near him is his 
	girl, who has entered the gambling den with 
	him. The Waster's money is almost gone; and,  
	as he stands there nervously fingering his 
	chips, he watches the wheel intently.
 
195.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ROULETTE TABLE:
	As The Waster realizes that he has again lost, 
	he passes his hand over his forehead in a dazed 
	sort of way.  Ruination faces him. The girl 
	reaches over and squeezes his hand as if to 
	reassure him, but The Waster feels helpless as 
	he looks down and fingers the few chips that 
	remain.
 
SUBTITLE 53:--A fool--and the last of his money.
 
196. 	ROULETTE WHEEL AND TABLE:
 	The girl places some chips on one of the 
	numbers.  The Waster watches intently as the 
	wheel spins swiftly around.
 
197.	CLOSE SHOT ON ROULETTE TABLE:
	Both The Waster and the girl are watching the 
	spinning wheel intently as Dave and Martin 
	enter scene.  They stop near end of table. 
	Dave is greatly interested in the wheel, and 
	stands close to The Waster and the girl to see 
	what is going on.  As The Waster nervously 
	fumbles in his pocket for a match, Dave sees 
	him and, taking a match from his own pocket, 
	graciously lights The Waster's cigarette.  
	While this action is going on, Martin quietly 
	moves on out of the scene.
 
198.	OVAL ARCHWAY IN GAMBLING DEN: 
	Martin is discovered standing in the archway. 
	He beckons to Dave to come along and see the 
	rest of the establishment.
 
199.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ROULETTE TABLE:
 	Dave sees Martin beckon to him and exits.
 
200.	OUTER DOOR--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	Shooting from the inside of the apartment. 
	Helene already has her coat on and, accompanied 
	by John, comes to the door. John opens the door 
	for her and together they stand there, Helene's 
	hands resting affectionately on John's arms.  
	John asks her to let him accompany her; but 
	she says:
 
SUBTITLE 54:--"No, dear, you stay here--I'm only 
		going around the corner."
 
	(Scene 200 continued.)  As this title appears 
	there DISSOLVES INTO it a spinning roulette 
	wheel and the table upon which the bets are 
	placed.  Helene, naturally, does not attempt 
	to explain where "around the corner" is.  Her 
	statement is the literal truth--that is all.
 
201.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE:
	Helene kisses John goodbye. He smiles down at 
	her and then hugs her tight to him, reluctant 
	to let her go, if only for a little while. 
	Helene exits through doorway; and John stands 
	there, watching her go down the hall.
 
202.	OUTER DOOR--HELENE'S APARTMENT: 
	John watches Helene go down the hall and then 
	closes the door.
 
203.	CORNER OF ROULETTE TABLE:
	The game still goes on.  Another man has come 
	to the table and has taken the place beside The 
	Waster's girl.  Upon one of the numbers, the 
	man has placed a large number of chips.  He 
	wins and the banker pays him a stack of bank 
	notes.  The Waster's girl has been watching 
	this play; and, when she sees that the man has 
	won, she looks up at him with an alluring 
	smile.  As the man gathers up his winnings and 
	starts to leave the table, he nods to the girl, 
	inviting her to follow him. Unobserved by The 
	Waster, the girl quietly slips away from the  
	table and follows.
 
204.	KEENAN'S OFFICE:
 	Keenan is discovered at the door and greets 
	Helene as she enters. The prospective buyer is  
	introduced to Helene and bows at the 
	introduction.  Then Helene sits down near the 
	desk and starts to unfasten her coat.
 
205.	CLOSE SHOT ON ROULETTE TABLE:
 	The Waster has staked the last of his chips 
	and is gazing fixedly at the wheel.
 
206.	CLOSE-UP ON THE WASTER:
 	Again The Waster has lost.  With staring eyes 
	he watches the banker rake in the chips. Dazed 
	by the realization that he is ruined, The 
	Waster aimlessly puts his hand to his forehead.  
	Suddenly he turns to speak to the girl and 
	finds her gone.  Swiftly he turns his head in 
	the opposite direction and sees--
 
207.	CLOSE-UP ON MAN AND GIRL:
	The man, who has just won the stack of bank 
	notes, is standing in the archway with the 
	girl, just above the steps that lead down to 
	the main room of the gambling den.  The man is 
	offering the girl some money.
 
208.	CLOSE-UP ON THE WASTER:
 	The Waster's face is clouded with rage as he 
	sees the man offer money to the girl.
 
209.	CLOSE-UP ON MAN AND GIRL:
	The man gives the girl a handful of bills, 
	then leans down and whispers something close to 
	her ear.  She smiles up at him coyly, 
	acquiescing in what he has asked her.
 
210.	CLOSE-UP ON THE WASTER:
	The Waster, wholly beside himself with rage, 
	rushes from the scene.
 
211.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ARCHWAY:
	The man is still talking to the girl when The 
	Waster rushes into the scene, furiously 
	determined to break up this affair.
 
212.	CLOSE-UP ON GROUP:
	The Waster shoves the man backward and then 
	turns wrathfully to the girl, demanding to 
	know who the man is and what she intends to do.  
	The girl is defiant; does not answer The 
	Waster, but slowly walks away with a very bored 
	expression on her face.  More furious than ever,  
	The Waster grabs her viciously by the arm and 
	takes the money away from her.
 
213.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ARCHWAY:
	The man, having recovered his balance after The 
	Waster had pushed him out of the scene, comes 
	back to where The Waster and the girl are still 
	standing, determined to protect her against the 
	younger man's violence.  The Waster suddenly 
	turns upon the man and slaps him full in the 
	face.  Infuriated by this blow, the man hits 
	The Waster a stinging blow and knocks him, 
	staggering backward, down the steps.
 
214.	CLOSE SHOT ON ROULETTE TABLE:
 	The Waster comes stumbling backward into the 
	roulette table, his eyes flaming with fury. 
	Then he quickly reaches toward his hip pocket 
	for his revolver, determined to kill.
 
215.	MEDIUM SHOT ON ARCHWAY:
	Wholly unmindful of danger, the man stands in 
	the archway talking to the girl.  Dave and 
	Martin enter the archway and stand there for a 
	moment.  Dave, unaware of the fact that Death 
	is hovering close at hand, is directly 
	between The Waster and the man with whom he has 
	quarrelled.
 
216.	CLOSE SHOT ON GROUP AROUND ROULETTE TABLE:
	The Waster draws his pistol and fires blindly.
 
217.	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE:
	The bullet strikes Dave close to the heart. On 
	his face comes a look of surprise as, for the 
	instant, he does not realize what has struck 
	him.
 
218.	CLOSE-UP ON THE WASTER:
	The Waster looks upon the scene with horror 
	written on his face.  Terrified he raises his 
	hand to his forehead; and his eyes almost 
	start from their sockets as, like one 
	entranced, he watches Dave, the innocent 
	victim of his fury.
 
219.	CLOSE-UP ON DAVE:
	Gradually to Dave comes the realization that he  
	is shot and mortally  wounded. Slowly he puts 
	his hand inside his coat, close to his heart.   
	Then his head tips back, he totters, and begins 
	to fall.
 
220.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	This shot shows the archway in the background.  
	Dave reels and falls backward down the steps, 
	dead.
 
221.	CLOSE-UP ON THE WASTER:
	A flash of The Waster as he realizes what he 
	has done.
 
222.	FOOT OF STEPS LEADING TO ARCHWAY: 
	Dave is lying face down.  Martin turns his body 
	over and realizes that he is dead.
 
223.	CLOSE SHOT ON THE WASTER:
	Horrified at the enormity of his crime, The 
	Waster places his pistol against his side.
 
224.	FOOT OF STEPS LEADING TO ARCHWAY: 
	A flash of  Martin  kneeling beside Dave's 
	body.
 
225.	CLOSE-UP ON THE WASTER:
	Quickly The Waster pulls the trigger.  His face 
	takes on a look of agony as he topples out of 
	the scene, dead.
 
226.	FOOT OF STEPS LEADING TO ARCHWAY:
	Martin is still kneeling beside Dave's body 
	when Keenan enters and sees what has taken 
	place.  Martin hurriedly gets up and exits 
	from the scene to go for John Trevor.
 
227.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	The crowd of gamblers, realizing that a double 
	tragedy has taken place, begins a wild 
	struggle to get out before the arrival of the 
	police.
 
228.	EXTERIOR GAMBLING DEN--NIGHT:
	Martin, hatless, rushes excitedly out of the 
	gambling den and, for a moment, pauses on the 
	sidewalk, uncertain what direction to take to 
	go to Helene's apartment.  Then he exits 
	hurriedly.
 
229.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DESK--POLICE STATION:
	A police sergeant is sitting behind desk, 
	making entries in a ledger, when the phone 
	rings.  The sergeant takes down receiver and 
	answers phone.
 
230.	MEDIUM SHOT ON STEPS LEADING TO ARCHWAY:
	Keenan, satisfied that Dave is beyond medical 
	aid, gets up from a kneeling position beside 
	Dave's body and hurriedly exits so as to get 
	outside before the arrival of the police.  The
	crowd is still struggling to get out and many 
	are panic stricken.
 
231.	CORNER OF APARTMENT BUILDING--NIGHT:
	This is the corner of the building in which
	Helene's apartment is situated.  Martin, on
	his way to get John, runs into scene, turns 
	corner, and exits.
 
232.	EXTERIOR APARTMENT BUILDING--NIGHT:
	Martin enters on the run and goes into 
	apartment.

233.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN: 
	The crowd, verging on panic, mills back and 
	forth.  Every minute is bringing certain 
	arrest nearer and nearer.
 
234.	EXTERIOR POLICE STATION--NIGHT: 
	Police automobiles drive up to the curb and,
 	as fast as they are filled with policemen, 
	exit.
 
235.	RECEPTION ROOM--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Shooting toward alcove and outer door of 
	apartment.  John is discovered in an easy 
	chair, reading, as the butler lets Martin in. 
	Martin is almost breathless with excitement 
	and exertion.  As he hurries to John, the 
	latter rises from his chair, realizing that
	something must be wrong; but wholly in the 
	dark as to what it is.
 
236.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MARTIN: 
	Martin grasps John's arms and says:

SUBTITLE 55:--"Dave's shot--killed!"
 
	(Scene 236 continued.)  As Martin says this, 
	the two turn and hurry toward outer door of 
	Helene's apartment.
 
237.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:  
	Shooting toward alcove leading from main floor 
	of gambling  den.  As the crowd is struggling 
	to get out, the police enter alcove and come 
	down the steps into midst of crowd. 

238.	EXTERIOR APARTMENT BUILDING-NIGHT:
	A flash of John and Martin as they come out of 
	the apartment building and start running along 
	the street.
 
239.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	The panic-stricken crowd is still struggling 
	wildly to escape the clutches of the law; but 
	the police are restraining them with none-too-
	gentle hands.
 
240.	CORNER OF APARTMENT BUILDING--NIGHT: 
	A flash of John and Martin as they come running 
	up the street and turn the corner.
 
241.	CLOSE SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE: 
	Helene is still seated near desk. Negotiations 
	have been concluded. The prospective buyer of 
	her interest in the establishment has his hat 
	in hand, preparatory to leaving.  The buyer 
	says to Helene:
 
SUBTITLE 56:--"I'll be back in half an hour with the 
		money."
 
	(Scene 241 continued.)  As he finishes this
	title he puts on his hat and exits through door 
	on left.
 
242.	CLOSE-UP ON TWO POLICEMEN:
	One of the policemen is the lieutenant in 
	charge of the detail sent to the gambling den; 
	the other is a patrolman.  The lieutenant says 
	to the patrolman:
 
SUBTITLE 57:--"Get Keenan!"
 
	(Scene 242 continued.)  The patrolman raises 
	his hand in acknowledgment of his superior's 
	orders and exits.
 
243.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	The crowd is still struggling wildly to escape. 
	Some of them are being roughly handled by the 
	police.
 
244.	FOOT OF STEPS LEADING TO ARCHWAY: 
	Dave is still lying on the floor where he fell 
	but his face has been partly covered up with a 
	coat.
 
245.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John's face twitches with emotion as he looks 
	down and sees his friend lying dead at his feet.   
	The shock is so great that he can scarcely 
	believe what he sees.
 
246.	FOOT OF STEPS LEADING TO ARCHWAY: 
	John sorrowfully drops to one knee beside 
	Dave's body.  The police lieutenant moves 
	forward and stands near John.
 
247.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MARTIN: 
	John is almost beside himself with grief. He 
	can scarcely realize the awfulness of the 
	tragedy which has taken place.  Shaken with
	emotion he turns to Martin and says pitiful in 
	a voice:
 
SUBTITLE 58:--"Why did he come here--how did it 
		happen?"
  
	(Scene 247 continued.)  Martin stammeringly 
	starts to explain as he realizes that he is 
	indirectly responsible for Dave's death in 
	bringing him to a place such as this.
 
248.	CLOSE SHOT ON KEENAN'S OFFICE:
	Helene has arisen from her chair near the desk 
	and is about to put on her coat when she turns 
	and sees patrolman who is entering through door 
	opposite that through which prospective buyer 
	left the office.  Helene's eyes open wide with 
	surprise as she cannot even guess the object of 
	the officer's visit. The patrolman glances 
	around, looking for Keenan; and, having assured 
	himself that Keenan is not there, says to 
	Helene:
 
SUBTITLE 59:--"There's been a murder and a suicide in 
		there!"
 
249.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	As she hears the above title, Helene almost 
	loses control of herself.  Her face is terror
	stricken as she realizes what a terrible
	calamity has overtaken her.
 
250.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MARTIN:
	In a halting voice, Martin explains that he 
	brought Dave there merely to see the place-- 
	that he was taking him to see all the sights 
	of the town.  John's head is bowed with grief.
 
251.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND MARTIN:
	Martin helps John to his feet as the police 
	lieutenant, realizing that both of these young 
	men are friends of the dead Dave, crosses 
	behind them and takes his place beside Martin.  
	The lieutenant is facing now toward the alcove 
	through which Helene enters in the next scene.
 
252.	ALCOVE OF GAMBLING DEN:
	Accompanied by the patrolman, Helene enters as 
	if in a dream and goes to top of steps which 
	lead down to main floor of gambling den.
 
253.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	With staring eyes, the terrorized Helene gazes 
	down at the floor of the main room of the 
	gambling den and sees--
 
254.	CLOSE SHOT ON DAVE'S BODY: 
	A flash of Dave's body lying on the floor.
 
255.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	The awfulness of the tragedy is beginning to 
	dawn on Helene's mind.
 
256.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN, MARTIN, AND POLICE LIEUTENANT:
	John, harassed by  his grief and scarcely 
	knowing what he says, looks at the police 
	lieutenant and demands to know--
 
SUBTITLE 60:--"Why don't you hang the swine that run 
		these places  Why do you let THEM live?"
 
	(Scene 256 continued.)  As he speaks this 
	title, John's attitude is almost a threatening 
	one.  He cannot but feel that the police are 
	partly responsible for Dave's death in 
	permitting a place of this kind to remain in 
	operation. To him it seems that none but swine 
	would ever stoop to such a nefarious business 
	as this.
 
257.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	A flash of her as she realizes that it is John 
	who speaks, and that he is unknowingly 
	referring to her as one of the swine who 
	operate gambling dens.
 
258.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN, MARTIN, AND POLICE LIEUTENANT:
	The police lieutenant does not attempt to 
	answer John's questions for to him they are 
	merely the ignorant questions of a grief-
	stricken  boy; but turns toward Martin as much 
	as to say that the latter, being a man of the 
	world, had better answer his friend's inquiries.
 
259.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	A flash of her as she stands there, unable to 
	take her eyes off the scene before her.
 
260.	CLOSE-UP ON POLICE LIEUTENANT: 
	The police lieutenant, seeing Helene standing in 
	the alcove and knowing that she is one of the 
	proprietors of the place, turns to John and 
	says sarcastically:
 
SUBTITLE 61:--"There is the woman who owns this one--
		ask her!"
 
261.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN, MARTIN, AND POLICE LIEUTENANT:
	As the lieutenant speaks this title, John 
	quickly turns and sees--
 
262.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	A flash of Helene, as with a startled look, she 
	sees John turn and look at her.
 
263.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN, MARTIN, AND POLICE LIEUTENANT:
	John, looking off scene, sees his mother, turns  
	again to police lieutenant, and says in a voice 
	vibrant with emotion:
 
SUBTITLE 62:--"Why you're crazy--that's my mother!"
 
	(Scene 263 continued.)  John cannot understand 
	why the police lieutenant has mistaken his 
	mother for the proprietor of the gambling den.
 
264.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	Shooting so as to include group and also 
	Helene and patrolman standing in alcove. John 
	leaves Martin and police lieutenant, runs 
	toward his mother and starts up the steps.
 
265.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE:
	John runs up the steps, takes one of Helene's 
	hands in both of his own, and says to her 
	pleadingly:

SUBTITLE 63:--"Why did you follow me, mother? You 
		must go home--something terrible has 
		happened ...."
 
 	(Scene 265 continued.)  To John no other 
	explanation to account for his mother's 
	presence suggests itself. He pats her 
	reassuringly and kisses her on the forehead, 
	begging her to go home and wait for him there. 
	Helene sadly turns away.  She cannot for the 
	life of her bring herself to tell John the 
	truth just now.
 
266.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	Leaving his mother in the alcove, John runs 
	back to where Martin and the police lieutenant 
	are still standing.
 
267.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN, MARTIN, AND POLICE LIEUTENANT:
	So far John has utterly failed to grasp the 
	significance of the police lieutenant's remark. 
	Still believing that the lieutenant does not
	know what he is talking about, John says 
	disgustedly:
 
SUBTITLE 64:--"You don't know what you're talking 
		about--she came here for me!"
 
 	(Scene 267 continued.)  As he says this, John 
	looks at the lieutenant with a feeling of pity 
	for the latter's ignorance.  The lieutenant, 
	not being disposed to argue the matter of 
	whether Helene came for John or not, says 
	positively:
 
SUBTITLE 65:--"That may be so, but she owns this 
		place!" 

	(Scene 267 continued.)  As the lieutenant 
	speaks the foregoing title, John raises his arm 
	to strike him for offering such a gross insult 
	to Helene; but Martin quickly throws his arms 
	around John and keeps him from making matters 
	worse than they are.
 
268.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE AND PATROLMAN: 
	A flash of Helene and the patrolman as she 
	becomes startled to see John raise his arm to 
	strike the lieutenant.
 
269.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MARTIN:
	Martin still holds John, who turns to him and 
	asks him if what the lieutenant says is true.  
	Martin turns his head aside, not daring yet to 
	tell John the truth.
 
270.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN, MARTIN, AND POLICE LIEUTENANT:
	John looks searchingly at both Martin and the 
	police lieutenant.  He cannot bring himself to 
	believe that what the lieutenant says is true.   
	The idea is too preposterous--the thing is 
	unthinkable.
 
271.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MARTIN:
	To John comes the suspicion that perhaps after 
	all it may be true.  He puts his clenched fists 
	before his eyes--it is too horrible to even 
	think of.
 
272.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	John turns, sees his mother still standing in
 	the alcove, and runs to her.  She, he believes,
	will deny the truth of the lieutenant's 
	statement.
 
273.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE:
	John goes to her, begging her to deny what has 
	been said.  He is a pitiful object as he pleads 
	with her and says:
 
SUBTITLE 66:--"Mother, you don't own this place, do 
		you?  Tell him he lies!"
 
	(Scene  273  continued.)  As he says this 
	Helene, almost in tears, hangs her head with 
	the shame of it.  She is utterly speechless--
	she cannot deny.  To John comes the 
	realization that it is true.  Helene's very 
	actions proclaim her guilt.  Tortured with the 
	mental anguish this discovery has brought him, 
	John staggers backward.

274.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John, staggering backward, leans  against one 
	of the pillars in the alcove.  With head bowed 
	down with sorrow, he stands there, too stunned 
	for the moment to move.  Then he looks up and 
	sees--
 
275.	CLOSE SHOT ON DAVE'S BODY:
	A flash of Dave's body lying on the floor.
 
276.	CLOSE-UP OF JOHN AND HELENE:
	Helene has moved close to John, who stands 
	there gazing dully at the floor.  Finally he
	turns and looks at her and says piteously:
 
SUBTITLE 67:--"Mother, you don't know what you've 
		done."
 
	(Scene 276 continued.)  Helene turns to him in 
	mute appeal; and then, in a voice throbbing 
	with emotion, he says:
 
SUBTITLE 68:--"I love you--worship you--and you-- 
		YOU ...."
 
	(Scene 276 continued.)  John cannot find words 
	to express for him what he would say.  The 
	whole castle of his dreams has come tumbling 
	down about his ears.  The night's tragedy has 
	utterly destroyed his tranquillity of soul.  
	He must get away--must go anywhere and forget 
	the happenings of this dreadful night.  Torn 
	with grief, he rushes wildly from the scene. 

277.	MAIN ROOM--GAMBLING DEN:
	John rushes down the steps near the alcove
	and exits from the scene.  With a cry of
	despair, Helene holds out her arms to him 
	appealingly and then staggers down the steps 
	calling to him.  (FADE OUT QUICKLY)

278.	JOHN'S SUITE OF ROOMS--HELENE'S APARTMENT: 
	(FADE IN)
	With head bowed with grief, John enters slowly 
	to center of room and stands there dazed by the 
	shock of the terrible events through which he 
	has passed.
 
279.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	Determined to get away from it all, John turns 
	and starts toward his bedroom to pack up his 
	belongings.
 
280.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE AND BUTLER:
 	Helene hurriedly enters her apartment, looking 
	for John.  Moving quickly to foreground, she 
	asks the butler where John is.  Her face is 
	haggard and drawn.
 
281.	JOHN'S SUITE OF ROOMS--HELENE'S  APARTMENT:
	Shooting from living room of suite toward door 
	of bedroom, showing clothes closet in 
	background.  John goes to clothes closet and
 	takes out his clothes, which he tosses in a 
	heap on a table at one side.
 
282.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN:
	John's grip is on the table close to where he 
	has tossed his clothes.  He picks up clothes; 
	and, without stopping to fold them, starts to
	hurriedly pack them in his grip.  Then he 
	tosses them to one side again and stands 
	looking at them with loathing and disgust.
 
283.	CLOSE-UP ON CLOTHES:
	The clothes are lying heaped up on the table. 
	There DISSOLVES INTO them quickly a spinning 
	roulette wheel and a roulette layout.
 
284.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	In imagination, as he looks down at the 
	clothes, John sees this spinning wheel and 
	realizes that even the clothes he wears have 
	been purchased with money won from 
	unfortunates.
 
285.	CLOSE-UP ON OUT DOOR OF JOHN'S SUITE: 
	A flash of Helene as she enters door, her eyes 
	opened wide with terror.
 
286.	JOHN'S SUITE OF ROOMS--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	Helene stands near door while John comes from 
	his bedroom to meet her.  He can ill conceal 
	the bitterness he feels as he stands there and 
	looks at her.  Helene pitifully extends her 
	arms to him, begging him to listen to what she 
	has to say.
 
287.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John looks at Helene with a feeling of almost
	loathing to think that she is the cause of all 
	the misery that has come to him.
 
288. 	JOHN'S SUITE OF ROOMS--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
 	Helene comes to him and begs him to listen to 
	her, but he turns his head away in bitterness.  
	Then she puts her arms around him and implores 
	him to hear her. Helene says:
 
SUBTITLE 69:--"You must listen to me--you MUST!"
 
289.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	Helene still clings to John and implores him to 
	listen to her.  To John, nothing matters now 
	save that a tragedy has taken place and that 
	his once-adored mother is the cause of it. No 
	explanation of hers can change these
	outstanding facts.  He turns from her, almost
	with loathing.
 
290.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	John leaves his mother's side and walks to
 	foreground.   Helene follows, still pleading
 	with him. She says:
 
SUBTITLE 70:--"I didn't know how your father made his 
		money until he died--then I went on with 
		it for you!"
 
 	(Scene 290 continued.)  Helene, almost at the 
	breaking point, says this pathetically; but 
	John pays scant heed to what she says. The very 
	pleasures of his life have been bought at the 
	price of blood and woe.  He moves out of scene, 
	leaving Helene staring at him helplessly.
 
291.	CLOSE-UP ON CHAIR:
	A flash of John as he sinks heavily into chair 
	and bows his head over his hands.
 
292.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	A flash of Helene as she stretches her hands 
	appealingly to him.
 
293.	CLOSE-UP ON CHAIR:
	John sits sideways in the chair staring down at 
	the floor.  Helene comes to him and kneels down 
	at his feet. Piteously she says:

SUBTITLE 71:--"I was going to sell out--it was all 
		for you."
 
	(Scene 293 continued.)  As she says this, 
	John's face clouds with disgust at the very 
	thought that she had so far misjudged his 
	character, as to think that he wished for 
	anything in life that could not come to him 
	save at the price of such misery to others. He 
	gets up out of chair.
 
294.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	A flash of him as he stands above the still 
	kneeling Helene, his face twitching with 
	emotion.
 
295.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	As he stands above her, he says bitterly:
 
SUBTITLE 72:--"For ME.  For the food I eat--the 
		clothes I wear--God, what a price!"
 
296.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	As he says this, Helene covers her face with 
	her hands.  His remark cuts her like the lash 
	of a whip.
 
297.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as his face twitches with 
	emotion.
 
298.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	Helene reaches up to him, grasps his hand, and 
	lays her other hand on his arm pathetically.  
	Then she says:
 
SUBTITLE 73:--"I wanted you to have money--everything
		--can't you see?"
 
299.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	Helene begs him to try to see things as she sees 
	them.  It has all been done for him, and him 
	alone.
 
300.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	To John it is wholly impossible to see things 
	in the same light as his mother sees them. He 
	says:
 
SUBTITLE 74--"No, all I can see is Dave and Mary--and 
	the other Daves and Marys ..."
 
	(Scene 300 continued.)  As he says this, he 
	closes his eyes as if to shut out the tragedy 
	that has overtaken him.
 
301.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
	A flash of Helene as she holds up her hand to 
	him imploringly.
 
302.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John looks at Helene with loathing and says:
 
SUBTITLE 75:--"... murder ... suicide ... and broken 
		lives!"

303.	JOHN'S SUITE OF ROOMS--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Helene is still kneeling near the chair, 
	staring down at the floor and almost in tears. 
	For a moment John stands there looking at her, 
	then rushes from the scene.  As he goes, Helene 
	cries out to him in despair, begging him to 
	stay.  At the doorway, John pauses and looks 
	back toward Helene.
 
304.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	As he stands near the door, John says from the 
	very bottom of his heart:
 
SUBTITLE 76:--"I wish I had never been born!"
 
	(Scene 304 continued.)  As he says this he puts 
	his clenched fists to his forehead, exits 
	hurriedly through the doorway, and closes the 
	door behind him.
 
305.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE: 
	Helene calls out to him wildly, still begging 
	him to stay. Then, as she realizes that he is 
	gone out of her life, perhaps forever, her eyes
	fill with scalding tears and she becomes
	engulfed in the flood of her emotion.
 
306.	JOHN'S SUITE OF ROOMS--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Pressing her hands to her brow, Helene bows
	down, her body shaken by her sobs.  (FADE OUT)
 
SUBTITLE 77. (FADE IN ON):

		In spite of sorrow, life goes on and the 
		day's work is done.
 
307.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mrs. Heath sits in the corner of the room 
	between two windows, darning Bob's socks. Her 
	eyes are full of sadness, and the lines in her 
	face have noticeably deepened.  Several weeks 
	have elapsed since Dave's death and burial, but 
	she is still haunted by the great grief caused 
	her in the loss of her beloved son. Every 
	waking minute she thinks of her boy who can 
	return to her no more.
 
308.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARM:
	In this scene a partly plowed field shows in 
	the foreground,  the creek in background. 
	Underneath the wide-spreading branches of the 
	trees which line the creek, the cows are 
	grazing peacefully, unconcerned with the 
	affairs of mortals.  Two horses enter attached 
	to a plow which the struggling Bob is vainly 
	trying to guide.  To Bob, unaccustomed as he 
	is to any form of manual labor, the task of 
	plowing is a very arduous one.   Dave's death 
	has forced him to do all the work that must be 
	done on the farm, if the family is to live; and 
	Bob's dreams of a college education have been 
	rudely shattered.  He utterly detests the very 
	thought of having to do this work, but now 
	there is no help for it.
 
309.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB: 
	Bob is struggling with the handles of the plow, 
	intense disgust written large upon his face. 
	Brutally he jerks the reins of the horses as he 
	calls out to them.  None of his troubles in 
	trying to plow a field does he blame upon 
	himself; but considers that the horses are 
	wholly at fault and vents his spite on them, 
	knowing that they can offer no protest in 
	return for any brutal treatment he may accord 
	them.
 
310.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARM: 
	Bob still struggles angrily with the plow. It 
	seems invested with almost human perversity as 
	it jumps out of the furrow.
 
SUBTITLE 78:--After weeks of wandering--drawn back to 
		Darienne by anxiety for the family and 
		his love for Mary.

311. 	INTERIOR CABIN:
 	This cabin is a small one used by the college 
	boys as a hunting lodge and is situated close 
	to the Heath farm on a hillside over-looking 
	it.  The place is crudely furnished; but it is 
	equipped with sufficient furniture and cooking 
	utensils so that one can be comfortable, if he 
	is prepared to rough it.  To one side is a 
	large, stone fireplace with a wide mantel above 
	it.  John, accompanied by one of the 
	neighboring farmers, who has driven him over to 
	the lodge from the railroad station, is 
	discovered on scene.  The farmer is carrying 
	John's grip, his sole article of baggage. John, 
	now dressed in a flannel shirt and a suit of 
	clothes such as a young man with little money 
	might wear, is looking around and inspecting 
	the cabin.   Finally, as John seems well 
	pleased with the place, the farmer places the 
	grip on a chair beside a small wooden table.
 
312.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND FARMER--CABIN: 
	They are standing at the end of the small 
	table.  John asks the farmer if he thinks it 
	would be all right for him to occupy the cabin
	for a while.  The farmer is a very genial old
	fellow and says:
 
SUBTITLE 79:--"Sure you can have it; them college 
		boys only use it for a hunting lodge."
 
	(Scene 312 continued.)  The farmer, having 
	assured John that it will be all right for him 
	to take possession of the cabin and make 
	himself at home, exits.  John watches him go 
	and then stands there wondering if the Heaths, 
	ignorant of the place where Dave met his death, 
	will welcome him to their home as before or 
	whether they have learned that Dave was killed 
	in Helene's gambling den and will close their 
	doors against him forever.
 
313.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mary and her mother are standing at the gate in  
	the picket fence which surrounds the Heath 
	farmhouse. As Mary looks across the fields, 
	wondering what has become of John Trevor, her 
	face becomes very sad.
 
314.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
 	John turns his head and, seeing a little 
	window of the cabin overlooking the Heath farm, 
	starts toward it.
 
315.	CLOSE-UP ON WINDOW OF CABIN:
	John advances to window and peers through it 
	longingly.
 
SUBTITLE 80:--Desperately afraid they have found out
		--and shut their door against him.
 
	(Scene 315 continued.)  For a moment John 
	lingers at the window, then sadly turns away.

316.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath affectionately places her hands on 
	Mary's shoulders and sympathizes with her.
 
317.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY--SOFT FOCUS: 
	A very pretty shot of her here as she says 
	wistfully:
 
SUBTITLE 81:--"I can't understand why John doesn't 
		come back or write--after all he did for 
		us when Dave--died."
 
	(Scene 317 continued.)  As she says this, her 
	lips quiver ever so little.  She feels hurt to 
	think that after his long period of devotion he 
	may desert them all now, in their hour of
	greatest need.  To her it is strange indeed
	that one could show such solicitude when her 
	brother died and then disappear from sight 
	altogether; but deep down in her heart, she 
	knows that someday he will come back to her.
 
318.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath assures Mary that everything will 
	turn out for the best and starts out of scene, 
	going up the walk that leads to the farmhouse.
 
319.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN--CABIN:
	John has already placed his grip on the table 
	and is now unpacking some of his belongings. 
	Laying some of his things to one side, he 
	takes from his grip a framed photograph of his 
	mother.
 
320.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE'S PHOTOGRAPH: 
	A flash of the photograph as John holds it in 
	his hands.
 
321.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	As John gazes intently at the photograph, a 
	look of loathing comes over his face.  The 
	photograph but recalls memories of the tragic 
	past.  He starts to hurl the photograph to the 
	floor, determined to put the past out of his 
	life forever.  Then he changes his mind and 
	decides to keep the picture--the one memento of 
	a mother who loved him so devotedly.  He 
	thinks of his mother as she was in the old days 
	before calamity descended upon them both, and 
	his face softens with the thought.
 
322.	EXTERIOR OF HEATH FARM:
 	Shooting from across the road which runs in 
	front of the Heath farmhouse and showing 
	farmhouse, picket fence and gate.  Mary is 
	still standing at the gate, gazing sorrowfully 
	across the fields; when the farmer, who took 
	John to the cabin, drives into the scene in his 
	buckboard, stops his team, and calls out to 
	Mary.
 
323.	CLOSE-UP ON THE FARMER:
	A flash of the farmer, seated in his wagon, as 
	he calls out to Mary.
 
324.	PICKET FENCE AND GATE:
 	Mary hears the farmer call to her and starts 
	from gate toward farmer's buckboard.
 
325.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Full scene, continuing main action.  Mary 
	advances to a position close to the farmer's 
	wagon.
 
326.	CLOSE-UP ON FARMER:
	The farmer looks at Mary and smiles at the 
	importance of the news he is about to tell her.  
	He says:
 
SUBTITLE 82:--"Guess who I just took up to the lodge!"
 
	(Scene 326 continued.)  As the farmer says 
	this, he leans forward eagerly waiting for Mary 
	to guess.
 
327.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY: 
	Mary is intensely interested but cannot guess 
	who it is.
 
328.	CLOSE-UP ON FARMER: 
	A flash of the farmer as he says, with an air 
	of great importance:
 
SUBTITLE 83:--"John Trevor!"
 
329. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
 	Mary can scarcely believe him--it seems too 
	good to be true.
 
330.	CLOSE-UP ON FARMER: 
	The farmer laughs and points toward the hunting 
	lodge, quite pleased that he has been the one 
	to bring such good news to Mary.
 
331.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary is too happy to speak. Her heart is 
	bubbling over with joy to think that at last 
	John has come back to her.  She turns and 
	starts to move toward Heath farmhouse.
 
332.	PICKET FENCE AND GATE: 
	Mary comes into scene on a run, opens gate, 
	and hurries up the gravel walk which leads to 
	farmhouse.
 
333.	HEATH KITCHEN: 
 	The stove is in the foreground; a cupboard in
	background.  To the left, close to the kitchen
	sink, stands Mrs. Heath, peeling potatoes.
 
334.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath hears Mary running toward kitchen, 
	turns and looks toward doorway as Mary enters.
 
335.	HEATH KITCHEN: 
	Mary has entered and now moves forward to tell 
	her mother the good news.  Mrs. Heath laying 
	down the potato she is peeling, advances to 
	center of kitchen to meet Mary.
 
336.	CLOSE UP ON MARY: 
	Her face radiant with joy in the thought that 
	at last John has come back to her.
 
337.	CLOSE SHOT ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH--HEATH KITCHEN:
 	Mary, pointing off scene toward the cabin, tells 
	her mother that John is back.  Mrs. Heath, happy 
	for the moment in the thought of Mary's 
	happiness, kisses her fondly.
 
338.	COUNTRY ROAD:
	Shooting down the road toward the Heath 
	farmhouse which appears in the distance. The 
	farmer, in his buckboard, comes driving along
	the road, having just left Mary.  In his
	roadster, Martin enters from the opposite 
	direction.  The auto and wagon almost collide. 
	The farmer draws up his team and Martin quickly 
	stops his roadster.
 
339.	CLOSE-UP ON FARMER:
	The farmer is very angry at Martin's reckless
	driving and wants to know why Martin does not 
	stay on his own side of the road.
 
340.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
 	Martin is equally angry and tells the farmer to 
	drive where he belongs and not try to hog the 
	road.
 
341.	CLOSE-UP ON FARMER:
	The farmer, having had his say, starts to drive 
	away but suddenly realizes that he can spoil 
	Martin's day for him by telling him of John's 
	return.  He has never liked the rich Martin,
	anyhow.  The farmer says:
 
SUBTITLE 84:--"You won't be seein' so much of Mary, 
		now John Trevor's back!"
 
	(Scene 341 continued)   As he says this he
	watches Martin intently to see the effect of 
	the remark will be, for he is well aware of 
	Martin's jealousy of John.
 
342.	CLOSE-UP MARTIN: 
 	Martin hears the farmer's remark and shows 
	that the news is not pleasing to him.  During
	John's absence, he has had a clear field with
 	Mary.  Now he will again meet with opposition 
	in his suit for Mary's hand.
 
343.	CLOSE-UP FARMER:
	The farmer, grinning maliciously at the thought 
	that he has hurt Martin, starts to drive out of 
	scene. 
 
344.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
	Disgusted, Martin slumps down in the seat of 
	his roadster.  Then, on his face comes a look 
	of grim determination, as he decides on his 
	line of action.  He will break up John's 
	romance immediately by going to the Heaths and 
	telling them where Dave was killed.
 
345.	MARY'S ROOM: 
	Shooting through the open door of Mary's room 
	toward living-room where Mrs. Heath and Mary 
	are now standing.  Mary enters room, closes 
	door, and stands with her back to it.
 
346.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY: 
	Mary stands with back against door.  Her face 
	is radiant with joy.  This is the happiest day 
	of her life. At last John has come back.
 
347.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Martin enters slowly in roadster and stops his 
	car in the yard.

348.	WATERING TROUGH:
	This is the watering trough in the Heath 
	backyard.  Bob enters with the two plow horses 
	to give them a drink before putting them in 
	their stalls for the noon hour.  He gradually 
	gets the horses maneuvered around in front of 
	the trough but has a difficult time managing 
	them, and is in a very disagreeable mood. The 
	horses could be easily managed by anyone 
	experienced in that line; but they seem to 
	sense Bob's inexperience, although they are in 
	no sense fractious.

349.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB'S FOOT: 
	A flash of Bob's foot as he steps forward and 
	one of the horses plants its hoof on it.
 
350.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB AND HORSE:
	A flash of Bob as he starts to unfasten the 
	horse's bridle and then looks down and sees the 
	horse's hoof on his foot.
 
351.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB'S FOOT:
	A flash of Bob's foot as the horse stands on it.
 
352.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB AND HORSE:
	Bob's disgruntled mood, at the thought that he 
	is forced to work on the farm, changes to one 
	of anger.  He cruelly strikes the horse on the 
	muzzle, causing it to pull back quickly and 
	remove the hoof from off his foot. Then he 
	reaches down, grasps his injured foot, and 
	starts to strike the horse again.
 
353.	CLOSE SHOT ON MARTIN: 
	Martin, standing beside the roadster, has been 
	quietly observing all that has taken place at 
	the watering trough.  He notes that Bob is very 
	angry with the horse and is in a disagreeable 
	mood toward things in general, and considers 
	this the propitious moment to tell him just 
	what he knows of John Trevor and the gambling 
	den where Dave was killed. Bob will make a 
	useful ally in forever blasting John's romance 
	with Mary.  With this idea in mind, Martin 
	starts toward watering trough.

354.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath, standing near cupboard, turns and 
	sees Mary as she enters room.
 
355.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary has just entered room.  She has a package 
	under her arm.  For a moment, Mary stands near 
	door and says:
 
SUBTITLE 85:--"These are the things John left.  I 
		think I had better take them to him."
 
	(Scene 355 continued.)  Mary waits there 
	momentarily for her mother's approval.  So 
	anxious is she to see John again that she 
	cannot wait for him to come to the farmhouse 
	to see her--she must needs go to him.
 
356.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath smiles good-naturedly at Mary, and 
	says that it will be all right for her to take 
	the things to John.
 
357.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY: 
	Mary smiles back at her mother, and says that 
	she will not be gone very long.
 
358.	MEDIUM SHOT ON WATERING TROUGH: 
	Bob, thoroughly disgusted with his lot in life 
	and still angry because the horse accidentally
	stepped on his foot, is seated on the end of 
	the trough. Martin is now standing near him, 
	looking at him with eyes in which malice 
	gleams.  Noting Bob's mood, Martin says, as 
	if he were trying to sympathize with him:
 
SUBTITLE 86:--"It's a shame you couldn't finish 
		school, Bob."
 
	(Scene 358 continued.)  Martin realizes that 
	school is the thing nearest to Bob's heart and 
	has chosen to attack him at his weakest point. 
	Bob looks up at him helplessly; and Martin 
	continues to speak, now in an insinuating 
	tone:
 
SUBTITLE 87:--"Did you ever wonder where John Trevor 
		got his money?"
 
 	(Scene 358 continued.)  As this title appears 
	there DISSOLVES INTO it a spinning roulette 
	wheel and a roulette layout.
 
359.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB AND MARTIN:
	Bob is listening attentively but makes no 
	attempt to answer Martin's question.  It had 
	never occurred to him to question the source 
	of John's money.  Martin continues, maliciously:
 
SUBTITLE 88:--"From his mother's gambling house--she 
		owned the biggest one in the city!"
 
	(Scene 359 continued.)  As this title appears, 
	there DISSOLVES INTO it a spinning roulette 
	wheel and a roulette layout as in the previous 
	scene.  Bob looks mildly surprised but is not 
	the type of character who worries about where 
	money comes from, so long as it comes. 
	Moreover, he is inclined to doubt Martin's 
	statement.  Martin, now watching Bob intently, 
	says:
 
SUBTITLE 89:--"It's the truth! She owned the one 
		where--Dave was killed!"
 
	(Scene 359 continued.)  The effect of this
	statement is electrical.  Bob excitedly leaps
	to his feet.  Martin, adding fuel to the
	flames, says:
 
SUBTITLE 90:--"That's why he paid all the funeral 
		bills and helped you--because he was to 
		blame!" 

	(Scene 359 continued.)  Bob is almost trembling 
	with rage as he hears this.   Martin, having 
	now so successfully stirred up Bob's wrath 
	against John, continues:
 
SUBTITLE 91:--"But you have to work while he takes it 
		easy--and makes love to Mary!"
 
	(Scene 359 continued.)  Bob, becoming more and 
	more wrought up with the injustice of things, 
	turns trembling toward Martin.  The latter, to 
	spur Bob on to immediate action against John, 
	says:
 
SUBTITLE 92:--"He's up at the lodge now."
 
360.	MEDIUM SHOT ON WATERING TROUGH: 
	Bob is now beside himself with rage. 
	Determined to break up forever Mary's romance 
	with John, he clenches his fists, and hurls
	himself out of the scene.  Martin, thoroughly 
	satisfied with what he has so far 
	accomplished, and with an amused expression on 
	his face to think that his plan has worked out 
	so well, watches Bob go.
 
361.	HEATH KITCHEN: 
	Mrs. Heath is now working near the kitchen sink 
	when she hears Bob hurriedly enter the kitchen 
	door.  She turns and advances to meet him, 
	unable at the time to fathom the cause of Bob's 
	agitation.  Bob excitedly rushes to center of 
	kitchen and asks wildly:
 
SUBTITLE 93:--"Where's Mary?" 

	(Scene 361 continued.)  Mrs. Heath, although 
	she realizes that Bob is greatly wrought up 
	over something, does not stop to question him.  
	She tells him that Mary has gone to the hunting 
	lodge to take some things to John. This is 
	enough for Bob, who rushes to the kitchen door 
	and exits.
 
362.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Shooting from the road which passes in front
	of the Heath farm.  Mary is at the side of
	the road, gathering some flowers to take to 
	John.  She starts to move to road just as she 
	hears Bob call, then she turns and Bob comes 
	running up to her.
 
363.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY: 
	Just a flash of Mary as, uncomprehending, she 
	looks at Bob.
 
364.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Continuing the main action, Bob grabs the 
	package which Mary is carrying under her arm 
	and hurls it from him. Then he seizes the wrist 
	of the still uncomprehending Mary, hurries her 
	through the gateway and up the gravel walk to 
	the house.

365.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Shooting toward window.  Bob enters, still 
	dragging the surprised Mary after him. Then he 
	drops her arm and stands with his back to the 
	door, his face working with anger.  Mrs. Heath, 
	sensing that something is wrong, rushes into 
	the scene from the kitchen and stands near the 
	trembling Bob.
 
366.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	A flash of Mary as she stands there bewildered 
	at Bob's unexplained conduct.
 
367.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath turns toward Bob, a questioning look 
	in her eyes.  She is entirely at a loss to 
	explain the cause of his anger.  Bob, pointing 
	a shaking finger at Mary off scene, and 
	trembling with rage, says:
 
SUBTITLE 94:--"You're never going to see John Trevor 
		again!" 

	(Scene 367 continued.)  As he says this, Bob 
	can scarcely contain his anger.
 
368.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	A flash of Mary as she gazes at Bob with wide-
	open eyes.
  
369.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB AND MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath is surprised at Bob's strange
	conduct.  Bob continues to speak:
 
SUBTITLE 95:--"John hilled Dave--he and his mother!
		She owned that gambling house!"
 
	(Scene 369 continued.)  Mrs. Heath, unbelieving, 
	looks at Bob in amazement that he could make 
	such a statement concerning John Trevor.
 
370.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	A flash of Mary as she gasps and puts her
	hands to her mouth. 
 
371. 	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath gazes first at Mary and then back at 
	Bob.  The thing is unbelievable.
 
372.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	A flash of Bob as he looks off scene and sees 
	Martin who has just entered the door leading in 
	from the side porch.
 
373.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
	A flash of Martin as he stands near the side 
	door.  His face is serious, but he is well 
	satisfied with the way matters have developed. 

374. 	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	Bob points toward Martin and says: 

SUBTITLE 96:--"Ask Martin--he'll tell you!" 

	(Scene 374 continued.)  Bob stands there 
	waiting for Martin to speak.
 
375.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath slowly turns her head and gravely 
	looks at Martin.
 
376.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
	Martin looks at Mrs. Heath and says that it is 
	true.
 
377.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	A flash of Mary as she quickly glances at 
	Martin and then, almost in tears, starts toward 
	Mrs. Heath.
 
378.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH:
	Mary grasps Mrs. Heath's dress and, having 
	glanced back at Martin, piteously pleads with 
	her mother not to believe him.  Then she rushes 
	from her mother toward Martin.
 
379.	CLOSE SHOT ON MARTIN:
 	Mary runs into scene and stands near Martin, 
	begging him to say that it is not true.
 
380.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary is almost in tears as she says to Martin:
 
SUBTITLE 97:--"I don't believe it!"
 
 	(Scene 380 continued.)  To her the thing is 
	unbelievable.
 
381.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	As Mrs. Heath stands looking at Mary, Bob
	suddenly rushes through the outer door,
	determined to confront John and accuse him to 
	his face.  Fearful lest, in Bob's rage, he may 
	kill John or be killed by him, Mrs. Heath 
	hurries to follow Bob as she sees him leave the 
	house.  One tragedy has fallen upon the 
	household--there must be no more.
 
382.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARM:
	Shooting from country road which passes in 
	front of the farmhouse.  Bob comes running from 
	house, rushes through the gate, and turns toward 
	road.
 
383.	CLOSE SHOT ON MARY AND MARTIN:
	A flash of Mary as she sees her mother start to 
	leave the house.  Mary runs from scene towards 
	window.
 
384.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	A flash of Mary as she runs toward window and 
	gazes out.
 
385.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARM:
	Continuing the main action, Mrs. Heath comes 
	running from the gate to the road, holding her 
	hands out appealingly to the hurrying Bob and 
	calling wildly to him.
 
386.	CLOSE UP ON MARY:
	Mary is at the window, watching her mother go.   
	Her face is twitching with her great emotion 
	as she now turns and looks toward Martin.
 
387.	CLOSE SHOT ON MARTIN:
	Martin having accomplished his purpose without 
	seeming to do so, turns and exits through the 
	side door; his face serious as if he greatly 
	regretted having had to tell the Heaths where 
	Dave was killed.
 
388.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Martin's roadster is standing in the side yard. 
	A turkey gobbler is sitting on the running
	board as Martin enters.  Martin viciously
	knocks the gobbler off the machine and starts 
	to climb in to drive away.
 
389.	MEDIUM SHOT ON CABIN FIREPLACE:
	John places his mother's photograph on the 
	mantel above the fireplace, and his eyes soften 
	with tender memories of the happy days that 
	were his.
 
390.	MEDIUM SHOT ON CABIN DOOR:
	The door opens, Bob quickly enters and stands 
	with his back to the door, his face livid with 
	rage.
 
391.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John is still looking at his mother's 
	photograph when he hears the door open. He 
	turns and for a moment a smile of welcome to 
	Bob flickers across his face.   As he is about 
	to speak, he notes that Bob is boiling with 
	anger.
 
392.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB: 
	Bob's face is distorted with rage as he stands 
	momentarily at the door. Then he advances 
	threateningly toward John.
 
393.   CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN:
	John still stands at the fireplace, awaiting 
	Bob's approach.  Bob enters with clenched fist  
	and, trembling with his anger, stands before 
	the wondering John.  Then in a voice, vibrant 
	with rage, Bob says:
 
SUBTITLE 98:--"You killed Dave--you and your mother!"
 
394.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	A flash of Bob, as with blazing eyes, he draws 
	back his hand to strike John.
 
395.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN: 
	John is surprised at Bob's vehemence.  He 
	opens his mouth to speak but cannot find words 
	to say.
 
396.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND BOB:
	For the moment, John feels utterly helpless in 
	the face of Bob's sudden onslaught.  While he 
	tries to explain matters to the angry Bob, the 
	latter says with a heart full of bitterness and 
	resentment:
 
SUBTITLE 99:--"You--always sending me on errands--you 
		with lots of money--from a GAMBLING 
		HOUSE!"
 
397.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	A flash of Bob as he finishes speaking the 
	foregoing title and looks angrily at John.
 
398.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John endeavors to explain but cannot find words 
	that are adequate. He turns nervously and looks 
	at his mother's picture, realizing that she is 
	the indirect cause of all of his misfortunes.
 
399.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND BOB:
	AS John turns to look at Bob, the latter 
	exclaims:
 
SUBTITLE 100--"Deny it! Why don't you deny it!"
 
400.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND BOB:
	As he speaks the foregoing title, Bob looks up 
	at John threateningly.  John, unable to deny 
	the truth of Bob's accusations, sadly turns his 
	head to one side.
 
401.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND BOB:
	Bob is still threatening John when the latter, 
	with staring eyes, looks and sees Mrs. Heath
	standing in the doorway.  Bob, noting the look 
	that has come into John's eyes, turns and sees 
	her too.
 
402.	MEDIUM SHOT ON CABIN DOOR:
	Mrs. Heath, panting from her exertion in 
	climbing the hill to the cabin, stands there 
	and looks at John appealingly. As she slowly
	places her hands upon her heaving bosom, her 
	face clouds with sorrow.   Down deep in her 
	heart, for the sake of Mary's future happiness, 
	she still hopes that what Martin has said is 
	not true.
 
403.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	With wide-open eyes, John stares at Mrs. Heath.

404.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND BOB:
 	Mrs. Heath, with eyes fixed intently upon John, 
	moves from the door toward the fireplace of the 
	cabin.
 
405.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND BOB:
	With measured tread, Mrs. Heath enters scene.  
	Her face is worn with care and sorrow. Even now 
	she fervently prays that John will be able to 
	deny the truth of the story Martin has told.  
	As she approaches John, Bob turns away.
 
406.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	With steadfast eyes which earnestly gaze up into 
	John's face, Mrs. Heath asks solemnly:
 
SUBTITLE 101:--"Is it true, John?" 

	(Scene 406 continued.)  As she asks this fateful 
	question, she waits for John to answer.
 
407.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John cries to stammer out some reply.  He
	cannot answer yet and turns his head to one 
	side, a tortured look upon his face.
 
408.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	For a moment Mrs. Heath awaits his answer, then 
	sorrowfully bows her head.
 
409.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	In his agony John stammers:
 
SUBTITLE 102:--"I'm sorry--I--" 

	(Scene 409 continued).  He tries to find words 
	to complete the sentence he has begun but cannot 
	go on.  From the very bottom of his heart, he is 
	sorry; but he realizes that sorrow cannot bring 
	back Dave again.
 
410.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath looks up sternly at John and, with a 
	voice choking with emotion, says:
 
SUBTITLE 103:--"Will sorrow, give Dave back to us? 
		Will it harvest the grain--will it feed 
		the children?" 

	(Scene 410 continued.)  John cannot answer 
	these questions.  He knows that no sorrow on 
	earth can do any of the things Mrs. Heath has 
	mentioned.
 
411.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND BOB:
	As Bob hears Mrs. Heath's questions, he quickly 
	turns on John and asks vehemently:
 
SUBTITLE 104:--"Will it give me an education--will
           it Keep me from working like a dog"

	(Scene 411 continued.)  These two things are 
	uppermost in the mind of the selfish Bob. To
	him it seems far more important that he should 
	get an education, and not be compelled to work,  
	than that the grain should be harvested and the 
	children fed.
 
412.	CLOSE SHOT ON GROUP--CABIN:
	Mrs. Heath lays a reproving hand on Bob's arm.  
	As John stands helpless before them, Bob gives 
	him a vindictive look and leads his sorrowing 
	mother out of the scene.  For a moment John 
	watches them as they slowly approach the door 
	of the cabin, then rushes out of the scene to 
	intercept them at the door, to make a one last 
	plea to Mrs. Heath.
 
413.	MEDIUM SHOT ON CABIN DOOR:
	John runs to door as Bob and Mrs. Heath 
	approach.  Bob quickly draws back his hand to  
	strike John; but Mrs. Heath, placing herself 
	between the two boys, restrains the angry Bob, 
	who hurriedly exits from the cabin to await his 
	mother outside.  He has heard enough of John's 
	attempts to palliate his guilt for Dave's death 
	and wants to hear no more.
 
414.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MRS. HEATH: 
	As they stand at the cabin door, John says from 
	the bottom of his heart:
 
SUBTITLE 105--"I'd give anything in the world ..." 

	(Scene 414 continued.)  Although she cannot but 
	realize John's contriteness of spirit, yet he 
	cannot give her the one thing she most longs 
	for. With a choking voice, Mrs. Heath says:
 
SUBTITLE 106:--"Give us--Dave!" 

	(Scene 414 continued.)  Having said this, she 
	exits through the doorway of the cabin. John 
	sees her join Bob and go down the hill toward 
	the farmhouse, his heart torn with anguish.
 
415.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY: 
	Mary is sitting on the bed in her room, sobbing.  
	As the scalding tears roll down her cheeks, she 
	bows her head with grief at the thought that 
	perhaps she has lost forever the one boy she 
	has most loved.
 
416.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARM: 
	Mrs. Heath and Bob slowly enter scene from the 
	road which passes in front of the farmhouse and 
	go toward the gate.
 
417.	MEDIUM SHOT ON CABIN FIREPLACE:
	John stands near fireplace, his brow knitted in 
	thought.  As he stands there thinking, an idea 
	suddenly comes to him.  He can and will help 
	the Heaths in their hour of sorrow.
 
418.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath, upon re-entering the farmhouse, has 
	gone at once to Mary to tell her that John has 
	tacitly admitted his guilt for the murder of 
	Dave.  Hopeful to the last, Mary has for the 
	moment succeeded in drying her tears. Together 
	Mrs. Heath and Mary stand in the doorway 
	leading to Mary's room.  Mrs. Heath notes the 
	fact that Mary has been crying bitterly and 
	says to her solemnly, in a tone of mild 
	reproof:
 
SUBTITLE 107:--"Mary, if you loved Dave, you won't 
		waste tears on John Trevor." 

	(Scene 418 continued.)  As her mother says this, 
	Mary cannot keep back the tears that glisten in 
	her eyes.  For her the days of romance have 
	passed; and she has lost, perhaps forever, the 
	love that she held closest to her heart.

419.	MEDIUM SHOT ON CABIN FIREPLACE: 
	As John stands there, a resolution is horn 
	within him.  He looks down at his hands and 
	sees that they are strong.  Although he cannot 
	bring Dave back to life again; yet he can, 
	with those strong young hands of his, harvest 
	the grain and feed the children.  He looks at 
	his mother's picture and tells her, just as if 
	she were there in person to hear him, that with 
	his hands and with them alone he can atone for 
	the sin that was hers.  Determined to go at 
	once to Mrs. Heath and offer what little he has 
	to give, he hurriedly exits from the scene.
 
420.	WATERING TROUGH:
	Bob comes toward trough, leading two plow 
	horses from the barn in the background.
 
421.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Shooting toward barn and watering trough but 
	tipping in the side porch. John runs into scene 
	and goes to side porch to find Mrs. Heath.
 
422.	MEDIUM SHOT ON WATERING TROUGH: 
	A flash of Bob as he turns, looks off scene, 
	and sees John.
 
423.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Shooting toward porch and side door of house. 
	John stands on the lower step to porch, as if 
	about to enter the house, then calls out; and, 
	as no one appears at the door, looks around, 
	sees Bob near the watering trough, and starts 
	toward him.

424.	MEDIUM SHOT ON WATERING TROUGH: 
	Bob, looking off scene and seeing John coming 
	toward him, hunts for something with which to 
	defend himself.  Finally, under the trough, he 
	discovers a stout club and picks it up. Then he 
	awaits John's approach, in a defiant attitude.
 
425.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	John stops for a moment, looks toward house, 
	and calls to Mary and Mrs. Heath.
 
426.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mary and Mrs. Heath are still standing in the 
	doorway leading to Mary's room, as they hear 
	John call.
 
427.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	As no one appears at side door in response to 
	his call, John turns and runs toward watering 
	trough.
 
428.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath, having heard John call, goes to the 
	side door to see what he wants. Mary follows 
	her.
 
429.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB:
	Bob, club in hand, has moved away from the 
	watering trough and stands waiting John's 
	approach.  John enters scene and goes to Bob.
 
430.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB: 
	A flash of Bob as, with face clouded with 
	anger, he tells John to get off the place.
 
431.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN: 
	A flash of John as he tells Bob to wait a 
	moment and listen to what he has to say.
 
432.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Mrs. Heath, having come out of the house in 
	answer to John's call, stands on the steps to 
	the side porch.  She looks off scene and sees 
	John and Bob, the latter in a very threatening 
	attitude.  Fearing that the two young men are 
	about to engage in a physical encounter, Mrs. 
	Heath hurriedly exits toward them, followed by 
	Mary.
 
433.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND BOB:
	Bob is still threatening John, when Mrs. Heath 
	and Mary run into scene and take their places 
	beside Bob.
 
434.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH AND BOB: 
	A flash of them as they stand there waiting to 
	hear what John has to say.
 
435.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
 	John looks at them earnestly and, stretching 
	out his hands, says:
 
SUBTITLE 108:--"I have come to do what I can ..."

	(Scene 435 continued.)  As he says this, his 
	face lights up with joy at the thought that he 
	can help them all.
 
436.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND BOB:
	As Mary realizes that John has come to sacrifice 
	himself for them, she steps forward impulsively 
	to thank him; but Bob roughly pulls her back.
 
437.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath looks earnestly at John, waiting to 
	hear what more he has to say.  John continues:
 
SUBTITLE 109:--"I know I can't fill Dave's place--but  
		I can give you my hands and myself ...."
 
 	(Scene 437 continued.)  As he says this, he 
	looks at Mrs. Heath imploringly.  He is in 
	deadly earnest and hopes that she will not 
	refuse him.
 
438.	MEDIUM SHOT OF GROUP:
	As Mary turns her head away to conceal her 
	emotion, John begins to roll up his sleeves, 
	preparatory to going to work at once.  Bob, 
	mistaking John's action and thinking that John 
	is threatening him, also rolls up his sleeves, 
	prepared to defend himself if necessary against 
	John's assault. 

439.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN:
	John finishes rolling up his sleeves and says:
 
SUBTITLE 110--"I will work the farm--I'll plow--I'll 
		harvest the grain ...."
 
440.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	As John speaks the foregoing title, his face is 
	tense with emotion; but he is determined to 
	atone for his mother's sin, even though he must 
	give up all the years of his youth.
 
441.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH AND BOB: 
	Both Mrs. Heath and Bob are skeptical of John's 
	sincerity of purpose.  They look at him fixedly, 
	not believing that he realizes just what he is 
	saying.
 
442.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN:
	John is not to be deterred in what he has 
	determined upon.  He says earnestly:
 
SUBTITLE 111:--"I promise to do Dave's work--the rest 
		of my life, if you'll only let me."
 
443.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of him as he finishes title.
 
444.	MEDIUM SHOT ON GROUP:
	As Mrs. Heath has not denied him his request, 
	John crosses scene, running toward watering 
	trough.  The others stand and watch him go.  
	Mrs. Heath is frankly skeptical of his 
	sincerity of purpose; while Bob, the perpetual 
	scoffer, thinks it just a sudden whim although 
	in his heart he hopes that John will not back 
	down, thus forcing him to take up again the 
	odious labor on the farm.  To Mary, John's act 
	is one of supreme self-sacrifice, and her heart 
	goes out to him.
 
445.	CLOSE SHOT ON WATERING TROUGH: 
	John enters to where the horses are standing, 
	takes hold of the reins, and starts to lead the 
	horses away.
 
446.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY, BOB, AND MRS. HEATH:
	A flash of them as they stand watching John.
 
447.	SIDEYARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Shooting toward windmill which appears in 
	background; the watering trough is in the 
	middleground.  John leads the horses from the 
	trough, to take them to the field for the 
	afternoon plowing.
 
448.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	With her heart overflowing with pity for his 
	hard lot in life and yet admiring him for the 
	nobility of his self-sacrifice, Mary watches 
	John as he leads the horses away.
 
449.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY, BOB, AND MRS. HEATH:
	For a moment, they stand there watching John; 
	then Bob exits, going toward watering trough.  
	Mary turns and looks at her mother, wondering 
	what she will say; but Mrs. Heath says nothing 
	at all.  Into Mary's eyes comes a look of pain 
	to think that her mother is so unappreciative
	of the sacrifice John is making for them all.  
	Mrs. Heath cannot look upon John's act as one 
	of self-sacrifice.  With her stern sense of 
	duty, she believes that he is doing no more 
	than he is really obligated to do in the 
	circumstances.
 
450.	CLOSE SHOT ON WATERING TROUGH: 
	Bob leans against the end of the trough, 
	watching John.  Seeing that the latter is in 
	earnest and really intends to do all the work 
	on the farm, Bob slowly rolls down his sleeves
	--for him farm work is at an end. Then Bob 
	glances down at the club in his hand, as much 
	as to say that he will force obedience from 
	John Trevor even with a club, if necessary.   
	(FADE OUT)
 
SUBTITLE 112. (FADE IN ON) 

		Christmas  (FADE OUT)
 
451.	CLOSE-UP ON TURKEY (FADE IN): 
	The months of summer and fall have gone, and 
	Christmas is at hand.  A fat luscious turkey is 
	baking in a white enamel pan. The hand of Mrs. 
	Heath, as she bastes the turkey, shows in the 
	scene.
 
452.	CLOSE SHOT ON MRS. HEATH AND PATSY: 
	Mrs. Heath is kneeling down near oven, basting 
	the turkey; while Patsy stands at her side 
	talking to her about the turkey and the 
	wonderful things she expects to eat with the 
	turkey.
 
453.	WOODPILE--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Snow covers the ground as winter has set in in 
	earnest.  John is discovered at the woodpile, 
	splitting wood for the kitchen stove.
 
454.	CLOSE-UP ON WINDOW--HEATH LIVING ROOM: 
	Mary comes to the window and stands there 
	watching John as he splits the wood.  She 
	looks at him pityingly to think that he has to 
	work so hard to keep them all.
 
455.	MEDIUM SHOT ON WOODPILE:
	John gathers up some sticks of wood in his arms 
	and starts to exit toward the kitchen door.
 
456.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary stands at the window, watching John as he 
	approaches the house with his armful of wood.   
	She sorrowfully turns her head away as she 
	thinks of how few pleasures he has in life.
 
457.	EXTERIOR KITCHEN DOOR: 
	John enters with armful of wood and stands at 
	the foot of the steps leading to the kitchen 
	door, looking back at the woodpile.
 
458.	MEDIUM SHOT ON WOODPILE: 
	Paul enters, gathers up three sticks of wood 
	in his little arms, and exits to kitchen door
	where John is still standing. Paul is very 
	devoted to John and helps him with his work, 
	although he is too small to make his efforts 
	very effective.
 
459.	EXTERIOR KITCHEN DOOR:
	Paul, struggling, under the weight of the three 
	sticks of wood he is carrying, enters to John 
	who opens the kitchen door.  Together they 
	start to enter the kitchen.
 
460.	CLOSE SHOT ON KITCHEN DOOR--INTERIOR: 
	John and Paul enter with the wood they are
	carrying.  They stoop down and put the wood in 
	a box near the door.
 
461.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary stands near the china closet in the 
	kitchen, watching John as he works.
 
462.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN: 
	John, as if to speak, looks longingly at Mary.
 
463.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY: 
	Mary smiles at John reassuringly.  In the face 
	of tragedy, Mary's love for John has never 
	faltered.
 
464.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN: 
	For a moment John stands there and looks 
	intently at Mary, then he turns and starts to 
	exit through the kitchen door.  In the hour of 
	adversity, he loves her for her faith in him 
	and in the rectitude of his intentions.
 
465.	CLOSE SHOT ON KITCHEN DOOR--INTERIOR: 
	Just a flash as John exits through the doorway.
 
466.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary still stands near china closet in the
	kitchen.  Her eyes are suffused with pity as 
	she thinks of John's hard lot in life--
	homeless and almost friendless.  Today is 
	Christmas and is supposed to be a day of good 
	cheer; but it seems to her that he has nothing 
	to cheer him, save the hallowing thought of his 
	self-sacrifice.
 
467.	EXTERIOR KITCHEN DOOR:
	Momentarily John stands near the kitchen door, 
	his heart warmed by the sympathy he had read 
	in Mary's eyes.  Then he exits toward the barn, 
	to do the other chores that demand his 
	attention.
 
468.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary stands near the china closet, thinking. 
	"Would it not bring just a little joy into 
	John's life to have him eat Christmas dinner 
	with them? As she asks herself this question 
	she smiles at the happy thought, and starts 
	toward her mother to get the latter's approval 
	of her idea.
 
469.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mary moves close to Mrs. Heath and says:
 
SUBTITLE 113:--"Mother, can't we have John eat dinner
		--with us--today?" 

	(Scene 469 continued.)  Mrs. Heath's face is 
	very grave and stern as she looks at Mary 
	intently and says:
 
SUBTITLE 114:--"I don't see how you can ask it--our 
		first Christmas without Dave."
 
470.	ROAD NEAR HEATH BARN:
	Shooting from across the road so that the barn 
	appears in the background.  The roofs of the  
	barn and the adjoining sheds are heavily 
	covered with snow.  In the middleground is the 
	road which has been cleared through the deep 
	drifts. A sleigh loaded with Bob and some of 
	his friends, who are coming to Christmas 
	dinner, drives into the scene.
 
471.	CLOSE-UP ON WINDOW:
	From this window, one, who is standing there, 
	can see and hear what is taking place on the 
	side porch.  Mary comes to window and stands 
	there gazing out at the snow-covered ground, sad 
	to think that she has been unable to bring even 
	a little happiness into John's life.
 
472.	MEDIUM SHOT ON SIDE PORCH:
	Bob's friends enter to side porch, waiting for 
	him to join them before they go into the house. 
	Through the window near where she is standing, 
	Mary sees them and smiles a welcome.

473.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB AND SLEIGH HORSES: 
	Bob stands at the horses's heads,looks off 
	scene and sees John shoveling snow.  Bob calls 
	to him and beckons to him in a peremptory 
	manner.
 
474.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN: 
	A flash of John as he hears Bob call.
 
475.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB AND SLEIGH HORSES: 
	In Bob's estimation, John has never been 
	anything but a hired man since he began work on 
	the farm to atone for his mother's sin. Bob 
	points to the horses and calls out insolently 
	to John:
 
SUBTITLE 115:--"Hey you! Blanket the horses and feed 
		'em." 

	(Scene 475 continued.)  Having said this, Bob 
	starts to exit from the scene.
 
476.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as he starts to where Bob has 
	left the horses.
 
477.	MEDIUM SHOT ON SIDE PORCH:
	Bob's friends are still standing on the side 
	porch when Bob enters the scene.
 
478.	CLOSE SHOT ON SLEIGH HORSES:
	John enters, gets a blanket from the sleigh and 
	throws the blanket over one of the horses.
 
479.	CLOSE SHOT ON SIDE PORCH:
	Bob looks back to see if John is tending the 
	horses.  One of Bob's boy friends, looking 
	toward John, asks, "Is that John Trevor?" Bob 
	answers him superciliously:
 
SUBTITLE 116:--"Sure, that's John Trevor--he's my 
		hired man now!" 

	(Scene 479 continued.)  The unsympathetic Bob 
	smiles as he says this, thinking that it is a 
	great joke.
 
480.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	A flash of Mary as she gasps when she hears 
	Bob's unkind remark.
 
481.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John is standing near the horses' heads, 
	looking helpless but defiant, as he sees that 
	Bob is ridiculing him.
 
482.	CLOSE SHOT ON SIDE PORCH:
	Bob motions to John, telling him to get to 
	work, then he and his friends start to enter 
	the house.
 
483.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	For a moment John stands there looking 
	defiantly at Bob, then he starts to blanket the 
	other sleigh horse.
 
484.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY AND GIRL FRIEND: 
	Mary is taking the girl's wraps.  One of Bob's
	boy friends comes up behind Mary and puts a cap 
	on her head.  She looks at him with a winsome 
	smile, determined not to let Bob's friends see 
	that she is sad.
 
485.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mary, with the wraps on her arm, starts from 
	the scene.   Bob and his guests talk animatedly.
 
486.	CLOSE SHOT ON SLEIGH HORSES:
	John, having blanketed the other sleigh horse, 
	pats them, and then starts out of scene.
 
487.   HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Shooting so that full length of table shows.
	Some of the guests are already seated when Mrs. 
	Heath enters from the kitchen, carrying a 
	platter on which is the big turkey.  Mary is in 
	the background, fixing the twins preparatory to 
	lifting them into their places at the table.
 
488.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND THE TWINS: 
	Mary has just finished fixing the twins when 
	Paul, almost crying, looks at her and says with 
	quivering lips:
 
SUBTITLE 117:--"Us wants Christmas wif John!" 

	(Scene 488 continued.)  Mary fully sympathizes 
	with the twins but there is nothing that she 
	can do.  She too, would like to have had dinner 
	with John, had not her mother so firmly decided 
	against it.
 
489.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB AND MRS. HEATH: 
	A flash of them as they look reprovingly at 
	Mary and the twins.
 
490.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND THE TWINS: 
	A flash of Mary and the twins as Mary looks 
	toward her mother, hoping that she will relent 
	at the last minute and let John come to eat 
	Christmas dinner with them.
 
491.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB AND MRS. HEATH: 
	A flash of them as they still look reprovingly 
	at Mary and the twins.
 
492.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND THE TWINS: 
	Mary, realizing that the twins' request will 
	not be granted, takes them in her arms and hugs 
	them tight.
 
493.	SIDE YARD--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Shooting toward the barn.  Martin, in his 
	sleigh, drives into the scene.
 
494.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BARN DOOR:
	John comes out of the barn, looks off scene, 
	sees Martin, and starts to move away.
 
495.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN'S SLEIGH HORSES: 
	Martin, having got out of the sleigh, comes to 
	horses' heads and insolently calls out to John:

SUBTITLE 118:--"Watch my horses. I'll be right out--
		I'm taking Mary to the pageant." 

	(Scene 495 continued.)  Martin emphasizes the 
	fact that he is taking Mary to the pageant
	knowing that this will wound John.
 
496.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John looks steadily at Martin and says 
	determinedly:
 
SUBTITLE 119:--"I don't take orders from you." 

	(Scene 496 continued.)  The relations between 
	John and Martin have never been harmonious in 
	the past because of their rivalry for Mary's 
	hand; and now John knows that these relations 
	have reached the breaking point, as he is 
	determined to take no orders, whatever, from 
	the caddish Martin. Although voluntarily bound 
	to serve the Heaths, he is not obligated to do 
	anything for Martin.
 
497.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN'S SLEIGH HORSES: 
	A flash of Martin as he leaves his place near 
	the horses' heads and moves toward where John 
	is standing off scene.
 
498.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN: 
	John stands there awaiting Martin's approach, 
	determined not to yield a single inch.  Martin 
	enters and advances threateningly toward him.
 
499.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as he looks fixedly at Martin.
 
500.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
	Martin looks sneeringly into John's face and 
	says:

SUBTITLE 120:--"You'll take orders from anybody. Your 
		mother took orders to quit running a 
		gambling place!" 

	(Scene 500 continued.)  Although uncertain 
	whether or not John will resent this insult yet 
	he does not for a moment take his eyes off John.  
	Martin holds John in supreme contempt and has 
	deliberately insulted him.
 
501.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as he hears this title, his 
	face livid with rage.
 
502.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN AND MARTIN:
	John, with clenched fist, knocks Martin against 
	the side of the barn. Martin almost falls but 
	recovers his balance and clinches with John. As 
	they struggle violently, John grasps Martin by 
	the throat and bends him backward to the ground.  
	Months of hard labor on the farm have put John 
	in much better physical condition than his 
	opponent and the latter is no match for him.
 
503.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John.  His face is dark with anger.
 
504.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
	A flash of Martin.  His face is distorted with 
	pain as he gasps for breath.
 
505.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as Martin shoves his fist into 
	John's face.
 
506.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN AND MARTIN: 
	A flash of them as they still struggle.
 
507.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as Martin tries to shove his 
	fingers into John's eyes.
 
508.	FLASH ON JOHN AND MARTIN:
	A flash of them as John hurls Martin to the 
	ground.
 
509.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN AND MARTIN: 
	John stands threateningly over the prostrate 
	Martin and says, in a voice choked with anger:

SUBTITLE 121:--"If you ever say anything about my 
		mother again, I'll ...."

	(Scene 509 continued.)  Having spoken this 
	title, John exits from scene leaving Martin to 
	struggle to his feet as best he may.
 
510.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Shooting from above so that entire table and 
	guests are shown as the latter partake of the 
	Christmas feast. The scene is one of pleasure, 
	in sharp contrast to the foregoing ones in 
	which John has had to fight Martin because of 
	the latter's insolence.  (FADE OUT)
 
511.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE (FADE IN):
	Helene, seated alone in the reception room of 
	her apartment, is very sad and lonely for the 
	absent John.  On this Christmas day, she more 
	bitterly than ever feels her loss. Almost at 
	the breaking point, she has decided that either 
	John must come back to her or she will go to 
	him.  So poignant has been her grief at losing 
	her beloved boy that she has but recently 
	arisen from a bed of sickness. Her face is 
	drawn and shows that day and night the tears 
	have rushed unbidden to her eyes.
 
512.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John, standing near the woodpile in the Heath
	farmyard, looks longingly out across the snow-
	covered fields and wonders what his mother is 
	doing this Christmas day.  Although he had left 
	her in loathing, yet months of absence from her 
	have softened the harshness of the thoughts he 
	held; and now he wishes that he might see her 
	again, if only for a little while.

513.	SIDE PORCH--HEATH FARMHOUSE:
	Bob's guests are just leaving.  Mrs. Heath and 
	Mary, with one of the twins on either side of 
	her, have come to the porch to see the guests 
	depart.  One of the guests says:
 
SUBTITLE 122:--"We'll meet you at Darienne."
 
514.	MEDIUM SHOT ON SIDE PORCH:
	The guests begin to leave, to drive back to 
	Darienne.  Mrs. Heath stands on the side porch, 
	watching them go. 

515.	BOB'S SLEIGH:
	Bob and the twins are now in his sleigh and 
	start to drive out of the barnyard.  Bob stops 
	the sleigh for a moment and they all look 
	toward Mrs. Heath, still standing on the side 
	porch
 
516.	CLOSE SHOT ON MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath is watching Bob and the twins.
 
517.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB'S SLEIGH:
	A flash of the twins as they wave goodbye to 
	Mrs. Heath.
 
518.	MEDIUM SHOT OF JOHN:
	John sees the twins and waves goodbye to them.
 
519.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB'S SLEIGH:
	The twins, seeing John, continue to wave their 
	hands and call out to him:
 
SUBTITLE 123:--"Goodbye, John." 

	(Scene 519 continued.)  Bob hears the twins call 
	to John and drives out of the scene.

520.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John's face grows sad as he turns and walks 
	away.
 
521.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN'S SLEIGH:
	Martin tucks the laprobe around Mary, who
	looks off scene and sees John.  Martin notes
	the fact that she is looking at John, and his 
	eyes gleam with malevolence.
 
522.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN:
	John turns away, gets his heavy overcoat, 
	which is hanging in a shed near the woodpile, 
	and starts to put it on to go to the cabin.
 
523.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary looks toward John, pitying him because 
	all the pleasures of life are denied him.
 
524.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN'S SLEIGH:
	Martin gets into the sleigh, tucks the laprobe 
	around himself, gives Mary a sarcastic glance, 
	and drives away.
 
525.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as he stands and watches Mary 
	and Martin drive away.
 
526.	ROAD NEAR HEATH BARN:
	Shooting diagonally down the road.  The snow-
	laden barn and sheds show in background.  
	Martin and Mary enter in sleigh and exit down 
	the road.
 
527.	SEMI-CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John turns and exits to go to cabin.
 
528.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MARTIN:
	Martin is driving along, smiling sarcastically. 
	Suddenly, out of a clear sky, he says:
 
SUBTITLE 124:--"Still crazy about your hired man?"
 
529.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary hears Martin's question and is desperately 
	angry.
 
530.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
	Martin sneeringly says, as he sees that Mary is 
	very angry:
 
SUBTITLE 125:--"A lot you must have cared for Dave to 
		love the fellow that helped kill him." 

	(Scene 530 continued.)  Martin watches Mary 
	intently, as he says this, to see the effect of
	his remark.  Smarting under the rough treatment 
	he has received at John's hands and sensing 
	that he is playing a losing game with Mary's 
	affections because she does not love him and 
	never will, Martin does not hesitate to goad 
	her to desperation.
 
531.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	As Martin speaks the above title, Mary is more 
	angry with him than ever.  Although the sleigh 
	is in motion, Mary starts to get out of it to 
	get away from the hateful Martin. He grabs her 
	arm to restrain her, but she struggles out of 
	his grasp.
 
532.	CLOSE-SHOT ON MARTIN'S SLEIGH: 
	Seeing Mary's intention of leaping from the 
	sleigh and unable to restrain her, Martin 
	quickly reins in the horses.  Mary leaps out 
	into a deep drift beside the road, falling 
	down as she strikes the snow.
 
533.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN: 
	A flash of Martin as he smiles sardonically, 
	well satisfied with the pain he has caused her.
 
534.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY: 
	Mary stands in the deep drift beside the road, 
	almost in tears.  She tells Martin how she 
	hates him, and never wants to see him again as 
	long as she lives.
 
535.	CLOSE-UP ON MARTIN:
	Martin looks at her with a sneer on his face, 
	and says:
 
SUBTITLE 126:--"Give my regards to the hired man." 

	(Scene 535 continued.)  As he says this, he 
	raises his whip and starts to drive away.
 
536.	COUNTRY ROAD:
	Martin gives the horses a crack with the whip 
	and drives away.  Mary struggles out of the 
	drift into the roadway, and starts to walk 
	back to the Heath farmhouse.
 
537.	CLOSE SHOT ON CABIN FIREPLACE: 
	John, with a letter in his hand, goes to the 
	mantel and stands there looking at his 
	mother's photograph.
 
538.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John looks earnestly at his mother's 
	photograph, yearning to see her again and 
	pitying her because of the grief she feels at 
	his continued absence.
 
539.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE'S PHOTOGRAPH: 
	A flash of the photograph as John looks at it.
 
540.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	John gazes at the photograph, then takes off 
	his stocking cap, looks at the letter which he 
	is holding in his hands, and reads:
 
INSERT:	"And I know it is worry over your absence 
		that caused your mother's illness; and,
		even now, she cries continually.  Won't 
		you please come to her or let her come to 
		you? Her heart is breaking and I feel 
		that ...."
 
	This letter is written in a scrawly hand, as if 
	it had been written by one of Helene's servants
	--probably her maid.  As he reads this letter, 
	John is in a torment of doubt, uncertain 
	whether to go to her or have her come to him.
 
541.	RECEPTION ROOM--HELENE'S APARTMENT:
	Helene, with her fur coat on her arm, comes to 
	davenport in the foreground, and drops the coat 
	on the davenport as the butler enters, hands 
	her a timetable and says:
 
SUBTITLE 127:--"Here's the time table, ma'am."
 
542.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE AND BUTLER: 
	As the butler exits, Helene looks at the 
	timetable.
 
INSERT: 	A flash of a New York Central timetable, 
		followed by a close-up of the same, 
		partly masked so that the words and 
		figures "8:41, Darienne, 9:30" stand out 
		distinctly.  The first figure given is 
		the time of the train's departure from 
		New York, the latter figure that of 
		arrival at Darienne.
 
543.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE:
 	As Helene stands there looking at the timetable, 
	she cannot but think of the tragic night when 
	John, wishing that he had never been born, had 
	cast her out of his life. INSERT:  A flash of 
	the time-table and DISSOLVE INTO it the title:   
	"I wish I had never been born!"  As Helene 
	seems to hear again this bitter remark that 
	John had made, her face grows very sad. (FADE 
	OUT)
 
544.	HEATH LIVING ROOM--NIGHT.  (FADE IN):
	Mrs. Heath is seated in a rocking chair near 
	the fireplace, gazing into the fire with 
	anxious eyes.  Mary is about to light the 
	hanging lamp over the table. Mrs. Heath gets up 
	and goes to the window, looking out as if her 
	gaze could pierce the darkness which has 
	settled down over the landscape.  Mary lights 
	the lamp.  Mrs. Heath, plainly worried, returns 
	to replace and glances up at the clock--
 
INSERT:  	A close-up on the clock, showing the 
		time to be 6:27.  

	Mrs. Heath, noting the hour, turns anxiously to 
	Mary.
 
545.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath, looking at Mary, says:
 
SUBTITLE 128:--"Bob said they'd be back by six." 

	(Scene 545 continued.)  Intuition tells her 
	that some accident has befallen Bob and the 
	twins.
 
546.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary has her hand on the ring at the base of 
	the lamp, ready to push it toward the ceiling, 
	the lamp being one of the old fashioned hanging 
	kind suspended from the ceiling by chains and  
	having prisms encircling the painted china 
	shade.  Mary tries to allay her mother's 
	anxiety as she says:
 
SUBTITLE 129:--"Don't worry, mother.  They said the 
		pageant was going to be awfully long."
 
547.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	As she speaks the foregoing title, she pushes 
	the hanging lamp toward the ceiling.  She, too, 
	is worried but feels it her duty to conceal 
	this fact from her mother.
 
548.	BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT:
	A blizzard is raging and Bob, blinded by the 
	fury of the storm, has got off the main road. 
	The horse plunges wildly as it tries to drag 
	the sleigh through the drifts.
 
549.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT: 
	Bob lashes the struggling horse with the whip. 
	Paul looks up at Bob and asks:

SUBTITLE 130:--"Are we 'most home, Bob?" 

	(Scene 549 continued.)  Bob cannot tell Paul 
	how desperate is their predicament. He tries to 
	calm him, covering him up with the laprobe 
	against the flying snow.   (NOTE to Art 
	Department:  In shooting the foregoing title 
	and all others that appear during the storm 
	sequence, double expose drifting snow into 
	titles.)
 
550.	BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT:
	The horse is now down on its haunches, vainly 
	striving to move the sleigh out of a drift.  
	Bob lashes the horse with the whip; and, with a 
	terrific effort, the horse, becoming more and 
	more terrified, moves the sleigh out of the 
	scene.
 
551.	INTERIOR CABIN:
	Shooting toward door and window. A candle, the 
	only light in the cabin, is burning on the 
	little table which appears in the foreground. 
	John is standing near the door, his brow 
	knitted in deep meditation.  Outside the storm 
	is raging, becoming more violent as the minutes 
	pass.  John turns from door, goes to the 
	window, and watches the storm, then comes to 
	the table in foreground.
 
552.	BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT:
	The horse, having succeeded in getting the 
	sleigh out of the drift, now comes struggling 
	along trying to pull it over a rise in the 
	ground. The horse has become terrorized with 
	fright.
 
553.	HILLSIDE--NIGHT:
	The horse comes plunging into the scene, rushes 
	wildly down the hill, and tips over the sleigh.
 
554.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB AND THE TWINS--NIGHT:
	As the sleigh tips over, Bob and the twins come 
	rolling down the hillside into the foreground.  
	Further up the hill is the sleigh, turned over 
	on one side. The horse in tipping over the 
	sleigh has broken the harness and being free 
	has set out to find its way back to the shelter 
	of the Heath barn.
 
555.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mary is seated in a corner of the room, vainly 
	trying to read, as she listens for every sound 
	that may announce the coming of Bob and the 
	twins.  Mrs. Heath, as she rocks slowly back 
	and forth in her chair before the fireplace, 
	gazes anxiously into the fire.  Her mind is 
	greatly agitated at the fact that Bob and the 
	twins have not yet come, but she shows great 
	repression in all of her actions.
 
556.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB AND THE TWINS--NIGHT:
	Bob gathers up the twins in his arms and 
	starts to take them up the hill to the shelter
	of the overturned sleigh.
 
557.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN--CABIN:
	John picks up the letter from the table and 
	re-reads it.
  
INSERT:	"And I know it is worry over your absence 
		that caused your mother's illness; and, 
		even now, she cries continually.  Won't 
		you please come to her or let her come to 
		you?  Her heart is breaking and I feel 
		that ...."
 
	(Scene 557 continued.)  (NOTE: Insert a flash 
	of this sufficiently long to identify it with 
	the letter previously shown.) As John re-reads 
	this letter, he makes up his mind to go to his 
	mother. Getting paper and pencil, he sits down 
	at the table and writes.
 
558.   CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
       John hurriedly writes a note.
 
INSERT:	"I am leaving on this evening's train.
 
				John."

 	John folds up the note.

559.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN--CABIN:
	Knowing that, when he does not appear at the 
	farmhouse in the morning, Mary will come to the 
	cabin to see what has become of him, John 
	places the folded note under the candle where 
	she can find it in the morning.
 
560.	OVERTURNED SLEIGH--NIGHT:
	Bob has carried the twins into the shelter of 
	the overturned sleigh.  Knowing that, unless he 
	can find the road that leads to the farmhouse, 
	both he and the twins must perish in the storm, 
	Bob calms them as best he may and says:
  
SUBTITLE 131:--"Stay here--I'll be right back!"
 
561.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB AND THE TWINS--NIGHT:
	Having carefully covered up the twins with the 
	laprobe and assured them that he will come 
	right back to them, Bob exits to get the 
	lantern and attempt to find the road.
 
562.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN--CABIN:
	John puts on his overcoat and stocking cap, 
	blows out the candle, and exits from the cabin.  
	(FADE OUT)
 
563.	CLOSE-UP ON CLOCK--HEATH FARMHOUSE: (FADE IN) 
	The clock now shows the time to be 8:03.
 
564.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE--NIGHT: 
	The violence of the storm is mounting. The 
	branches of the trees near the house are 
	whipped about by the wind.
 
565.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mary is standing at the window near the 
	fireplace.  She turns and looks anxiously at 
	her mother who still sits there, gazing into 
	the fire and greatly worried because the twins 
	and Bob have not yet come.
 
566.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB--NIGHT:
	Bob, with lighted lantern in hand, comes 
	struggling through the snow and exits.  
	Although he knows that there is no one to hear 
	him, yet in desperation he calls wildly for 
	help.
 
567.	CLOSE-UP ON TWINS--NIGHT:
	The twins are crusted with the drifting snow. 
	The sobbing Paul tries to calm his little
	sister, saying:
 
SUBTITLE 132:--"If you cry, you'll get big ithicles 
		on your nose." 

	(Scene 567 continued.)  Together they lie down 
	and try to comfort each other.
 
568.	INTERIOR RAILROAD STATION:
	John enters railroad station and goes toward 
	ticket window.  This is the ordinary country 
	station, with double bench in the middle of the 
	floor and a large coal stove in one corner of 
	the room.
 
569.	CLOSE-UP ON TICKET WINDOW:
	John enters to window and asks the station 
	agent about the night-train to New York.
 
570.	CLOSE-UP ON STATION AGENT--TICKET WINDOW:
	Shooting from behind ticket window, toward
	John.  The station agent looks up at John
	and says:
 
SUBTITLE 133--"The train to the city is held up by 
		the storm--it won't be along until 9:30."
 
571.	CLOSE-UP ON TICKET WINDOW:
	As the station agent speaks the foregoing title, 
	John turns and looks off scene at the clock 
	above the door through which he has entered,
 	notes the length of time that must elapse 
	before the train's arrival, and starts toward 
	the stove in the corner of the station.
 
572.	INTERIOR RAILROAD STATION: 
 	John goes to stove and stands there warming his 
	hands.
 
573.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB--NIGHT:
	Bob is still struggling through the drifting 
	snow.
 
574.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB--NIGHT: 
	Bob holds up his lantern and sees a tree begin 
	to fall, too late to save himself as he is in 
	direct line with the falling tree.
 
575.	CLOSE-UP ON TREE--NIGHT: 
	A flash of the tree as it begins to fall.
 
576.	FALLING TREE--NIGHT:
	The tree crashes to the ground and pins the 
	luckless Bob underneath its branches.
 
577.	ANGLE OF RAILROAD STATION:
	Shooting toward the stove in the corner of the 
	station.  To the right of the stove there is a  
	window.  John is looking out of the window at 
	the storm which now seems to be raging more 
	violently than ever.  The station agent enters 
	scene with his hat and coat, preparatory to 
	going out on the station platform.  He puts on 
	his hat and, while putting on his coat, says 
	to John:
  
SUBTITLE 134:--"This is the worst blizzard we've had 
		in years.  I hope to God nobody's caught 
		out in it!"
 
	(Scene 577 continued.)  As the station agent 
	speaks this title, John turns and looks at him 
	with alarm.  The station agent exits to station 
	platform.
 
578.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN: 
	John watches the station agent go, then turns 
	to window and tries to look out into the 
	darkness.  The station agent's remark has 
	alarmed him; and he cannot but wonder if his 
	little friends, the twins, are safe at home 
	again.  As he turns and looks toward the center 
	of the room, he sees, in vision, the twins just 
	as he saw them that afternoon as they waved to 
	him and said goodbye.  FADE OUT and--
 
INSERT:	CLOSE-UP ON BOB'S SLEIGH as the twins 
		wave their hands to him and say:
 
SUBTITLE 135:--"Goodbye, John." (See scene 519). 
		FADE OUT. 
 
	(Scene 578 continued.)  John's face is very 
	thoughtful as, in his mind's eye, he sees the 
	twins waving their goodbye.  He has a 
	premonition that they have been caught out in 
	the blizzard and determines to go at once to 
	the Heath farmhouse and see whether or not they 
	have arrived safely at home.
 
579.	CLOSE-UP ON FALLEN TREE--NIGHT:
 	Bob slowly drags the upper part of his body 
	from under the fallen tree, tries to move one 
	of his legs but cannot do so as it is pinned 
	fast to the ground by one of the branches.  
	Terrorized, he calls for help, but his only 
	answer is the moaning of the wind as it sweeps 
	across the snow-covered ground.  Bob realizes 
	that for him and the twins the hours are 
	numbered, unless succor should miraculously 
	come.  For the time being he cannot aid himself
	--let alone the little brother and sister whom 
	he left in the shelter of the overturned sleigh. 
	With his face distorted with pain and fear, Bob 
	sinks down into the snow.
 
580.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Shooting toward fireplace and the window which 
	is to one side. As she gives one hasty glance 
	at the clock, Mary turns from the fire place 
	and goes to her mother.  Both of them are tense 
	with fear for the safety of Bob and the twins, 
	and vainly try to comfort each other.

581.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BARN DOOR--NIGHT:
	Snow is heaped up against the barn doors and is  
	drifting badly.  Bob's sleigh horse, with 
	broken harness, enters scene and stands near 
	doors, trying to get into the shelter of the 
	barn.
 
582.	CLOSE-UP ON KITCHEN DOORSTEP--NIGHT: 
	The family fox terrier is at the door, trying 
	to get in out of the storm.
  
583.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mary and Mrs. Heath, with their arms around 
	each other, are doing their best to allay each 
	other's fears but are plainly at the breaking 
	point in their anxiety.  Mrs. Heath hears the 
	dog at the door, believes that Bob and the 
	twins have returned, and her face lights up 
	with happiness as she hurries to the door, 
	followed by Mary.
 
584.	KITCHEN DOOR--INTERIOR:
	Followed by Mary, Mrs. Heath comes to kitchen 
	door and opens it, expecting to find Bob and 
	the twins there. The dog enters, pleased to get 
	in from the cold. A look of apprehension comes 
	into Mrs. Heath's face as she sees no one at 
	the door; but this look quickly passes away, 
	and she gazes out through the scurrying snow 
	and sees the horse standing, in the dim light, 
	near the barn door.
 
585.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BARN DOOR--NIGHT: 
	The horse is still standing near the barn door, 
	trying to get into the barn.
 
586.	CLOSE SHOT ON KITCHEN DOOR:
	Mary and Mrs. Heath are standing at the kitchen 
	door. The light t near the barn is not 
	sufficient to reveal the fact that the horse is 
	not still hitched to the sleigh; but Mrs. Heath 
	now feels assured that, at last, Bob and the  
	twins have succeeded in making their way home 
	through the storm.  She starts to go out to the 
	barn; but Mary draws her back into the kitchen, 
	takes her mother's scarf, puts on a coat, and 
	exits through the kitchen door.  Mrs. Heath 
	quickly closes the door to keep out the cold 
	wind and the flying snow and for a moment 
	stands there, her face radiant with happiness 
	at the thought of Bob's return.
 
587.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BARN DOOR--NIGHT:
	Mary runs into scene, goes to horse, and is 
	almost frantic when she discovers that the 
	harness is broken and that Bob and the twins 
	are nowhere in sight.
 
588.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND HORSE--NIGHT:
 	Mary is frantic with terror as she looks at 
	the broken harness and realizes that some 
	accident has befallen Bob and the twins.
 
589.	CLOSE SHOT ON KITCHEN DOOR:
 	Mrs. Heath starts from kitchen door to fix
	blankets in chairs so as to warm Bob and the 
	twins when they enter.
 
590.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BARN DOOR--NIGHT:
	Mary brushes and kicks the snow away, then 
	pulls door open so that the horse may enter the 
	barn.
 
591.	MEDIUM SHOT ON FIREPLACE: 
	Mrs. Heath places blankets in the chairs in 
	front of the fireplace.
 
592.	CLOSE SHOT ON KITCHEN DOOR:
	Mary quickly enters and stands there looking
	off scene at her mother.  Mary is greatly 
	agitated at her discovery of the broken
	harness.

593.	KITCHEN DOOR--INTERIOR:
	Mary's eyes are opened wide with terror, as 
	she advances toward foreground to meet her 
	mother.  In a voice shaken with fear, Mary 
	says:
 
SUBTITLE 136:--"Bob's horse is loose--without the 
		sleigh! Something's happened!"
 
	(Scene 593 continued.)  As Mary speaks this 
	title, Mrs. Heath almost collapses.  She clasps 
	her hands in the agony of fear that Bob and the 
	twins have perished in the blizzard.   Mary 
	exits to her own room. Something must be done 
	immediately.  She will go to the cabin and get 
	John Trevor to hunt for the missing ones!
 
594.	MEDIUM SHOT ON DOOR OF MARY'S ROOM:
	Shooting from the living room so as to show 
	foot of bed in middleground.  Mary enters, 
	throws the scarf on the footboard, sits on bed, 
	and starts to put on heavy shoes.
 
595.	CLOSE SHOT ON MRS. HEATH:
	With hands outstretched imploringly, Mrs. Heath 
	starts toward Mary's room.
 
596.	CLOSE SHOT ON DOOR OF MARY'S ROOM:
	Mrs. Heath goes to Mary who is now dressed in 
	heavy winter wraps.  Together they stand in the 
	doorway.  Mary, realizing that there is not a 
	moment to be lost as the predicament of Bob and 
	the twins is necessarily a desperate one, says:
 
SUBTITLE 137:--"I'm going to get John--he'll find 
		them!"
 
 	(Scene 596 continued.)  As Mary exits from the 
	scene, Mrs. Heath looks at her appealingly. 
	Mary's love for John has never died nor has her 
	faith in him ever wavered--he will not fail her 
	in her hour of need!
 
597.	CLOSE SHOT ON SIDE DOOR:
	Mary has entered to door, when the door 
	suddenly opens, and John comes hurriedly in.
 
598.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary is overjoyed to see him. Impulsively she 
	raises her arms to put them around his neck.
 
599.	CLOSE SHOT ON SIDE DOOR:
	Mary throws her arms around John's neck and 
	hugs him tight.
 
600.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath is surprised that Mary should so far 
	forget herself as to hug John.  Even though the 
	lives of Bob and the twins are hanging in the 
	balance and John is the only one on earth who 
	can bring her lost ones back to her, yet she 
	believes that Mary but demeans herself by thus 
	showing her love for John.
 
601.	CLOSE SHOT ON SIDE DOOR:
	Mary stands close to John, puts her hands on 
	his shoulders and says:
 
SUBTITLE 138:--"Something has happened to Bob and the 
		twins!"
 
	(Scene 601 continued.)  She tells him that they 
	should have returned at six.  Gently John takes 
	her in his arm and assures her that he will do 
	all in his power to find Bob and the twins. 
	Mary goes to corner and gets a pair of snowshoes 
	which she gives to John, then she exits to the 
	kitchen to get a lantern. John bends down and 
	hurriedly puts on the snowshoes.
 
602.	CLOSE SHOT ON LANTERN:
	Mary enters, takes the lantern down from the 
	nail on which it is hanging and exits toward 
	John.
 
603.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mrs. Heath is watching John as he puts on the 
	snowshoes.  John rises and takes the lantern 
	from Mary, who has just entered. Mary goes to 
	him and stands there looking at him with 
	adoring eyes.
 
604.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
 	Mrs. Heath's face hardens in protest at Mary's 
	action.
 
605.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM:
 	Mary throws her arms around John's neck and 
	kisses him devotedly. John quickly turns and 
	exits through door.  Mary goes to door, closes 
	it, and stands there looking at her mother.
 
606. 	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
 	Mary soberly looks at her mother, grieved to 
	think that she did not even speak to John when 
	he was about to plunge out into the raging 
	storm to risk his life for Bob and the twins.
 
607.	ANGLE OF HEATH LIVING ROOM: 
	Mary goes to her mother's side.
 
608.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY:
	Mary looks sadly at her mother, and says:
 
SUBTITLE 139:--"He has gone out in that storm to 
		risk his life for us, and you wouldn't 
		even speak to him."
 
	(Scene 608 continued.)  As she says this, her 
	eyes are moist with tears.  She is indeed 
	grieved to think that her mother could not 
	bring herself to offer at least a little 
	encouragement to John.  To her, Mrs. Heath has 
	seemed unnecessarily severe.
 
609.	ANGLE OF HEATH DINING ROOM:
	Mary goes to window and looks out, wondering if 
	John will be able to effect the rescue of Bob 
	and the twins or whether they are all four 
	doomed to perish in the storm.  Mrs. Heath, 
	feeling the weight of Mary's rebuke, bows her 
	head in sorrow.
 
610.	ANGLE OF STORM--NIGHT:
	John is but faintly seen as he walks through 
	the snow, calling loudly to Bob whom he hopes 
	may hear his voice above the whistling of the 
	wind as it wildly sweeps across the snow-covered 
	ground.
 
611.	PLATFORM OF RAILROAD STATION--NIGHT:
	This station is the small one at Darienne on 
	the New York Central lines.   The train comes 
	into scene slowly and stops.
 
612.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN--NIGHT:
	John, as he comes to foreground carrying the 
	lighted lantern, is calling loudly to Bob.
 
613.	PLATFORM OF RAILROAD STATION  NIGHT:
	Conductor enters with Helene, who carries a 
	small grip in her hand and has on a heavy fur 
	coat.
 
614.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE--NIGHT:
	For a moment Helene looks around anxiously and 
	then starts toward the railroad station.
 
615.	MEDIUM  SHOT  ON JOHN--NIGHT:
	John calls loudly to Bob. Suddenly he hears 
	Bob's answering call and starts to exit to 
	him.
 
616.	CLOSE SHOT ON HELENE AND STATION AGENT--NIGHT:
	The station agent points in the direction in 
	which the Heath farm lies, and says to Helene:
 
SUBTITLE 140:--"The Heath farm is over yonder--but 
		you couldn't hire anybody to drive that 
		far in the blizzard!"
 
	(Scene 616 continued.)  For a moment Helene 
	gazes about her, not knowing what to do. Then, 
	seeming to sense a diminution in the violence 
	of the storm, she decides that she can find her 
	way across the fields as it is much shorter 
	than by the road which runs past the Heath 
	farm. Urged on by the overpowering desire to 
	see her loved boy again, she determines to go 
	to him at once and starts to exit from the 
	scene.
 
617.	CLOSE SHOT ON FALLEN TREE--NIGHT:
	Bob raises himself up on one elbow and calls to 
	John, as he sees the bobbing lantern which 
	marks John's approach.
 
618.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN--NIGHT:
	John, making his way slowly and still uncertain 
	just where Bob is, comes through the snow, 
	calling to Bob.
 
619.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB--FALLEN TREE--NIGHT: 
	Bob, with his face twisted with pain and 
	fearful lest John may fail to discover his 
	whereabouts, calls loudly for help.
 
620.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN--NIGHT:
	John hears Bob's call for help and at last 
	determines the general direction from which the 
	call comes.  He exits toward where Bob lies 
	pinned down beneath the fallen tree.
 
621.	FALLEN TREE--NIGHT:
	John enters scene and goes to Bob, as fast as 
	the cumbersome snowshoes will permit.
 
622.	CLOSE SHOT ON FALLEN TREE--NIGHT: 
	John begins to extricate Bob from beneath the 
	branches of the fallen tree.
 
623.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE--NIGHT:
	Helene comes stumbling through the deep drifts,  
	rapidly tiring with her exertions in fighting 
	her way against wind and snow.  At last, 
	unable longer to keep her feet, she falls down 
	but finally struggles to her feet again and 
	plunges on through the storm, uncertain now of 
	the direction in which she is going.
 
624.	FALLEN TREE--NIGHT:
	After a strenuous effort, John finally succeeds 
	in dragging Bob from beneath the branches of 
	the fallen tree; but Bob's foot pains him so 
	that, for the time being, he is unable to walk.
 
625.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mary is standing at the window, looking out 
	anxiously into the storm.  Mrs. Heath slowly 
	rocks back and forth in the chair before the 
	fireplace as she gazes fixedly at the fire, 
	listening for the slightest sound that may 
	proclaim the coming of Bob and the twins.  The 
	minutes, seeming like a very eternity of time, 
	slowly tick themselves away.
 
626.	EXTERIOR HEATH FARMHOUSE--NIGHT: 
	The violence of the storm is rapidly mounting. 
	A tree near the corner of the house sways with 
	the wind, totters, and falls with a crash.
 
627.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mary, startled, jumps back from the window as 
	the tree falls and strikes the house.  Mrs. 
	Heath gasps with sudden fear.  Smoke from the 
	fireplace pours into the room, almost choking 
	them.  Mary comes and kneels down beside her 
	mother's chair to comfort her.
 
628.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH:
	Mary, though she herself is thoroughly 
	frightened because the storm has increased its 
	fury, tries to reassure her mother and calm her 
	fears.
 
629.	ANGLE OF STORM--NIGHT:
	John, still carrying Bob on his back, makes his 
	way slowly through the snow. 

630.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mary is still trying to calm her mother's fears.   
	Even though she stands on the very brink of 
	despair, Mary cannot give up hope that John will 
	rescue Bob and the twins.
 
631.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT:
	Still carrying Bob, John enters and carefully 
	puts him on the ground close to the overturned 
	sleigh.  Then he begins to search for the twins 
	who are nowhere in sight.
 
632.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN--NIGHT:
	A look of horror comes to John's face as he 
	discovers that the twins are no longer there. 
	Here is a calamity, indeed.  He calls out to 
	Bob:
 
SUBTITLE 141:--"They're gone!"
 
633.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT:
	Vainly John looks around, uncertain for the
	moment what to do.  Bob, spurred to action by 
	this desperate predicament in which they find 
	themselves, struggles partly to his feet and 
	looks around.  He cannot bring himself to 
	believe that the twins have actually wandered 
	away from the shelter of the overturned sleigh. 
	Then as he sees them nowhere, he realizes that 
	they are indeed gone.  Perhaps their footprints 
	have not yet been fully obliterated by the 
	drifting snow.
 
634.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath is still gazing blankly at the fire. 
	Mary comes to her. Tragedy stalks abroad, and 
	mother and daughter are becoming more and more 
	fearful as the minutes pass.
 
635.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT: 
	John and Bob are looking for footprints in the 
	snow.  Suddenly, Bob points to the ground and 
	they see--
 
636.	CLOSE-UP ON FOOTPRINTS IN SNOW--NIGHT: 
	A flash of the twins' footprints in the snow, 
	partially drifted over.
 
637.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB'S SLEIGH--NIGHT: 
	John starts to lift Bob on his back again to 
	follow the footprints in the snow.
 
638.	ANGLE OF STORM--NIGHT:
	The twins, having set out to find Bob, are 
	making their way with great difficulty through 
	the drifting snow.
 
639.	CLOSE-SHOT ON HELENE--NIGHT:
	Helene, with uncertain steps, comes stumbling 
	through the fast-deepening snow.
 
SUBTITLE 142:--Lost!
 
	(Scene 639  continued.)  She has lost all 
	sense of direction and, having wandered around 
	aimlessly for some time, is about to give up 
	the unequal struggle.  What little strength she 
	has is rapidly ebbing away.
 
640.	MEDIUM SHOT ON TWINS--LOG--NIGHT: 
	The twins come to a log. Patsy lies down in the 
	shelter of it.  Paul looks around vainly, 
	wondering what he can do.  The twins, too, are 
	lost and are terrorized because they have been 
	unable to find Bob.
 
641.	CLOSE-UP ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mary and her mother clasp each other in their 
	arms, fearing that the worst has happened.
 
642.	MEDIUM SHOT ON TWINS--LOG--NIGHT: 
	Paul gazes around helplessly, then lies down by 
	Patsy's side so that they can keep each other 
	as warm as possible.
 
643.	ANGLE OF STORM-NIGHT:
	John, still carrying Bob and following 
	footprints in the snow, moves into foreground.
 
644.	CLOSE SHOT ON TWINS--NIGHT:
	The twins are lying huddled together. The 
	drifting snow is fast covering them.
 
645.	LOG--NIGHT:
	Helene, still stumbling along but about to sink 
	down from utter exhaustion, comes to the log.
 
646.	ANGLE OF STORM--NIGHT:
	John, still carrying Bob on his back, follows 
	the footprints in the snow.
 
647.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE--LOG  NIGHT: 
	Helene falls prone near the log, struggles 
	uncertainly to her tired feet and with one last 
	despairing effort is about to plunge on, when 
	she suddenly looks down at the log and 
	discovers the twins huddled together there.
 
648.	CLOSE-UP ON TWINS--LOG--NIGHT:
	A flash of them as they lie there huddled 
	together.
 
649.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE--LOG--NIGHT: 
	A flash of Helene as she starts to go to the 
	twins.
 
650.	LOG--NIGHT:
	Helene goes to twins, kneels down beside them, 
	and starts to brush away the drifted snow.
 
651.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE--LOG--NIGHT: 
	Helene helps the twins to their feet, puts them 
	inside her fur coat, and starts to lie down 
	with them to shelter them and keep them warm.

652.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	Mary and her mother are in the very depths of 
	despair.  Mary glances anxiously toward door.
 
653.	LOG--NIGHT:
	John, still carrying Bob, comes into scene and 
	sees someone lying near the log.
 
654.	CLOSE SHOT ON LOG--NIGHT:
	A flash of the twins and Helene as they lie in 
	the snow near the log.
 
655.	LOG--NIGHT:
	John carries Bob to a spot on the ground from 
	which the snow is partly blown away, puts him 
	down, and starts toward Helene and the twins.
 
656.	MEDIUM SHOT ON LOG--NIGHT:
	John goes to log, kneels down, and starts to
	brush the snow away.  He draws Paul out from 
	beneath the shelter of Helene's fur coat and 
	sends him out of scene to Bob. Then he starts 
	to get Patsy.
 
657.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB--NIGHT:
	Bob holds out his hands to Paul who enters 
	from fallen log.  Bob clasps Paul tight in his
	arms, overjoyed to think that his little
	brother and sister are safe.
 
658.	MEDIUM SHOT ON LOG--NIGHT:
	John gets Patsy from out beneath the fur coat, 
	sends her to the waiting Rob, and then returns 
	to the other figure lying prone in the snow. 
	Although he realizes that this figure is that 
	of a woman yet he does not know that his mother 
	is so close at hand.
 
659.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE--NIGHT:
	John, still unsuspecting that the woman 
	beside him is Helene, brushes away the snow 
	from her face to discover who she is. Suddenly 
	he gazes at her intently and can scarcely 
	believe his eyes as he sees his mother beside 
	him.
 
660.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN--NIGHT:
 	A flash of John as he looks at his mother 
	spellbound.
 
661.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE--NIGHT:
	A flash of Helene as her eyes open wide in her 
	discovery that the boy beside her is none other 
	than her dearly beloved son.
 
662.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND HELENE--NIGHT: 
	A flash of them as they hug each other tight, 
	too overjoyed for words.
 
663.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB AND TWINS--NIGHT: 
	A flash of Bob as he looks off scene and sees 
	Helene there.  He has not the slightest idea 
	who she is.
 
664.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE--NIGHT: 
	John hugs his mother close to his breast and
	calls out to Bob: "This is my mother!" Helene, 
	exhausted, sinks back into the snow. John tries 
	to lift her to her feet but she is unable to 
	stand.  Helene says:
 
SUBTITLE 143:--"I can go no farther, John--I'm too 
		weak--leave me--take the children."
 
	(Scene 664 continued.)  As she falteringly says 
	this, she looks at him with appealing eyes in 
	which the light of eternal love is shining.  
	She has found him again, and knows that he 
	still loves her as of yore--this to her is 
	sufficient.
  
665.	CLOSE SHOT ON BOB AND TWINS--NIGHT:
	A flash of Bob and the twins as he clasps them 
	tight to his breast and looks off scene at John 
	and Helene.
 
666.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE--NIGHT: 
	John implores his mother not to give up. He 
	loves her too deeply to lose her now.
 
667.	CLOSE-UP ON HELENE  NIGHT:
	Helene's strength has given out.  She can go
	no further.  With her face hallowed by the 
	self-sacrifice she is making for Mrs. Heath, 
	she says:
 
SUBTITLE 144:--"Tell their mother--I send her three
		--for the one I took."
 
668.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE--NIGHT:
	John hugs her tight and kisses her fondly. He 
	begs her not to give up hope as he will come 
	back for her when he has Bob and the twins safe 
	in the farmhouse.  If only she can keep alive 
	until then, all will be well.
 
669.	LOG--NIGHT:
	Helene begs John to go and leave her, so that 
	he may save Bob and the twins.
 
670.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN--NIGHT:
	A flash of John as his face is distorted with 
	agony at the thought of having to leave Helene 
	there. 
 
671.	LOG--NIGHT:
	John goes to Bob and the twins, gathers the 
	twins up in his arms, helps Bob to his feet, 
	and starts out of scene.  Bob, though 
	painfully hurt, nevertheless hobbles along, 
	holding to John's hand.  Helene watches them as 
	they go, rejoicing that her beloved John is 
	able to rescue them even though she may perhaps 
	meet death ere John can return for her.  

	(FADE OUT)
 
672.	HEATH LIVING ROOM  (FADE IN):
	Mrs. Heath at fireplace has given up hope of 
	ever seeing her children again.   Mary is 
	almost distracted with grief as she goes to 
	comfort her mother, just as the door flies open 
	and John enters with Bob and the twins.
 
673.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	A flash of them as they turn and look toward 
	the door, overjoyed at the sight which greets 
	their eyes.
 
674.	HEATH LIVING ROOM:
	As John comes in with Bob and the twins, Mrs. 
	Heath and Mary go to him. Mrs. Heath takes the 
	twins, puts them into one of the blanketed 
	chairs, and starts to take off their wet 
	clothes.  With Mary's assistance, Bob hobbles 
	to the other chair.
 
675.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN:
	A flash of John as he stands near the door, 
	panting with his exertion.
  
676.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB, MARY, AND MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath is now kneeling in front of the 
	twins, almost overcome with joy that they are 
	still alive.  Mary pats her brother 
	affectionately, but Bob is still very much 
	wrought up with the experiences through which 
	he has passed.  He struggles to his feet, and,
	pointing toward John, says excitedly:
 
SUBTITLE 145:--"His mother is out there--in the
            storm!  His mother, I tell you!"

	(Scene 676 continued.)  As he says this, Bob 
	sinks back into the chair, exhausted.
 
677.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN:
	John starts to open the door to go to the 
	rescue of Helene.  Mary runs to him and takes 
	his arm.
 
678.	CLOSE-UP ON MRS. HEATH:
	Mrs. Heath realizes Helene's desperate plight 
	and starts toward John with outstretched arms.

679.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND MARY:
	Mary encourages John who opens the door just as 
	Mrs. Heath runs into scene.  John quickly 
	closes the door to hear what she has to say.  
	Mrs  Heath, looking appealingly at John,says:

SUBTITLE 146:--"John, bring her--here--to us!"
 
	(Scene 679 continued.)  John can scarcely 
	believe his ears.  Can Mrs. Heath really mean 
	what she says? Then his face lights up with joy 
	as he notes her sincerity.
 
680. 	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MRS. HEATH: 
	John throws his arms around her, hugs her tight 
	to his breast and kisses her fondly. Swept away 
	by his emotion and gratitude to her for her 
	kindness, he bends down and kisses her hand.
 
681.	MEDIUM SHOT ON JOHN, MARY, AND MRS. HEATH:
	John starts to go out into the storm.  Mary 
	puts her arms around his neck and kisses him 
	passionately.  Mrs. Heath wishes him Godspeed 
	and John, flinging open the door, once more 
	plunges out into the raging storm. Mary closes 
	the door behind him and, going to the window, 
	watches him vanish into the darkness as he 
	crosses the yard.  (FADE OUT) 

	(FADE IN ON)
 
SUBTITLE 147:--Dawn.
 
	(FADE OUT)
 
682.	HEATH BEDROOM  (FADE IN):
	John, almost exhausted from his exertions of 
	the night before, is lying quietly in bed; 
	while Mrs. Heath sits beside him, watching with 
	a mother's love.  The door opens and Mary 
	enters.
 
683.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY AND HELENE: 
	Mary's face is radiant with joy as she stands 
	at the door smiling.  Then, hand in hand with  
	Helene, she leads her into the scene.  Helene, 
	with wistful eyes, looks anxiously off scene to 
	where John is lying in the bed.
 
684.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND MRS. HEATH: 
	John's face is white and drawn but he has
	recovered somewhat from  his exhaustion. Mrs. 
	Heath turns her head and looks off scene toward 
	where Mary and Helene are still standing.
 
685.	HEATH BEDROOM:
	Mrs. Heath gets up from the bed, starts toward 
	Mary and Helene, and says:
 
SUBTITLE 148:--"He's better now."
 
686.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY, HELENE, AND MRS. HEATH:
	As Mrs. Heath speaks this title, Helene quietly 
	enters the room and starts toward bedside.
 
687.	HEATH BEDROOM:
	Helene goes to the bed, sits down, and leans 
	down to John, putting her face close to his.
 
688.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE:
	John looks up admiringly at his mother who 
	leans down and kisses him affectionately. Then 
	she gently passes her hand across his brow as 
	she gazes fondly into his eyes.  He reaches up, 
	puts his arm around her neck and draws her down 
	close to him, happy indeed that she has come to 
	him.
  
689.	MEDIUM SHOT ON MARY AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mary and Mrs. Heath stand watching John and 
	Helene for a moment, then Mary starts to side 
	of bed opposite to that on which Helene is 
	sitting.
 
690.	HEATH BEDROOM:
	Mary comes to bedside and stands there watching 
	John and his mother, while Mrs. Heath stands at 
	foot of the bed.
 
691.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND HELENE: 
	For a moment Helene sits on bed, happy in the 
	thought that she has won back her beloved boy.
 
692.	HEATH BEDROOM:
	Helene gets up from the bed and starts to Mrs. 
	Heath, who is standing near the foot of the 
	bed.  Mary sits on bed beside the adored John.  
	With arms outstretched in a plea for 
	forgiveness for all the sorrow she has caused 
	them in the past, Helene falls repentantly on 
	her knees before Mrs. Heath and puts her arms 
	around her.
 
693.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE AND MRS. HEATH: 
	Mrs. Heath helps Helene to her feet and gently 
	sits her down on the foot of the bed. Then she 
	holds her in her arms and tells her that all 
	the past is forgiven.
 
694.	HEATH BEDROOM:
	Mrs. Heath is still sympathizing with Helene 
	when Bob comes to the door and looks in.
 
695.	CLOSE-UP ON BOB:
	Bob smiles sweetly as he sees the scene before 
	him.  He has learned one of life's greatest 
	lessons--that one cannot live for oneself alone.
 
696.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN AND MARY:
	Mary puts her hand on John's and smiles at him 
	with adoration.  He pats her hand affectionately 
	as he gazes up into her brimming eyes.  Through 
	calm and storm their love has endured and will 
	go on forever.
 
	(FADE OUT)
 
	FADE IN ON 

SUBTITLE 149:--Time keeps pace with youth and love, 
		and the returning Spring comes smiling 
		through.
 
697.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE AND TWINS--GATE: 
	Spring has come again and with it the wedding 
	of John and Mary.  On this day, they are 
	expected to return home from their honeymoon.  
	Helene and the twins are standing at the 
	gateway in the picket fence which surrounds the 
	Heath farmhouse.  All are dressed in light 
	fluffy clothes, for not only is the day a warm 
	one but it is a gala one too. Helene is talking 
	gaily to the twins, who have learned to love 
	her dearly, as Bob comes down the path from the 
	house. Bob puts his arms around her 
	affectionately for he, too, has learned to love 
	her for her gentleness and kindness.  He talks 
	to her for a moment and then exits from scene 
	in the direction in which John and Mary will 
	come.
 
698.	MAIL BOX NEAR ROAD:
	Bob enters on the run, gazes up the road, and 
	calls back to Helene:  "Here they come!" Then 
	he starts up the road to meet them.
 
699.	MEDIUM SHOT ON HELENE AND TWINS--GATE: 
	Helene and the twins look up the road, watching 
	for Mary and John.  Mrs. Heath, having heard 
	Bob call, comes down the walk from the house 
	and joins Helene and the twins.  The twins wave 
	their hands and John and Mary draw nearer and 
	Mrs. Heath throws a kiss to them in welcome.
 
700.	COUNTRY ROAD:
	Shooting up the road past the Heath farmhouse.  
	Mrs. Heath, Helene, and the twins can be seen 
	at the gate. The buggy in which John and Mary 
	are riding, coming down the road, enters the 
	scene rapidly.  The group at the gate move to 
	road as the buggy drives up.
 
701.	CLOSE-UP ON JOHN AND MARY IN BUGGY: 
	John stops the buggy.  Mary affectionately 
	squeezes John's arm, then turns and sees Bob
	coming to the side of the buggy.
 
702.	CLOSE SHOT ON BUGGY:
	Bob comes to side of buggy. Mary gets out of 
	the buggy, and Bob gleefully picks her up in 
	his arms to carry her into the house in state.
 
703.	CLOSE SHOT ON TWINS:
	The twins start to throw rice at the 
	honeymooning pair.
  
704.	CLOSE SHOT ON BUGGY:
	John fastens the reins as Bob starts to carry 
	Mary out of scene.

705.	BUGGY IN ROAD:
	As Bob carries Mary toward Mrs. Heath and 
	Helene, John gets out of buggy.
 
706.	MEDIUM SHOT ON BOB AND MARY: 
	Bob carries Mary up the gravel walk toward the 
	house.  John runs into scene and genially slaps 
	Bob on the back, then he comes back to Mrs. 
	Heath and Helene who are now standing near the 
	gate.
 
707.	CLOSE SHOT ON JOHN, HELENE, AND MRS. HEATH:
	John comes to Helene and Mrs. Heath, places an 
	arm around each of them and kisses them both 
	with filial affection, while the twins look on.  
	Mrs. Heath says: "Well, let's go into the 
	house," and, as she says this, they all go up 
	the path together.  The tragic past is dead but 
	the future beckons to them, promising happy 
	years.  (FADE OUT.)
 
	(FADE IN ON.)
 
SUBTITLE 150:--The End. 

	(FADE OUT.)
 
 
 


Screenplay by Ethel Styles Middleton
1