Youth's Endearing Charm

 
	PART ONE
 
		1 

	A DISORDERED HOUSEHOLD 

Bed-room at Jenkins' farm, five o'clock in the 
morning.  Discovered, Mrs. Jenkins, up and 
dressing.   In bed under covers, still lies  
Farmer Jenkins, snoring.  Mrs. Jenkins awakens 
him, pointing to the daylight through the 
windows.  He arouses and sits up sleepily.   
Berating him for leaving the early rising upon 
her, she throws his clothes on the bed at him.  
He yawns and steps out.  Mrs. Jenkins stops to 
listen at the three children "bawling" in the 
next room  She walks to the door and shouts for 
them to "shut-up."
 
		2 

Children's bed-room at Jenkins'.  Discovered, 
sitting on a towseled bed, Willie, age five, 
Lucy, four, the baby, two years old, all crying. 
Mrs. Jenkins appears in door -- they cry the 
louder. She does not come in to attend to them.
 
		3

Same as 1. Bed-room at Jenkins'. Discovered, Mr.
and Mrs. Jenkins, dressing and jawing at each 
other.
 
	MARY, AN ORPHAN, BOUND OUT TO 
	FARMER JENKINS TWO YEARS AGO
 
Kitchen at Jenkins'.  A big room, serving both 
as kitchen, dining-room and partial living-room.   
The place is replete with all necessities, and 
though kept in certain order, is anything but 
neat, or inviting. Enter Mary, a young girl 
about fifteen, slovenly dressed, awkward and 
unsophisticated, but bearing evidence of beauty 
and refinement through all disguise.  Mary is 
yawning and trying to button her apron back of 
her neck.  Washing her face and hands in a 
basin, she fills the stove full of shavings and  
kindling from a basket and sets it afire.  Next 
the coffee-pot is set on the stove.  In this 
scene, and a few subsequent ones, Mary, a little 
tall for her age, wears a discarded skirt of 
Mrs. Jenkins' reaching almost to her ankles (too 
long for her age).  Her hair is rudely twisted 
in a knot behind.   With a gesture of disgust, 
Mary hears the children crying.   With a sigh, 
she shambles toward their room and exits.
 
		5

Same as 2. Children's bed-room. Discovered, the 
three of them still unattended and "bawling."  
Jenkins himself, pulling on his trowsers, 
appears in door. He shouts:--

On screen.
 
 	"SHET UP!"
 
Back to scene. 

But they don't. He stands there menacing them.
Enter Mary.  The children see her and all hold 
out their arms to her as their salvation. She 
is nice and kind to them and starts dressing 
them.  Jenkins moves away from the door.
 
		6

Same as 4.  Kitchen at Jenkins'. Enter Mrs. 
Jenkins.  She sees the roaring, smoking fire of 
Mary's, caused by the dry shingles, and runs and 
takes a lid off to cool the stove.  Enter 
Jenkins.   Mrs. Jenkins "goes for" Mary, in her 
usual complaining, nagging manner.
 
		7
 
Flash.  Children's bed-room.  Discovered Mary 
and children.   She stops dressing them long 
enough to listen to the remarks paid her in the 
kitchen.
 
		8
 
Same as 6.  Kitchen at Jenkins'.  Mrs. Jenkins 
starts to get breakfast at the same time calls 
to Mary to hurry up.   Jenkins combs his hair  
(by a comb hanging by a chain to the mirror) 
near the dining table.  From the table Mrs. 
Jenkins takes a bowl of eggs--counts them--
there are but few.  She calls Jenkins' 
attention to the fact, saying: 

On screen.
 
	"YOUR HENS HAVE GOT TO LAY MORE, 
	IF WE'RE TO FEED THIS FAMILY!"
 
Back to scene.
   
Jenkins scratches his head.  He'll "be blamed" 
if he knows how to get 'em to lay any more. Mrs. 
Jenkins breaks the eggs, and with milk added 
stirs up an omelet.  She calls across the 
kitchen for Mary to hurry up.   Jenkins  exits 
outside house.   Enter Mary, with children.  
She carries the baby and sets it in its 
high-chair before the table, then flies, in her 
usual confusion in always being frightened by 
both the Jenkinses, to set the table.  Mrs. 
Jenkins hands her a bucket and pushes her out 
after water.  Mary exits.

		9
 
	ZIPPY
 
Exterior of Jenkins' house--kitchen door, with 
farm surroundings.  Discovered Jenkins in 
distance chopping wood at wood-pile.  Sitting 
upon the doorstep is Zippy, Mary's little cur 
dog--a breed of the stiff-haired Airedale 
variety, bright and affectionate. He wears a 
collar. Enter Mary with bucket. Mary loves 
Zippy.  He is her best friend.  She pats him 
affectionately and he runs to the pump and back 
with her.  She and Zippy enter house.
 
		10
 
Same as 8.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins with breakfast prepared and all the 
children seated at table. Enter Mary and Zippy.  
Mrs. Jenkins goes to door, and irritably calls 
out at Jenkins to come in to breakfast.  Mary 
sets down her water-bucket and starts to 
frolicking with Zippy.  Mrs. Jenkins looks out 
the corner of her eye, but does not say 
anything.  Immediately after playing with and 
patting Zippy, Mary turns to the table and 
begins cutting the loaf of bread.  Mrs. Jenkins 
whirls around with:--

On screen.
 
 	"WASH YOUR HANDS AFTER 
	HANDLING THE DOG!"
 
Back to scene.
   
Nearly scared out of her senses, Mary drops the
knife and runs to the wash-basin.   Enter 
Jenkins with armload of wood.   "What's the 
commotion now?" he inquires. Mrs. Jenkins 
explains there is "too much dog."  Dropping his 
wood with a bang behind the stove--Jenkins 
opens the outer door. Zippy exits, almost 
riding Jenkins' foot.  Turning, to take her 
dog's part, Mary receives a cuff on the ear 
from the woman, and subsides in her place at 
the breakfast table.

		11 

	MORNING CHORES
 
Same as 10.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Room cleared, 
save Mary, who is washing up the breakfast 
dishes, pans, etc.  A great pile of them 
already washed and draining, stands on the 
table.  Enter Mrs. Jenkins. She scolds Mary as 
usual for being slow.  Stopping the dish-
washing, the woman starts Mary on her morning's 
chores.  Two large pails, filled with "swill" 
stand by the kitchen stove for the pigs.  An 
empty pail for milking is near.  Mrs. Jenkins 
loads Mary up with all of them. From the table 
she also takes two butcher knives, which Mary 
can sharpen up at the grindstone when she 
returns.  Mary exits with her uncertain load.
 
		12 

Same as 9. Exterior of Jenkins' house--kitchen 
door.  Enter Mary from 11.  Zippy is there to 
go with her.  She exits toward stables.
 
		13

Pig pens. Enter Mary.  She feeds the pigs, also 
stops for a moment's talk to them, as well. She 
and Zippy exit.
 
		14

Cows in barn-yard. Jenkins is already there, 
milking several and about finished.  Enter Mary.  
She starts to milk a cow.  Jenkins exits with 
his two filled buckets, but stops to take a 
silent look at Mary, for he realizes that she 
is growing pretty.
 
		15 

	JACK OF ALL TRADES 

A grindstone on the barn-lot.  Discovered Mary, 
her filled milk-bucket on the ground, grinding 
and sharpening up her two butcher knives.  She 
finishes the last and exits with her buckets.
 
		16

Same as 11.  Jenkins' kitchen. Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins, sorting the family wash.  On the stove 
a wash boiler steams.  Enter Mary with the 
bucket of milk and her two butcher knives.  
Mrs. Jenkins takes the milk and knives, and 
indicates that Mary's next chore is the family 
washing.  She is tired, but rolls up her 
sleeves and stands contemplating the time-old 
job.  A stamp from Mrs. Jenkins' foot sends her
flying to work.  Enter Jenkins from another 
room. He carries a coat with the sleeve half 
worn out. He shows it to Mary--her next turn 
is to sew in the sleeve.  Wearily she takes 
note and nods, rubbing away on the board. 
Jenkins leaves the coat and exits out doors.  
The table has a checked cloth on and is all set  
up for dinner, evidently by Mrs. Jenkins. Mrs. 
Jenkins enters another room and returns with 
the baby, for Mary to mind, and sets it on the 
floor (on an old comfort) near enough the table 
for the baby to catch hold of the tablecloth 
later. "Yes," Mary indicates, she will "mind 
him."  Exit Mrs. Jenkins out of doors, in 
sunbonnet.
 
		17

Same as 12. Exterior Jenkins' house--kitchen 
door.  Enter Mrs. Jenkins.  She takes a rake 
and hoe, leaning against the house, and exits 
for the garden.

		18
 
Corner of yard, near house.  Discovered, 
Jenkins sharpening a scythe at the grindstone.  
He sees his wife off for the garden.
 
		19

Garden. Enter Mrs. Jenkins to work.
 
		20

Same as 18. Corner of yard. Discovered Jenkins.
He sees his wife in the garden. Setting aside 
the scythe, he starts for the house.
 
		20 1/2
 
Same as 16. Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mary
occupied between the washing and trying to 
amuse petulant baby, succeeding a little at 
both.  Enter Jenkins.  He looks on.  Attracted 
by Mary in a way she does not understand he 
starts up a conversation at the tub.  Soon he 
is handling her pretty hair.  Annoyed, yet 
always frightened of him, she suggests he amuse 
the baby rather than bother her.  He laughs and 
passes through kitchen.
 
		21 

Garden.  Discovered Mrs. Jenkins.  She exits 
for house with rake and hoe and a basket of 
vegetables.
 
		21 1/2
 
Same as 16. Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mary 
washing in tub, and baby on floor.  Unobserved 
by Mary, the baby has caught hold of the 
tablecloth and pulls it and the dishes upon the 
floor.  Standing on the other side of the tub, 
though some distance from the baby, Mary 
reaches out furtively toward the falling dishes, 
and thus upsets the tub and all the clothes on 
the floor.  Enter Mrs. Jenkins at this climax 
with basket of vegetables.  Enter Jenkins from 
another room.  Furious, Mrs. Jenkins picks up 
the wet and frightened child and starts to cuff 
Mary with the free hand.  Paralyzed, Mary takes 
the cuffing, till Jenkins comes to Mary's 
rescue and jerks his wife away. This being a 
new attitude to Mrs. Jenkins she does not know 
what to make of it.  "Let her alone," exclaims 
Jenkins, "can't you see she's got too much to 
do?"  "No!" Mrs. Jenkins can't see it that way, 
and starts again at Mary, but Jenkins holds her 
back.  He orders Mary to pick up her wash.  He 
exits.  Mary keeps an eye ready for escape on 
the woman, but Mrs. Jenkins is too surprised at 
Jenkins to do anything but sit down. 

		THAT EVENING
 
Same as 17. Exterior of Jenkins' house--kitchen 
door.  Discovered Mary, playing with Zippy.  
Enter Mrs. Jenkins in door, with basket to hunt 
the day's eggs.  She admonishes Mary:--
  
On screen.
 
	"NEVER BRING IN SO FEW 
	EGGS AGAIN. HUNT TILL 
	YOU FIND THEM ALL!"
 
Back to scene.

Mary exits toward barn.
 
		23

Barn.  Enter Mary with basket. She exits in 
barn.
 
		24

Interior of  barn--a row of nests in the hay. 
Enter Mary. She finds eggs in some nests but 
not all.  Coming to one nest, Mary reaches over 
and pats a setting hen on the back.
 
		25

Close-up.  Hen on eggs in nest. Mary pets and 
talks to her.
  
		26

Same as 24.  Nests in barn.  Mary exits, but is 
afraid to go in with so few eggs.  
  
		27 

Same as 23.  Barn.  Enter Mary from inside. 
Zippy is waiting for her.  They exit toward 
house.
 
		28

	A FEW DAYS LATER 

Same as 21 1/2.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered
Mary, alone, washing dishes.  Enter Jenkins 
from outdoors.  It is plain now that the man is 
enamoured of Mary and that she is entirely 
innocent of his intentions.  He approaches her 
with a remark that causes her to stop work.  
He looks her over admiringly.  He says:--

On screen.
 
	"'PEARS TO ME YOU'RE 
	ABOUT GROWN UP!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Mary registers "Maybe so."
 
		29

Same as 1. Jenkins' bed-room. Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins making the bed. She overhears the 
talking outside and listens.
 
		30

Same as 28. Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mary 
and Jenkins.  She slides away from his intrusion. 
He grabs and kisses her.  Indignant and furious,
Mary gives him a piece of her mind -- "What are 
you bothering about me for--Go about your 
business!" she exclaims.
 
		31 

Same as 29. Jenkins' bed-room. Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins listening.  With set lips she exits to 
kitchen.
 
		32

Same as 30. Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mary 
and Jenkins. He has hold of her arm. Mrs. 
Jenkins appears in door.  She then advances, 
surprising the crestfallen Jenkins, and orders 
him away.  But her wrath is vent upon Mary, 
instead.  Taking his hat, Jenkins slinks out.  
Mrs. Jenkins wheels upon Mary. She exclaims:--
 
	"YOU OUGHT TO BE ASHAMED OF 
	YOURSELF--TRYING TO FASCINATE 
	A GODFEARING MAN!"
 
Back to scene.

Dazed, Mary hasn't the slightest idea what she 
means, but says in return, very indignant, "I 
wasn't bothering him--he was bothering me!"  
Mrs. Jenkins won't accept it that way.  She 
looks Mary over. So she 'pears grown up?  Well, 
she'll soon fix that--it's the long skirt, it 
is.  Mary's widening eyes behold the woman get 
a big pair of scissors.  Jerking Mary into the 
middle of the floor, Mrs. Jenkins makes her 
stand still.  Then she cuts off the bottom of 
the skirt about a foot, so that it falls to an 
inch below the knees, revealing Mary's white 
stockings and old shoes in ridiculous fashion.  
Mary protests, but Mrs. Jenkins finishes her 
job.  Next she sights the lovely hair.  Down it 
comes.   Getting a brush, she is so mad she 
douses it in the bucket of drinking water 
(dipper standing in bucket) and wets down 
Mary's curls -- divides them and begins to 
braid them in two pig-tails.

		33
 
Flash.  Same as 22.  Exterior of Jenkins' house. 
Discovered Jenkins sitting on a log not far 
away, whittling, with furtive glances toward 
the house.  He is quite provoked his "old woman" 
got one on him.
 
		34

Same as 32.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins and Mary.  One pig-tail is braided and 
tied. Mary is commanded to braid the other 
herself. Humiliated at her short skirt she 
tries to pull it down. Mrs. Jenkins glances in 
anger toward the outer door. " I'll show him 
who's grown up," she says.  Mary sits down on a 
chair and begins to cry, reduced to angry 
submission.  Mrs. Jenkins stamps her foot. 
Jumping, Mary starts to braid her pig-tail.  
Exit Mrs. Jenkins.  Mary braids an instant, 
then steals outside to show Zippy her disgrace.
 
		35

Same as 33. Exterior of Jenkins' home. 
Discovered Jenkins unobserved, some few feet 
away.  Discovered Zippy around the door (or Mary 
can appear in door, weeping, and call him when 
he comes running around the house).  The poor 
child, now in pig-tails, hair parted in the 
middle and "slicked back" and with a skirt 
ludicrously short, is a sorry little object 
indeed.  Jenkins, whittling.  He comes forward.  
Mary has sat down on the steps, her arms around 
Zippy, crying.  Jenkins catches her by the arm, 
makes her stand up, reluctantly, and looks Mary
over.  He is compelled to laugh at the 
metamorphosis--to Mary's innocent grief and 
despair.  He says: 

On scene.
 
 	"MY, AIN'T SHE CLIPPED 
	YOUR WINGS, THOUGH!"
 
Back to Scene.
   
Mary just cries, sitting down by Zippy again. 
Mrs. Jenkins appears in the door and orders 
Jenkins about his business.  He goes off 
laughing.
 
		36 

	THE LAST STRAW
 
Same as 34.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins, Mary, and the three children--baby in 
high-chair.  Mrs. Jenkins and Mary are getting 
dinner.  Mrs. Jenkins gives Mary the egg-basket 
and orders her to hunt some eggs for dinner.  
"And see that you bring enough for all of us," 
says the woman. Mary exits.

		37
 
Same as 23.  Barn.  Enter Mary.  She exits in 
barn.
 
		38

Same as 24.  Interior of barn--with the row of 
nests and the setting hen.  Enter Mary.  She 
collects what eggs there are--but there are not 
enough. She disappears further in the barn, is 
gone a moment, and returns--still afraid to go 
back with so few eggs. She stops and 
contemplates the setting hen.  Why not?  These 
would add more eggs at least.  Mary reaches 
under the hen and draws out two eggs.  She says 
in apology: 

On screen.
 
	"EXCUSE ME, PEGGY--IF THEY DON'T 
	EAT 'EM, I'LL BRING 'EM BACK."
 
Back to scene.
   
Mary puts the eggs in her apron pockets so they 
may be identified, and exits with the rest in 
her basket.

		39 

Same as 36.  Jenkins' kitchen, empty, save the
children.  Enter Mary with eggs.  She 
stealthfully takes the two eggs from her pocket, 
then with an old stub of lead-pencil from a 
shelf, makes a cross on each egg.

		40 

Close-up--the eggs in Mary's hand, each with a 
cross -- X.

		41 

Same as 39.  Whole scene--Jenkins' kitchen. 
These two eggs Mary drops in a separate bowl on 
the table, hoping Mrs. Jenkins will not cook 
them. Enter Mrs. Jenkins to continue her 
preparation of the dinner.  She sees the egg 
basket and noting its contents begins to berate 
Mary, till Mary indicates there are more eggs in 
the bowl on the table.  Apparently satisfied, 
Mrs. Jenkins drops the eggs in the basket in a 
pot of boiling water, to boil.  She indicates 
for Mary to watch the clock and time them. But 
Mary is worried about the eggs on the table. 
Enter Jenkins--he takes his place at the table, 
and hurries on dinner.  Mary with an eye on the 
clock, and on the bowl on the table, puts the 
two other children up at the table.  Mary begins 
to cut the bread.  The two older children, side 
by side, start to quarrel and cry.  Jenkins 
tries to silence them.  Enter Mrs. Jenkins; 
having set the coffee-pot on the table she 
places another bowl before Jenkins for his 
boiled eggs.  Mary had tried, but is never able 
to get the other bowl off the table.  Mrs. 
Jenkins ladles out the boiled eggs in a wire 
strainer and approaches the table.  She picks 
out an egg apiece and sets each on the plate in 
front of each child.  The others she dumps out 
in the same bowl in which Mary has placed the 
two marked, uncooked eggs, and pushes the whole 
up before Jenkins. Mary, worried, draws off to 
one side and watches. Preoccupied with the 
children handling their eggs, and calling Mary 
to fix them, Jenkins takes one egg from the 
bowl and breaks it on the edge of and into his 
dish.  Still preoccupied, he picks out two 
other eggs in one hand.
 
		42 

Close-up.  The two marked eggs in Jenkins' hand. 

		43 

Same as 41. Jenkins' kitchen--a nearer view of 
the table.  Jenkins takes one egg in each hand, 
and between "jawing" at the children and his 
wife, starts to break them on the side of his 
dish, as he did the first.

		44
 
Close-up of Mary -- watching Jenkins.
 
		45

Same as 43.  Jenkins and children at the table. 
Mrs. Jenkins sits down.  Cracking one egg, 
Jenkins starts and listens.  He holds one egg 
to his ear. Mrs. Jenkins watches him in concern.  
So does poor Mary.  He breaks the shell.
 
		46

Close-up Mary -- waiting, open-mouthed.
 
		47

Same as 45.  Discovered Jenkins, Mrs. Jenkins, 
and children, the latter watching.  The broken 
eggshell lies on the table beside Jenkins' 
plate, but he has slapped an empty dish down 
over the object of his amazement.  Mary is 
moving toward the outer door. Jenkins with a 
terrible look, raises the dish and a little 
chicken totters out.  Tableau--especially with 
Mary. Jenkins and his wife stare at shrinking 
Mary, who is tying to reach the outside door.  
"And so this is some more of you!" cries Mrs. 
Jenkins.  Jenkins hurls the loaf of bread, his 
empty plate, and coffee-cup at Mary. Both the 
farmer and his wife rise in their places.  The 
last straw is broken -- Mary takes out for her 
life.

		48 

Same as 35. Exterior of Jenkins' home. 
Discovered Zippy, tied by a string at the 
corner of the house.  Enter Mary hastily from 
house.  She starts to run for dear life, then 
sees Zippy and quickly unties him.  She says to 
him: 

On screen.
 
 	"ZIPPY, WE SURE HAVE 
	GOT TO GO NOW!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Zippy is glad enough.  They start on a dead run 
over the lot.
 
		49		

Same as 47.  Jenkins' kitchen. Discovered Mr. 
and Mrs. Jenkins and the children.  The 
children giggle and there is a family uproar.  
Jenkins goes to the wall and takes down a whip, 
then springs to the door in Mary's wake.
 
		50

Same as 48.   Exterior of Jenkins' home, with 
Mary and Zippy running in background. Enter 
Jenkins in door with whip. "Come back here!" 
he yells, brandishing the whip. But Mary and 
Zippy do not alter their intentions. They keep 
right on. Jenkins goes back in house.
 
		51

Same as 49.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins and children at table.  Enter Jenkins.  
He throws down whip and goes back to table.  He 
says: 

On screen.
 
	"SHE'LL BE BACK, ALL RIGHT!"
 
Back to scene.
 
He sits down. Fade out.
 
	END OF PART ONE
  
	PART TWO 

		52 

Barn-lot.  Discovered Mary and Zippy still 
running, and looking back.
 
		53 

Same as 14.  A group of cows in barn-lot.  
Enter Mary and Zippy, running. As Mary passes 
the cows, she calls to them: 

On screen.

	"GOOD-BYE, COWS!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Exit Mary and Zippy.
 
		54

Same as 13.  Pig-pens.  Mary and Zippy pass 
these in their flight.  As she passes, Mary 
looks over into the pen at her old friends. 

On screen.
 
	"GOOD-BYE, PIGS!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Exit Mary and Zippy.
 
		55 

A fence dividing barn lot from turnpike.  Enter 
Zippy and Mary.  She lifts him over the fence, 
and follows herself.  They start up the turnpike
--still running.  It is real and sure enough 
"business" for Mary, but a lark for Zippy.
 
		56 

Turnpike.  Another scene, further on.  Mary 
running, still looking back, and Zippy.  She 
imagines her offense so great that there never 
can be any returning.

		57 

Turnpike.  Further on.  Discovered a wagon of 
loosely piled hay, driven by farmer, moving 
ahead on road, back of wagon to camera.  
Discovered Mary and Zippy behind it, running.
 
		58 

Same as 57.  Closer view.  Mary reaches the 
wagon, panting for breath.  She crawls in 
behind (leaving Zippy out) and tries to conceal 
herself under the hay.  Zippy runs along behind.
 
		59
Flash.  Close-up of Zippy barking behind wagon. 
Mary has climbed under the hay and is concealed 
all but one ankle and foot.
 
		60 

Turnpike, with wagon moving along, side view. 
The farmer hears a dog barking and looks around 
to see where it is, as the road is deserted as 
to houses, etc.  He finds Zippy running behind 
and whips back at him.

		61 

Same as 49.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mr. 
and Mrs. Jenkins and children, having finished 
meal. The elders are quarreling over Mary's 
absence. Mrs. Jenkins goes to the door, looks 
out, and returns, saying that Mary is nowhere 
in sight.  Mrs. Jenkins with brandishing arm, 
hurls at Jenkins: 

On screen.
 
	"IF YOU'VE DROVE HER AWAY, 
	YOU GET ANOTHER ONE!"
 
Back to scene.
  
Jenkins registers he has had about enough of it 
as it is and exits outdoors.
 
		62 

Same as 50.  Exterior of Jenkins' house.  Enter 
Jenkins from house.  He looks for Mary--she is 
really gone.  Calling does not bring her.  "Oh, 
well," he registers, "she will be back."  He 
moves off.
 
		63
 
Same as 60.  Turnpike.  The wagon has stopped in 
road.   The farmer gets down and goes back to 
whip away Zippy and still his irritable barking.  
He can't imagine why and where Zippy has come 
from. Concealed under the hay, all but her foot 
sticking out behind, Mary hears Zippy being 
scolded and wiggles her foot almost in the 
farmer's face.  In astonishment he sees he has 
an extra load.  Catching Mary by the ankle he 
pulls her out the hay on the road. He surveys 
the pig-tails and the white stocking. He asks:

On screen.
 
 	"WELL, NOW--WHOSE 
	CRITTER AIR YOU?"
 
Back to scene.
   
Afraid she will be sent back to the Jenkins', 
if the farmer should know them, Mary answers: 

On screen.
 
	"NOBODY'S -- I'M 
	JUST TRAVELIN'!"
 
Back to scene.
   
Finally the farmer permits her to get up on the 
front of the load with him, taking Zippy along.  
He drives off.

		64 

	SUMMER VACATIONISTS 
	RETURNING HOME
   
A country railroad station.  Discovered Mr. and 
Mrs. Bell, middle-aged city people of 
comfortable circumstances, with two children, a 
boy of four and a baby a year old, camped on the 
benches outside, tediously awaiting the arrival 
of the country train. Mrs. Bell, younger than 
her husband, is nearly tired out with the crying 
baby, etc.  An array of baggage, hand and 
otherwise, is stacked on the platform.  Mr. 
Bell is trying to help the station-boss check 
up some of the hand-baggage.  Consulting his 
watch, the station-boss registers he has no 
idea when the train will come.  Mrs. Bell 
registers weary collapse.
 
		65

Flash.  Same as 63. Turnpike and wagon.  Mary 
chats with the farmer.

		66 

Same as 65. Wagon. Close-up. Front view over 
the horses' backs.  Discovered farmer and Mary 
on front of wagon, with Zippy sitting between 
them. Mary finding the man friendly, chats 
volubly. She says:

On screen.
 
	"I HAVE RELATIVES IN THE CITY"
 
Back to scene.
 
The farmer looks her over, amused. He asks:

On screen.

	"BE YOU A-GOIN' TO 'EM?"
 
Back to scene.
   
Mary nods.  She hasn't a friend on earth but 
Zippy, and she must lie and get along somehow.  
Nervously she adds: 

On screen.

	"YES. THEY'RE--THEY'RE 
	MILLIONAIRES" 

Back to scene.
   
Surveying her tattered condition again, the 
farmer takes this with a grain of salt.  Mary 
endeavors to convince him of her assertion.  He 
whips up.
 
		67 

Same as 69.  Country railroad station, another 
view. Enter the hay-wagon, with farmer, Mary, 
and Zippy. Of course, he thinks, if Mary is 
going to the city, the station is the place to 
let her  off.  The poor child has led him on by 
her own bait, and when he draws up, she and 
Zippy have to get off the wagon. But she thanks 
him, and he drives on.  Alone in another strange 
place, Mary picks up the string tied to Zippy's 
collar, a forlorn little creature.  She moves up 
on the platform, however, leading Zippy.
 
		68 

Same as 64.  Country railroad station.  
Discovered all the Bells, as in 64.  The baby 
is still crying--Bell himself shakes a rattle 
before it. Enter Mary and Zippy around corner 
of building. All see each other.  Mary slowly 
sidles up.  Her appearance is so ludicrous that 
the Bells are amused.  But Mary has chiefly 
taken note of one thing--the baby is crying -- 
she knows how to tend to babies, and they are 
not doing it right.  Approaching Mrs. Bell, she 
takes the baby and cuddles him up--just right.  
"See--like this? " she says.  And sure enough, 
Mr. Baby stops crying.  They ask Mary where she 
is going.  "To the city," she replies, not 
knowing in the least how she will reach there.  
Enter station-boss from building.  "The train 
is coming," he announces, pointing up the track, 
and whirling some of the trunks to the edge of 
the platform.  "Will you take care of my baby, 
going in?" asks Mrs. Bell. Mary nods and 
indicates that Zippy must go too. Mr. Bell runs 
to buy another ticket.
 
		69 

	ENGAGED AS NURSEMAID 
	FOR THE RAILROAD FARE

Same as 68. Bell returns with the extra ticket 
for Mary.  Mary looks so pitifully grotesque 
that Mrs. Bell hands her one of her own cloaks, 
an old golf cape reaching a little below Mary's 
skirts, which will cover her up.  Mary is still 
hatless.  The train pulls in.   The Bells and 
Mary and Zippy all get aboard, Mary carrying 
the baby.
 
		70 

	FREE AT LAST!
 
Close-up of Mary, with baby in her lap.  Just 
one seat in the car.  Mary's facial emotions 
are conflicting--still one is paramount.  She 
has gotten away from those horrible Jenkins' at 
last!  Even with no place to lay her head she 
is glad.  Zippy sits beside Mary and the baby.
 
		71

Interior of passenger car.  Discovered the 
Bells sitting behind Mary, baby, etc., in car.
The conductor comes along.  Mr. Bell gives him 
the tickets, indicating that one is for Mary.  
Conductor moves up beside Mary, and sees Zippy 
in the seat.  "He must get down from there," 
demands the official. "Oh, please let him stay, 
he's my best friend!" exclaims Mary.  Mr. Bell 
pulls the conductor's sleeve. "It's all right
--let him stay," says Bell.   The conductor, 
with a warning, passes on.  Mary hugs Zippy 
and grins back at the Bells.  Then she begins 
to amuse the baby.
 
		71 1/2 

	THE CITY
 
Large city terminal station.  Discovered, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bell, the children, Mary, and Zippy, 
entering from station to sidewalk.  The Bells 
think that Mary is coming right along with them, 
but she stops and hands over the baby.  "Why 
don't you come?" begs Mrs. Bell.  Mary shakes 
her head for reasons of her own, and says: 

On screen.
  
	"I GOT TO HUNT MY RELATIONS"
 
Back to scene.
   
They can't induce her to come--nor will she 
tell who her relatives are. Bell asks her if she 
has any money.  Mary has not.  Bell gives her 
two crisp one dollar bills for her services -- 
a fortune to Mary, who has never owned a cent 
in her life.  She is so grateful and so 
ludicrous when she removes Mrs. Bell's cloak, 
that Mrs. Bell decides she does not need it and 
presses it upon Mary to keep.  Bell hands Mary 
his card and address.  The Bells take a taxi 
and exit. Mary, alone and friendless in a great 
city, stands looking at her two new bills.  
"Goodness, Zippy--we are rich."  Pedestrians 
passing, she hides her money and leads Zippy 
out on his string.
 
		72

City street, presumably not far from terminal 
station.  Discovered Mary leading Zippy by a 
string. They pass a stand where a man is 
selling hot frankfurter sandwiches.  Mary 
concludes that she and Zippy must eat.  She 
selects a sandwich for herself, but compromises 
on two frankfurters alone for Zippy, instead of 
the added bread.  Hating terribly to part with 
one of her new bills, Mary nevertheless pays. 
She gives Zippy his portion, and eating her 
own, exits with him.

		73
 
Street scene--residence portion.  Enter Mary 
and Zippy, lost in a big city.  Very weary, 
Mary is revived to see a handsomely dressed 
young woman pass from the opposite direction, 
leading a poodle dog with a big ribbon bow at 
back of his neck and another tied on his 
harness in the middle of his back. The haughty 
lady never notices Mary, but Mary takes note of 
her dog, also observes the little ribbon tied 
around his nose as a muzzle.  "My, Zippy! I 
guess you are all out of style," says Mary.  
While Mary has been observing the passing dog, 
a maid enters from a house carrying out some 
tied-up newspaper packages and a fairly good 
woman's hat which she stuffs in top of a 
garbage barrel at edge of the sidewalk.  Maid 
exits.  Mary sees the hat.  She wears none.  
With a furtive glance at the house, she finally 
gets the hat.   "Why, this is a good hat--what 
a shame to throw away a good hat."  Mary tries 
it on and lets it remain on her head.  
Curiously she pulls at one of the parcels.  A 
yard or so of three-inch-wide ribbon emerges.  
Mary pulls it out.  She has no place about her 
person for it.  But there is Zippy!  Mary 
glances in direction of the other dog and 
laughs. Just watch her fix up Zippy in style.  
She doubles and ties all the ribbon in a big 
bow on his collar. How Mary laughs. She 
exclaims: 

On screen.
 
 	"NOW, ZIPPY, YOU 
	ARE A CITY DOG!"
 
Back to scene. 

They exit.

		74
 
	STRANDED
 
A poorly furnished garret bed-room.  Discovered 
Mary sitting on the bed, feeding herself and 
Zippy from a paper bag.  Things look black--she 
is about ready to cry.  Enter the old, old 
bugbear--a landlady.  Landlady wishes rent.  
Mary only has a few pennies left.  The unkind 
woman takes all of these, then out Mary and 
Zippy go!  Mary gets into her cloak and the 
(garbage) hat, a summer style with some flowers 
upon it and very becoming, and exits with Zippy, 
crying.

		75 

Business street scene. Enter Mary and Zippy.  A 
policeman stops Mary. She hasn't her dog muzzled 
and must observe the law.  Mary recalls the 
other lady's dog and knows what is meant, but 
she has no means nor muzzle.  The policeman is 
kind and as Zippy looks harmless, he manages to 
feel about his pockets till he discovers a piece 
of tape.  This he folds around Zippy's nose and 
ties around his neck. Zippy don't like it, but 
Mary is thankful.  "Do not leave it off," says 
the officer.  Mary and Zippy exit.
 
		76 

	MIDDAY -- AND HUNGER
 
Discovered Mary and Zippy sitting upon a 
doorstep, very forlorn.   As they sit there an 
old blind man feels his way along with a cane, 
holding out his tin cup as he passes.  A few 
pedestrians toss him a coin.  Poor man--Mary is 
very sorry for him.  He exits.  Mary registers 
hunger.  What on earth can she do--the Jenkins 
are far away and there is not a soul to go to.  
Suddenly she thinks of Mr. Bell's card and 
brings it forth from her waist.  While she 
looks at it fade to--
 
		77 

Same as 69. Country railroad station. Discovered 
Bell family awaiting the train, with Mary 
approaching the crying baby and taking it in 
her arms.  Fade back to--   

		78 

Same as 76. Discovered Mary and Zippy on 
doorstep.  Mary looks at the card.  She shakes 
her head -- she does not like the vision. She 
exclaims, holding her face in her hands: 

On screen.
 
 	"I'VE ALWAYS HAD BABIES--
	I DON'T WANT ANY MORE!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Mary looks up and receives another vision. Fade 
out or dissolve to-
 
		79 

Same as 61. Jenkins' kitchen. Discovered Mary, 
Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins, the baby who pulls the 
cloth and dishes from the table, and Mary who 
has overturned the wash-tub.  Fade out into--
 
		80 

Same as 78.  Discovered Mary and Zippy on 
doorstep.  The nightmare of the Jenkins family 
is too much.  Anything but that!   Holding her 
head, Mary runs out the picture--Zippy 
following.
 
		81 

	THE THEATER HOUR
 
Tinted bright, yellow gas-light.  The entrance 
to a good city theater.  Men and women in 
evening dress are entering.  Enter Mary and 
Zippy, on his string--ribbon bow and all.  Mary 
contemplates it all. All are so happy and she 
and poor Zippy are hungry. They must eat--but 
how?  She looks down and speaks to him, saying: 

On screen.
 
	"ZIPPY, WE'VE GOT TO EAT"
 
Back to scene.

But how can they accomplish it?  Suddenly a 
thought strikes Mary.  She remembers the old 
blind man.  She will play blind herself!  Here 
with the rich people is just the place for it.
Unobserved up to this time, she moves a few 
paces along, and loosening out her hair, which 
is now pinned up in the former way, lets it 
fall about her shoulders.  Her hat she tucks 
under her cloak.  Pulling the cloak around her 
she sits down near theater entrance, with Zippy 
beside her, and holds out her hand, her head 
back--her eyes closed.  Automobiles draw up 
with theatergoers at the curb.  Mary is 
beautiful in her falling hair, and sweet, 
up-turned face, and the coins drop in her hand.
A gentleman drops her a half-dollar. Mary feels 
of its size and senses its value.
 
		82 

Close-up of Mary, blind-- and Zippy.  Feeling 
the half-dollar in her hand, she can't help but 
squint down at it--her eyelids flutter--she sees 
fifty cents.  My!  Her eyes snap back shut again.
 
		83

Same as 81. Curb, near theater, with Mary blind 
and Zippy.  The theater crowd swells, and the 
coins still drop to Mary.   One lady alighting 
from a taxicab, notes the girl's rare beauty.  
She is sorry and makes her husband go down in 
his pockets for a silver dollar.  Feeling of it, 
Mary's eyelids flutter--but she don't dare look.  
Enter, feeling along with his stick, another 
blind man--thin, about 45, wearing smoked 
glasses.  Mary has evidently squatted herself 
in his regular stand in  front of the theater. 
Nudging her with his cane, he resents her 
intrusion. Forgetting herself, she squints up 
at him--and is suspicious that he is not blind, 
either.   The man squats down beside her.  
Pushing her he says: 

On screen.
 
	"MOVE ALONG! THIS IS MY 
	STAND, AND I AM BLIND"
 
Back to scene.
 
Mary listens with imperturbable face--eyes 
closed. Then, curious, she slowly turns her 
head toward him.

		84 

Close-up of Mary and the blindman.  As she 
turns her face to him, he does the same to her, 
slightly looking out under his glasses to see 
her, thinking she is blind.  They both catch 
each other with open eyes. Mary snaps hers shut 
again and exclaims: 

On screen.
 
	"MOVE ON YOURSELF. I GUESS 
	I AM AS BLIND AS YOU ARE!"
 
Back to scene.
 
The man quickly readjusts his dark glasses. 

		85
 
Same as 83.  Curb in front of theater.  
Discovered Mary and the blind man and Zippy.  
Mary completely usurps him and makes him go, 
even setting Zippy upon him.  He rises and 
feels his way with his cane out of the picture.  
Holding out her hand, Mary is quite blind again 
-- and the coins drop, their givers remarking 
her beauty.  Enter taxicab containing Harry 
Disbrow, young son of millionaire Disbrow, with 
three young companions, all in evening dress.  
Harry sees Mary, admires her, but is pushed on 
into the theater by his companions.  She does 
not observe him.

		86
 
	PROFESSIONAL JEALOUSY
 
The crowd in front of theater.  A fine looking 
young policeman is on duty, preening himself 
before the theatergoers.  Enter blind man from 
85.  He manages to sidle up to the policeman 
and slips him a money bribe.  Then the blind 
man whispers: 

On screen.
 
 	"PINCH THAT LITTLE 
	IMPOSTER OVER THERE"
 
Back to scene.
   
The policeman nods.  Ostensibly this mendicant 
is a regular patron (tipster) of his.  
Registering that he will nip the flowering bud, 
the officer ambles over to the other side.  The 
blind man settles himself for his night's 
begging.

		87

Same as 85. Curb in front of theater, with Mary 
and Zippy. Enter policeman from scene 86. He 
sees his mark.  Just as Mary has received a 
coin from a passerby, and ties it in her 
handkerchief with her goodly collection, she 
senses something ominous standing beside her 
(the policeman), but she does not look up.  No 
one will catch her off her job again, while she 
is on it.  The officer touches her shoulder 
with his night-stick.   Mary turns a guileless 
face up to his--eyes closed.  He lifts her up 
by the arm.  He peers into her face.  Mary 
never flickers.  Her hands grope over him 
blindly.  So far as he knows she may be blind, 
but she is on the other mendicant's beat who 
has paid for his -- so he must get this one out 
of the way.  He arrests Mary and leads her and 
Zippy away.  But Mary is pretending that she is 
blind very effectively.
 
		88

Sergeant's office in police-station.  Enter 
policeman, Mary, and Zippy.  The sergeant is 
impressed with the scene, and Mary's beauty, 
but listens to the complaint.  The policeman 
says Mary is shamming.  Asked if she is really 
blind by the sergeant, Mary says she is.  Asked 
if she has a license for begging, Mary answers 
she has nothing but Zippy. The sergeant is 
reproachful to the officer for bringing Mary 
in, but is compelled by law to hold her as a 
vagrant.  A guard leads her and Zippy, whom she 
insists having along, to a cell. 

		89 

Jail--three cells.  Enter guard or turnkey, 
with Mary and Zippy. He locks them in, Mary 
still blind, and protesting.  The turnkey is 
sorry.  He exits. When he has gone, Mary opens 
her eyes and looks out through the bars, from 
her seat.  Grasping Zippy around the neck, she 
cries: 

On screen.
 
 	"OH, ZIPPY, MAYBE 
	THEY'LL HANG US!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Mary is truly frightened.
 
		90
 
	HARRY DISBROW, DISSIPATED 
	SON OF A MILLIONAIRE 

Same as 85.  Front of theater, the performance 
over.  Enter Harry, with companions.  They 
enter a taxicab and exit.
 
		91 

	IN THE WEE SMA' HOURS
 
Exterior of gentlemen's club.  Tinted moonlight. 
Enter from club building, Harry and companions. 
One or two wish to see him home, but Harry is a 
handsome young chap, the prince of good fellows
--and can find his way home alone, thank you.  
All have been drinking in the clubrooms, 
however.  They separate, going in opposite 
directions, Harry staggering out alone.

 		92

Exterior of the Disbrow home -- a handsome 
place.  Enter Harry, hat on the back of his 
head, swinging his cane zig-zag up the walk.

		93 

Same as 92. Exterior Disbrow house.  Close-up 
of front door. Discovered, Harry with his latch 
key, trying to unlock the door.  With futile 
jabs he is never able to strike the keyhole, 
nor can he feel of it with his fingers.  
Drawing back he jabs again. Blinkingly he looks 
the premises over--yes, this is his house. He 
tries the key again--no use.   He exclaims:

On screen.
 
	"THE KEYHOLE ISHN'T HERE TONIGHT!"
 
Back to scene.
 
He is utterly unable to find it.
 
		94 

Same as 93. Whole scene of porch. Harry stands 
at the outer edge, scratching his head, looking 
at his key.  He starts to ring the door-bell. 
No, that won't do--his father will go for him 
again. There's noting to do but try to get in a 
window. He scales the porch railing and tries a 
front one. It won't work.
 
		95 

Hedge-fence or wall, outside Disbrow house.  
Discovered a policeman--the night-watchman.  
Looking in, he sees a probable Raffles.  He 
slowly starts over the fence.


		96 

Same as 93. Exterior of Disbrow house--another 
view along the side.  Discovered Harry creeping 
along.  He climbs up, reaches one window and 
tries it--locked.  The next he is able to open.  
Just as he is half way in, enter policeman who 
pulls him out by the leg and arrests him.  
Drunk and mad, he protests and wants the 
officer to call his people.  But the officer 
declines--he is on to these Raffles fellows. He 
jerks Harry out, protesting vigorously, but he 
is compelled to come along.  They exit.
 
		97
 
Same as 88.  Sergeant's office in police-
station. Discovered, the same sergeant as in 88.  
Two policemen are waiting their turn with 
"arrests." One is an old woman in tattered 
shawls, who protests; the other officer has a 
couple of pickpockets.  Enter officer with 
Harry, good-natured but reeling.  The others 
are taken back to the cells.  Harry has his 
turn with the sergeant.  Harry starts into 
assailing his officer.   The sergeant silences 
him.   Asked for identification (they see he is 
well dressed) Harry filches in every pocket of 
his dress-suit and cannot find a card, his 
wallet, or a letter.  He accuses the policeman 
of having robbed him.  The sergeant knows 
better.  At any rate he concludes that Harry 
can sober up in the lock-up with the rest, and 
have his hearing before the magistrate in the 
morning.  Harry is piloted back to the cell.  
The sergeant shakes his head.  This is a wise 
crook--or a young swell going wrong very fast.
                  
 
		98
 
Same as 89. Tier of cells. Discovered Mary and 
Zippy in one.  Mary hears a commotion and rises 
up from her bench, holding Zippy.  Enter 
policeman, who passes with Harry. Unobserved by 
turnkey, who thinks her blind, Mary gets a good 
look at Harry in his evening clothes.  She says: 

On screen.
 
 	"MY, ZIPPY! HE'S DRESSED 
	ALL BY 'MAIL ORDER'" 

Back to scene.

		99 

Harry's cell.  Policeman locks him in.  His 
silk hat on back of his head, he makes a pillow 
of his overcoat.  Hardly realizing where he is, 
he philosophically begins to make himself 
comfortable.  His attention is attracted by 
Zippy barking down the corridor.  "Who in the 
devil's dog?" he growls, trying to look out.

		100
 
Close-up of bottom of Mary's cell-door, with 
Zippy barking through the bars.
 
		101 

Same as 98.  Whole tier of cells.  Mary tries 
to quiet Zippy.
 
		102 

Same as 99. Harry's cell. Closer-up.  He yells 
at Zippy.  Pulling off his shoe he rises to 
throw it. 

		103

Same as 101. Mary, with startled eyes, grabs 
Zippy up in her arms. Comforting him she 
exclaims: 

On screen.

	"I DON'T BELIEVE THAT ANY 
	OF THESE IS NICE FOLKS"

Back to scene.

While Mary buries her face in Zippy's coat, the                               
picture fades.                                 

	END OF PART TWO

	PART THREE

		109
 
	SORTING OUT THE CHAFF
 
Magistrate's Court.  Discovered the usual court 
attendants, and several "arrests" up for a 
hearing. Judge Strong sits on the bench.  
Discovered Mary, her complaining officer, and 
Zippy.  Enter Harry, sobered and indignant, in 
his evening clothes.  The spectators titter at 
him.   A case having just been disposed of, the 
magistrate hears Mary's.  Mary never once loses 
her hold on being blind before the court.  Very 
much frightened, she keeps up her shamming 
beautifully and enlisting the sympathies around 
her.  The judge questions her.  She has no 
place to go--no friends but Zippy. Harry 
notices and begins to take an interest in her.
The judge is sorry for Mary.  In disposing of 
her case, he leans kindly over the bench and 
says:

On screen.
 
	"BLIND AND FRIENDLESS, I 
	SHALL HAVE TO COMMIT YOU 
	TO AN INSTITUTION"
 
Back to scene.

Mary is much perturbed.  This may be a worse 
place than the Jenkins'. But the judge tells 
her she will be safe from the streets. He waves 
her on and out.  Harry interrupts.  His case is 
next and the girl's innocent beauty and pitiful 
plight have interested him; also he smiles at 
sight of and memory of Zippy of the night 
before. As Mary moves out with the officer, 
Harry signals the judge:
 
On screen.
 
	"WAIT A MOMENT, JUDGE. ALLOW 
	ME TO BAIL HER OUT"

Back to scene.
 
Mary is held a moment.  She tries hard to steal 
a glance at her benefactor out the corner of her 
eye. The judge addresses Harry--"And now who 
are you, young man?"
 
		105 

	THE MAGIC OF A NAME
 
Same as 109. Magistrate's Court. Discovered all 
as in 108.  Harry mentions his own and his 
father's name.  At the latter, the judge evinces 
interest.  It is impossible that millionaire 
Disbrow's son had been in jail all night. Harry 
indignantly explains (referring to police): 

On screen.
 
 	"THIS LOBSTER ARRESTED ME 
	GETTING IN MY OWN HOUSE!"
 
Back to scene.

The policeman does not like the appellation and 
resents it.  When asked for means of 
identification, Harry can produce none.  The 
magistrate has the detective get him Disbrow, 
Sr.'s telephone number. Having found it, the 
judge takes the telephone.
 
		106

Library suite of Disbrow's palatial home.  
Discovered John Disbrow, Harry's father, in his 
hat and overcoat, ready to start for business.  
Discovered also  Mrs. Disbrow, the mother, and 
the butler, Decker, and Marie, the maid.  The 
dining-room is visible in the rear and the 
butler and maid are just explaining to Disbrow, 
who is much ruffled, that Harry has not been in 
all night. In anger, Disbrow says:

On screen.
 
	"I'LL BREAK THE BOY'S 
	DISSIPATION IF I HAVE 
	TO BREAK HIS HEAD!"
 
Back to scene.

Harry's mother intercedes.  The telephone rings. 
The butler answers, then hands the receiver to 
Disbrow. "Yes?"  He starts, then listens with 
concentrated features.

		106 1/2

Same as 105. Magistrate's Court. Discovered all 
as in 105.  Judge Strong at the 'phone, talking.  
He describes Harry.
 
		107

Same as 106.  Disbrow's library.  Discovered 
Disbrow at 'phone, talking -- Mrs. Disbrow, 
Decker, and Marie.  Disbrow says: 

On screen.
 
	"YES--THAT IS MY SON"
 
Back to scene.

Shutting off the receiver, Disbrow pauses to 
explain.  Me says to Mrs. Disbrow--"Well, he's 
been in jail all night and wants to get out."  
Mrs. Disbrow is horrified.  Disbrow turns back 
to the telephone and talks -- then listens.
 
		108 

Same as 106/2.  Magistrate's Court.  Discovered 
all as in 106 1/2.  Judge Strong at 'phone.  In 
explaining, the judge says: 

On screen.
 
 	"HE WISHES TO BAIL OUT A 
	YOUNG WOMAN ALONG WITH HIM"
 
Back to scene.
 
Harry nods that this is right. 

		109 

Same as 107.  Disbrow's library.  Discovered 
all as in 107.  Disbrow at phone.  When he 
hears that assertion, his jaws snap shut like a 
trap.  So that is it!   The boy has been in some 
"woman mess," and wants assistance to get her 
out.  Disbrow answers:

On screen.
 
	"THEN YOU BETTER PUT 
	HIM BACK IN JAIL AGAIN!"
 
Back to scene. 

Disbrow is furious.
 
		110 

Same as 108. Magistrate's Court. Discovered all 
as in 108.  Judge at telephone.  He smiles, 
then explains to Harry that his father is angry.  
Harry runs around the bench and takes the 
telephone himself.  He tries to talk to his 
father.
 
		111 

Same as 109.  Disbrow's library. Discovered all 
as in 109.  Disbrow at phone.  When he hears 
his son's voice, his jaws snap and he hangs up 
the receiver with a bang, cutting off.  He 
turns and says to the other--"I will have 
nothing to do with it." With his wife pleading, 
he exits by front door.
 
		112 

Same as 110. Magistrate's Court. Discovered all 
as in 110.  Harry hangs up the receiver 
hopelessly.  The judge understands and makes up 
his mind to discharge Harry.  Harry is now 
standing right alongside Mary.  He still wants 
to get her out--institutions are horrible 
things--yet he hasn't an idea of what he will 
do with her.
 
		113 

Same as 112. Magistrate's Court. Discovered all 
as in 112.  The magistrate discharges Harry 
this time, with only a warning.  But with regard 
to Mary he advises the young man: 

On screen.
 
	"THE COURT THANKS YOU FOR 
	YOUR INTEREST IN THIS YOUNG 
	WOMAN. BUT BLIND, SHE WOULD 
	ONLY BE AN INCUMBRANCE"
 
Back to scene.
   
Harry doesn't mind that--something about the 
girl has appealed to him--he wants to take her. 
While the magistrate confers a moment with the 
detective, unobserved by all, Mary slips her 
hand into Harry's.  Glancing up at Harry, she 
surprises him; with her lovely eyes, and 
strikes his high sense of humor when she says: 

On screen.
 
	"PLEASE TAKE ME.  I'LL RECOVER 
	MY SIGHT ON THE OUTSIDE"
 
Back to scene.
   
Her counterfeit blindness, for whatever reason 
it is, strikes Harry as so cute that he makes 
up his mind to release her at all odds.   
Suppressing his smiles, he makes his last plea.  
The magistrate at last lets Mary go.  Harry 
leads her out, quite blind again. Zippy is 
pulled along on his string.
 
		114

Exterior of court.  Exit Harry in evening-dress 
and Mary, with Zippy, from 113.  But Mary won't 
listen to him here.  She still pretends 
blindness, and he must hurry around the corner 
to hear about it. They exit.

		115
 
Bench in a park. Enter Harry, Mary, and Zippy, 
from 114.  They sit down.  Harry is delighted 
to look into the frank seeing eyes of Mary.  
What a lark--and why did she get in jail? In 
all serious innocence, Mary starts to tell him.  
Dissolve to--
 
		116   

Same as 87.  Curb in front of theater.  
Discovered, Mary begging with  Zippy.  She is 
arrested by the policeman.   Dissolve to--

		117 

Bench in park.  Discovered Harry, Mary, and 
Zippy.  He is inwardly touched by her 
cleverness. He says then: 

On, screen.
 
 	"I AM GOING TO TAKE 
	YOU HOME WITH ME "
 
Back to scene.
 
A bright thought enters Mary's mind.  She 
exclaims, all smiles: 

On screen.
 
 	"I'M GOOD AT CARING FOR BABIES!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Harry doubles up with laughter. 

On screen.
 
 	"I'M THE ONLY BABY AT OUR HOUSE"
 
Back to scene.
   
That is funny -- also sad for Mary, who now 
would do most any chore so as not to leave this 
nice young man.  Finally Harry makes up his 
mind.  He is dead "busted," but he is not going 
to leave the kid on the streets.  He's going to 
take her to his home! He pulls her out the 
picture, with Zippy on the string.

		118

Same as 93.  Exterior of Disbrow house.  Enter 
Harry and Mary, with Zippy. Mary pauses in 
astonishment. "My, do you live here?" she asks. 
"Sure," returns Harry.  Mary pats up the ribbon 
bow on Zippy's collar.  She hesitates to go in, 
but Harry leads her by the hand.
 
		119

Same as 98. Close-up, the front door of 
Disbrow's house.  Enter Harry, Mary, and Zippy.  
His latchkey fits now -- but he indicates to 
Mary that the keyhole was not there last night
--hence his downfall. They exit in house.
 
		120
 
Hall and vestibule stairs, in Disbrow's house. 
Discovered Decker, the butler.  Enter Harry, 
Mary, and Zippy.  Decker is glad to see his 
young master, then his eyes fall upon Mary and 
her old hat, cloak, and white stockings. His 
eyes waft ceiling-ward. Who might this young 
female be? And why with the young master?  But 
Decker asks no questions. But looks tell.  
Having taken Harry's things, he waits for 
Mary's.  Nervous in such an affluent atmosphere, 
Mary only hangs to her protector's arm. "Where's 
mother and dad?" asks the boy.  With a 
nonplussed expression Decker exits upstairs.  
Harry, Mary, and Zippy exit in library.
 
		121
 
Same as 111.  Disbrow's library.  Enter Mary, 
Harry and Zippy.  Mary is almost afraid to move 
among the fine furnishings.  These indeed must 
be millionaires.   Harry endeavors to get Mary 
to sit down but she is apprehensive, and wants 
to run away. Enter presently, Mrs. Disbrow from 
hall.  She is both concerned and glad to see 
Harry--he is a spoiled son, but she looks 
aghast at Mary and her dog.  Harry tries to 
explain.  Mrs. Disbrow is a fine lady and well 
bred, but Harry must be crazy to bring the girl 
home.  Mary starts to run away but Harry pulls 
her back.  Harry pleads:--
 
On screen.

	"LET HER STAY TILL 
	DAD GETS HOME"
 
Back to scene.

Mrs. Disbrow expostulates with raised hands.  
She knows about what Dad will say.  Finally she 
consents to keep Mary at least for the day.  
Harry exits upstairs to change his clothes.  
Not knowing what to do with Mary and Zippy, 
Mrs. Disbrow leads them through the dining-
room.
 
		122 

Dining-room at Disbrow's.  Enter Mrs. Disbrow 
in repressed exasperation with Mary and Zippy.  
She leads them through the swinging-door into 
the kitchen.
 
		122 1/2
 
Kitchen at Disbrow's  house.  A fine, modern 
affair.  Discovered Decker, cleaning silver; 
Marie polishing glass-ware and Louis the cook 
at work with pastry.  Enter Mrs. Disbrow, with 
Mary and Zippy. The kitchen folk, all 
specialists in their line, are aghast at Mary's 
timid awkwardness, but are restrained before 
their mistress.  Mrs. Disbrow orders some food 
set up before Mary and exits. The kitchen folk 
ask her what she is to be, maid, waitress, or 
what? Mary does not know--but she does know 
she and Zippy are very hungry.  The butler 
carries some of his silver into the dining-
room, much upset over his young master's 
latest escapade.
 
		123 

Same as 122.  Dining-room at Disbrow's.  
Discovered Mrs. Disbrow, much distracted over 
the latest addition to her household.  Enter 
Decker with his silver-ware.  She registers she 
does not know what to do with Mary, but Decker 
suggests that she leave the matter to him.  Mrs.
Disbrow is about to exit when Harry, dressed in 
business suit, enters dining room looking for 
Mary.  His mother indicates she is in the 
kitchen eating.  Harry asks why she is not in 
the dining-room?  Mrs. Disbrow and her butler 
exchange glances.  What next?  Harry wings 
into the kitchen.
 
		124
 
Same as 122 1/2.  Disbrow's kitchen.  
Discovered Marie, Louis and Mary eating at 
table.  Enter Harry. He finds Mary on a chair 
with Zippy behind the door, the plate of food 
on her lap.  He is provoked that Mary is in the 
kitchen.  He registers that she follow him to 
the dining-room, but Mary holds him back--she 
would not think of going in that fine place to 
eat!  Enter Decker.  He complains of the dog 
being in the kitchen.  Harry retaliates.  Mary 
is satisfied and feeds Zippy.  "Well, you wait 
here, kid, till I come home from the office," 
indicates Harry, leaving. Mary promises.  
Circumspect in their young master's presence, 
the kitchen folk are still aghast at Mary's 
intrusion.

		125
 
	WAITING TILL DAD COMES HOME
 
Same as 129.  Disbrow's kitchen. One corner, in 
which Mary sits in a kitchen chair, hat and 
cloak removed, where she has sat all day, the 
object of amusement of the help.  Zippy is 
beside her.  Discovered Decker, Marie and Louis, 
getting up evening dinner.  Mary sits calmly and 
looks on.
 
		126
 
Same as 120. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Enter Harry from street.  He no sooner has his 
coat and hat hung on the rack than his father 
Disbrow enters from street.  At sight of his 
son, the old gentleman is mad.  His escapades
have gone far enough. "Never mind, Dad, I got 
out all right." Disbrow worships his son, but 
despises his weaknesses. Harry is on the other 
hand, merely a lovable up-to-date young man.  
He exits upstairs.  Harry secretively goes to 
look for Mary.
 
  		127

Same as 125. Disbrow's kitchen.  Discovered all 
as in 125, save that Decker moves in and out 
dining room.  Enter Harry.  Mary still sits in 
her corner. Harry greets her warmly and she is 
glad to see him. " You wait," he says, "I'll 
fix it all right." He exits.
 
		128
 
Same as 123. Disbrow's dining-room. Enter 
Disbrow and Mrs. Disbrow. Harry is waiting for 
them. They all sit down at table.  Enter Decker 
with soup. Harry starts to tell his father 
several times about Mary, but each time his 
mother shakes her head. Finally Disbrow, Sr., 
wipes his lips, leans back and says, with 
inscrutable glance at his son: 

On screen.

	"WHO WAS THE WOMAN YOU 
	WANTED TO BAIL OUT?"
 
Back to scene.

Opening an admirable opportunity, Harry tells 
his father to wait a moment.  He exits to 
kitchen.  Mrs. Disbrow and Decker exchange 
glances.  Disbrow is mystified.
 
		129
 
Same as 127.  Disbrow's kitchen.  Discovered 
Mary in her same corner, Zippy, Marie and Louis. 
Enter Harry.  He leads Mary, shrinking in the 
dining-room.

		130
 
Same as 128. Disbrow's dining-room. Discovered 
Mr. and Mrs. Disbrow, served by Decker.  Enter 
Harry, with Mary and Zippy. Well, Dad, has a 
good look at Mary and Zippy.  Between wonder 
and surprise, his explosion is restrained a 
moment.  Mary is scared to death at his look.  
Then the old gentleman, disregarding any 
explanation, orders Mary out. Harry intercedes, 
but matters go badly, till Mary of her own 
accord turns upon Disbrow and says: 

On screen.
 
	"YOU ARE JUST LIKE JENKINS"
 
Back to scene.

Curious, Disbrow wants to know who Jenkins is. 
Mary explains, dramatically, imitating Jenkins' 
salient points.  Attracted by her clever 
mimicry, Disbrow is interested. Mary continues: 

On screen.
 
	"HE WAS SO MEAN HE 
	MUST BE DEAD BY NOW!"
 
Back to scene.

Disbrow at last laughs heartily.  Harry's heart 
lightens.  While Disbrow chuckles and eats his 
meal, having first taken note of Zippy, to 
Mary's delight, Mary feels the ice is broken. 
Her sweet infectious smile wins them all.
 
		130 1/2
 
 	HARRY'S FIANCEE, 
	MAUD, ARRIVES
 
Same as 126.  Hall and stairs.  Discovered, 
Decker at evening.  Decker opens front door.  
Enter Maud, a pretty girl, whose traveling togs 
indicate she has traveled some distance, 
followed by Harry and a chauffeur carrying some 
luggage.  Disbrow and his wife hasten from the 
library to welcome Maud.
 
		131 

Top of stairs -- landing, at Disbrow's. 
Discovered Mary at top of stairs. She wears a 
neat house-dress. Hearing the welcome below, 
she runs and looks down.
 
		132 

Same as 130 1/2.  Hall at Disbrow's.  Discovered 
all as in  130 1/2.   Exit chauffeur, Decker, 
with the girl's luggage, followed by Mrs. 
Disbrow, Maud and Harry exit up stairs.

		133 

Same as 131. Head of stairs at Disbrow's. 
Discovered Mary peering over.  Hearing the 
others coming, she runs back in hall.  But all 
arriving upstairs, Mrs. Disbrow sees Mary and 
calls her to assist with the young guest's 
things.  Harry gives Mary a pat of encouragement 
on the back, and leaves, Mrs. Disbrow, Maud and 
Mary exit in a bedroom.
 
		133 1/2

Bedroom at Disbrow's. A pretty guest-room, with 
bath, furnished with cane bed, and chintz 
hangings, etc.  Enter Mrs. Disbrow, Maud, Mary 
and Decker with luggage.  Exit Decker.  Maud is 
very pretty and Mary is anxious to help her. 
Mary is soon excused from the room however, by 
Mrs. Disbrow, when her own lady's maid, Agnes, 
enters. Mary as much alone as ever, exits 
reluctantly.
 
		134 

	HER SURROUNDINGS NOT IMPROVED
 
Night.  Back yard or area of Disbrow's home.  A 
corner of it.  Discovered Zippy, tied in an 
unattractive spot, exiled from the house, a 
plate of food before him.  He barks in protest.  
Enter Mary.  She sits down with her arms around 
his neck, but is afraid to untie and liberate 
him.  Patting him, both are forlorn; oh, very 
forlorn!
 
		135 

Same as 121. Disbrow's library. Discovered Mr. 
Disbrow waiting with Harry.  Enter Mrs. Disbrow 
and Maud from upstairs.  The parents are hoping 
Harry will display more interest in Maud, but 
somehow he is distraught -- something else is on 
his mind (easily registered it is Mary) and he 
finally exits through dining-room.
 
		136

Same as 134.  Disbrow's back-yard.  Discovered 
Mary and Zippy in the moonlight.  Enter Harry.  
He comforts Mary -- he really wants to kiss her 
but does not.  Surely it is a shame for Zippy 
to be out by himself.  Harry unties him, and 
they all exit toward house.

		137 

Same as 129.  Disbrow's kitchen.  Discovered 
Louis, Marie and Decker, finishing the dinner 
clean-up.  Enter Harry, Mary and Zippy.  Louis 
protests, but Harry informs him that Zippy stays 
in the kitchen. Harry exits.

		138
 
Same as 135. Disbrow's library. Discovered Mr. 
and Mrs. Disbrow and Maud, the latter 
loquacious and entertaining.  Enter Harry.  He 
interests himself with Maud who is in love with 
him.
 
		139
 
	A BALL IS GIVEN 
	IN HONOR OF MAUD
 
Same as 133 1/2. Bedroom at Disbrow's. 
Discovered Maud dressing for the ball in lovely 
evening gown, assisted by Agnes and Marie, the 
maids.  Maud is about ready to go down stairs, 
when she picks up a pretty evening gown lying 
on the bed, and showing a slight rent in it, 
says to Agnes: 

On screen.
 
 	"MEND THIS, SO I CAN 
	WEAR IT TOMORROW"
 
Back to scene.
 
Agnes exits with gown.
 
		140

Maid's room at Disbrow's.  Enter Agnes, with 
the evening gown, which she throws over the 
back of a chair.   Arranging her cap more 
becomingly, Agnes exits.
 
		141

Same as 135.  Disbrow's library.  Well dressed 
guests have arrived and are dancing, etc.  
Discovered among them, Mr. and Mrs. Disbrow, 
Maud, Harry and all of Harry's thoroughbred 
companions from the club-room scenes, 90, 91, 
etc., pretty girls.
 
		142

Same as 133.  Top-stair landing.  Discovered 
Mary in her house dress, looking down at the 
dancers over the balustrade.  What a wonderful 
sight!  All those pretty evening dresses!  She 
creeps a few steps down.

		143
 
Same as 132. Close-up.  Hall and stairs at 
Disbrow's.  Discovered Mary looking over about 
half way down at--  

		144

Flash.  Same as 141.  Disbrow's library.  The 
ball in progress.

		145
 
Same as 143. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Discovered Mary electrified, watching.  People 
passing below; cause her to run upstairs again.
 
		146 

Same as 144.  Disbrow's library. Guests at hall. 
Decker singles Mrs. Disbrow out and calls her 
to one side.  He says: 

On screen.
 
	"MADAME, THE EXTRA WAITRESS 
	HAS NOT COME" 

Back to scene.
   
Mrs. Disbrow is provoked.  She considers a 
moment.  Then she asks--"why not let Mary 
substitute?" Decker is willing and both exit 
through the dining-room.

		147 

Same as 130. Disbrow's dining-room. Enter Mrs. 
Disbrow and Decker.  Decker exits to kitchen 
and brings in Mary.  Mrs. Disbrow makes known 
to her the absence of the much needed waitress.  
Can Mary take her place? Indeed, Mary is quite 
willing. Glad, Mrs. Disbrow pats her on the 
shoulder and says: 

On screen.

	"YOU WILL FIND A SUITABLE 
	DRESS IN THE MAID'S ROOM" 

Back to scene.

Mary indicates she will find it.  Exit Mrs. 
Disbrow relieved.  Mary exits alone. Decker 
goes about his task of setting his tables for 
the late supper. There are beautiful floral 
decorations on the large table, while the 
smaller ones are set with glass ware, 
punchbowls, etc.
 
		148

Same as 140.  Maid's room.  Enter Mary alone. 
No dress is in sight, but Maud's evening dress 
over the back of the chair, where Agnes left 
it.  Mary looks in a ward-robe, but finds 
nothing but a cloak and a wrapper.  Her eyes 
light on Maud's dress. She has never seen it 
before.  She concludes it has been placed out 
there where she could find it -- surely Mrs. 
Disbrow must have meant this one.  Anyway, all 
the pretty girls were wearing these kind of 
dresses. Of course, that is just what Mrs. 
Disbrow meant. Oh, the joy of getting into such 
a pretty dress. Mary begins to quickly disrobe.
 
		149

Same as 137.  Disbrow's kitchen.  Discovered a 
commotion among Louis and Decker trying to give 
orders at once to Agnes and Marie, who are 
getting up the dinner for the dancers.
 
		150
 
Same as 146. Flash.  Library at Disbrow's.  
Discovered the guests at the ball.
 
	END OF PART III 
 
	PART FOUR 
 
		151 

Same as 148.  Discovered Mary, dressing, as in 
148.  She has on a plain white petticoat and 
corset cover.  Standing before the bureau she 
has coiled her hair up on her head attractively 
and is sticking two of Agnes' shell pins in to 
hold it.  Then she throws the evening dress 
over her head, happy as a child. The dress is 
low-necked, white and girlishly made, after the
prevailing style of ball-gowns for debutantes.
 
		152 

Same as 147.  Disbrow's dining-room.  Enter 
Decker, carrying a big cut-glass bowl full of 
punch. This he places right in the door 
leading to the library on a small table, also 
the glasses, that all may be available as 
refreshment to the dancers.  He exits in 
kitchen.

		153
 
Same as 151.  Maid's room.  Discovered Mary 
dressed, fastening the last hook at her waist.  
In this pretty dress she is a startling 
revelation of loveliness. She can't believe her 
own eyes. On tip-toes she looks at herself -- 
then pinches her arm to make sure it is she.  
And so she goes down, in her innocence, to be 
the "extra waitress."
 
		154

Same as 152. Disbrow's dining-room. Discovered 
many of the guests gathered around the punch-
bowl, drinking, among them  Maud, Harry and 
several young people.

		155
 
Same as 145. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Discovered Mary in her ball-gown, coming down 
stairs, leaning over the balustrade.  She has 
had no one to instruct her as to her entrance 
-- she is simply coming down to be like other 
folk, and help in what way she can.

		156
 
Same as 150. Library at Disbrow's.  Discovered 
most of the dancers, including Mr. and Mrs. 
Disbrow. Seeing those possibly in need of help 
at the punchbowl, Mary passes through the 
library to it.  Mrs. Disbrow sees her. Open-
mouthed she places her hand on Disbrow's arm, 
then follows Mary out.  Disbrow follows too.

		157
 
Same as 154.  Disbrow's dining-room.  At the 
punch bowl.  Discovered Maud, Harry and others 
gathered around.  Enter Mary shyly and sweetly, 
and she starts to ladle out the punch.  Wide-
eyed and electrified at the revelation of Mary, 
Harry gasps. Wider-eyed, Maud beholds her ball-
gown upon Mary! The young men thinking she is 
some lovely belated house guest, crowd about 
her.  Oblivious to all, Mary thinks she is 
doing her duty.  Enter Mrs. Disbrow, who, with 
finger to her lips, silences any out-break from 
Maud. Mr. Disbrow enters, and looks upon one of 
the prettiest young women he has even seen.  
Harry is so elated with Mary's mistake that he 
would throw up his hat if he had one -- he 
catches his father's eye. Enter Decker and 
Agnes carrying more punch in cut-glass 
pitchers. They both behold Mary and nearly 
subside on the spot. Two young men press up to 
Mrs. Disbrow and ask for introductions.  
Distracted and not knowing what to do Mrs. 
Disbrow is beside herself what to say, till she 
catches Harry's eye, and sees a light of love 
in it for Mary.  Mrs. Disbrow steps forward.  
She says: 

On screen.
 
	"MY NIECE"
 
Back to scene.
   
Mary nearly drops her ladle, then beautifully 
composes herself and chats with the young men.  
Unobserved, Harry wrings his mother's hand.  
The joke is so good, that Mr. Disbrow himself 
presses up for a glass of punch.  With eyes 
heavenward, Decker and Agnes exit. Maud is a 
study.
 
		158

Close-up of Mary filling the punch glasses.  
Maud stands near, her face in mingled emotions.  
She cannot imagine how Mary got possession of 
her evening gown.

		159
 
Same as 157. Disbrow's dining-room. Discovered 
all as in 157.  Mary at the punch-bowl.  In the 
homage paid her, she seems to entirely forgot 
her awkward shyness.  The young men bear her 
off in the library.

		160

Library.  Discovered, the guests, dancing, etc. 
Enter Mary, with the young men.  Quite the 
belle of the ball, she nevertheless has to make 
an excuse that she does not dance.  Thoroughly 
amused and interested, Disbrow, Sr., begins to 
see new possibilities in Mary.  Harry is 
secretly delighted.  Maud watches the progress 
of her ball-gown, with indignation. When Harry 
hears from Maud that it is her dress, his humor 
knows no bounds.
 
		161

	LATER
 
Same as 157. Disbrow's dining-room.  Whole 
scene.  Decker announces that luncheon is 
served. The guests take their places at the big 
table (smaller tables may be seen through 
another door for other guests).  At the big 
table, Mary is in evidence, seated between 
Harry and Banker Jordon, a fine-looking elderly 
man, much taken with Mary.  Other guests 
surround the table, including Mr. and Mrs. 
Disbrow, Maud, etc.  Enthused and delighted, 
Mary begins a chatter of  conversation.  All 
listen attentively. Decker, Agnes and Marie 
wait on table. 
 
		161 1/2

	MARY TELLS THEM A STORY 

Same as 161.  The Disbrow's dining-room, with 
guests, the Disbrows and Mary, talking.  In 
answer to a question from Banker Jordon she 
says: 

On screen.

	"YES I FELT I NEEDED 
	A CHANGE IN THE CITY"
 
Back to scene.
 
"But this is why I came so quickly," she goes 
on. All listen. Dissolve to--
 
		162

Same as 79. Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mary 
at the wash-tub, with the baby pulling the 
table-cloth over on the floor.  Dissolve back 
to--
 
		163

Same as 161. Disbrow's dining-room. Mary tells 
her narrative. But the faces of those around 
have sobered up--especially that of Mrs. 
Disbrow.  "That was bad enough," goes on Mary, 
"but listen --" Dissolve to--
 
		164

Same as 162. Jenkins' kitchen. Discovered Mary 
and Mrs. Jenkins. Mrs. Jenkins hands Mary the 
egg basket and scolds her for not finding more 
eggs. 

Cut in--

On screen.
 
	"SHE WAS ALWAYS MAD BECAUSE 
	I DID NOT FIND MORE EGGS"
 
Back to scene.
 
Mary takes the basket and exits.  

		165

	"SO ONE DAY, I TOOK 
	SOME FROM UNDER PEGGY"
  
Same as 38. Interior of barn. Discovered Mary. 
She takes two eggs from Peggy and puts them in 
her pocket.  She exits.
 
		166 

Same as 169. Jenkins' kitchen. Discovered Mrs. 
Jenkins at stove.  Mary brings in the basket of 
eggs, and drops the two in the dish on the 
table.  Enter Jenkins who sits down at table 
with children.
 
		167 

Same as 161. Disbrow's dining-room. Discovered 
the listening guests around the table.   Mrs. 
Disbrow is mortified to death but cannot reach 
Mary to stop her.  Laughing, Mary says: 

On screen.
 
	"MR. JENKINS ALWAYS LIKED 
	TWO OR THREE EGGS"
 
Back to scene.
   
Mary talking -- the others with mingled 
emotions. Fade to--    

		168 

Same as 166.  Jenkins' kitchen.  Discovered Mr. 
and Mrs. Jenkins, the Jenkins children and Mary. 
Mr. Jenkins at the table has just discovered 
the little chickens.  Mary darts out the door. 
 
		169
 
Same as 55. Fence on Jenkins' barn-lot. 
Discovered Mary and Zippy going over the fence.  
Mary runs up road for dear life. Dissolve to--
 
		170 

Same as 167. Disbrow's dining-room. Discovered 
Mary finishing her story, with guests listening. 
There is a moment's pause  when every one 
silently convulsed, roars with laughter.  Mary 
does not know what she has done, and she looks 
at her embarrassed hostess in fright, but Banker 
Jordon pats her on the back.  "Good for you," he 
says.  And turning to Mrs. Disbrow, he says, "I 
congratulate you on your plucky niece."  Decker 
stands with his back to the table, his face in 
his hands, his shoulders shaking with laughter.  
Mary has made the hit of the evening, even if 
certainly an embarrassing one for her self-
claimed "relatives," the Disbrows.

Break scene.  The guests rise and leave dining-
room.  It is plain to the Disbrows that Mary 
can never be relegated to the background again, 
as they watch the young men and Banker Jordon 
bear Mary away.  Women, too, congratulate Mrs. 
Disbrow upon Mary's loveliness, even though 
they cannot quite understand or dove-tail the 
Jenkins' story with that of the Disbrow proud 
ancestry.  Harry has the joke on his parents.

		171 

	DISCOVERIES
 
Same as 160. Disbrow's library. Discovered 
Disbrow, Mrs. Disbrow and Maud, whom they some 
day expect to be a daughter.  Enter Harry from 
another part of the house.  With a glance at 
him, his parents slip out to leave them alone.  
Maud gives Harry the chance to declare his 
love, but he does not take it. Looking toward 
the hall he smiles, for he sees --
 
		172

Same as 155. Hall and stairs. Discovered, Mary 
coming down in a pretty and simple house-dress 
now as one of the family.  With something of a 
start she sees Maud and Harry alone, and 
notices Maud's attitude toward Harry, and turns 
as if to retrace her steps upstairs.

		173
 
Same as 171.  Disbrow's library.  Discovered 
Maud and Harry.  Harry calls Mary and goes to 
meet her.  Maud witnesses where his heart has 
found refuge.  With suppressed indignation at 
Mary for not keeping her place, Maud with an 
excuse soon exits. Harry falls to chatting with 
Mary, not realizing that he is in love with her.
 
               174
 
	AFTER THE DINNER HOUR
 
Same as 170.  Dining-room at Disbrow's.  
Discovered, finishing dinner at table, Mr. and 
Mrs. Disbrow, Mary, Harry and Maud.  Mary is 
quite happy, but Maud has never forgiven her 
for her pleasantly made sensation of the other 
evening.  As the women exit for the drawing-
room, Harry follows, but he is held back by his 
father who wishes to speak with him in 
confidence.  Disbrow says to Harry, finally: 

On screen.

	"WE HAVE PLANNED TO SEND 
	MARY AWAY TO SCHOOL UNTIL 
	AFTER YOUR MARRIAGE WITH 
	MAUD"
 
Back to scene.

Harry is stunned over his father's keenness for 
this marriage.   Harry insists he has no 
inclinations of the kind toward Maud, and is 
angry when the matter is pushed.  Disbrow 
continues: 

On screen.
 
	"I HAVE GRAVE REASONS FOR 
	DESIRING THIS MARRIAGE"
 
Back to scene.
   
Leaving Harry alone to come to a sensible 
resolve, Disbrow exits to drawing-room.
 
		175

Same as 173. Disbrow's library. Discovered Mary 
and Maud sitting alone on a divan.  Also Mrs. 
Disbrow, elsewhere.  Enter Mr. Disbrow.  He 
passes Mary and Maud, and pats Maud 
affectionately upon the shoulder as he does so.  
After he has joined his wife, both exit, 
leaving the girls alone. Maud, with an object 
in view, grows confidential. Feigning a shy 
blush, Maud leans over and whispers to Mary. 
 
		176

Same as 175. Close-up of Mary and Maud. Maud 
confides to Mary effectively: 

On screen.
 
	"DID YOU KNOW THAT HARRY 
	AND I ARE ENGAGED?"
 
Back to scene.

Mary registers that she certainly did not know 
it, and an expression of pain flashes over her 
face. Maud enjoys her discomfiture.  Mary looks 
out toward the dining-room and sees through the 
door.
 
		177

Same as 174.  Disbrow's dining-room.  Discovered 
Harry.  He looks through and catches Mary's eye. 
Pained, and looking guilty, she thinks, he turns 
away. He exits toward the vestibule.
 
		178

Same as 175.  Disbrow's library.  Whole scene. 
Discovered Mary and Maud on divan.  Mary is 
watching Harry, which Maud takes note of.  
Unable to throw off the report of Maud's 
confidence, Mary exits toward stairs.
 
		179

Same as 172. Hall and stairs. Discovered Harry, 
his evening at home spoiled, getting into his 
hat and coat.  Mary enters, passes wordless 
upstairs, Harry reaches after her.  He exits 
just as his father steps into the hall to see 
where he is going, evading questioning.

		180
 
	YOUTH'S CONSOLATION
 
Same as 90. Card-room at gentlemen's club. 
Discovered several of Harry's old society pals 
at the usual game.  Enter Harry dejected.  He 
won't tell what's the matter, but orders drinks 
-- plenty of them.
 
		181
 
	MIDNIGHT
 
Same as 179. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Enter Harry.

		182

Same as 178. Disbrow's library. Lights lowered. 
Discovered Mary, curled up on the divan, where 
she has been awaiting Harry's return.  She 
hears him and hurries out.

		183 

Same as 181. Hall and stairs. Harry discovered, 
fumbling about to get out of his coat.  Enter
Mary. She did not think he would come home like 
this. He is humiliated she has found him so.  
Mary begs him to give up his dissipation.  
Thinking him engaged to Maud she breaks into 
tears and starts to run upstairs. He checks her. 
More than that, tenderly in love with her, he 
tries to take her into his arms.  He registers 
that he will never drink again, if she will 
care for him. Mary shakes her head. She 
remembers what Maud told her.  All her 
happiness for some reason seems gone. She says 
to him:
 
On screen.
 
	"I GUESS I WILL GO 
	BACK TO THE JENKINS!" 

Back to scene.

Harry's brain is not too be-muddled to grasp 
the significance, and it strikes him as 
particularly funny. "Never that," he assures 
her. Laughing, he grasps her reluctant hands.  
Mary runs up stairs.  Harry sits down on the 
hall-rack, his brain dazed, to think it over.

		184
 
	THE UNITY TRUST COMPANY
 
Private office or handsome library of the Trust 
Company.  Discovered Mr. Disbrow, alone.  In 
his hands he holds a legal paper.  Its contents 
worry him deeply.  It is as if he reads in the 
sinister lines, failure of his bank.  He paces 
the floor, irresolute. He places his hand over 
his eyes, to shut out a vision of horror.

		185
 
Exterior of a bank.  Discovered a maddened run 
upon the bank, with officers fighting back the 
depositors.

		186
 
Same as 189.  Private office of Trust Company. 
Discovered Disbrow, alone.  He registers that 
such a calamity must never happen if he can 
avert it.  Disbrow consults his watch.  The 
outer door opens. 

		187

	GEORGE HORTON, PARTNER OF 
	DISBROW, AND MAUD'S FATHER
 
Same as 186.  Private office.  Trust Company.  
Discovered Disbrow.  Enter Horton, an 
immaculately dressed man of fifty-five.  Horton 
at ease with himself, however craftily notices 
the document in Disbrow's hand.  Disbrow asks 
Horton. 

On screen.
 
	"WHO HOLDS OUR GREAT 
	NORTHERN SECURITIES?" 

Back to scene.

Horton feigns he is surprised that such a 
question should be asked him.  But as if to 
remind Disbrow he says:

On screen.
 
	"I HEARD YOU DICTATE A 
	LETTER OFFERING THEM 
	OUR BONDING COMPANY"
 
Back to scene.
   
To prove this, Horton takes a letter file from a 
desk and shows Disbrow the copy.  "Yes," Disbrow 
replies, "I dictated the letter, but," he adds: 

On screen.
 
 	"THE LETTERS AND THE SECURITIES 
	BOTH FAILED IN SOME MYSTERIOUS 
	MANNER TO REACH THEIR DESTINATION"
 
Back to scene.
 
Horton registers this must be impossible. 
Disbrow goes on to describe over again, just 
how he dispatched the securities.  Dissolve to--
 
		188 

Same as 187. Disbrow's office of Trust Company. 
Discovered Disbrow dictating a letter to his 
stenographer (man).  As he dictates, unobserved 
Horton enters door, pauses--listens.   With a 
sinister expression, he lingers till Disbrow 
observes him.  Then slips outside again.  
Having finished, Disbrow hands the stenographer-
secretary the securities which are to be 
enclosed in the letter.  Stenographer exits.
 
		189 

Main office of Trust Company. Several clerks 
discovered.  Enter Disbrow's stenographer. He 
immediately begins typing the important letter. 
Horton passes through the office, watching him.
 
		190

Flash.  Same as 188.  Discovered Disbrow at his 
desk, arranging papers.   Enter stenographer 
with the letter, for Disbrow's signature which 
he adds. Disbrow himself encloses the securities 
and seals the letter.  Stenographer exits with 
envelope.
 
		191
 
Same as 189.  Main office of Trust Company. 
Enter stenographer.  He places the envelope 
among a stack of like mail to be sent out. 
Horton watches. Stenographer exits in another 
office. Horton passes and unseen by any one of 
the clerks, whose backs are turned, slips out 
the one envelope and secretes it.  He exits to 
the private office.
 
		192

Same as 190.  Private office of Trust Company. 
Discovered Disbrow at his desk.   Enter Horton, 
suave and matter-of-fact.  He asks what Disbrow 
has been doing.  When Disbrow explains he has 
offered the securities, Horton registers he 
thinks it a good move.
 
		193

Diagram in.  Same as 187.  Discovered Disbrow 
with Horton, listening.  Horton distinctly 
remembers the transaction, and again proves his 
assertion by the carbon copy of the letter.  
Puzzled, and worried, Disbrow registers the 
securities are missing.  He touches the button 
on his desk.  Enter stenographer secretary.  
When asked about the letter in question, 
stenographer thinks a moment, then replies: 

On screen.
 
 	"I SENT OUT ALL THOSE 
	LETTERS FIVE MINUTES LATER"
 
Back to scene.
   
Exit stenographer.  Horton tells Disbrow not to 
worry--that there is a mistake somewhere.  But 
Disbrow registers how serious the matter is--
also that it involves himself in a careless 
business transaction.  He closes his desk to 
leave. 

		194   

Exterior of Trust Company.  Enter in car, Mrs. 
Disbrow and Mary in pretty afternoon dress.  In 
front with the chauffeur, sits Zippy resplendent 
in a white sweater.  Mrs. Disbrow gets out to 
meet her husband.  She exits in building.  Mary 
has the chauffeur help Zippy to the back seat 
beside her.
 
		195 

	OLD ACQUAINTANCES
 
Same as 194. Exterior of Trust Company.  
Discovered Mary and Zippy and chauffeur in car.  
Enter, passing the bank building, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bell and their two children.  The small boy 
walks, but the baby Mr. Bell pushes in a baby-
carriage.  They are almost past when Mary 
happens to recognize them. With all manner of 
pantomime and calls, she manages to attract 
their attention.  The Bells come back and are 
amazed to see that this is Mary of former 
pig-tails.  Mary in a big automobile, 
beautifully dressed! Delighted, Mary confides 
to them: 

On screen.

	"I FOUND MY RELATIVES!"
 
Back to scene.

The Bells register that they must be "some 
relatives."  Mary presses a bunch of violets 
she is wearing upon Mrs. Bell, who modestly 
takes them.  "And oh, look at Zippy," exclaims 
Mary, "isn't he society?"  The Bells are so 
taken by surprise that they do not see Mr. and 
Mrs. Disbrow, who have entered from the 
building.  But Mary excitedly introduces the 
Bells and relates wherein they once did her a 
kindness.  Disbrow and Mrs. Disbrow shake hands 
with the Bells kindly, then enter the car.  The 
chauffeur darts out of the picture with them, 
leaving the Bells behind amazed. Mr. Bell takes 
off his hat and scratches his forehead. Mrs. 
Bell wonders if her clothes appeared just right 
before the rich Disbrows.
 
		196 

	SOME TROTHS ARE 
	NEVER PLIGHTED 

Same as 119. Exterior of Disbrow's home. 
Discovered, the Disbrow car with chauffeur in 
front of house.  Enter from house, Harry and 
Maud.  Decker, the butler, and Mrs. Disbrow see 
them off.  Car exits with Harry and Maud.
 
		197 

Several flashes of country road to indicate 
that Maud lives in some suburban home near New 
York. Discovered in the car, Harry and Maud.
 
		198 

Exterior of Horton's home--a beautiful place, 
presumably on Long Island.  Enter, through 
driveway, Disbrow's car with Harry, Maud and 
chauffeur. A servant runs out from the house, 
to take the luggage.  Pressed to come in by 
Maud, Harry is sorry. The hour is late--he must 
return to the city.  The car whirls around and 
away with Harry and driver. Maud stands looking 
after him. Her distress finally subsides in 
anger.  She feels secure, yet she is far from 
landing Harry yet.
 
		198 1/2
 
Same as 155. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Enter Harry in his motor coat, plainly wearied 
with the question of Maud.  Enter, from 
upstairs, Mary and Zippy, Harry sees her.  His 
face grows radiant. Getting out of his coat, he 
greets her at the bottom of the stairs, where 
she sits on the lower step.  With a sigh, he 
exclaims: 

On screen.
 
	"THANK HEAVEN I AM THROUGH 
	WITH THAT! DO YOU KNOW WHY?"
 
Back to scene.
  
Mary does not know why.  "This is why," 
exclaims Harry, and taking her face in his 
hands, he looks into her falling gaze, then 
gives her a kiss square on the lips.  Mary is 
so sweetly embarrassed, that she reaches down 
and holds her hand over Zippy's eyes.  He must 
not see such actions.  Harry laughs.  The 
picture fades.
 
	END OF PART FOUR
 
	PART FIVE
 
		199 

	THE DIRECTORS' MEETING 

Same as 193.  Private office of Trust Company. 
Discovered Disbrow and the directors of the 
company, seated at the table, which is piled 
with papers, etc. One chair is vacant--that of 
Horton. The others have been awaiting his 
arrival.
 
		200
 
	THE MISSING MEMBER
 
Hotel lobby.  Discovered the usual habitues. 
Among them is Horton, leaning against the news 
stand with a newspaper, reading.  It has been 
his intention to stay away from the directors' 
meeting, until he unexpectedly comes across 
some headlines in the paper.  He reads: 

Newspaper on screen.
 
VALUABLE, SECURITIES MISSING. RUMORS REACHED 
BANKING CIRCLES LATE TODAY THAT SECURITIES TO 
BE OFFERED A LARGE BONDING COMPANY AS 
COLLATERAL, BY THE UNITY TRUST COMPANY ARE 
MISSING. THE INFORMATION IS UNOFFICIAL.

Late this afternoon apparently reliable 
information reached financial circles that 
securities amounting to--
 
Back to scene.
   
This changes matters for Horton. So the news 
has crept out!  It is something which he did 
not yet intend to happen.  He knows there is a 
directors' meeting tonight. For fear that 
suspicion might rest upon him, because of his 
absence, he decides he had better go.  
Consulting his watch, he exits.  

		201
 
Same as 193.  Private office of Trust Company. 
The meeting is in session now, as Disbrow 
finally takes up the issue of the missing 
securities.  Disbrow says:
   
On screen.
 
 	"IT MAY LOOK CARELESS OF ME, 
	NOT TO HAVE DELIVERED THEM BY 
	SPECIAL MESSENGER, BUT THEY 
	WERE SENT, NEVERTHELESS"
 
Back to scene.
   
Disbrow touches a button on desk.  Enter his 
stenographer-secretary.  When asked if he 
positively mailed the envelope again, the man 
thinks a moment -- his brain is becoming dazed, 
but he finally says he is positive.  As 
stenographer exits, he meets Horton, late, 
coming in.   Horton apologizes for his lateness. 
Noting the serious expression of his confreres, 
he signifies his tardiness has been caused by 
the article which has appeared in the newspaper.  
The newspaper publication is a surprise to the 
directors. "Who could have given such rumors 
out?"  No one knows. Seating himself, Horton 
explains that he knows nothing of the 
transaction, other than that he heard Disbrow 
dictate the letter, the copy of which he 
recognized on the table before him and picks up.  
At all events, Disbrow indicates that the 
newspaper publications must be stopped.  Also, 
Disbrow insists that the securities must turn 
up yet. 

Break scene. 

The directors are adjourning.

		202 

Same as 182.  Disbrow's library.  Discovered 
Mary, curled up on the divan, unseen by Disbrow 
as he returns home from the directors' meeting.  
He comes in, alone he thinks, and lays his hat 
and coat over another chair.  He sits down, 
meditating, in a big arm-chair.  Mary notices 
he is in some trouble.  She has had an inkling 
of the trouble herself.  She glances to a 
newspaper she has herself seen, earlier, and 
folded and placed behind a vase on the table.  
Approaching Disbrow, she sits down on the arm 
of his chair.  She has always wanted to look 
upon him as a father, but somehow the constraint 
is still felt, and she is too shy to make first 
advances.  But now, Disbrow is glad to see her 
-- glad of the company of her youth.  She 
questions him what is wrong.  He laughs--it is 
nothing she can remedy.  Mary then reaches for 
the hidden newspaper and shows him the 
headlines.  "Is this the reason?" she asks.  
Surprised that the late publication has 
reached his home, Disbrow says, "Yes."  Disbrow 
asks if the whole house knows it--but Mary 
indicates that only she does. "Be quiet then," 
he requests. Mary is very sorry--but hopeful.  
Indeed she is so overjoyed that Disbrow should 
put upon her the honor of a confidante in his 
trouble, that she impulsively pats him upon the 
bead and gives him a good squeeze around the 
neck. Then she runs for the stairs -- and won't 
look back, when he rises and calls her. Once 
she is gone, Disbrow sits down, a new light in 
his face.  He sees Mary's real worth.  He 
smiles and says: 

On screen.
 
	"A FRIEND LIKE THAT 
	IS A FRIEND INDEED!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Disbrow finally exits.

		203
 
	SECRETLY PLAYING THE MARKETS 

Business street in New York--financial 
districts. Discovered Harry coming out of a 
cigar store.  He lights a cigarette in the 
doorway.  As he stands there lighting, Horton, 
absorbed deeply, passes.  Harry recognizes and 
hails him, but Horton passes, not hearing or 
seeing him.  Harry follows him out.
 
		204
 
Same as 203. Financial district. Discovered a 
big building, in ground-floor office of which 
is plainly evident a large brokerage house.  
Enter Horton. With a glance about, he exits. 
Enter Harry, who has seen Horton enter the 
place.  He pauses.
 
		205

Close-up of Harry, outside the window of 
brokerage house.   He registers expression--
"Why is Horton here?" 

		206
 
Same as 204. Financial district--outside window 
of brokerage house.   Discovered Harry, 
watching. He sees Horton pass the plate glass 
window, inside the office.  Assured that Horton 
is playing the markets, Harry goes into the 
building to see. 
 
		207
 
Interior trading-room of stock brokerage office, 
with quotation boards, men matching the market, 
etc. Horton watches the board a moment.  Harry 
appears unobserved in the door.  Horton scans a 
ticker-tape -- luck is against him.  He calls 
one of the brokers the broker registers that 
everything is on the "break" for the day.  
Horton indicates a certain market. "Rotten, and 
dropping every second," indicates the broker.  
Convinced that Horton is playing, Harry exits.  
Horton exits into private office of the firm.

		208

Private office of brokerage house.  Discovered 
an official.  Enter Horton  perturbed.  The 
official regrets the depreciation of the 
markets--but requests more money for margins.  
Horton exits.
 
		209

Same as 201.  Private office of Trust Company. 
Discovered Disbrow, at work.  Enter clerk, with 
a newspaper reporter, carrying pad and pencil.  
Taking up the newspaper with the run of 
headlines, Disbrow registers he has no 
interview or information, and to cut out such 
publication immediately.  "The Unity Trust 
Company is all right," affirms Disbrow. 
Reporter exits.  Alone--Disbrow sees the 
seriousness of the matter.  Enter Harry--he has 
met and passed the reporter outside.  He asks 
his father if he gave out any news.  Disbrow 
says he did not.  Then Harry confides what he 
has just seen in the financial district.  He 
says: 

On screen.
 
 	"HORTON IS PLAYING MIDLAND 
	STEEL, WHICH HAS BEEN 
	DROPPING SINCE FRIDAY!"
 
Back to scene.
   
Disbrow cannot believe it, but Harry assures him 
it is true.  Disbrow wonders  if Horton could 
have had anything to do with the missing 
securities --but that cannot be possible either 
-- yet Harry's information is valuable.  They 
will keep quiet on the discovery awhile, at 
least.  Harry exits.
 
		210
 
	AS THE FACTS DEVELOP
 
Same as 209. Private office of Disbrow. 
Discovered Disbrow.  Enter Horton.  He starts to 
pass through the office to his own office, 
leading off the private office, when Disbrow 
calls him.  Once seated, Disbrow says: 

On screen.
 
	"HORTON, YOU KNOW IF THERE IS 
	A CRASH HERE, EVERY CENT OF 
	YOUR FORTUNE AS WELL AS MINE, 
	MUST BE ASSIGNED TO OUR 
	DEPOSITORS"
 
Back to scene.
 
Horton is silent.  He finally has to confess: 

On screen.
 
	"PRIVATE ENTERPRISES HAVE 
	LATELY DEPLETED MY OWN WEALTH"
 
Back to scene.
  
Disbrow's suspicions grow, but he decides not 
to make an accusation yet. Horton is glad to 
get out to his own office.

		211
 
 	THAT EVENING
 
Same as 198. Exterior of Horton's house.  
Discovered, Horton in car, with chauffeur, 
having run out from city.  He exits in house.  
Car exits.
 
		212

A drawing-room or library in Horton's home.  
Enter Horton from scene 211.  Enter Maud, who 
greets him warmly.  Horton is troubled over his 
own ignominy.  But the sight of his daughter, 
and the comfort of his home, increases his 
desperation to win out at all odds.  He sits 
down--she stands chatting behind him.  As he 
sits there, dissolve to--
 
		213 

Same as 185. A run on the bank. Dissolve to--
 
		214 

Same as 212.  Interior Horton's home.  He is 
thinking:

On screen.
 
	"IS PRIVATE WEALTH WORTH MORE 
	THAN DEPOSITORS' SAVINGS?"
 
Back to scene.
 
Horton wipes out the picture with a laugh.  He 
rubs his hands, "Yes! Yes."  Compared to his 
selfish interests, depositors are worth nothing 
to him.  Maud has stopped chattering.  Why is 
Horton so engrossed? He collects himself, and 
rising, pats her on the shoulder fondly.  They 
exit:
 
		215 

	THE DAY FOLLOWING
 
Corner of library in Horton's home (same as 
214). Discovered Horton, working the combination 
of a wall-safe.  He removes the envelope 
containing the stolen securities.  He pauses--
it is a terrible move to make.  He did not 
intend at first to wholly steal them, but merely 
to offer them temporarily as his own, individual 
collateral.  Then, desperate, he secretes the 
envelope in his coat pocket.  He is in overcoat 
and hat, and exits for the city.
 
		216 

Same as 211. Exterior of Horton's home. His car 
is waiting.  Horton enters from house and enters 
car. Chauffeur drives out.
 
		217 

	"WIPED OUT" 

Same as 210.  Private office of Trust Company, 
empty.  Enter Horton.  Disbrow's desk is open.  
He runs through some of the papers, as if 
seeking something more for collateral, then 
calls up the telephone.  

		218 

Close-up of Horton--intensely strained features.
 
		219 

Same as 208.  Private office of brokerage house.  
Discovered official.  He turns to telephone -- 
talks.
 
		220 

Same as 217.  Private office of Trust Company. 
Discovered Horton, inquiring about his stocks.
 
		221 

Same as 219.  Private office of brokerage firm
--official at telephone.  He says: 

On screen.
 
	"ALL YOUR MARGINS MUST BE 
	COVERED BEFORE THE MARKET 
	OPENS IN THE MORNING"
 
Back to scene.
 
The official, is very sorry, but such is the 
case.
 
		221 1/2 

Same as 220.  Private office of Trust Company. 
Discovered Horton at 'phone.  He hangs up the 
receiver, stunned.   He feels of the envelope 
in his pocket.  As the last straw he will have 
to use these the missing securities to cover 
his losses.
 
		222 

	THAT EVENING
 
Same as 170.  Dining-room at Disbrow's.  
Discovered, Mrs. Disbrow, Mary and Harry, at 
dinner served by Decker.  Decker hears Mr. 
Disbrow coming home, in hall, and exits to him a 
moment.

		223 
Same as 155. Hall and stairs in Disbrow's home. 
Enter Disbrow. Enter Decker, who removes his 
coat. Exit Disbrow and Decker to dining-room.
 
		224

Same as 222.  Disbrow's dining-room.  
Discovered Mrs. Disbrow, Mary and Harry, dining.  
Enter Disbrow and Decker.  Mary especially is 
happy to see him home.  No one of the household 
but Disbrow and Harry know of the real crash 
imminent.  Disbrow takes place at table.  Decker 
announces to Disbrow: 

On screen.
 
	"MR. HORTON TELEPHONED HE 
	WILL SEE YOU HERE AT EIGHT-
	THIRTY THIS EVENING, SIR "
 
Back to scene.
 
Disbrow replies -- "Very well." Mary hates all 
the Hortons.

		225
 
	OFF FOR THE THEATER
 
Same as 228. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Discovered Harry and his mother, Mrs. Disbrow, 
off for the theater.  Mary bids them good-bye 
at door. Decker sees them out.  Mary runs 
upstairs. 
 
		226 

Same as 203. Disbrow's library. Discovered 
Disbrow at table reading--awaiting Horton.
 
		227 

Same as 139.  Guest room at Disbrow's--now 
Mary's bed-room. Enter Mary. Glad to be left 
alone with her interesting novel, she curls 
herself up in a big chair, under a softly 
shaded reading lamp to read.
 
		228 

	EIGHT-THIRTY 

Same as 225. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Discovered, Decker, opening front door.  Enter 
Horton. Decker takes his things, then announces 
him.
 
		229 

Same as 227. Guest-room.  Discovered, Mary, in 
chair reading.  She hears Horton arrive--
listens an instant, nods then settles back to 
read again.
 
		230 

Same as 226. Library at Disbrow's. Discovered, 
Disbrow who rises to welcome Horton. There is 
only luke-warm cordiality between the partners.  
They both sit down at the table, on which 
Disbrow already has some documentary papers, 
etc.  Disbrow sees that Horton is on the brink 
of a nervous breakdown. Beginning at once, with 
firmness Disbrow says to him, with shaking 
finger:

On screen.
 
 	"HORTON, I HEAR YOU HAVE 
	BEEN DABBLING IN STOCKS!"
 
Back to scene.
 
Horton is surprised that Disbrow knows this. 
Horton's face is pale--he does not answer--he 
looks into space. Disbrow waits.
 
     		231

Same as 229.  Guest-room.  Discovered Mary, 
reading.  For some unexplainable reason she 
grows restless and can't read.  She rises and 
pats her hair before the glass.  She walks to 
the door, opens it, and listens out in the 
hall.
 
		232

Same as 230. Disbrow's library. Discovered, 
Disbrow and Horton in tense attitudes.  Horton, 
at last nods.  He says, "Yes, I have been 
speculating--disastrously."  Disbrow hates to 
hear him make the admission, but he presses 
Horton with the words: 

On screen.
 
 	"YOU ADMIT YOU ARE WIPED OUT. 
	WHAT HAVE YOU DONE WITH THE 
	BANK'S SECURITIES?"
 
Back to scene.
 
Horton starts over the fact that he has been 
suspected, but he nods.  Now, however, he has 
the whip-hand to hold over Disbrow.
 
		233
 
Flash.  Same as 231. Guest room at Disbrow's. 
Discovered, Mary, listening. She exits in hall.
 
		234 

Same as 228. Hall and stairs at Disbrow's. 
Discovered Mary creeping down, holding to 
balustrade, listening.  She stops midway on 
stairs, looking into library.

		235 

Same as 232.  Library at Disbrow's.  Discovered 
Disbrow and Horton.  Horton starts to make a 
rapid explanation.  Disbrow stops him--all he 
wants are facts--not generalities.  Horton sinks 
back with a smile, pushing his chair back a pace.  
From an inner pocket, he takes before Disbrow's 
almost unbelieving eyes, the envelope containing 
the securities.  With an exclamation, Disbrow 
holds out his hand for the envelope.  Horton 
does not give it to him.
 
		236

Flash. Close-up of Mary, listening on the 
stairs, unobserved.
 
		237

Same as 235. Disbrow's library. Discovered 
Disbrow and Horton. Horton waves Disbrow's 
extended hand back.  He says to Disbrow: 

On screen.

	"I HAVE NOT USED THESE 
	SECURITIES YET.  BUT I AM A 
	RUINED MAN, DISBROW. FIRST, 
	MAKE MY FAMILY SAFE BY A 
	MARRIAGE OF YOUR SON AND MY 
	DAUGHTER, AND YOU CAN HAVE 
	THE SECURITIES TO SAVE THE 
	DEPOSITORS. IF NOT --"
 
Back to scene.
   
At first, Disbrow is staggered with the bald-
faced proposition.  He simply stares at Horton, 
now the aggressor.
 
		238

Flash.  Same as 234.  Close-up of Mary on 
stairs, listening, wide-eyed.  How she hates 
that Mr. Horton!

		239 

Same as 237. Disbrow's library. Discovered 
Disbrow and Horton. Still holding out his hand, 
Disbrow says:

On screen.
 
	"I CANNOT FORCE MY SON TO 
	MARRY A WOMAN HE DOES NOT 
	LOVE"
 
Back to scene.

Horton stung at the refusal of his daughter, 
begins to wear a sneer.

		240

Flash.  Same as 238.  Close-up of Mary, on 
stairs listening.  She hugs herself with joy, 
to hear Mr. Disbrow sit that.
 
		241

Same as 239. Disbrow's library. Discovered, 
Disbrow and Horton.  Disbrow holding out his 
hand again, is amazed to see Horton start to 
replace the securities in his coat.  Horton 
shakes his head.  "So long as I hold these 
securities, Disbrow, you and your bank are in 
my power." Disbrow springs to his feet, 
outraged.  He cries:  "You scoundrel, do you 
mean to hold the bank's money to cover your own 
indebtedness!"  Horton nods.  Disbrow springs 
to his feet. Horton does the same--but on his 
side of the table in order to steady himself in 
his quick rising, he grasps the table's edge, 
which knocks the security envelope from his 
hand forgotten to the floor beneath the table 
at his feet
 
		242 

Flash.  Same as 240.  Whole scene.  Mary on 
stairs, listening.  She has seen the envelope 
drop. She runs down stairs and out around by 
the dining-room entrance.

		243

Same as 241. Disbrow's library. Discovered 
Disbrow and Horton, quarreling bitterly.  
Disbrow over the end, Horton over the side of 
the table.
 
		244

Close-up of envelope lying on floor a little 
behind Horton.

		245
 
Flash.  Close-up of Mary peering in at dining-
room entrance.  She drops behind a big chair in 
the library, then gets down to crawl over the 
floor.
 
		246 

Same as 249.  Disbrow's library.  Discovered, 
Disbrow and Horton quarreling.  In rage and 
losing his head, Disbrow reaches in the nearest 
drawer and secures a revolver.  Horton springs 
upon him to save his own life.  Mary is 
crawling on the floor behind them, toward the 
security envelope.
 
		247

Same as 244. Close-up of envelope. Enter Mary 
crawling.  She secures the envelope, and darts 
back.
 
		248 

Same as 246. Disbrow's library. Discovered,
Disbrow and Horton struggling with the revolver. 
Discovered, Mary--she rises from the floor, 
still unseen, and runs near the dining-room 
door and drops the envelope in a huge Japanese 
vase standing on the floor.  She then turns and 
is horrified to see the men struggling with the 
revolver.  Furthermore, Horton has wrested the 
weapon from Disbrow's hand, and it is only the 
question of a moment with the two infuriated 
partners. Mary picks up a slender bronze statue 
on the table. She comes down with it on 
Horton's arm, averting his aim, as he fires 
into the air.
 
		249

Flash.  Same as 149.  Disbrow's kitchen  
Discovered, Decker, Louis, Marie and Agnes, 
the help at a game of cards on the kitchen table. 
They hear the shot, arise and run to find the 
reason thereof.

		250
 
Same as 248. Disbrow's library. Discovered 
Disbrow, Horton, and Mary.   The men see Mary 
for the first time. Holding his arm, Horton 
drops the revolver on the table.  Disbrow knows 
she has saved his life. With a glance at the 
dining-room, Mary quickly conceals the weapon 
in a drawer, just as Decker, Louis, Marie, and 
Agnes burst in.  They find a tableau, but 
apparently no tragedy.  The partners try to 
readjust themselves.  But it is Mary who allays 
the servants' curiosity and fears.  She pushes 
the four of them back toward the dining-room.  
With exchanging glances the "help" retire.  The 
two partners look at each other.  Mary has not 
only averted a scandal, but she has saved the 
bank as well, for Horton, scattering the papers 
over the table and looking on the floor, cannot 
find the securities.  He staggers out of the 
room, a beaten and ruined man.  Alone, Disbrow 
opens his arms.  Thankful to have such a 
daughter, Disbrow closes Mary to his breast.   
When he recovers, she pulls him by the arm to 
the vase.  She points inside. Holding her 
against him, Disbrow dashes the tears from his 
eyes.
 
		251
 
	SAFE HAVEN
 
Same as 250. Disbrow's library.  Red lights 
glow in the fireplace. Discovered, Disbrow 
sitting in a big chair before the fire in quiet, 
restful rumination, while Mary, reposing on the 
chair arm, Disbrow's arm around her, is asleep.  
She has found a real daddy at last.  Disbrow 
holds the security envelope on his knees.

		252 

Same as 251.  Disbrow's library.  Whole room. 
Discovered Disbrow and Mary in the chair, as in 
251. Enter Harry and Mrs. Disbrow from the 
theater. They see the two before the fire. 
Disbrow smiles up at them.  Don't wake her, he 
registers.  Harry and his mother exchange 
glances. It looks about time that somebody was 
awakened. Harry shakes Mary by the arm.  She 
gets up, rubbing her eyes--and smiles.  Harry 
takes her away from his father and shelters her 
in his own arms.  Disbrow arises and blesses 
the two of them.  With a cry of gladness, Mary 
throws her arms round Harry's neck. Fade out --

		253
 
	ENVOY - THE HONEYMOON
 
Same as 60, 63, and 65. Scenes along the old 
familiar turnpike, near the Jenkins farm.  
Discovered Harry and Mary in motor clothes 
(Mary with a big motor veil and smart suit) 
driving in a sporty roadster.  They draw up.  
Mary is quite sure this is the way.  Zippy, who 
is along, certainly recognizes it, for he 
barks.  Car exits.
 
		254

Same as 55. The fence at Jenkins' barn-lot, 
dividing the place from the turnpike. The big 
gate is open.  Enter Harry and Mary in car.  
They stop.  "This is the place, all right," 
Mary exclaims.  So they drive the car in and 
up to--

		255
 
Same as 50. Exterior of Jenkins' home. 
Discovered Jenkins feeding a flock of chickens 
around the door, among which are two pure white 
chickens, exactly alike.  The three Jenkins' 
children are also in evidence.  Harry and Mary 
drive up in the car. Mary nearly paralyzes 
Jenkins when she at last makes him realize she 
is Mary of old.  He runs to the door and shouts 
to his wife.  She comes running out.  "My land 
of love, pa, it is her!" exclaims the woman.   
"And gracious me--here is Zippy too." Mary 
points to her wedding-ring and Harry, her 
husband.  The Jenkins are speechless, 
especially "Pa," who surveys the snappy car. 
But Mary sees the children.  Mrs. Jenkins 
helps the baby in to her.  And from the bottom 
of the car Mary takes up presents to show she 
has not forgotten the children--a girl doll--a 
clown-doll, a jumping-jack, a little iron train 
of cars, etc.  Mrs. Jenkins is so overcome she 
sobs outside the car against Mary's shoulder.  
"Oh, Lord, pa, we was so mean to her!"  But 
Mary pats her gently on the head--"It is all 
right now."   Then Mary sees the chickens and 
laughs.  "Wait," says Jenkins, with a laugh.  
He makes a dive for one of the white chickens.

		256
 
Same as 255. Exterior of Jenkins' house. 
Discovered all as in scene 255. Further away in 
the lot. Jenkins has been unable to catch either 
of the two white chickens, but he returns and 
tells Mary these are the two which caused her to 
run from home. Mary and Harry laugh. Jenkins 
says in explanation: 

On screen.
 
	"THOSE ARE THE TWO. WE ALWAYS 
	CALLED THEM 'MARY'S CHICKENS'!"
 
Back to scene.
  
They all laugh.  Mary would like to take them 
with her, but she cannot this time.  But she 
will come back again.  Handing out the baby, 
which she has kissed good-bye, Harry starts the 
car.  They back and drive out.
 
		257 

Flash.  Discovered the back of Harry's car, 
driving out of the barn-lot gate.  Mary waves 
back.  The Jenkins wave to her.
 
		258 

Flash. Same as 253. Scene of the turnpike. Mary 
and Harry coming in car, Zippy seated between 
them.
 
		259 

Same as 258.  Close-up of Harry and Mary in car.
Driving with one hand, he has the other arm 
about her.  They laugh and chat.  Then he draws 
her smiling lips to his.  The picture fades.
 
 
 



______________________________________
Screenplay by Maibelle Heikes Justice, 
"probably the best known free lance 
scenario writer in America. Miss Justice 
seldom receives less than $1,500 for a 
mere synopsis, and more frequently sells 
her completed scripts for a big advance 
and royalty." 

Scenes numbered in half-numbers were
inserted scenes after the scenario was 
first drafted.

1