The Spitfire (1914)

				"THE SPITFIRE."
				By Edward H. Peple. 
			Scenario by B. P. Schulberg. 
		(Produced by The Famous Players' Film Co.)
 
				CAST.
 		Bruce Morson. 
		Valda Girard. 
		Marcus Girard. 
		James Ormond.
		Tracey. 
		Beasley.
		Aunt Mary. 
		Polly.
 
			SYNOPSIS.
Bruce Morson, a young American, returning from travels
in Egypt is robbed of some valuable jewels in a London
hotel, and chases the thieves to the yacht, "Spitfire," at
Calais, which the crooks have boarded and taken command
of under forged orders from its owner, Marcus Girard, who
is in London. The yacht is just about to sail out of port,
but by a ruse, Morson manages to get aboard, and promptly
falls in love with Valda, Girard's pretty daughter, who is
also a "spitfire."  The crooks tell Valda her father is a
smuggler, show her the jewels they have stolen, and convince 
her they are guarding them for her father, and that
Morson is a customs officer, spying upon her in order to
trap Girard.  Valda indignantly turns upon the helpless
Morson, orders him into seaman's costume, and compels
him to work his passage to New York. On the homeward
voyage, Morson undergoes many ordeals, both humorous
and dramatic, and is even finally accused of the theft of
his own property, before the final denouement, which shows
the burning of the yacht and the heroic rescue of Valda by
Morson, who is at last able to right himself, before the
thieves, and win the woman he loves.
 
                        The Story.
 
LEADER.		BRUCE MORSON, AN AMERICAN ENGINEER,
		TRAVELS THROUGH EYGPT.
 
Scene  1.	EXTERIOR--DESERT ATMOSPHERE.
		Sandy road.  Morson and two Egyptian 
		servants riding along on horseback.  Morson
		dressed for desert travel, helmet, khaki suit,
		etc., studying guidebook, surveys scenery, etc.
 
Scene  2. 	EXTERIOR--DESERT.
		Tent in background.  Little Oriental child in
 		foreground, evidently wandered from tent.
 		Small band of marauders (6) rush into scene,
		snatch child off.  Sudden commotion at door of
		tent.  Men and women run from tent, and from 
		behind tent, old Sheik snatches rifle, mounts 
		horse, rides off hastily, few servants following. 

Scene  3.	EXTERIOR--STRETCH OF SANDY ROAD 
		(SIMILAR TO SCENE 1).
		Morson registers he has seen theft of child. 
		Tells servants, urges horse forward, looks again, 
		snatches rifle, aims carefully--shoots (quick 
		action in all this)--cut. 

Scene  4.	EXTERIOR--DESERT.
		Distant view of man with child (dummy) on 
		horseback in lead--man rolls from horse.
 
Scene  5.	EXTERIOR.
		Morson and followers riding swiftly to rescue.
 
Scene  6.	EXTERIOR--DESERT.
		Sheik and followers ride into scene, beating 
		down marauders.  Child rises unhurt.  Sheik 
		leaps from horse to child. Morson and servants 
		join Sheik in finally routing brigands.  Sheik 
		with son in arms, thanks Morson gratefully. 
		Cut.
 
LEADER. 	NEXT DAY THE SHIEK SENDS MORSON INVALUABLE 
		JEWELS AS A REWARD. 

Scene  7.	EXTERIOR--DESERT.
		Hastily-erected travelers' tent.  Morson sitting 
		in front of it.  He is making notes, eating food 
		servants hand him.  Messenger brings him 
		packet from Sheik, which proves to be valuable 
		jewels.

Scene  8.	CLOSE UP OF OPENING OF PACKET AND JEWELS.

Scene  9. 	INTERIOR--GIRARD'S WALL STREET OFFICE IN N. Y.
		Typical broker's office, handsomely furnished. 
		Girard, prosperous, gray-haired, big gruff man, 
		busy at desk. Clerks come and go. Activity in 
		office.  Enter Valda, his daughter, pushing past 
		clerks, who timorously indicate her father has 
		said no one must enter.  She approaches desk, 
		he turns with a scowl, until he sees it is his 
		daughter, smiles grimly in spite of himself, 
		then motions her off--too busy for her.  She 
		stamps foot--wants him to come with her--he 
		can't, it is out of the question--she picks up hat 
		from rack, she indicates clock, puts hat on his
 		head, tries to drag him off, he resists.

CUT-IN. 	"Your mother was the only woman who could 
		boss me!" 

		Back to scene. Valda registers little tempest of 
		rage at being crossed--pounds his desk with 
		her fist--he does the same, both angry, she 
		"chip off the old block"--at last she turns and 
		flounces, almost in tears--he still angry, then 
		chuckles slowly after door closes, shakes head, 
		rises, puts on coat and hat, follows her rapidly
		--he turns at door and gives awful look to 
		grinning clerks, which stiffens them into 
		soberness.

LEADER.		THAT EVENING.

Scene 10.	INTERIOR--TYPICAL NEW YORK CLUB ROOM.
		Girard sitting, smoking, reading--waiter 
		deferentially lights his cigar--two men walk in, 
		one of them Ormond, conspicuous for elegance 
		and suavity. Ormond is introduced to Girard 
		by the other--the three sit and talk--Girard
		orders drinks.  Girard seems impressed and
		interested by Ormond  during conversation. 
		Girard and Ormond exchange cards--Girard 
		examines Ormond's card.  Flash card.
 
INSERT. 	(Card): JAMES ORMOND 
		Pres. International Touring Company, 
		Offices:  London, Paris and Berlin. 

		Back to scene. Girard registers interest.
 		Ormond shows by sinister flickering of eyelids 
		his triumph in getting personal attention of 
		the rich man.  After a little talk, they rise 
		and go out together.

Scene  11.	INTERIOR--ORMOND'S HOTEL ROOM. 
		Ormond, Beasley, Trainor and Tracey on--by 
		contrast, Ormond and Beasley are gentlemanly 
		in every attitude, while Trainor and Tracey 
		are "rough-necks"--they are seated, grouped 
		closely together about little center table, 
		talking very earnestly--register caution when one 
		raises voice too loud, evidently conspiring--
		sinister---evidently band of crooks--Ormond 
		takes Girard's card, passes it to the others--
		speaks:

CUT-IN. 	"A wealthy capitalist--worth following!" 

		Back to scene.  Others interested--talk 
		animatedly--Tracey over-serious, takes himself 
		and his business and the world very seriously,
		chews cigar solemnly, is rough and positive in 
		movements, pounds fist on table once, others 
		silence him--Ormond directs conversation to 
		Beasley, they agree to something--Beasley 
		agrees, nods head in reply to Ormond's 
		instructions.  Cut.
 
Scene  12. 	EXTERIOR--ON PIER.
		Girard and Valda, accompanied by Ormond, 
		come into scene. Girard points to trim yacht 
		in the distance, pointing out its various points. 
		Ormond again impresses the old man with his 
		knowledge of yachts and admiration of this 
		particular one--into launch and off. 

Scene  13.	CLOSE UP OF LAUNCH.
		Valda, Girard and Ormond talking.  Girard 
		with mischievous sly look at his daughter, 
		says:

CUT-IN. 	"I have named the yacht after my daughter!" 

Scene  14.	FULL VIEW OF LAUNCH AND YACHT--
		With name of "SPITFIRE" plainly printed on 
		bow of yacht.
		Valda registers petulant indignation.  Girard
		turns to Ormond with "I told you so" 
		expression--laughs. 

Scene  15.	DECK OF YACHT NEAR LANDING STAIRWAY.
		Girard, Valda and Ormond coming over stairway 
		to deck. Capt. Larris greets party, speaks 
		to Girard, in reply to Girard's question as to 
		how things are going, tells Girard they need 
		new first mate. Register Ormond's opportunity, 
		as Girard seems perplexed, speaks: 

CUT-IN.		"If you need a first mate, I know just the man." 

		Girard shakes Ormond's hand.  Glad.  Speaks 
		to Larris.  Larris nods briefly.  Register that 
		Larris does not appreciate butting-in of Ormond.
 		They stroll out of scene. 

Scene  16.	EXTERIOR--A TENT.
		Desert exterior.  Morson issued from tent,
		he and servants finishing loading pack-horse, 
		and he bids good-bye to servants, gives them 
		coins which they receive gratefully.  He
 		mounts horse, servant leads the other horse 
		by bridle, other servants all salaam--he and 
		servant wave farewell salute, he with his hat,
  		servant with hand--he is leaving the desert, 
		his face set toward "home." 

Scene  17.	INTERlOR--OFFICE OF GIRARD.
 		Girard and Ormond chatting, office empty, 
		clock points to 5:30.  Enter Valda, very much
		upset--has little weekly paper in her hand--
		nods curtly to Ormond as she remembers to 
		greet him.  Turns to her father angrily.  
		Begins to speak, glancing rather nervously at 
		Ormond, who takes cue and strolls to window 
		standing with hands behind back--pretends
		not to hear, although listening.  Valda shows
		father clipping.  Flash clipping.
 
INSERT. 		"TOWN ITEMS." 
		It has just transpired that a certain New 
		York capitalist and yachtsman on his return 
		from Europe found himself in serious 
		trouble with the customs officers, who 
		had discovered in his luggage some valuable 
		jewels, which he said he had "forgotten" 
		to declare, and which probably were 
		intended to deck his beautiful daughter, 
		a popular debutante of the season.

		Girard reads, laughs, shrugs shoulders. Valda 
		takes it more seriously.  She stamps foot, 
		tears necklace from neck, throws it on desk
 		before him.  Girard gets furious, throws papers
 		on floor, pounds desk.  Valda up to door,
		angry, in tears.  Girard follows her.  Scene
		at door, during which Ormond slyly picks up 
		paper, reads, tears out article, slips it in 
		pocket, throws paper back under desk.  Girard 
		back to deck after Valda leaves, tries to appear 
		unconcerned. Cut.

Scene  18.	INTERIOR---ORMOND'S ROOM IN HOTEL.
 		Beasley and Ormond on, talking.  Both in 
		evening dress.  Ormond draws out clipping he 
		tore from paper, talks about it.  Beasley 
		interested--nods--Ormond speaks:
 
CUT-IN. 	"You are to be first mate on the 'Spitfire.' 
		We may need that yacht in our business." 

		Ormond shows Beasley theater tickets (don't 
		flash).  Beasley smiles broadly.  Both talk, 
		Beasley agreeing with Ormond.  Ormond and 
		Beasley go out of room.
 
Scene  19.	INTERIOR--RECEPTION PARLOR--SMALL BUT 
		BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED. 
		Girard, in smoking jacket and slippers, comes 
		in with Ormond, evidently just from outdoors. 
		Father sends maid for Valda, and calls 
		servant, who takes Ormond's stick, hat and
		gloves.  Father is genial in manner toward 
		Ormond, who talks pleasantly.  Enter Valda, 
		who greets Ormond politely, but not effusively.
 		He draws theater tickets from pocket and 
		invites her to theater. She pleads headache. 
		Father looks at her sternly.  She flashes back
		at him behind Ormond's back.  Ormond taken 
		aback and baffled, but smoothly conceals 
		feelings.  Returns tickets to pocket, sits, talks 
		entertainingly to Valda, who is bored, but too
		polite to show it.  Ormond politely draws 
		Girard into conversation.  Valda takes chance to 
		plead headache and withdraw, to the chagrin 
		of both Ormond and her father, though she
		does it pleasantly.  Cut.
 
Scene  20.	DECK OF THE YACHT.
		Preparing to leave--crew active. Beasley now 
		first mate in uniform of "Spitfire," much in
		evidence.  Register Larris' dislike for the 
		officious Beasley.

Scene  21.	INTERIOR--VALDA'S ROOM.
		Valda, father and maid packing; steamer 
		trunks with traveling clothes, frocks, etc. 
		Girard fussily superintending with outburst from 
		Valda  now and then.  Valet assisting
		and being regularly scolded.  Enter her Aunt
		Mary and Cousin Polly, who are greeted with 
		enthusiasm by Valda.  Father and Aunt Mary 
		register mutual lack of sympathy.  Girard,
		scowling, leaves.  Polly wild with excitement
		and curiosity about Valda's prospective trip 
		to Europe.  She exclaims in envy and Valda, 
		suddenly getting mischievous idea, turns to 
		her, asking if they want to go, too.  Polly, 
		after a moment of silent surprise, turns to 
		Aunt Mary, begs her. Aunt Mary finally consents.  
		Polly dances about in joy, hugs aunt 
		and Valda.  Valda laughs to herself as aunt 
		and Polly leave in excitement.

Scene  22.	INTERIOR---CLUBROOM (AS IN SCENE 10). 
		Ormond and friend who previously introduced 
		him, there with others.  Girard comes in, tells
		of his coming trip, bids all good-bye, asks 
		Ormond if he would like to go. Ormond hesitates, 
		narrows eyes, as though he thinks better 
		of it (as though plotting) then refuses 
		politely. All then crowd around Girard, Ormond
		leading in good-bye toasts.
 
Scene  23.	DECK OF YACHT.
		Everything in readiness.  Capt. Larris makes
		last tour of inspection.  Girard comes aboard
		with luggage carried by valet--very fussy and 
		very cross--stewards assist him. 

Scene  24.	ORMOND'S ROOM AT HOTEL.
		Trainor, Tracey and Ormond at door of room. 
		Ormond giving men final instructions. Gives 
		each his steamer ticket folded, which they 
		unfold and examine--nod--he directs them to 
		meet him later, pointing off--they nod--all
		out.

Scene  25.	DECK OF YACHT.
		Girard waiting for Valda. "Late as usual." He 
		says same to Capt. Larris, who agrees with 
		him.  "Women are all alike."  Girard paces 
		deck impatiently, looks at watch, stamps and 
		swears.  Suddenly he turns and sees Valda 
		coming up landing stairway followed by Ormond.  
		Girard registers relief.  She runs to him 
		and when he reprimands her for her tardiness, 
		smiles sweetly at him and stepping aside,
		says:

CUT-IN.		"I forgot to tell you, I've invited Aunt Mary 
		and Cousin Polly to go to Europe with us!" 

		She steps aside and discloses Aunt Mary puffing 
		up the stairway followed by the gleeful 
		and excited Polly.  Girard takes one look.  An 
		expression of horror comes over his face and 
		he nearly collapses. Capt. Larris supports him
		and sees the humor of it, aside.  Aunt Mary
		looks sternly at the hapless Girard.  During 
		this business Ormond walks out.  Cut. 

Scene  26.	ANOTHER SECTION OF BOW AROUND BOAT.
		Out of sight of others, Beasley on, giving 
		instructions to sailors.  Ormond comes on, talks 
		to Beasley hurriedly and earnestly.  Beasley
		registers he understands.  Ormond returns to

Scene  27.	SAME AS SCENE 25 (DECK OF YACHT). 
		Bids all good-bye and hastily off.
 
Scene  28.	BOW OF DECK.
		Final casting off, and raising of anchor. 

Scene  29.	INTERIOR--CORNER OF SMOKING ROOM ON YACHT.
		Near buffet.  Girard with look of despair, 
		takes huge drink of whisky, downs it at one 
		gulp.

Scene  30.	EXTERIOR--PIER.
		Ormond waiting, looking toward yacht--sees 
		it steam off, looks a moment, hastily turns, 
		runs off.

Scene  31.	EXTERIOR--STREET NEAR PIER. 
		Ormond hails taxi--jumps in after giving 
		direction to chauffeur.  Off.

Scene  32.	EXTERIOR--GANGPLANK OF OCEAN LINER.
		Ormond runs hastily up, the grinning faces of
 		Trainor and Tracey peering at him over the
		rail.
 
LEADER.		MORSON ARRIVES IN LONDON. 

Scene  33.	EXTERIOR--LONDON HOTEL.
		Bruce Morson arrives at entrance with luggage
		--looks around with pleased expression. 
		Glad to be back in civilization. Uniformed 
		attendant comes forward for luggage.  He goes 
		in.

Scene  34.	EXTERIOR--STRETCH OF OCEAN. 
		The yacht and ocean liner, liner in lead, both 
		moving in same direction. 

		End of reel one.
  
			"THE SPITFIRE." 

				Reel Two.
 
Scene  35.	EXTERIOR. CAFE.
		Ormond and Tracey at side table, and few 
		others in groups at tables.  Morson and friend 
		come in, sit at table, order drinks. Morson
		peels bill from large roll, pays for drinks. 
		Ormond gets glimpse of bills. Tracey, seeing, 
		tugs at Ormond's sleeve, with bulging eyes. 
		Ormond, always the controlled master crook, 
		calms him sternly, but moves his chair back 
		a little to hear Morson talk.   Ormond's back 
		is toward Morson, in response to friend's 
		questions Morson tells of his experience with the
		Sheik in Egypt.  As he talks fade out into
  
Scene  36.	SAME AS SCENE 3. 
		Quick flash.

Scene  37.	SAME AS SCENE 4. 
		Quick flash.

Scene  38.	SAME AS SCENE 6. 
		Quick flash.

Scene  39.	SAME AS SCENES 7 AND 8. 
		Fade out into 

Scene  40.	SAME AS SCENE 36.
 		At finish of the narrative, Morson half pulls 
		out jewel case from pocket with: 

CUT-IN. 	"And so he gave me these jewels." 

		Morson, with half look around, suddenly 
		remembers he is in a public place and puts back 
		jewels.  Ormond indicates intense interest, but 
		has to quiet Tracey, who is now nearly crazy 
		with covetous greed.  Morson and friend rise
		and go out.  Ormond and Tracey rise, Tracey 
		rising so quickly that he knocks over
		chair, nearly ready to run after Morson.  
		Ormond pulls Tracey back sternly. They go out, 
		affecting casual indifference.

Scene  41.	SAME AS SCENE 33, EXTERIOR. MORSON'S HOTEL.
		Morson arrives and goes in.  Ormond and
		Tracey follow cautiously, as though they have 
		been shadowing at a distance.
 
LEADER. 	"714, PLEASE." 

Scene  42.	INTERIOR, HOTEL LOBBY.
		Morson comes into scene, goes to desk and 
		gets key.  Tracey walks casually past desk in 
		time to catch number, turns and walks out,
		as Morson walks toward elevator.  Cut. 

Scene  43.	EXTERIOR, HOTEL (SAME AS SCENE 41). 
		Tracey out, rejoins Ormond, tells number; 
		both off; Tracey excited. 

Scene  44.	EXTERIOR, HARBOR.
		Spitfire steaming into harbor, city in distance. 

Scene  45.	EXTERIOR, UPPER DECK OF SPITFIRE. 
		Valda, Aunt Mary and Polly looking over rail
		toward city.  Valda explaining to the excited
		party, marine glasses in use, etc. 

Scene  46.	INTERIOR, SMOKING ROOM.
		Beasley cautiously writing, occasionally 
		looking over shoulder.  Flash telegram:

INSERT.
		James Ormond, 
			Hotel Cecil, 
				London.

		Arrived at Calais, dropped Girard and 
		valet at Liverpool; old man will be tied 
		up with business deal in London for ten 
		days and is stopping at Hotel Ritz. 
		Await further instructions from you.

					BEASLEY. 

		Finishes writing, folds paper, puts in pocket. 
		Cut.
 
Scene  47.	INTERIOR, ENGLISH HOTEL ROOM 
		(HANDSOMELY FURNISHED).
 		Girard fuming, as usual, valet unpacking and 
		panic-stricken.  Cut.

Scene  48.	EXTERIOR, PIER--SUPPOSEDLY AT CALAIS.
		Launch lands, Aunt Mary, Polly and Valda 
		exit from launch and scene, with individual
		business.  Aunt Mary nervous.

Scene  49.	INTERIOR. ORMOND'S ROOM IN LONDON 
		HOTEL--RATHER WELL-FITTED ROOM. 
		Discovered Ormond, smoking and planning, 
		narrowed eyes, uniformed boy brings telegram
		on tray.  Ormond takes message, tips boy, 
		reads, nods, dismisses boy, then studies 
		telegram.  Flash (London receiving blank).
 
INSERT.		WIRE WRITTEN BY BEASLEY IN SCENE 46. 
		Ormond registers approval, knock on door. 
		Trainor and Tracey arrive.  Ormond instinctively 
		conceals wire until he sees who they are. 
		Three talk and plan. Trainor is crook of lowest 
		type.  Tracey "rough-neck" sport, still
		chewing cigar.  Tracey and Trainor lounge 
		about in characteristic attitudes.  When Ormond 
		shows wire they become keen and alert 
		and businesslike. All heads together. Ormond 
		outlines action:

CUT-IN.		"When the job is done, make for Calais and 
		meet me on the 'Spitfire.'"

 		Tracey and Trainor excited and eager.  All 
		leave.

Scene  50.	EXTERIOR, STREET--TINT NIGHT. 
		Ormond, Tracey and Trainor come on.  Ormond 
		gives last direction and leaves, Ormond 
		going in opposite direction from others.

Scene  51.	INTERIOR, GIRARD'S ROOM HOTEL--
		LIGHTS--NIGHT (SAME AS SCENE 47).
 		Girard, changing shoes, excited. Valet becomes 
		nervous.  As valet hands Girard shoe he drops
		it on his stockinged foot.   Girard in rage and
		pain, picks up shoe and hurls it at valet, 
		evidently striking him in the face; valet puts 
		hand to face.  Girard commands him to bring
		the shoe.  Valet brings shoe with one hand,
		guarding his face with the other.  Girard 
		snatches shoe, puts it on, slaps on hat and goes
		out of room with a final impression.  Valet
		shakes fist toward closed door, really dares to 
		be a man in Girard's absence.

Scene  52.	EXTERIOR, HOTEL (IMPOSING)--ENTRANCE 
		AS ENGLISH AS POSSIBLE. 
		Girard comes out. Ormond, who has been 
		cautiously watching in background, hat pulled 
		over eyes, now comes forward and goes, into
		hotel.

Scene  53.  	INTERIOR, LOBBY IN MORSON'S HOTEL 
		(SAME AS SCENE 42).
		Tracey and Trainor in--up to desk--speaks 
		to clerk:

CUT-IN.		"We are friends of Mr. Morson's and would 
		like the room next to his." 

		Clerk looks at his list of vacant rooms, nods, 
		calls front, gives key, they register, and off. 

Scene  54.	INTERIOR, CORRIDOR IN HOTEL--TWO 
		DOORS SHOWING IN ROW--714 AND 716.
 		Bellboy, Trainor and Tracey come to room
 		716--bellboy inserts key in lock.  Cut. 

Scene  55.	INTERIOR, HOTEL ROOM OF GIRARD 
		(SAME AS SCENE 51).
 		Ormond enters and is greeted with pleased 
		surprise by valet.  Ormond asks valet about black 
		eye.  Valet explains, tells his troubles.  Ormond 
		sympathizing. Ormond gives valet cigar, 
		sits, motions valet to sit;  valet shows he is 
		pleased and flattered by Ormond's condescension.  
		Sits awkwardly.  Ormond begins to talk 
		earnestly.  Cut.

Scene  56.	INTERIOR, MORSON'S ROOM IN HOTEL. 
		Morson prepares to retire, opens window 
		wider, takes jewels out of belt case, putting them 
		under pillow (they are in soft chamois bag). 
		Morson starts undressing, takes off collar. 
		Cut.
 
Scene  57.	INTERIOR, GIRARD'S ROOM IN HOTEL. 
		Continuation of conversation between Ormond 
		and valet. Valet now on Ormond's side, listening 
		eagerly.  Ormond gives valet bills, which 
		valet takes gloatingly.  Ormond rises: 

CUT-IN.		"Remember, if any telegrams arrive from 
		Calais for Mr. Girard, you are to read and 
		answer them as I have instructed." 

		Valet nods with many assurances that he will
		do as told.  Ormond smiles, pats bim on back. 
		A monogramed cigar case of Girard's is on 
		dresser--as he turns, Ormond sees it--thinks--
		he decides to ask for it--valet at first 
		hesitates, then gives it to him--he goes out, 
		smiling in sinister fashion--valet gloats over
		money.

Scene  58.	INTERIOR--MORSON'S ROOM (AS IN SCENE 56).
		Morson, in pajamas, puts hand up to turn out
		light.  Cut to
 
Scene  59.	INTERIOR--CORRIDOR OUTSIDE ROOMS 
		714 AND 716 (AS IN SCENE 54)
		No light in 716, door slightly ajar, hall dimly 
		lighted.  Tracey's face in door of 716, peering 
		cautiously out toward 714.  The light that 
		shows over transom of 714 suddenly goes out. 
		Look of satisfaction on Tracey's face as he 
		disappears into darkened room 716 again. 

Scene  60.	EXTERIOR--R. R. STATION--NIGHT. 
		Ormond pacing platform impatiently waiting 
		for Dover train (suggestion, sign in vicinity 
		of platform, "Train for Dover--time, etc."). 

Scene  61.	EXTERIOR--SHOWING WINDOW--MOONLIGHT
		--SHOWING WINDOW LEDGES ADJOINING, 
		SO THAT ONE WINDOW CAN BE REACHED 
		FROM THE OTHER--DEEP LEDGES, ETC.
		The figure of Trainor, with dark lantern, 
		mask, revolver, etc., from his window L. to 
		R. window, makes journey with difficulty, 
		registering peril, caution and fear; he 
		reaches the other window, begins to enter, 
		Tracey follows, starting from L. window in same 
		manner.  Cut.

Scene  62.	INTERIOR--MORSON'S ROOM (AS IN 
		SCENE 56) ROOM ALMOST IN TOTAL 
		DARKNESS--ONLY WEAK SHAFT OF
		LIGHT IN TRANSOM, COMING FROM
		LIGHT IN CORRIDOR.
		Trainor comes through window with lantern, 
		flashes light about room, throws it on Morson's 
		sleeping face, quickly off again, his shadowy 
		form approaches bed, seen in light which he 
		has placed on table.  He takes bottle from 
		pocket, saturates handkerchief, puts over 
		Morson's face--at this point Tracey comes through 
		window--light now increased by two lanterns. 
		Morson stirs.  Tracey quickly searching for 
		jewels, feels under pillow, flashing light on it, 
		pulls out jewel bag--registers triumph--Morson 
		rouses in spite of chloroform, jumps up 
		while he is struggling with Trainor, Tracey 
		runs with jewels to window and clambers out. 
		Trainor hits Morson over head with revolver. 
		Morson staggers back against the bed an instant,
 		but recovers, dashes blood from eyes and 
		rushes after Trainor as he reaches window, 
		pulling him back into room by leg--desperate 
		struggle with intermittent darkness and
		gleams from the lantern. Cut.

Scene  63.	EXTERIOR--NIGHT--IN FRONT OF MORSON'S HOTEL.
		Tracey out, fearfully and quickly hurries out 
		of scene.

Scene  64.	INTERIOR--MORSON'S ROOM.
		Morson tying Trainor in chair. Morson turns 
		up light and reveals Trainor trussed in chair 
		and looking as though he had had far the
		worst of the combat.  Morson eyes Trainor
		contemptuously and then wipes away blood 
		from his own forehead, goes to bed, searches 
		for jewels, goes to Trainor, searches him, asks 
		where they are.  Trainor doggedly refuses
		to tell.  Morson sees the other lantern, points
		to it, and to window, asks him where his partner 
		is--again Trainor sullenly shakes his head 
		won't talk.  Trainor registers he is uncomfortable, 
		wants to be unbound.   Morson refuses.  
		Trainor must stay as he is tell he decides 
		to tell.  Trainor writhes in discomfort, 
		but Morson sits calmly on bed, lights cigarette 
		nonchalantly and waits.

LEADER. 	DAWN.

Scene  65.	EXTERIOR--PIER AT CALAIS (SAME AS 
		SCENE 48)--"SPITFIRE" LITTLE OFF IN 
		HARBOR.
		Ormond arrives at pier, registers recognition 
		of the yacht, and success--gets into launch at 
		pier, tells man in charge to make for yacht in 
		distance.
 
LEADER. 	TRAINOR TALKS.

Scene  66.	INTERIOR--MORSON'S ROOM.
		Continuation of scene 64.  Morson now clad
		in shirt and trousers, sits on edge of bed, still
		smoking calmly.  Trainor, head drooped, 
		exhausted from the all-night confinement in his 
		bonds to chair, all in. Morson asks him if he's 
		ready to talk.  Trainor hesitates, then nods 
		emphatically--he is.  He talks rapidly.  Morson 
		now interested and alert, leans forward, 
		listens, rings bell, into hat and coat, opens 
		door, bellboy in-doorway.  Morson  quickly 
		speaks to him, pointing to trussed figure of 
		Trainor in chair. Bellboy is left standing in 
		open-mouthed astonishment as Morson rushes 
		past him and out.

			End of reel two.
 
 
  
			"THE SPITFIRE."

			Reel Three.
 
Scene  67.	EXTERIOR--DECK  OF  YACHT--DAWN TINT.
 		Beasley and Larris on deck--register attempt 
		at conversation by Beasley--discouraged by 
		Larris, who is gruff.  Larris walks away, reads
 		telegram with worried expression. Flash 
		(telegram from Girard to Larris): 

INSERT		Capt. Larris, 
			Aboard Spitfire, 
				Off Calais.
		Mr. James Ormond to take full charge
		--reach New York by twentieth.  Fly 
		private signals and cruise off Sandy 
		Hook till further orders.  Drive her 
		as hard as hell will let you.
				MARCUS GIRARD. 

		Beasley looks over rail, sees Ormond approaching 
		in launch, speaks to Larris after indicating 
		interest and delight.  Indicates to Larris
   		that Ormond is intending to board yacht. 
		Larris surprised.

Scene  68.	EXTERIOR--LAUNCH ON WATER APPROACHING YACHT.
		Ormond signals Beasley.  Launch reaches
		yacht, Ormond climbs up stairway. 

Scene  69.	INTERIOR--VALDA'S CABIN.
		Valda sleepy, in kimona, sitting at dressing-
		table combing hair. Polly runs in in negligee, 
		wide awake, chattering.  Valda answers her. 
		Polly admires Valda's hair, takes comb, starts 
		to comb.  Valda smiles, suddenly Polly comes 
		to a snarl, pulls hair accidentally.  Valda 
		jumps up in rage, takes comb away, makes 
		face of pain.  Polly overcome by Valda's scolding 
		and remorse at hurting her cries babishly. 
		Valda immediately becomes good natured and 
		comforts Polly. 

Scene  70.	DECK OF YACHT.
		Ormond on board, greeted by Beasley and Larris.   
		Larris polite, but not deferential, rather 
		puzzled by Ormond's presence.  Ormond produces 
		telegram.  Larris reads.  Flash telegram:

INSERT.		James Ormond,
			Hotel DuBois, 
				Calais, France.
		"Spitfire" in port, just off mole--clears 
		this afternoon.  Tracey will meet you in
 		time.  Go on board and take full charge
 		of sailing directions and anchorage.
                  		MARCUS GIRARD. 

		Larris looks angry and puzzled.  Returns 
		telegram to Ormond, looks as though he places
 		little credence in its authenticity.  Larris paces
 		deck, hands in pockets or behind back, lost in
		thought, undecided, wondering. Ormond waits, 
		anxious, but affecting calm, and retaining self-
		possession.  Larris gets idea.  Sends steward
		down to call Valda. Cut. 

Scene  71.	INTERIOR VALDA'S ROOM.
		She and Polly chatting, as in scene 69--
		steward knocks, is told to come in--stands in 
		doorway and gives message to Valda--captain
		wants her on deck.  Valda rises, wondering. 
		Polly very much excited.  Valda calms her 
		with little shake. Valda hastily gets into long 
		steamer coat, throws cape to Polly. Girls out.
 
Scene  72.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT.
		Larris and Ormond still discussing wire.  
		Ormond calm and imperturbable. Larris angry
 		and disturbed, arguing.  Beasley watching
		with a smile. Valda comes on quickly, 
		followed by Polly. Stops short when she sees
		and recognizes Ormond.  Girls embarrassed, 
		quickly pull long coats around them to hide
		negligee. Aunt Mary enters and witnesses
		scene. Larris explains situation to Valda.
 		She looks puzzled and Ormond politely hands 
		her the telegram. She glances at it, looks 
		puzzled again.  Ormond steps forward--speaks: 

CUT-IN.		"I am acting as your father's agent on a 
		private business matter." 

		Valda accepts the explanation as sufficient--
		pouts a little--turns to captain, questions him. 
		Reluctantly the captain pulls out his own wire, 
		shown in previous scene (67).  Aunt Mary 
		shocked at father's profane wire.  Valda 
		laughs, recognizes father's profanity.  She is 
		then completely convinced.  Valda introduces 
		aunt and Polly.  They are rather stiff. Valda 
		and the captain are at one side talking, Valda 
		telling  Larris  she  knows  Ormond  socially,
		vouching for him.  Polly watches them open-
		eyed, the scene is altogether too exciting and 
		puzzling for her.  Beasley and Ormond are off 
		to one side, exchange quick word or two and 
		meaning glances.  Captain nods to Valda, 
		walks away, slowly and thoughtfully. Valda 
		and Polly excuse themselves, go down to dress.
 
Scene  73.	FLASH OF BRIDGE.
		The captain stands at bridge undecided, makes 
		up his mind, stands a moment undecided then 
		makes resolve.  Walks away quickly. 

Scene  74.	INTERIOR--WIRELESS ROOM IN THE YACHT.
		Operator at table, apparatus, etc. Larris 
		comes in, gives instructions, operator nods, 
		busies himself in sending messages. 

Scene  75.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT.
		Tracey climbs on yacht by landing stairway. 
		Ormond greets him.  Introduces him to 
		captain.   Tracey's jovial, over-friendly manner 
		disgusts the dignified Captain Larris, who 
		repels his advances coldly, looks meaningly at 
		the two and turns his back--walks off.
  
Scene  76. 	INTERIOR--GIRARD'S ROOM IN HOTEL SAVOY.
		Boy brings in captain's wire to Girard, valet 
		signs, pays, smiles, indicates this is one he 
		is to handle.   When boy goes he opens and
 		reads.  Flash wire.
 
INSERT.		TRANSCRIPT OF WIRELESS. 
		Marcus Girard, 
 			Hotel Ritz, 
				London.
 		Are James Ormond's orders from you to 
		take full charge of "Spitfire" and sail at 
		once to New York authentic?
					LARRIS. 

		Valet reads, grins, then starts to write with 
		glee, followed by fear and trembling, as he 
		thinks what might happen if caught.  Cut. 

Scene  77.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT.
		Larris, Beasley, Ormond, Tracey, Valda, Polly 
		and aunt, in two or three groups about deck. 
		Ormond and Tracey stroll away from scene into 

Scene  78.	INTERIOR--SMOKING ROOM.
		Ormond glances round, makes sure of privacy,
		quickly questions Tracey--Tracey nods with 
		importance, hand goes to pocket, draws out 
		chamois bag of Morson's jewels--at this moment 
		door opens--both men start--it is Beasley, 
		who smiles at their nervousness--Tracey, 
		when door is closed, again takes jewels from 
		pocket--Beasley's eyes light up, involuntarily 
		puts out hand.  Ormond calmly waves him off 
		takes the jewels from Tracey himself, who is
 		reluctant to part with them.  Ormond asks
 		for Trainor, Tracey makes gesture, "all in,"
 		describes flight and capture.  Ormond 
		thoughtful, registers worry--Ormond draws out 
		Girard's cigarette case from pocket, puts jewels 
		in it--men admire case.

Scene  79.	CLOSE UP OF CASE, FINGER POINTING MONOGRAM.

Scene  80.	WIRELESS ROOM, AS IN SCENE 74. 
		Captain Larris standing by operator--then 
		paces floor, waiting answer to his message--
		light flickers, operator gets message, writes it 
		out, smiles as he gets it--hands it to Larris, 
		who reads. Flash message:
 
INSERT.		Capt. Larris, 
			Spitfire,
 				Off Calais.
 		Mind your own business, or you'll have 
		no business to mind! 
				MARCUS GIRARD.
 
 		Larris finishes reading--crumples wire--
		exclamation of profane disgust, but convinced
 		of its authenticity--operator chuckles.  Larris
 		off.

Scene  81.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT.
		Captain Larris appears and tells Valda of wire 
		from father--pulls out message and shows it 
		to Valda, who laughs heartily.  Aunt Mary
 		registers cold disapproval of it all.  Larris
 		very much annoyed, as Ormond registers calm 
		triumph--others walk away, leaving Larris 
		scratching chin thoughtfully.

CUT-IN.		"I wish I could wake up and find I was drunk." 

		Shoves hands in pockets, hunches shoulders, 
		strides moodily down deck.

Scene  82.	EXTERIOR--ANOTHER PORTION OF DECK 
		Larris and Beasley on, giving hurried directions 
		to sailors to cast off.  Great activity. 

Scene  83.	EXTERIOR--PIER AT CALAIS.
		Morson quickly on, breathlessly, sees yacht in
		distance--questions man in uniform, man nods 
		--Morson registers delight--it is the "Spitfire," 
		the yacht of which Trainor has told him--he 
		wipes his forehead, pushes hat back--shows 
		relief.

Scene  84.	EXTERIOR--CLOSE UP QUICK PLASH OF
		PULLING UP "SPITFIRE'S" ANCHOR. 
		Ormond, Beasley and Tracey register nervous 
		relief and gladness.
 
Scene  85.	EXTERIOR--PIER AT CALAIS (SAME AS SCENE 84).
		Morson, with dismay, sees "Spitfire" steam 
		slowly off--a moment of indecision and he 
		rushes to the piermaster and points to yacht, 
		imperative that he catch it--men hastily hoist 
		signal flags on pole at end of pier. 

Scene  86.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT, SHOWING 
		PORTION OF BRIDGE.
		Captain Larris on bridge, with glasses, registers 
		he sees signals, runs down ladder--tells 
		Ormond, points to flags on pole--Ormond
 		shakes head--pay no attention--Larris registers 
		they must stop.  Tracey shows comic despair.  
		Ormond indicates his instructions from 
		Girard, must go.  Larris glares at him angrily. 

Scene  87.	EXTERIOR--PIER.
		Morson desperate, yacht further off in the 
		harbor.  Morson suddenly conceives idea, makes
 		negotiations with tugmaster.  Points to yacht. 
		Talks to tugmaster, rehearses plan, tugmaster 
		laughs; is tempted by roll of bills Morson 
		shows, nods, agrees--hastily orders tug out. 
		Morson aboard.  Off.

Scene  88.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT.
		All on--girls excited and gleeful.  Aunt Mary 
		struggling with voluminous yells, blown by
 		the wind.  Ormond doing the gallant--talking 
		to girls.  Valda suddenly sees the tug, points,
 		Polly stares excitedly.  Tug can be seen not
 		far off, men can be seen struggling on the 
		deck of tug-boat near rail--all run to rail of 
		yacht, look toward tug, registering excited 
		interest.

Scene  89.	CLOSE UP OF TUG.
		Tug-boat crew lift the struggling Morson, and 
		throw him overboard.
 
Scene  90.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT.
		All see Morson thrown overboard.  Larris 
		orders ship to stop and boat to be lowered.  
		Ormond steps forward and stops him--tells 
		Larris to go straight ahead--gasp of horror from 
		all.   Larris remonstrates, the man is drowning.  
		Ormond reminds him forcibly that he is 
		commanding the yacht.  Morson can be seen 
		struggling in water, evidently drowning--Valda 
		looks at Ormond in horrified displeasure, 
		surprised at lack of humanity.  She takes 
		command herself, turns to Captain Larris and
 		tells him to stop the boat.  Larris obeys her
 		command with alacrity. Ormond, Tracey and 
		Beasley register chagrin.  Captain gives 
		directions to pilot, boat is lowered--swings off to
		rescue Morson. Beasley and four sailors get
		into the boat. Valda leaves Ormond with a
		frown and goes to bridge, looking on through 
		glass.   Aunt Mary covers her eyes in fear. 
		Excitement from Polly.

Scene  91.	CLOSE UP OF MORSON IN WATER. 
		Life-boat reaches him, men haul him in.
 
Scene  92.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT.
		All press against rail except Ormond and
		Tracey, who register disgust. 

Scene  93.	CLOSE UP OF DECK.
		Lifeboat being hoisted up to rail--crew and 
		Beasley clamber over rail, bringing with them 
		the wet and shivering Morson--Valda comes 
		forward with exclamation of pity.  Morson 
		throws hair back out of eyes, looks admiringly 
		at Valda, then bows gratefully and gallantly 
		over her hand. Both register instant admiration 
		and the romance to come.  Polly clasps 
		hands romantically, and gazes at Morson 
		adoringly.  Tracey, horror-stricken when he 
		recognizes Morson, excitedly pulls at Ormond's coat, 
		and tells him Morson is the man they robbed:
 
CUT-IN.		"Trainor has squealed!" 

		Tracey quickly and excitedly telling Ormond, 
		who silences Tracey, and is tense in thought, 
		planning quickly.  Valda points to Morson's 
		clothing, speaks to Beasley, who is watching 
		Tracey and Ormond in troubled  anxiety. 
		Beasley rouses with start, takes Morson with 
		him.  Morson turns and bows deeply to Valda, 
		who stands looking after him admiringly. 
		Polly comes up and tries to get a look at 
		retiring Morson, dodging from one side of Valda 
		to the other.  Valda turns and catches her. 
		Gives her blank look.  Cut.

Scene  94.	INTERIOR--GIRARD'S ROOM AT HOTEL. 
		Valet, repentant, horrified, abject figure of
 		woe, hastily packing to make his getaway before 
		Girard arrives.  Worried and frightened, 
		he grasps valise, shoves hat on head, runs out. 

Scene  95.	INTERIOR--SMOKING ROOM OF YACHT. 
		Ormond, Beasley and Tracey conspiring best 
		way out. Ormond thoughtful, suddenly draws 
		out clipping of scene 17--flash clipping--
		Ormond points to it, says he has way out. Tracey
		relieved and interested.  Heads close together. 
		Ormond draws out cigar case of jewels, taps
 		it, explains his plan--Ormond goes out,  
		followed by others.

Scene  96.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON.
 		Valda dreamily thinking of Morson--knock, she 
		says "Come"--Ormond enters, approaches a 
		little uncertain of his welcome.  Valda turns 
		and greets him coldly. Picks up magazine, 
		ignores him.  Ormond begins to talk eagerly. 
		She finally listens, impressed by his earnestness.  
		While Valda is listening, Tracey enters. 
		Valda motions Ormond to keep quiet, indicating 
		Tracey.  Ormond says it is all right--goes
		on:

CUT-IN.		"Your rescued gentleman is a customs officer. 
		He boarded the yacht by a trick to trap your 
		father, who has placed some undeclared jewels 
		in our trust." 

		Tracey nods corroboratively, and stares at 
		Ormond in admiration. Valda springs in 
		astonishment and anger.  Ormond slowly draws 
		clipping of scene 95 from pocket, hands it to 
		Valda gravely.  Valda reads, bites lips, sits, 
		taps foot--registers dismay and apprehension. 
		She asks to see jewels.  Ormond, prepared,
 		readily draws out cigar-case, handing it to 
		her.  She recognizes monogram of father, 
		starts, is becoming convinced, empties jewels, 
		examines. Cut.

Scene  97.	EXTERIOR--BEASLEY'S CABIN.
		Morson comes out.  Morson is in first 
		mate's dress uniform, looking very spick and 
		span and handsome--lights cigarette,
 		meditates, saunters away, musing.

Scene  98.	INTERIOR--CONTINUATION OF SCENE 96. 
		Valda is putting jewels back into bag and case. 
		Morson walks past window outside.  They see
 		him.  Valda half rises, looking toward him. 
		Ormond sees him, indicates--

CUT-IN.		"He plays on women's sympathies with a story 
		of having come from Egypt with a fortune in 
		jewels, and being robbed in a London hotel by 
		masked burglars!"

 		Valda registers indignation at Morson.  She
 		will be on her guard.  She calmly puts jewel 
		case in her hand-bag, telling Ormond she will 
		take care of them. Ormond bites his lips, with 
		frown, Tracey makes a grab, but is restrained 
		by Ormond, who makes the best of the situation.   
		Valda rises and goes out, followed by
 		Tracey and Ormond who exchange meaning 
		looks, Tracey shaking head in worry. 

Scene  99.	EXTERIOR--PORTION OF DECK. 
		Valda walks on thoughtfully, sits in steamer
 		chair--meditates, Morson in distance sights
 		her, comes eagerly toward her.  She looks up
		as he approaches, cool, but can't resist 
		interest in him.  At his stopping by her side, she
 		casually shifts handbag to opposite side from
 		him--this business all through scene.  He
 		takes off cap and stands with bared head, 
		thanking her for her aid in his "accident." 
		She coolly deprecates his gratitude. He is a
 		little dashed, but persistent.   He asks if he
 		may sit. She nods. He comes around to her 
		other side and takes steamer chair.  She 
		shifts bag to the opposite side of chair, a
 		little fearfully, and clutches it nervously.  He
 		sits and talks.  The rug comes loose from
 		her feet.  He stoops gallantly and fixes it 
		tenderly.   She draws the bag up out of his 
		reach--registers little panic.  He talks on, 
		not noticing her nervousness.  Cut. 

Scene 100.	EXTERIOR--FLASH ANOTHER SECTION OF DECK.
		Tracey and Ormond gazing toward Morson and 
		Valda.  Tracey almost wild with anxiety and
		suspense.  Ormond, by contrast quiet, gazes
		quietly, with narrowed eyes.  Men smoking.
 
Scene 101.	EXTERIOR--CONTINUATION OF SCENE 99.
		Morson talking to Valda. Valda looks at him 
		a little  suspiciously.  The bag accidentally 
		catches on steamer chair--falls.  Morson 
		gallantly leans over to pick it up.  Valda quickly 
		snatches it up and stares defiantly at him,
		to his complete amazement.  Valda, quickly 
		changes expression to fixed smile.  Tells him
 		to go on with story.  Aunt Mary and Polly 
		listen interestedly as they come into scene. 
		He tells of--fade out into 

Scene 102.	SAME AS SCENE 16. 
		Quick flash--fade out into--
 
Scene 103.	SAME AS SCENE 6.
      		Quick flash--the fight--fade out into.
 
Scene 104.	CONTINUATION OF SCENE 101.
		Morson finishes with last punch that ended 
		flight and finds her contemplating him icily, 
		with folded arms and mocking smile.  
		Suddenly she becomes furious.  She springs to
 		her feet.  The astonished Morson rises also. 
		Valda, in a tempest of rage, denounces him 
		as an imposter. He stares at her dazed. 
		Ormond and Tracey, who have come into scene,
 		register triumph.  Aunt Mary in amazement
 		and rebuke.  Polly stares at Valda as though
 		she thinks her suddenly demented.  Valda
		speaks:

CUT-IN.		"You are an impostor! The uniform of an 
		officer doesn't suit you! You shall work your
		passage across!" 

		Morson stares at her in stunned astonishment.
		but sees her feeling is genuine.  For an 
		instant he is about to resent Valda's attack, 
		but suddenly realizes the humor of the 
		situation and grins.  Beasley steps forward to 
		take charge of him.  Morson bows low, sweeping 
		deck with cap.  Beasley takes him by 
		shoulder.  Morson, right-about-face, marches
 		off. Ormond and Tracey in triumph, Polly 
		wringing hands in sorrow over her hero's 
		fate, aunt Mary rebuking.  Valda, in rage, 
		stares after him, and as all turn and leave 
		her, sinks down in chair sobbing. 

			End of Reel Three.
 
 
			"THE SPITFIRE."
 
			Reel Four.
 
Scene 105.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON.
		Valda enters, looks about cautiously, goes to
		safe, kneels, works at combination.  The 
		sinister face of Ormond is seen at window.  He 
		glances in, sees her at safe, face lights up. 
		He watches. She opens safe, takes jewel case 
		from bag, puts it in safe.  As she swings 
		safe door shut, Ormond's face leaves window. 
		Valda leaves cabin.

Scene 106.	EXTERIOR--THE DECK.
		Polly, aunt Mary, Tracey on.  Valda comes
		on and joins party. Morson comes into scene 
		with tin box of cleaning powder and large 
		rag in hands.  He is dressed as ordinary 
		seaman, but, most becomingly, wears blue jersey, 
		duck trousers and canvas shoes, while a sailor 
		hat is set at a rakish angle.  Beasley ushers 
		him on and points to rail, speaking roughly. 
		Slight commotion when party recognizes the 
		transformed Morson.  Polly in distress. Aunt 
		Mary sympathetic, Valda stern with an effort. 
		Ormond hugely pleased.  Morson sees Valda, 
		frowns humorously; quickly followed by smile.
		Following Beasley's orders, Morson rubs rag 
		in powder and vigorously scrubs rail, 
		standing back to get artistic result.  Ormond is 
		smiling.  Morson works very gaily, whistling 
		blithely, as though delighted with work. 
		Valda shows irritation, picks up parasol--
		opens it.  Morson glances toward parasol--
		keeps on whistling.  Valda puts down parasol, 
		moves off with nose in air.  Tracey 
		shakes with satisfied glee, takes cigar out of
 		mouth to chuckle, laughs, suddenly sees
 		Morson staring coldly at him with a 
		vengeful look in his eye, and gasps with
		fear, shoving the wrong end of cigar 
		in mouth, turning cigar about two or 
		three times nervously before getting the right 
		end.  Morson works on nonchalantly.  Others
 		watch.  Tracey walks off in response to 
		significant glance from Ormond, who precedes.
 
Scene 107.	EXTERIOR--MAIN SALON--NEAR DOOR. 
		Ormond and Tracey come into scene, look 
		through window--coast  is  clear.  Ormond 
		cautiously opens door, indicates safe, which 
		can be seen through door, to Tracey.  Tracey 
		makes a movement to go in as Ormond 
		signifies jewels are in it.  Ormond holds him 
		back and they pass on.

Scene 108.  	EXTERIOR--ANOTHER PORTION OF DECK AT RAIL.
		Valda, standing at rail, very angry, foot 
		tapping impatiently.  Morson approaches with
 		rag and box, sees her, passes on.  Suddenly 
		he turns.  She has turned to look at him. 
		Then, angry at his having seen this, turns 
		shoulder again, abruptly, and studies ocean. 
		He hesitates, and then comes to her. He tries 
		to talk to her, but she refuses to listen.  He 
		speaks:

CUT-IN		"I don't blame you!  If somebody told me the
		tale I told you, I wouldn't believe it myself. 
		At the same time, my jewels are on this 
		yacht, and when we land In New Pork I'll 
		have the whole crew of you arrested--
		EXCEPT AUNT MARY!"   

		He finishes his speech, audaciously shaking 
		his finger near her face.  She backs away, 
		perfectly furious--stamps her foot in rage. 
		He goes away laughing at her discomfiture.
		Gradually her face softens into a tender little 
		smile, and she gives sentimental sigh, looking 
		dreamily off to sea.

Scene 109.  	EXTERIOR--ANOTHER PORTION OF DECK. 
		Polly alone at rail.  Morson passes, nods to 
		Polly, who smiles very sweetly as he lifts his 
		cap.  Encouraged by her friendly manner, he 
		looks back a little as he passes, smiling. When 
		he goes, Polly sighs sentimentally and clasps 
		hands ecstatically.
 
LEADER.		THAT NIGHT.

Scene 110.	INTERIOR--GIRARD'S ROOM IN LONDON. 
		Girard comes in, evidently after a few days' 
		absence.  Mail piled high on desk, unopened. 
		Girard walks in and storms about for the 
		valet--gradually works himself into rage--
		slams valise down, goes into next room, comes 
		out storming, muttering imprecations, shoves 
		hat back on head, goes to desk, prepares to 
		rummage through mail on desk, finds opened 
		envelope containing message from Larris (of 
		scene 76), picks it up, scratches head, pulls
		out message, reads--flash message.  Girard 
		stands stunned.  Then realizes that some 
		mischief is intended, shoves hat hastily down on 
		head, still holding message in hand, grabs up 
		valise again, rushes out.

Scene 111.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF SPITFIRE.--NIGHT TINT.
		Polly and Morson sitting in shadow of boat--
		mild flirtation--Polly chatting vivaciously, 
		Morson smiling.

Scene 112.	ANOTHER PORTION OF DECK.
		Valda walks down deck in long steamer coat, 
		suddenly spies Morson and Polly, becomes 
		extremely jealous, marches toward them 
		indignantly.
 
Scene 113.	DECK NEAR SMALL BOAT (SAME AS SCENE 111).
		Morson is about to playfully take Polly's hand
		when Valda appears and speaks sternly to   
		them. Polly is terrified;  Morson amused. 
		Valda speaks to Morson:

CUT-IN.		"You are to have no conversation with my 
		guests!"
 
		Morson smiles amusedly, bows gravely to 
		Polly, ironically to Valda, and walks away.
		Polly, in tempest of tears, turns and marches 
		away.  Valda sits in steamer chair, gazes
		ahead moodily--hurt.  Indicates she is now
		deeply in love with Morson.

Scene 114.	EXTERIOR -- CALAIS  PIER -- DAYLIGHT, FULL.
		Girard talks with a yacht captain, climbing
		aboard another yacht he has chartered. 
		(Yacht's name must be plainly seen to avoid 
		confusion with "Spitfire.") 

Scene 115.	INTERIOR--WIRELESS ROOM OF YACHT
		(OF SCENE 114). (Note--May be same
		wireless room used in previous scenes, with 
		little change and different operator.) 
		Girard into room, excited; tells the operator. 

CUT-IN.		"Locate the yacht 'Spitfire,' en route to New 
		York!" 

		Operator looks up.  Girard irritable. Captain
 		enters, as though accompanying Girard, 
		explains to operator.  Operator nods, begins to 
		send.  Girard angrily and profanely discussing 
		matter with captain.  Cut.

Scene 116.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON OF "SPITFIRE"--CLOSE UP.
		Polly on, kneeling on cushioned seat that runs 
		about port-holes.  Morson's grinning face can 
		be seen through port-hole. Polly has sandwich. 
		He opens mouth. She puts whole sandwich
 		in his mouth.  Cut.
 
LEADER:		MORSON GETS A HAND-OUT 

Scene 117.	EXTERIOR--DECK OUTSIDE PORT-HOLE. 
		Morson withdraws head with sandwich in 
		mouth, takes sandwich out with one hand, 
		extends other hand through port-hole for grateful 
		handshake, just as Valda comes into scene. 
		Valda stands for an instant.  Morson takes 
		hasty glance at her, withdraws hand quickly,
		and walks rapidly away.  Polly's hand comes
		through port-hole, groping frantically for his. 
		Valda stares in angry amazement, then she 
		walks angrily to door of salon and enters. 

Scene 118.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON--OTHER SIDE OF PORT-HOLE.
		Polly waving hand through port-hole as Valda 
		enters.  She hears Valda, hastily draws out 
		hand, turns to face the indignant Valda. Polly 
		goes meekly to Valda, who spurns her.
  
Scene 119.	INTERIOR--WIRELESS ROOM ON OTHER 
		YACHT--SAME AS SCENE 115. 
		Girard walks in, inquires of operator if any 
		news of "Spitfire."  Operator shakes head. 
		Girard registers disapproval of operator and 
		whole d--- thing, smites fist on table, goes out, 
		slamming door.  Operator leans back, gazing 
		after him, shrugs shoulders, goes back to work.
 
Scene 120.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF "SPITFIRE." 
		Morson polishing brasses of yacht with the 
		cleansing powder. Valda comes into scene, 
		imperatively beckons him to her with finger, as 
		to a servant.  With a mock sailor-like hitch 
		of his trousers, Morson, can of powder and 
		rag in hand, comes to her. She points to rail, 
		rubs finger across it--"Not clean enough." He
		touches cap gravely, polishes it briskly. She
		talks to him a little, as though rebuking him
		for his carelessness.  He listens with perky
		look on face, hitches his trousers again as he 
		listens, gravely rubs rag in cleansing powder
		and pretends to polish his nails.  Valda, 
		exasperated by his pretense, stamps foot--
		exclaims:

CUT-IN.		"I wish you were back in the sea again!" 

		Morson points gravely to the sea--"Does she 
		mean it?"  She nods vehemently.  With a 
		spring, he is over the side, clinging to a rope 
		on the side, though she is not aware of rope, 
		and thinks him overboard.  Valda, with wild 
		cry, rushes toward the pilot house, calling to 
		Captain Larris to stop the ship. There is 
		instant excitement of all on board--all rushing 
		toward her.

Scene 121.	EXTERIOR--VIEW OUTSIDE OF HULL OF YACHT.
		Morson clinging to rope hung on davit, out 
		of view of those on deck, grinning 
		mischievously.

Scene 122.	EXTERIOR OF "SPITFIRE."
		People running toward rail.  Polly, wringing 
		hands, grabs boat-hook.  Aunt Mary tears off
		life preserver from rail, throws it aimlessly, 
		faints--supported by the excited and delighted 
		Tracey, who nearly drops her at times in his 
		wild anxiety to glimpse the drowning figure 
		of Morson--off.  Ormond and Beasley  also 
		register pleased relief, and pretended solicitude.  
		Valda alone quiet, tense, hands clenched,
 		repentant and grief-stricken.  As Captain 
		Larris is about to order boat lowered, the 
		anxious  Tracey, holding the fainting Aunt 
		Mary, presses close to the rail, and looks over 
		rail.  He suddenly sees Morson, safe and 
		clinging to rope.  In his disappointed disgust, 
		Tracey drops Aunt Mary with a thump, and
		she immediately comes to.  Tracey points over
		shoulder with thumb to rail and walks off. 
		Others crowd to rail--register relief and 
		surprise to see Morson safe.  Ormond and 
		Beasley alone disappointed, though pretend 
		otherwise after a second.  Polly clasps hands in
		delight.  Valda, hand on heart, sways a little 
		in revulsion of feeling; then  her relief is
 		mastered by indignation and she imperiously 
		beckons Morson back. He sheepishly clambers 
		back over rail, with assistance of sailors, 
		saying apologetically to the angry Valda:
 
CUT-IN.		"I almost got my feet wet!" 

		Valda stamps foot in anger, turns indignantly 
		and walks away.
 
Scene 123.	EXTERIOR--ANOTHER PORTION OF DECK. 
		Valda comes down deck and approaches Beasley, 
		who is standing  morosely against rail. 
		She points back to Morson, seen in distance, 
		talking to the excited Polly, and speaks: 

CUT-IN.		"He hasn't enough to do. Give him some real 
		work!" 

		Beasley accepts this suggestion, very pleased, 
		bows--off to Morson.

Scene 124.	EXTERIOR--ANOTHER PORTION OF DECK. 
		Polly comes on, accompanied by Ormond and 
		Tracey, who are trying to be very gallant. 
		Polly is annoyed, showing plainly she has 
		little use for  either.  She drops her small
 		mesh-bag.  Both men stoop gallantly, Tracey
 		nearly getting it, but Polly is quicker, and 
		rescues the purse herself, showing satisfaction 
		purposely; then, with a meaning look at both 
		men, turns and leaves them.  Ormond shrugs 
		shoulders, smiles grimly at Tracey's 
		discomfiture--they walk on.

Scene 125.	EXTERIOR--STILL ANOTHER PORTION OF DECK.
		Beasley enters, followed by Morson.  Morson 
		carries a bucket of water and a mop with a
		long handle, scrubbing brush protrudes from 
		bucket.  Beasley carries holy-stone, concealed 
		behind his back.  Morson looks humbly 
		resigned, as though going through an ordeal, 
		Ormond and Tracey pass and register 
		thorough satisfaction.  Morson makes gesture as 
		though about to throw bucket at them, but 
		thinks better of it and proceeds on with it. 
		Beasley stops and shows Morson portion of 
		deck he is to scrub--Morson sets down bucket 
		--Beasley  slowly produces the holy-stone--
		shows it to Morson.  Morson pretends to 
		examine it as through opera glasses.  Beasley
		frowns, puts stone down on deck.  Morson
		puts long-handled mop in bucket, starts to 
		push holy-stone along with it--Beasley 
		interrupts him--"It isn't done that way"--gets 
		down on marrowbones and illustrates, with 
		action, method of holy-stone.  With a grimace 
		at him, Morson  reluctantly gets down on 
		knees as Beasley rises and goes at his work. 
		Beasley registers satisfaction at the 
		humiliation.

Scene 126.	EXTERIOR--PORTION OF DECK AT DISTANCE.
		Camera follows Ormond and Tracey, with 
		Valda in center, down deck. Polly and Aunt 
		Mary following. The two men point out distant 
		view of Morson scrubbing, with satisfaction to 
		Valda, whose triumph is marred by her own
 		secret sympathy with Morson.  She turns away
      		Polly and Aunt Mary register disapproval. 
		With a little sly look of glee toward 
		Ormond and Tracey, Beasley raises his foot,
 		and quickly placing it against Morson's 
		shoulder, pushes him violently, so that Morson 
		falls flat on his face in the soapy water. 
		Valda turns just in time to see this cowardly 
		act.  Morson leaps to his feet, is about to 
		rush toward Beasley, when he catches sight of 
		Valda.  With a great effort he controls 
		himself, bows to Valda and is about to return to
 		his work.  Beasley laughs and Valda, with an
 		outburst of fury, turns to Morson and speaks: 

CUT-IN.		"Mr. Morson, as mistress of this yacht, I give 
		you full permission to avenge that insult to 
		the limit of your strength and will." 

		Morson steps back with wondering unbelief,
		while Beasley and others also show their 
		amazement.  Morson thanks Valda and without 
		more ado, goes for Beasley.  (The fight 
		should be a short, sharp, decisive affair, 
		with Morson as victor, ending with Beasley 
		prostrate with Morson standing over him.)  The 
		sailors all cheer. Valda shows quiet delight 
		in Morson's triumph.  Cut.
 
LEADER. 	A FEW DAYS LATER--WIRELESS LOCATES "SPITFIRE" 
		ALMOST WITHIN VISION OF GIRARD'S VESSEL. 

Scene 127.	INTERIOR--WIRELESS ROOM ON GIRARD'S 
		CHARTERED YACHT (SAME AS SCENE 119).
		Girard on, is told by operator he has located
		"Spitfire."  Girard joyful, begins to dictate
		message.  Cut.

Scene 128.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF YACHT "SPITFIRE." 
		Ormond and Larris talking, Tracey at hand--
		wireless operator comes on deck with message, 
		looks for Larris--gives him transcript of messages
		--Larris reads.  Flash message: 

INSERT.		Capt. Larris, 
			Yacht Spitfire.
		Take charge of ship immediately.  Will
		overtake you soon.  Reduce speed and
		await instructions.
				MARCUS GIRARD. 

		Larris triumphantly shows wire to Ormond, 
		whose eyelids flicker, but does not otherwise
		betray emotion.  As a matter of course, and
		as though expecting message, he bows, says 
		a few words to captain, and strolls off easily. 
		The captain looks after the nonchalant Ormond, 
		puzzled, shakes head--the situation has 
		"got him" all right.  Tracey joins Ormond, 
		they walk down deck. 

Scene 129.	INTERIOR--SMOKING ROOM.
		Ormond and Tracey in--they sit with heads
		together, worried.  Ormond outlines action--
		Tracey listening.  Beasley comes in, all talk, 
		finally Ormond, with quick decision, says: 

CUT-IN.		"Tonight!"
 
LEADER.		WHAT HAPPENED THAT NIGHT. 

Scene 130.	STRETCH OF SEA--NIGHT TINT. 
		The "Spitfire" and other yacht, all lighted up, 
		against solid black night, and stars.

Scene 131.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF SPITFIRE--NIGHT. 
		Ormond and Tracey at rail, look off and see 
		lights of the other yacht.  They prime 
		themselves for action.

Scene 132.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON.
		Valda sitting by table reading by lights--she 
		hears knock, goes to door, opens it cautiously 
		--it is Morson, clad in Beasley's long oilcoat--
		she starts to close door, mocking him impertinently
		--he places foot in door, she can't shut 
		it--finally she allows him to come in--they 
		stand a moment, talking, tender little scene--
		he takes her hand as he says good night, she 
		pulls it away gently--she indicates now that 
		she can no longer conceal her love for him. 
		He says good night and closes door.  She 
		stands a moment and goes to port-hole, looks 
		after him tenderly, shakes head sadly--still 
		thinks him spy, though she loves him.  She 
		goes to door, right, and hesitates a moment, 
		then turns out lights. Room in darkness.
 
LEADER. 	MORSON REMEMBERS THE DECK HAND'S LAST DUTY 
		FOR THE NIGHT.

Scene 133.	INTERIOR--BEASLEY AND MORSON'S CABIN.
		Morson comes on, takes off coat as he goes in 
		and about to undress, when he remembers he 
		has forgotten to take in the chairs--leaving 
		coat he goes out. 

Scene 134.	EXTERIOR--DECK.
		Morson gathering up steamer chairs. 

Scene 135.	EXTERIOR--BEASLEY AND MORSON'S CABIN.
 		Ormond and Beasley come on cautiously--
		Beasley glances through port-hole or window--
		no one there--Beasley opens door, reaches and 
		gets coat Morson wore and hands to Ormond--
		men off.

Scene 136.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON (AS IN SCENE 132).
		Very dim light--flash at door of burglar's 
		lantern--figure in long coat of Morson goes 
		to safe, working away at safe, blows it open,
		steals jewels--to door--just as man gets to 
		door, Valda in doorway of her room, in time 
		to see figure of man dart from door in 
		Morson's coat--look of horror, registering she
		thinks it Morson, covers face--the room only 
		lighted by dim rays from port-holes and the
 		burglar's light left by man in his haste. 
		Valda takes the burglar's light and goes to 
		safe--kneels, looks through rifled safe. 

Scene 137.	EXTERIOR--OUTSIDE MAIN SALON. 
		Morson rounds the corner gathering steamer 
		chairs--by this porthole he stops, transfixed 
		by what he accidentally glimpses through the 
		port-hole--he steps nearer, and gazes in 
		horror at Valda in room.  He puts down chair, he
		walks away dazed and overwhelmed--disappears 
		around corner.  Valda rushes out of 
		door with wild excitement, but no outcry--
		she knocks at various doors, groups come out,
		she notifies them.  Cut.
 
LEADER.		NEXT MORNING. 
 
Scene 138.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON.
		Valda and all on---she shows the captain the 
		rifled safe, Aunt Mary and Polly register great 
		excitement.  Ormond and Tracey saunter in, 
		looking cool and interested.  Beasley looks at 
		Ormond and Tracey, but quickly looks away. 
		Captain begins to question them all--finally 
		questions Valda.  After struggle with herself 
		she turns, looks toward Morson while speaking, 
		points to him and safe, indicates she saw 
		him at safe. Morson staggers back and looks 
		at her in stunned amazement, indicating that 
		his feeling for his own position is less than 
		his loss of faith in her.  He passes hand across 
		his eyes, stares at her, but makes no denial. 
		Captain speaks:

CUT-IN.		"Do you deny that you were in the main 
		salon at midnight?"
 
CUT-IN LEADER.	MORSON CANNOT REPLY.
 
		Morson looks long and steadily at Valda, 
		refuses to answer.  Valda's eyes drop and she 
		registers emotion. Captain Larris gives 
		orders, they search Morson and bind him 
		to post.  Valda crushed.  All register 
		dismay at Morson's implied guilt.  Cut.
 
Scene 139.	INTERIOR--HOLD OF YACHT.
		Fire breaks out, sailor discovers, excitedly runs 
		off.
 
Scene 140.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON  (SAME AS SCENE 138).
		Varied business on parts of Polly, Aunt Mary, 
		Valda, Ormond, Tracey, captain, etc.  Morson
		still bound to pillar of cabin.  Sailor rushes in
		to captain, says "Fire!"  Others overhear and 
		register wild panic.  Captain Larris, after 
		momentary shock, rushes out, giving orders--
		all rush out in pandemonium, leaving Morson 
		alone, bound--smoke curls in.

Scene 141.	QUICK FLASH OF HOLD (SAME AS SCENE 139).
 		Flame now big and strong.  Captain Larris 
		and men appear, but are driven back by fire 
		and smoke.

Scene 142.	EXTERIOR--UPPER DECK.
 		Women all huddled together. Polly weeping, 
		Aunt Mary praying, Valda tense, suddenly 
		thinks of Morson, turns, rushes off. 

Scene 143.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF PURSUING YACHT. 
		Captain, Girard and others at rail, much 
		nearer to "Spitfire" now than in night scene--
 		see smoke of "Spitfire."  Girard registers great
 		fear and anxiety--much excitement--captain 
		gives quick orders to increase speed. 

Scene 144.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON OF "SPITFIRE" 
		(SAME AS SCENE 140).
		Morson alone, bound--smoke volumes increasing
		--Valda rushes in--looks about frantically 
		for some means of releasing him. 

Scene 145.  	EXTERIOR--DECK OF "SPITFIRE." 
		Lifeboats being lowered--Polly and Aunt Mary 
		being shoved into boat by captain, Beasley 
		and others. Ormond and Tracey at rail, register 
		sudden resolve to finish Morson.  Ormond,
		gun in hand, followed by Tracey, starts off. 

Scene 146.	INTERIOR--MAIN SALON (AS IN SCENE 144).
		Valda cutting cords with knife she finds in 
		desk--Ormond and Tracey come in, are 
		dumbfounded at the sight of Valda--with a spring, 
		Morson, freed, is upon Ormond, wrests away 
		gun, holds Ormond and Tracey at bay--then 
		hands gun to Valda, fights Ormond with bare 
		hands while Valda holds the terrified Tracey
		easily at bay.  Smoke rushing on thicker and 
		thicker--desperate fight between men.  Quick,
		Tracey, recovering from fright, makes 
		threatening movement, is knocked out by Morson. 
		Morson gets mastery over Ormond, knocks him 
		down, searches pockets, finds dangerous-
		looking knife, throws it aside, searches again, 
		as if for more weapons, finds the morocco 
		cigar case, starts to throw aside, when Valda 
		gives cry of astonishment--he looks at her, 
		opens case, Ands his jewels--he registers 
		delighted surprise and mental vindication for 
		Valda (Valda same business for him). Smoke 
		and flames now appear. Morson thrusts jewels
 		in belt.  Valda overcome.  Morson rushes off,
		half carrying  Valda.  Tracey and Ormond 
		stagger to their feet and follow. 

Scene 147.	EXTERIOR--DECK OF SPITFIRE. 
		Flames mounting high, the captain stands on 
		the bridge watchful and waiting, tense--
		commanding, heroic figure.  Morson is seen 
		rushing through the smoke, carrying Valda.  For
		a moment he bends over her, kisses her, then
		on to the rail.  Boats seen rowing hastily off 
		toward other yacht.  Flames envelop the
		yacht.  Cut.

Scene 148.  	EXTERIOR--EXPANSE OF WATER. 
		Distant view of the charred hulk of the 
		"Spitfire" descending into the sea.

Scene 149.  	EXTERIOR--DECK OF GIRARD'S OTHER YACHT.
		Girard, captain and others at rail.  Boat 
		reaches yacht.  Girard scans faces in boat in 
		vain for his daughter.  Tears his hair in 
		anxiety and grief.  Levels glasses and scans
		water.

Scene 150.  	EXTERIOR--EXPANSE OF OCEAN. 
		In foreground, charred spar of ship with Valda 
		and Morson clinging to it, Morson supporting 
		Valda.  A little bit off, a larger piece of 
		wreckage to which cling Beasley, Ormond, Tracey 
		and Captain Larris.

Scene 151.  	EXTERIOR--DECK OF GIRARD'S OTHER YACHT--
		SHORT FLASH.
		Girard, looking through glasses, spots daughter  
		on spar.  Excitedly tells captain, they
            	lower boat. Cut.

Scene 152.  	EXTERIOR--ROCKY BEACH.
		Valda and Morson on beach, spar lies near 
		them.  They look off at sea and then tenderly
		at each other.  Morson draws pouch from belt, 
		thrusts in hand, takes out some jewels, from 
		which he selects diamond ring--puts it on 
		her finger--speaks:

CUT-IN. 	"You called me a thief--and I am! I'm going
		to steal you" 

		She goes to his arms. 

Scene 153. 	FLASH TO BEACH.
		Father lands in boat, gets out with one or two 
		sailors, runs up beach, stops short in paralyzed 
		indignation at what he sees.

Scene 154.	EXTERIOR--BEACH (AS IN SCENE 152). 
		Valda still in Morson's arms.  Father storms 
		angrily into scene.  Morson looks at him, 
		annoyed at interruption.  Valda sees father, flies 
		to his arms, and after embrace, and then 
		turning, points to Morson, says:

CUT-IN.		"Father, Mr. Morson, a traveler from Egypt!" 

		Father angry, eyes Morson, sternly, then grins 
		slowly, extends his hand.  Fade out. 

				End of "The Spitfire."



Screenplay by B. P. Schulberg

1