The Diamond Necklace

		STANDARD OPENING

VISUAL				AUDIO

MEDIUM CLOSE SHOT. WAVING FIELD
OF FULL-GROWN TOBACCO.

				(MUSIC: "LUCKY DAY" THEME UP AND UNDER.)

UNOPENED LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE
RISES OUT OF TOBACCO.

LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE GROWS TO
CLOSE SHOT AND HOLDS.

LETTERING "LUCKY STRIKE" FLIES OUT
OF BULLSEYE AND TAKES POSITION
ABOVE AND WELL CLEAR OF PACKAGE.
PACKAGE DISSOLVES OFF QUICKLY.

				ANNOUNCER: (TRACK) (IN SYNC WITH
							VISUAL)

				Lucky Strike

THE WORD "PRESENTS" FADES IN
BELOW "LUCKY STRIKE" LETTERING.

				presents

LETTERING "YOUR SHOW TIME" APPEARS
ON SCREEN BELOW "LUCKY STRIKE
PRESENTS". FREEZE ON BILLBOARD
PLATE.

				"YOUR SHOW TIME"

				(MUSIC UP SLIGHTLY. SEGUE WITH SHOW

				THEME.)


FADE OUT

FADE IN

			"THE DIAMOND NECKLACE"


1.	INT. BOOKSHOP - MED SHOT - NIGHT

				BOOKSHOP MAN
		Ah, good evening...Welcome to "Your Show Time" ....
		come in and make yourselves comfortable. It's
		good to see you. I'm the Bookshop Man and I'll
		have a story for you each time we get together.
		All kinds of stories -- sad, funny, adventurous,
		romantic, but they'll all be good stories. No -
		maybe I'd better say they'll all be stories that
		I liked. Stories that have excited me, that made
		me laugh or cry -- stories that have made me
		understand other people, and myself just a little
		bit better. Take the one I've picked for this
		evening. Ah....here - it's called..."The Diamond
		Necklace". It's by the famous French writer -
		Guy de Maupassant. De Maupassant died over fifty
		years ago...and yet the people in this story are
		as real to us today as they were to the people in
		Paris in the 1880's. But first let's relax and
		light up a Lucky.

	(He lights a Lucky, sits back and takes puff.)

					DISSOLVE TO:

	COMMERCIAL

					DISSOLVE TO:


1A	INT. BOOKSHOP - MED SHOT - NIGHT
	(No cigarette)

				BOOKSHOP MAN
		Yes, the people in the "Diamond Necklace" lived
		in Paris...in the 1880's. The great Eiffel Tower
		was just being planned. The city was already a
		fashion-center, and bustles were the thing to
		wear. A wage earner made three or four dollars
		a week...but you could get a whole roast for a
		quarter. These were the times in which the
		Lazelles lived .........

					DISSOLVE TO:


2. 	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - SILENT - DAY
	Early morning. A young couple seated at the dining table;
	Matilda is dawdling over her breakfast, while Henry is
	gulping down his hot coffee.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		..... Matilda and Henry Lazelle. They should have
		been a happy couple .........


3.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA

	Pre-occupied.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		....but there was something in Matilda's nature
		that prevented it. She was young and pretty...


4.	BACK TO FIRST ANGLE

	as Henry gives his wife an unobserved look of affection.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		Henry was a kind and thoughtful husband who
		loved her very much. But that wasn't enough for
		Matilda.

	Henry finishes his coffee, gets up from table. He slips
	into his coat, starts to gather some papers together that
	are on the buffet back of the dining table.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		The trouble was, Henry was only a government
		clerk...while his wife was one of those women
		who feel there is nothing more desirable than
		to have the latest gowns and expensive jewels...
		attend gay parties...and be charming and
		sought after. Unfortunately, Henry was only
		a government clerk. True, the commissioner
		who was the head of his department, seemed to
		like him and there was a chance for advancement.
		But at the moment, Henry's job was minor and
		routine and paid very little...certainly nowhere
		near enough for Matilda to realize any of her
		dreams.

	With his papers tucked into a portfolio, Henry comes back to
	the table, bends over Matilda and kisses her on the cheek.
	Matilda snaps out of her reverie, and rises. CAMERA PANS as
	she escorts Henry to the portieres. He starts to kiss her
	again, but she avoids it, tells him to hurry or he'll be late.
	Looking a little hurt, Henry goes on out. CAMERA STARTS to
	MOVE IN on Matilda as she stands, leaning against door,
	absently frowning.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		It's not surprising then that Matilda was often
		distressed that she'd been so foolish as to fall
		in love with Henry. And this distress grew every
		time she went to visit her friend .....

					DISSOLVE TO:


5.	INT. FORRESTER BOUDOIR - CLOSE SHOT - DAY

	ON silver tea service, as a WOMAN'S HAND refills a half-
	empty cup. CAMERA PULLS BACK to disclose Matilda
	sitting at a low table in her friend's boudoir, while
	ELSA FORRESTER, in an elegant negligee, pours tea.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		... Elsa Forrester ... who had not
		been so foolish ... who had managed
		to marry a wealthy businessman.

	As Elsa sets down the teapot, LIVE SOUNDS IN.

				ELSA
		There you are, darling. Now excuse
		me a moment. I have something to
		show you ...

	Elsa exits. As she sips her tea, Matilda looks at the
	fine china cup, then at the ornate silver service, then
	around the room. Her eyes are filled with envy. She
	tries to conceal this quickly as Elsa returns carrying
	two new evening gowns. Matilda rises almost
	involuntarily.

				MATILDA
		Oh, Elsa! They're lovely
			(reaching out,
			feeling one)
		So fine ...

				ELSA
		One of Paul's orders, my dear.
		His wife must wear only the best.
			(with a smile)
		I try not to let him down.

	She holds the dresses up, studying them.

				ELSA
		But which shall I wear this evening?

				MATILDA
		Let me see that one ...

	Elsa hands her the dress she indicates. Matilda holds
	it up against herself.

				MATILDA
		This is very flattering, Elsa.

				ELSA
		Ye-es ... but I'm not sure it's
		dressy enough for Paul.  He's a
		problem at times.

				MATILDA
		How can you say that! ...
			(indicates surroundings)
		... with all this --

				ELSA
		Oh, I'm not complaining. I know
		what I've got - and I wouldn't
		exchange it for anything.


6.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA

	She strokes the dress of Elsa's she is holding.

				MATILDA
		I should hope not!


7.	MED. SHOT

				ELSA
		But that doesn't alter the fact,
		my dear, that Paul is set in his
		ways - and a little old.

				MATILDA
		I think he's distinguished-looking.

	Elsa looks at her wryly.

				ELSA
		Because he has no hair? Well,
		that may be. Anyway...
			(dismissing it)
		I'd probably better wear this.
		One should please one's husband
		now and then, don't you think?
		Now what'll go with it?
			(moving away)
		Come, Matilda - help me decide.


8.	MED. SHOT - AT VANITY TABLE

	as Elsa and Matilda come IN. Elsa opens a jewel-box and
	begins to try pieces against the dress she's selected,
	while Matilda watches.

				ELSA
		How about this brooch?

				MATILDA
		It's lovely ... but I don't think ...

				ELSA
		You're right. Not with this dress.

	She drops the brooch, extracts another piece from the
	box, repeats the process of trying each piece against
	the dress and discarding it. As she is busy with this,
	Matilda's eye is attracted to something in the box.
	She takes it out. It's a diamond necklace. She studies
	it a moment admiringly in her hand.


9.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA

	as she brings the necklace up to her throat, and we see
	it plainly. It is a glitteringly-handsome piece.

				ELSA'S VOICE
		I think this pin'll do it, don't
		you, Matilda?

	Enwrapped in dreams of herself and the necklace, Matilda
	doesn't hear Elsa.


10.	MED. SHOT

	Elsa, holding a jewelled pin up to the dress, smiles at
	her day-dreaming friend.

				ELSA
		Matilda!

	Matilda starts, then embarrassedly drops the necklace
	away from her throat, looks at what Elsa is showing her.

				MATILDA
		Oh, yes -- that's perfect.

	Else turns back to the table, starts to gather together
	the jewelry she's scattered, suddenly reacts to a small
	clock on the table.

				ELSA
		Good heavens! It's nearly six!
		You'd better run, dear. Tea
		next week?

				MATILDA
		I'd love it.

				ELSA
		Fine.
			(pressing Matilda's
			hand)
		Forgive me for not walking you
		to the door, but I really must
		hurry.

	Carrying the dress and pin, Elsa starts to hurry across
	toward her dressing room, stops and looks back at
	Matilda, still at the vanity table.

				ELSA
		On your way out, darling, will
		you tell the maid I need her
		right away? Thanks.

	Elsa exits. Matilda looks at the diamond necklace in
	her hand, sighs, and drops it into the jewel box. Then
	she turns and starts out of the room.

					DISSOLVE TO:


11.	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

	Matilda, an apron over her dress, is dusting, her face
	glum, her thoughts far away.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		Yes - each time she returned from
		Elsa's, Matilda got angrier ... at
		herself ... and at Henry ... who
		would never be able to give her the
		things she felt she deserved ...
		the only things she believed could
		make her happy.

	Now we HEAR LIVE SOUNDS as Matilda continues cleaning.
	Suddenly she sees the tassel cord that holds the drape
	hanging loose. She sighs with annoyance, moves to fix
	it, then gets another idea. She takes the tassel cord
	off, and with a graceful gesture, brings it up to her
	throat as if it were a diamond necklace. Then she
	pantomimes nonchalant acceptance of admiration for the
	necklace from an onlooker.

				MATILDA 
		Yes, it is a pretty thing. A
		birthday gift from my husband ...

	A SHARP HISSING SOUND from o.s. interrupts. Matilda
	reacts, startled out of her day-dream.


12.	CLOSE SHOT - POT ON STOVE

	(Just a small section of kitchen and a doorway through
	which we see the living room in b.g.) Pot is boiling
	over. Matilda COMES IN scowling, tries to lift cover
	off pot, burns her finger.

				MATILDA
                  Oh! ..... zut!!

	In the b.g. the apartment door opens and a man enters.
	Matilda turns, sees him, reacts with increased anger,
	as if it were his fault she burned herself. She exits
	back toward living room.


13.	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

	The man who has entered is Henry. Matilda comes out to
	him, gingerly holding her injured finger.

				MATILDA
		I burnt my finger on that stupid pot!

				HENRY
		I'm sorry, darling ...
			(kisses her finger
			smiles gently)
		But wait a minute --

	With a little air of mystery, which makes Matilda watch
	him puzzledly, he searches through the tattered paper
	portfolio he is carrying, brings out an envelope.

				HENRY (cont'd)
			(handing envelope to
			Matilda)
		Here's something to make up
		for it.

	He watches her eagerly as Matilda opens the envelope,
	extracts a sheet of note paper, scans it quickly. Her
	face lights up.

				MATILDA
		An invitation from the commissioner!

				HENRY
		A formal dinner party ... and
		I'm the only clerk invited.
		That must mean something, eh?
			(going on proudly,
			not noticing a change
			in Matilda)
		I told you Mr. Beaudine's been
		warming up to me ...

				MATILDA
		Oh, it's ridiculous, Henry ...
		We can't go.

				HENRY
		Can't go - ? But ... but ...

				MATILDA
			(indicating her
			clothes)
		In this?

				HENRY
		But your evening dress --

				MATILDA
		That rag was out of style two
		years ago. No, Henry -

	She tosses the invitation down on the table, stalks off
	to the buffet in b.g.

				MATILDA (cont'd)
		All the women there in the newest
		gowns .. covered with jewels ... and
		me looking like some poor relation?
		No thank you

				HENRY
		Could you buy the proper kind of
		dress for ... five hundred francs?

	Matilda comes back from the buffet with silverware.

				MATILDA
		Five hundred francs? Of course I
		could ...
			(starts setting table)
		Stop talking nonsense ... We can't go.

				HENRY
		Matilda ... I - I've been putting a
		little money aside for a vacation ...


	Matilda stops setting table, looks up at him.
               
				HENRY (cont'd)
		You take it. Buy something nice ...

	Matilda moves toward him with sudden eagerness.

				MATILDA
		Why, Henry - !

	Henry takes her in his arms, pleased at her renewed
	excitement.

				HENRY
		And as for a piece of jewelry, 
		wouldn't Mrs. Forrester lend you
		something just for the evening?

				MATILDA
			(excitedly)
		Sure she would ... Oh, Henry -
		that's a wonderful idea

				HENRY
			(drawing her closer)
		You see, darling, you shouldn't
		become upset about these things.
		We always manage to work them
		out, don't we?

				MATILDA
			(absently)
		Yes, Henry ...
			(her hand goes to
			her throat)
		I know just what I'm going to get
		from Elsa!

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		The diamond necklace ... 

					DISSOLVE TO:


14.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA - NIGHT

	Back of her head to Camera. She moves away a step, and
	swings around, her face glowing, Elsa's diamond necklace
	gleaming at her throat.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE (cont'd)
		Elsa's brilliant diamond necklace!
		Matilda felt she'd never looked so
		beautiful in her life ...

				MATILDA
		How do you like it?

15.	CAMERA PULLS BACK to disclose INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM,
	with Matilda now in her new gown; Henry in evening
	clothes. Henry shakes his head in mock warning.

				HENRY
		Every woman there's going to hate you -

	He smiles, and Matilda laughs, pleased. Then she comes
	forward to Henry, takes his arm.

				MATILDA
		Forgive me if I'm irritable sometimes ...

				HENRY
		There's nothing to forgive, darling.
		I'm happy knowing that you married
		me because you loved me. Obviously
		it couldn't have been for money -

	He smiles and kisses her gently. Then CAMERA MOVES with
	them as the go toward the door. As they exit,

					DISSOLVE TO:


16.	INT. BEAUDINE'S FOYER - NIGHT

	A small ante-room. Along the wall to our right a bench
	and coat-rack, both filled with the formal cloaks and
	toppers of the guests. Along the center wall, a small
	marble-topped table, above it an ornate gilded mirror.
	The wall to our left is broken by a drape-covered
	archway which leads into the drawing room. From behind
	the drapes we HEAR DANCE MUSIC, VOICES, LAUGHTER. The
	MUSIC STOPS, the drapes part, and Matilda comes IN. She
	is gay, slightly tipsy. She heads right for the mirror,
	takes a stance before it, begins to adjust her hair. As
	she does so, her eyes catch sight of the necklace in the
	mirror. She fondles it admiringly, poses for herself.
	She doesn't notice Henry COME IN. He pauses just inside
	the drapes, holding a glass of champagne, watching her
	antics amusedly.

				HENRY
			(after a pause)
		I beg your pardon, Madame. Have
		you seen my wife?

	Matilda turns, a little startled; then, seeing Henry,
	she plays along with his joke.

				MATILDA
		Your wife - ? I'm not quite
		sure I know ---

				HENRY
			(with a little bow)
		Lazelle is the name. She's just
		about your size ... and ... well ..

	His hands indicate their figures are about the same, too.

				MATILDA
		Oh, yes, of course. The Commissioner
		introduced us. You're a lucky man,
		Mr. Lazelle. A very attractive woman.

				HENRY
			(coming over to her)
		I'll tell her that ...

				MATILDA
			(studying him coquettishly)
		But now that I meet you - I think
		she's rather lucky, too.

				HENRY
		I wish you'd tell her that yourself.

				MATILDA
		You're too modest. I'm sure your
		wife already knows it --

				HENRY
		Must we talk only of my wife,
		Madame?

				MATILDA
		Sir - ?

	With a mock gleam in his eye, Henry chucks her under the
	chin.

				HENRY
		Come, you're a handsome woman
		yourself.

				MATILDA
		I happen to have a husband, sir.

				HENRY
		And I a wife ... But since neither
		one's around right now, there couldn't
		be any harm in your sharing a little
		champagne with me, could there?

				MATILDA
		We--ll ...
			(she glances about with
			feigned nervousness;
			then turns back to him
			with a coy smile)
		I guess not.


17.	TIGHT TWO SHOT

	as Matilda takes the glass from Henry, and sips the wine.
	Then she offers the glass back to him, and he downs the
	rest of it. Matilda, looking at him, suddenly giggles.

				MATILDA
		I hope you're not going to think
		me bold, Mr. Lazelle ... I suppose
		it's the champagne ... but I have a
		sudden, overwhelming desire to -
		kiss you!

	She leans forward and kisses him. His arm goes around
	her, and o.s. the DANCE MUSIC STARTS UP AGAIN. Their
	faces are very close.

				HENRY
			(dropping pose)
		Darling - having fun?
			(Matilda nods
			vigorously)
		Come - dance with me before someone
		else claims you. You're much too
		popular tonight.


18.	BACK TO ORIGINAL ANGLE

	as Henry sets their glass down on the wall-table, then
	takes Matilda in his arms, and they go waltzing gaily
	off through the drapes.

					DISSOLVE TO:


19.	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

	A key rattles in the lock, and then the door swings open.
	Matilda dances into the room, whirling about in a gay
	pirouette, obviously a bit tipsy. Henry closes the door,
	watches her with amused affection.

				MATILDA
		Mmmmmm ... lovely party ...
		wasn't it, darling?
			(before Henry can reply)
		What a home they have! Do you
		think I made an impression on Mr.
		Beaudine?
			(again before he
			can reply)
		Of course I did! Didn't you notice
		the way he looked at me when we were
		leaving? I wouldn't be surprised if
		they asked us over for dinner soon ...
		just us ...

	Matilda starts to undo the tie of her wrap, and Henry
	comes up behind her to take it off her shoulders.

				MATILDA (cont'd)
		What a difference the right gown
		makes. And a diamond necklace ...
		why, I felt like --

	Matilda gasps. Her hand has gone to her throat - and
	the necklace isn't there!

				HENRY
			(holding her wrap)
		What is it, Matilda?

				MATILDA
		The necklace! Elsa's necklace!
			(wildly)
		My wrap! Quickly - look in the
		pockets!

	Henry searches the pockets, feels through the wrap.

				HENRY
		No ..... nothing!

				MATILDA
		It was on me when I left the party ...
		I know I had it then. Oh Henry, help
		me find it!

	She begins to search the floor. Henry joins her.
	CAMERA PANS with them as they search back to the door.
	Then Henry straightens up, his face white.

				HENRY
		You're sure you had it when we
		left the Beaudines?

				MATILDA
		Yes, yes, I'm sure.
			(tears in her eyes)
		I looked at myself in the mirror 
		on our way out. I wanted to see
		it once more.

				HENRY
			(thoughtfully)
		Perhaps the cab -- or --

				MATILDA
		That's it! I must have dropped 
		it in the cab!
			(grabbing the lapels
			of his coat)
		Oh, please, Henry...please...
		you've got to find it!

	Henry takes her hands, strokes them soothingly.

				HENRY
		All right, Matilda...easy now.
		I'll check the cab. And I'll
		go over the whole route between
		here and the Beaudines -- street
		by street, if I have to. You go
		to bed, darling. I'll find it.

	Henry pushes her gently toward the bedroom, and exits.
	But Matilda just stands there staring after him.
 
					DISSOLVE TO:


20.	INT. BOOKSHOP - MED SHOT - NIGHT
	(Lucky in hand)

				BOOKSHOP MAN
		But Matilda couldn't sleep, she was too
		worried, too frightened... In a moment
		I'll tell you what happened to the Lazelles
		and the Diamond Necklace

	(TAKES PUFF)

					DISSOLVE TO:


	COMMERCIAL

					DISSOLVE TO:


20A	INT. BOOKSHOP - MED SHOT - NIGHT
	(Lucky in hand. He tamps out cigarette and into).

				BOOKSHOP MAN
		No - the necklace could not be found. Not
		after a whole night's search...not after days
		of offering a reward. And all at once that
		borrowed necklace, which had been such a joy
		to Matilda, became a curse on their lives.
		Then Henry did what he had to do...he borrowed
		on his salary as a government clerk for years
		into the future.

					DISSOLVE TO:


21. 	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - SILENT - NIGHT

	A MAN is making a list of the items in the room, noting
	their value, as Henry stands alongside, watching. Then
	Matilda enters from kitchen, carrying a small chest
	which she sets down on the table. She opens it,
	displaying their family silverware to the man. He makes
	an offer on it. Matilda angrily starts to argue. But
	Henry, after a moment, interrupts, resignedly indicates
	for the man to add the silverware to the list.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		He mortgaged their furniture ... and
		sold their few family heirlooms, and
		finally, he had scraped together
		twelve thousand francs -- for him, a
		lifetime fortune! That was the price
		a jeweler charged them for a duplicate
		of the diamond necklace. 

					DISSOLVE TO:


22.	INT. FORRESTER BOUDOIR - CLOSE SHOT - DAY

	ON a lady's handkerchief being unwrapped, revealing the
	duplicate diamond necklace.

				ELSA'S VOICE
		I wondered what had happened to you -

	CAMERA PULLS BACK (NOTE: SAME DOLLY SHOT AS IN FIRST
	BOUDOIR SCENE) to disclose Elsa and Matilda, the latter
	in hat and street dress. Matilda extracts the necklace
	from her handkerchief, watches with half-concealed
	tension as she hands it to Elsa.

				MATILDA
		I'm sorry, Elsa. I meant to
		return it the morning after the
		party, but I - I haven't been
		feeling well.

	Elsa doesn't give the necklace a second glance.

				ELSA
		Oh, that's too bad, darling.

	She crosses to the vanity table.

				MATILDA
			(her eyes follow,
			still tense)
		I'm fine now.
           	 	(moving after Elsa;
			attempting to be
			light)
		I just hope you didn't miss the
		necklace too much.

	Elsa opens her jewel case, drops the necklace in.

23.	LOW ANGLE - MATILDA - JEWEL CASE IN SHOT

	as Matilda comes up to the vanity table, stares at the
	jewel case.

				ELSA'S VOICE
		It's quite all right. As long
		as you enjoyed it.

				MATILDA
		Enjoyed it - ?
			(forcing her eyes
			away from the case)
		Oh yes ... very much. Why ...
		it ... made me ... the belle of
		the ball.

24.	MED. CLOSE SHOT - AT TABLE

	The strained note in Matilda's voice makes Elsa look up
	at her.

				ELSA
		Matilda, are you sure you're all
		right? You really don't look well.

				MATILDA
			(forcing a smile)
		It's nothing. Perhaps I'm still a
		little weak.

				ELSA
		Well, you worry me. I want you to
		be sure and write me how you're
		getting on.

				MATILDA
		Write you - ? Why, Elsa --

				ELSA
			(enjoying the surprise)
		Yes .. we're moving .. moving to
		Brussels.

				MATILDA
		Brussels! But when - ?

				ELSA
		Tomorrow. We've already sent the
		maid on, so I've been packing
		myself. Be a dear and help me,
		won't you?

	Without waiting for a reply, she picks up the jewel
	case, carries it off.

25.	MED. SHOT - NEAR SCREEN

	revealing a half-packed trunk, and some piles of
	clothing on a chair. Elsa comes IN, puts the jewel case
	into the trunk.

				ELSA
		I really hate leaving Paris - but
		Paul's business demands it. Anyway,
		he's promised me the Brussels house
		is even larger than this one.

	Matilda comes IN, begins blankly folding clothes and
	helping Elsa lay them into the trunk.

				MATILDA
		I'm sure it'll be lovely.

	Elsa misinterprets Matilda's blankness, puts a hand on
	her friend's arm.

				ELSA
		Don't feel too badly about my
		going, darling.
			(as she returns
			to packing)
		We're going to have a villa at
		Ostend for the summers. Perhaps
		you and Henry can come visit us.
		Leave it to me -- I'll fix it
		with Paul. But remember, I want
		you to write and let me know ...

	She continues chatting, but her VOICE FADES OUT. CAMERA
	HOLDS the SCENE, NOW SILENT: Elsa prattling on as she
	packs, Matilda helping, beginning to relax and chatter
	back. The Bookshop Man's VOICE COMES OVER:

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		Matilda watched the duplicate necklace
		disappear into the trunk ... and found
		a release from her tension in helping
		her friend pack. Secretly, she was
		glad Elsa was moving away. It would
		be easier not seeing her ... far easier
		not being reminded of the lost piece
		of jewelry.

					DISSOLVE TO:


26.	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

	as Henry comes home from work. He sinks wearily into
	a chair at the dining table, drops his portfolio on the
	table, rubs his tired eyes. Suddenly he becomes aware
	of a hat box on the table. He rises, looks into the
	box, pulls out a new women's hat. Staring at it, he
	shakes his head unhappily.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		But it was a vain thought. There
		was too much at home to remind her
		of it. For as they began their
		struggle to pay off the twelve
		thousand francs, life squeezed the
		Lazelles harder than ever ...

	Henry glances at the kitchen o.s., then turns toward
	the bedroom.

				HENRY
			(calling)
		Matilda!

	He turns the hat around in his hand as he waits.

27.	ANOTHER ANGLE - INCLUDING BEDROOM DOOR
	as Matilda appears.

				HENRY
		Matilda, did you buy this today?

	Matilda nods as she crosses to him.

				MATILDA
		Wait'll you see it on. It's
		very becoming.

	She takes it from his hand, puts it on, glances at a
	mirror o.s. and busies herself adjusting the hat.

				HENRY
		Darling - I thought we both
		understood ---

				MATILDA
			(turning back to him)
		There ... Like it?

				HENRY
		No, Matilda, I don't. We
		can't afford it.

				MATILDA
		You haven't even asked how
		much it was.

				HENRY
		I don't care. Whatever it
		costs, we can't spare it ...

28.	CLOSE SHOT - HENRY

	as he moves toward her appealingly.

				HENRY (cont'd)
		Darling, don't you understand?
		The salary I make isn't ours
		anymore. It'll take every cent
		we can save - and more, I'm afraid -
		to pay off our loans.

29.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA

	Her face sullen, resentful.

				MATILDA
		You want me to go around looking
		like an old drudge?

30.	MED. SHOT
	Henry smiles a little, trying to win her.

				HENRY
		You can never look like an .. "old
		drudge" to me.

				MATILDA
		Other people see me, too, you
		know.

				HENRY
		Matilda, don't care about other
		people. Let's get our life
		straightened out. I need your
		help. That diamond necklace
		cost --

	Matilda's deep sense of guilt causes her to flare up.

				MATILDA
		That's right! Throw it up to me!
		You never blame yourself, do you?
		If you'd made a decent salary in
		the first place, I wouldn't have
		had to borrow any jewelry!
			(yanking hat off
			her head)
		I'll take the hat back -- but I
		tell you, I don't want to hear
		about that necklace again!
			(near tears)
		I don't want to hear about it!

	She shoves the hat into the box, picks it up, and
	stalks off into the bedroom, leaving Henry looking after
	her, quite miserable.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		So the days turned into weeks ...

					DISSOLVE TO:

31.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA

	at butcher scale.  (SCENE 15, ORIGINAL SCRIPT)

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE (cont'd)
		... and the weeks into months ...
		and Matilda slowly resigned herself
		to the loss of even the few little
		luxuries they used to enjoy.

					DISSOLVE TO:


32.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA

	scrubbing clothes in a tub. (SCENE 13, ORIGINAL
	PICTURE)

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE (cont'd)
		But it was a grudging resignation --
		and she felt very sorry for herself ...

					DISSOLVE TO:

33.	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

	Matilda in an armchair, sewing end patching a small
	pile of clothes. She barely looks up as Henry enters
	the apartment. He crosses to her, bends over to kiss
	her, but she frowns, turns her head. He pecks at her
	cheek, and then goes on into the bedroom.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE (cont'd)
		Their lives were ruined - hopelessly
		ruined - and she was not going to
		let Henry forget it.
			(pauses)
		But however petty and selfish Matilda's
		heart was, it was still a heart.

					DISSOLVE TO:


34.	MED. CLOSE SHOT - HENRY - NIGHT

	working over books by lamplight. (SCENE 16, ORIGINAL
	PICTURE)

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE (cont'd)
		As she watched her husband more
		than share every burden ...

					DISSOLVE TO:


35.	WIDER ANGLE - LIVING ROOM - INCLUDING BEDROOM ENTRANCE

	Henry has fallen asleep at the table, his head resting
	on his ledger. The drapes that cover the entrance to
	the bedroom are parted, and Matilda peers out. She
	sees Henry asleep, smiles ruefully, sympathetically,
	then comes out to him. She is covered with her old
	wrapper.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE (cont'd)
		... watched him work night after
		night to earn extra money to meet
		their debts ... for the first time,
		she felt a sympathy for someone
		else's pains.

36.	CLOSER SHOT - AT DINING TABLE

	as Matilda shakes Henry gently, awakens him. He looks
	up at her, comically groggy. She smiles and helps him
	to his feet.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE (cont'd)
		The question was -- would this new
		understanding bear fruit - or wither -
		amid so many troubles ...

	Matilda turns down the oil lamp, and helps Henry off
	toward the bedroom.

					DISSOLVE TO:


37. 	INT. LAZELLE LIVING ROOM - CLOSE SHOT - BUFFET - NIGHT

	as a drawer is unlocked, and opened, revealing a small
	pile of bills and change inside. We HEAR A MAN'S VOICE
	O.S. as a HAND extracts the money from the drawer.

				COLLECTOR'S VOICE
		Mighty cold out this evening ...
		Yes, sir, mighty cold ...

	CAMERA PULLS BACK to reveal Henry in the b.g. at the
	buffet, while a man in overcoat and wool muffler, his
	hat under his arm, waits by the dining table in f.g.
	The latter - a debt collector - is a large, florid man,
	who talks with a professional heartiness.

				COLLECTOR
		Wouldn't be surprised to see snow
		before the end of the week.

	Closing the buffet drawer, Henry comes toward the dining
	table. He looks worn and tired, wears a torn old
	coat-sweater.

				HENRY
		Here's the money.

	The collector makes a quick entry in a small notebook.

				COLLECTOR
		That's fine, Mr. Lazelle. You're
		coming right along.

	He tucks the notebook sway and takes the money from
	Henry. He riffles through the bills, suddenly looks up
	at Henry, all congeniality washed from his face.

				COLLECTOR
		There's only ninety-two francs here.

				HENRY
		It's every cent we've saved for the
		month.

				COLLECTOR
		The payment's a hundred, you know
		that.

				HENRY
		I just couldn't put aside any more.
		There were some other bills - and
		I --

				COLLECTOR
			(his voice rising)
		I'm not interested in your other
		bills, Lazelle -

	Henry glances nervously off at the bedroom, afraid
	Matilda will hear.

				HENRY
			(gesturing)
		Please --

				COLLECTOR
			(ignoring him)
		We made you a loan. Now either
		you're going to live up to your
		obligations - or we'll be forced
		to take some very unpleasant steps.

				MATILDA'S VOICE
		What's the trouble, Henry?

38.	WIDER ANGLE

	as Matilda comes toward them from the bedroom. She,
	too, looks tired, older.

				HENRY
		It's all right, Matilda.

				COLLECTOR
		A very simple matter, Mrs. Lazelle.
		Your husband's eight francs short
		in his payment.

	Henry avoids Matilda's eyes, not knowing what her
	reaction is going to be.

				MATILDA
			(to Henry)
		I thought we had enough.

				HENRY
		I had to take some out. The
		butcher was going to stop credit.

				COLLECTOR
		I'm sure you understand, Mrs.
		Lazelle. My company can't ---

				MATILDA
			(interrupting;
			quietly)
		Yes, I understand. We owe you a
		hundred francs, and it's no concern
		of yours how or where we get it.

39.	CLOSE SHOT - COLLECTOR

	He makes a dissembling gesture which says, "You know
	how it is."

				MATILDA'S VOICE
		We've paid you regularly month after
		month. Now for the first time we're
		a little short ... and you start
		threatening my husband ...

	The Collector reacts. He hadn't expected trouble from
	Matilda.

40.	TWO SHOT - HENRY AND MATILDA

	Henry also reacts in surprise to Matilda's words.

				MATILDA
		Well, I understand something else,
		too. Henry's been working day and
		night - going without sleep - losing
		his health - just so we can scrape
		together enough to pay you. If
		we're a little short this month,
		we'll make it up next month ... or
		the month after. But don't threaten
		us.

41.	GROUP SHOT

	INCLUDING the Collector, as Matilda takes Henry's arm.

				MATILDA
		We're not going to be frightened ...
		Can you understand that? You're
		not going to grind us into the
		earth!

	The Collector hesitates a moment. Then, without a word,
	he slaps his hat on and exits. There is silence in the
	room as the outside door SLAMS. Henry regards his wife
	gratefully.

				HENRY
		Matilda - I --

				MATILDA
			(a simple statement)
		Henry, we've got to get more money.
		I think I have a way ...

				HENRY
		How - ?

				MATILDA
		I'm going to learn bookkeeping.

				HENRY
		But you're doing enough now ...

				MATILDA
			(shaking her head)
		I'm going to learn. Then you can
		bring more work home - and I can
		do it with you ...
			(almost to herself)
		Yes ... I'll work right with you.

	Henry stares at Matilda an instant; then his hands go
	to her shoulders and he draws her close to him. As
	he holds her:

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		And though neither would once have
		dreamed it possible ...

					DISSOLVE TO:


42.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA - NIGHT

	working over some books at the table.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		... Matilda did learn ...

					CUT TO:


43.	TWO SHOT - HENRY AND MATILDA - NIGHT

	working side by side at the lamp-lit table. (SCENE 17,
	ORIGINAL SCRIPT)

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		... and soon was able to work
		alongside Henry. From then on -
		together - they met all their
		obligations.
			(pauses)
		It took ten years ...

					DISSOLVE TO:


44.	CLOSE SHOT - DINING TABLE - NIGHT

	Table covered with a fresh cloth, and set for two
	servings. A man's HANDS COME INTO SHOT, set down first
	a vase of flowers, then a bottle of wine and two glasses.

				BOOKSHOP MAN'S VOICE
		... but the night finally arrived when
		they were free ... when all their debts
		were paid. It was a very happy night.

	CAMERA PULLS BACK and we find Henry WHISTLING happily
	as he pulls the loose cork from the wine bottle. He
	grins as Matilda comes IN, carrying a toureen. She
	grins back, lifts the lid of the toureen, extends it
	toward him.

				HENRY
			(sniffing at it)
		Ahhhh ......

	He reaches for the ladle, but Matilda quickly slaps the
	cover back on and puts the toureen on the table.

				MATILDA
		Pour the wine --

	As Henry picks up the wine bottle, there is a KNOCK at
	door o.s. Surprised, he pauses.


				MATILDA
		Go on ... I'll see -

	She exits toward door while Henry looks after her
	curiously.

45.	MED. SHOT - AT FRONT DOOR

	as Matilda comes up to it, opens it. Revealed outside
	is Elsa Forrester, looking chic and scarcely older than
	when we last saw her.

				ELSA
		I beg your pardon ... I was looking
		for a Mrs. Lazelle. I wondered if 
		she still --

	She breaks off, stares at Matilda.

				MATILDA
		Elsa ...

				ELSA
		Matilda!! Good heavens! I
		hardly recognized -- I mean --

				MATILDA
			(quietly)
		Come in, Elsa -

	CAMERA PANS with Elsa as she comes into the room. Henry
	comes IN to her.

				HENRY
		Mrs. Forrester - !

	He gives her a little bow.

				ELSA
		Mr. Lazelle ...

	Who stands there uncertainly, nervous and embarrassed
	about the contrast between herself and her friend.
	Matilda comes IN from the door.

				MATILDA
		You're upset about not recognizing
		me, Elsa. Don't be. I know I've
		changed.

				ELSA
			(trying to cover
			her embarrassment)
		Well ... it must be ten years
		since I saw you last. Paul and
		I just moved back to town ...
		and ... well, I was passing
		tonight and I thought ...
			(seeing table set)
		Oh ... but I shouldn't be inter-
		rupting your dinner --

				HENRY
		No interruption ... Have a glass
		of wine with us.

				ELSA
		Really, I can't stay ... I --

				MATILDA
			(to Henry)
		Of course she will.

	She goes to the buffet in the b.g. for a glass, while
	Henry leads a reluctant Elsa over to the table.

				HENRY
			(helping Elsa into
			chair)
		It must have been Fate that brought
		you here tonight.

	Matilda returns, setting a glass down before Elsa.

				MATILDA
		We were having a little celebration -
		and it concerns you ...

				ELSA
		Me - ?

	Henry fills her glass with wine.

				MATILDA
		Remember the necklace you lent me?
			(Elsa stares, puzzled)
		Just before you left Paris ... ?

				ELSA
			(with a smile)
		Oh, yes - the one you wanted for
		a big party.

				MATILDA
			(nods)
		I lost it that night.

				ELSA
		But I'm sure I remember your
		returning it.

				MATILDA
		I returned a duplicate. We just
		finished paying for it today.
			(turning to Henry}
		That's what we're celebrating ...

				ELSA
			(with sudden sharpness)
		You just finished paying - ?!

				MATILDA
			(apologetically)
		It was a fortune to us - twelve
		thousand francs.
			(then proudly)
		But they were fine diamonds. You
		see - you never knew the difference.

				ELSA
			(stricken)
		But Matilda - Matilda! The one I
		lent you was paste ... a copy!
		Not worth more then a hundred
		francs!

46.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA
	as she reacts.

47.	CLOSE SHOT - HENRY
	reacting.

48.	CLOSE SHOT - MATILDA

	Her head lowered, she starts to sob softly into her
	handkerchief.

50.	GROUP SHOT

	as Elsa Forrester rises, comes over beside Matilda.

				ELSA
		Good heavens, Matilda! What a
		terrible, terrible mistake!
			(looking up at Henry)
		Ten years of your lives - wasted!

	There is a moment's pause. Then Henry speaks, half to
	himself.

				HENRY
		Wasted? Wasted ... ?

	He walks over to Matilda, stands looking down at her.

				HENRY (cont'd)
		Were they, Matilda -- ? Matilda -
		were they wasted?

	Slowly, Matilda looks up from her handkerchief; slowly a
	smile breaks through her tears. Then she answers her
	husband's question by taking his hand and pressing it to
	her cheek. As they look at each other in secret under-
	standing,

					DISSOLVE TO:


50.	INT. BOOKSHOP - NIGHT

	as the Bookshop Man lights a fresh cigarette, exhales a
	cloud of smoke with a pleasant sigh.

				BOOKSHOP MAN
		Of course, Elsa returned the necklace,
		and Henry and Matilda sold it. And
		the money helped them live a lot
		easier ... but what helped even more
		was the thing they'd found in their
		years of struggle together ... Some-
		thing more precious than the Diamond
		Necklace itself.

	He smiles, half to himself, half to us; then, taking the
	book from the desk, he rises and steps back to the
	shelf behind him.

	(COMMERCIAL AND ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEXT WEEK'S STORY TO
	FOLLOW)

					FADE OUT.


	INTERIOR BOOK SHOP - CLOSE SHOT - NIGHT

	Bookshop Man is putting the book back in the shelves.
	Then he turns to camera.

				BOOKSHOP MAN
		Next week, I'll have a story for
		you that happened long ago --
		back in the old days when a noble-
		man ran his castle -- and the lives
		in it -- to suit himself. It's a
		story about a brave young man who
		had to choose between death...and
		marriage to a girl he'd never seen
		before. She turned out to be young
		and lovely -- but, as you'll see,
		that only made the choice all the
		more difficult.

	He smiles and lights up a Lucky. He turns out lamp and
	exits as camera starts pulling back.

					DISSOLVE TO:


A MARSHALL GRANT-REALM PRODUCTION

written by Stanley Rubin & Louis Lantz

directed by Sobey Martin



CAST

Bookshop Man .........Arthur Shields
Henry ............... John Beal
Matilda ..............Marie Palmer
Elsa . .............. Fay Baker
Bill Collector .......Stanley Andrews


Production Supervisor ... R. E. Abel
Photographed by . . ......William Bradford
Editored by  .............Jodie Kaplan
Music Supervisor .........William Lava
Art Director .............Eugene Lurie & Robert Boyle
Costumes by ............. Kitty Mager




		STANDARD CLOSING

VISUAL			AUDIO

WAVING FIELD OF FULL-GROWN 
TOBACCO.

			(MUSIC: "LUCKY DAY" THEME UP AND UNDER.)

CAMERA PANS LEFT ON TOBACCO FIELD 
SHOT. SUPERIMPOSE LETTERING (MADE
WITH CIGARETTES) OVER TOBACCO FIELD
IN SYNC WITH ORAL. LETTERING
FREEZES.

			(MUSIC: FADE WELL UNDER FOR.)

			ANNOUNCER: (TRACK)

			LS - MFT

			Lucky Strike means fine tobacco. 

LETTERING FADES OUT. CONTINUE PAN
ON TOBACCO FIELD. UNOPENED LUCKY
STRIKE PACKAGE RISES OUT OF TOBACCO
FIELD.

			Mild, enjoyable tobacco that puts you

			on the right level ... the Lucky Level ...

			where it's fun to be alive.

DOLLY IN RAPIDLY TO LUCKY STRIKE 
PACKAGE FULL SCREEN. TOBACCO 
FIELD BACKGROUND DISAPPEARS OFF
SCREEN.

			So, smoke a Lucky to feel your level best!

LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE OPENS.
THREE CIGARETTES POP OUT. HOLD
OPENED LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE
FULL SCREEN.

			(MUSIC: UP FULL TO FINISH.)

_________________________________________

Originally broadcast January 21, 1949
Sponsored by THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY



Two commercials prepared for the program:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

LEVEL BEST COMMERCIAL #1 - S

VISUAL				AUDIO

(FILM)

UNOPENED LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE FULL
SCREEN.

			ANNOUNCER #1

			Smoke a Lucky to feel your level best!

			Smoke a Lucky to feel your level best!

PACKAGE OPENS AND THREE CIGARETTES
POP OUT. IMMEDIATE VERTICAL
BARNDOOR WIPE, SIMULATING CURTAIN,
RISES REVEALING APARTMENT DINNER
TABLE.  ATTRACTIVE MAN (27) SITS
RELAXED AT END OF MEAL. HE IS
SIPPING COFFEE AND SMOKING LUCKY
STRIKE CIGARETTE. WIFE (23) RISES
ABRUPTLY FROM TABLE AND CLEARS HER
COFFEE CUP AND SAUCER FROM THE TABLE.
SHE DROPS CUP.


			ANNOUNCER #2

			Luckies' fine tobacco picks you up when

			you're low ... calms you down when you're 

			tense.

			(SOUND: CUP CRASHING TO FLOOR)

WIFE BENDS OVER DESPONDENTLY, PICKS
UP CUP AS HUSBAND SAYS.

			HUSBAND: (SYMPATHETICALLY)

			Having trouble, dear?

			WIFE: 

			Oh, nothing's been right today. I'm all

			keyed up.

WIFE THROWS BROKEN CUP ON TABLE.
HE CONSOLES HER. HE STILL HOLDS
LUCKY IN HAND. WIFE SITS DOWN.
HUSBAND OFFERS HER A LUCKY. SHE
ACCEPTS.

			HUSBAND: 

			Here, light up a Lucky. You'll feel better.

HE LIGHTS HER CIGARETTE. SHE TAKES
SLOW, RELAXED PUFF, EXHALES, LOOKS
AT CIGARETTE AND THEN SMILES UP AT
HUSBAND. SHE THEN TAKES ANOTHER SLOW
PUFF. LOOKS DOWN AT CIGARETTE
APPROVINGLY.

			WIFE: (AFTER FIRST PUFF, SMILES AT HUSBAND)

			You're right, I don't feel so edgy, now.

			ANNOUNCER #2

			Yes, Luckies' fine tobacco picks you up 

			when you're low ... calms you down when you're 

			tense.

			Puts you on the right level ... the Lucky

			Level ... where you can feel and do your

			level best. It's important for you as

			smoker to know that fine tobacco can do

			this for you.

DISSOLVE TO.

BIG CLOSEUP OF ATTRACTIVE HUSBAND (AS
BEFORE) HOLDING LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTE.
HE IS PICTURE OF BUOYANCY AND HEALTH. 
HE TAKES PUFF ON CIGARETTE AND SMILES.
SMOKE RISES. PAN UP WITH SMOKE.

			ANNOUNCER 1:

			And always remember!

			LS - MFT.

			ANNOUNCER 2:

			Lucky Strike means fine tobacco. Smooth,

			thoroughly enjoyable Lucky Strike Tobacco!

SMOKE DISSOLVES OUT. FULL SCREEN WHITE
LETTERING "SMOKE A LUCKY TO FEEL YOUR 
LEVEL BEST," AGAINST DARK BACKGROUND IN
SYNC WITH ORAL. LETTERING FREEZES.

			ANNOUNCER 1:

			So, smoke a Lucky to feel your level best!

OPENED LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE WITH THREE
CIGARETTES POPPED OUT ZOOMS FROM NOTHING
THROUGH LETTERING AS LETTERING FADES    
OUT. LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE CONTINUES TO
FULL SCREEN AND HOLDS.

			ANNOUNCER 2:

			Get on the Lucky Level where it's fun to be

			alive! Get started today!

FADE OUT


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


LEVEL BEST COMMERCIAL #4 - SW

VISUAL				AUDIO

HORIZONTAL OPTICAL FLIP REVEALS.

SINGLE LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE
DANCING FORWARD.

			(MUSIC: "SCARECROW." ESTABLISH
			THEN UNDER FOR ORAL.)

			ANNOUNCER #2
			Mild, ripe, light tobacco .....

PACKAGE CONTINUES TO DANCE
FORWARD. OTHER PACKS APPEAR AND
DISAPPEAR BEHIND FRONT PACKAGE.

			..... that makes a thoroughly enjoy-
			able smoke.

TEN OR TWELVE PACKAGES FAN OUT
BEHIND ORIGINAL PACK. PACKAGES
FAN BACK AGAIN BEHIND ORIGINAL PACKAGE.

			ANNOUNCER #1
			So, smoke a Lucky to feel your level
			best!

TWO CIGARETTES DANCE OUT THROUGH
FRONT OF PACKAGE WITHOUT BREAKING
OR DESTROYING PACKAGE. FIRST
CIGARETTE COMPLETES HALF-CIRCLE AND
STOPS AT RIGHT CENTER.

			ANNOUNCER #2
			Your level best! That's how you'll ....

SECOND CIGARETTE FOLLOWS MOVEMENT OF
FIRST CIGARETTE AND DISAPPEARS BEHIND
ORIGINAL CIGARETTE.

			.... feel when you smoke a Lucky....

			Because Luckies fine tobacco puts you

			on the right level...the Lucky Level...

TWENTY CIGARETTES DANCE OUT FROM
BEHIND FIRST CIGARETTE, CIGARETTES
CIRCLE TO RIGHT.

			....where you can feel your level best..

			...do your level best!

CIGARETTES LEAP INTO THE AIR AND
COME DOWN AGAIN AS THEY CIRCLE.

CIGARETTES PASS INTO LEFT SIDE
OF PACKAGE AND EMERGE FROM RIGHT
SIDE WITHOUT BREAKING OR DESTROYING
PACKAGE.

			ANNOUNCER #1

			So, next time you buy cigarettes,

			remember ...

CIGARETTES CIRCLE ROUND AND REPEAT
PREVIOUS MOVEMENT OF ENTERING LEFT
SIDE OF PACKAGE. SINGLE CIGARETTE
REMAINS STANDING IN CENTER SCREEN.

			ANNOUNCER #2

			Luckies fine tobacco picks you up when

			you're low ... calms you down when you're

			tense!


BOOK OF MATCHES FLIES IN. MATCH
COMES OUT OF BOOK, STRIKES ITSELF AND
LIGHTS CIGARETTE. CIGARETTE SMOKES.
BOOK OF MATCHES FLIES OFF SCREEN.

CUT TO.

MEDIUM SHOT. CIGARETTE TAKES OFF
AND FLIES TO UPPER LEFT-HAND SCREEN.  
PAN UP WITH CIGARETTE.

			ANNOUNCER #1

			Smoke a Lucky to feel your level best!

MEDIUM SHOT. CIGARETTE LEAVES TRAIL
OF SMOKE AS IT MOVES ACROSS SCREEN
TO RIGHT.

			Get a carton of Luckies and get started

			right with ...

SMOKE TRAIL DISSOLVES QUICKLY INTO
LETTERING "LUCKY STRIKE."

			Lucky Strike!

LUCKY STRIKE PACKAGE ZOOMS TO FULL
SCREEN. HOLD LETTERING "LUCKY STRIKE."

CURTAIN, FULL SCREEN. 
BULLSEYE ON CENTER DROP.

SIDE CURTAINS PULL BACK AND DISAPPEAR.
CURTAIN CENTER DROP WITH LUCKY STRIKE
BULLSEYE RISES OUT FRAME.

REVEALING LEAF WITH LUCKY STRIKE
PACKAGE SUPERIMPOSED. PACKAGE SLIDES
DOWN LEAF AND WALKS TOWARD CAMERA.

			ANNOUNCER #1

			Smoke a Lucky to feel your level best!

			Smoke a Lucky to feel your level best!

			ANNOUNCER #2

			Luckies' fine tobacco picks you up when

			you're low ... calms you down when you're 

			tense.

DOLLY IN FOR CLOSEUP OF WALKING
PACKAGE.

			It's important for you to know that fine 

			tobacco can do this for you.

DOLLY IN FOR VERY CLOSEUP SHOT OF
PACKAGE AS IT UNWRAPS. RED TAG
UNWINDS AND FLIES OFF. CELLOPHANE
PEELS OFF AND FLIES OUT OF FRAME.
LEAD FOIL OPENS, FORMS A BALL WHICH
JUMPS OFF PACKAGE AND ROLLS OFF-STAGE.

			For as every smoker knows .........


DOLLY BACK FOR MEDIUM CLOSE SHOT AS
PACKAGE IS UNWRAPPING.

CIGARETTES FLY OUT OF PACKAGE TO SPELL
LETTERING SUPERIMPOSED ON LEAF IN
SYNC WITH ORAL. LETTERING FADES OUT.

			ANNOUNCER #1

			LS - MFT

			LS - MFT

REPEAT LETTERING SEQUENCE.
LETTERING FREEZES.

			Lucky Strike means fine tobacco. 


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