Salt of the Earth

FADE IN (before titles)

EXT., QUINTERO BACKYARD. MEDIUM SHOT, DAY.

A woman at work chopping wood. Though her back is to the 
CAMERA, we sense her weariness in toil by the set of her 
shoulders. A five-year-old girl is helping the woman, 
gathering kindling. Over this scene comes the first 
title. A guitar dominates the musical theme. The motif 
is grave, nostalgic. 

EXT., QUINTERO BACKYARD. A SERIES OF SHOTS, DAY.

As successive titles appear, each is matched by a view of 
the woman at her chores. Though at no time do see her face, 
we begin to gather that she is large with child. The woman 
carries the load of wood to an outdoor fire, staggering 
under its weight, the little girl following with a box of 
kindling ... The woman feeds wood into the fire, on top of 
which is a washtub ... She scrubs clothes in the tub, bowed 
to the work, the little girl watching. She wrings out 
articles of clothing, hanging them on a clothesline, the 
little girl helping gravely.

EXT., QUINTERO BACKYARD. MEDIUM CLOSE SHOT, DAY.

As the last title fades, the woman continues hanging the 
wash and for the first time we see her face: a mask of 
suppression, a chiseled yet eroded beauty, the eyes hooded, 
smoldering. At the same time, though her lips do not move, 
we hear her voice: grave, nostalgic, cadenced, like the 
music of the guitar, inflecting the melody of 
Mexican-American speech.

			WOMAN'S VOICE 
	How shall I begin my story that has no 
	beginning?
 
MEDIUM FULL SHOT. 

The clothes billowing in the wind as the woman hangs them 
up. 

			WOMAN'S VOICE 
	My name is Esperanza, Esperanza Quintero. 
	I am a miner's wife.

EXT., FRONT OF THE QUINTERO COTTAGE. FULL SHOT, DAY. 

It is a small clapboard dwelling surrounded by a picket 
fence. Flowers are blooming outside the fence. Beyond 
this house similar cottages can be seen, strung out along 
a dirt road.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	This is our home. The house is not ours. 
	But the flowers ... the flowers are ours.
 
EXT., ZINC TOWN. VISTA SHOT, DAY.
 
We see several small stores, station, scattered frame and 
shacks, and in deep b.g., a Catholic church.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	This is my village. When I was a child, 
	it was called San Marcos.
 
FULLER VISTA SHOT, INCLUDING THE MINE ON A HILLTOP.
 
The mine dominates the town like a volcano. Its vast cone 
of waste has engulfed most of the vegetation on the hill 
and seems to threaten the town itself. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	The Anglos changed the name to Zinc Town. 
	Zinc Town, New Mexico, U.S.A.

EXT., CHURCH CEMETERY. MEDIUM SHOT, DAY.

An ancient graveyard beside a Catholic church.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Our roots go deep in this place, deeper than the 
	pines, deeper than the mine shaft.
 
EXT., COUNTRYSIDE. LONG PAN SHOT, DAY.
 
We see great scudding clouds and the jagged skyline of a 
mountain spur. The mountain is scarred and pitted by old 
diggings. The lower slope is a skirt of waste, the grey 
powdery residue of an abandoned mine.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	In these arroyos my great grandfather 
	raised cattle before the Anglos ever 
	came.

CLOSE SHOT: A SIGN ATTACHED TO A FENCE.

It reads:
 
	PROPERTY OF 
	DELAWARE ZINC, INC.
 
VISTA SHOT: THE ZINC MINE IN THE DISTANCE.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	The land where the mine stands -- that 
	was owned by my husband's own grandfather.
 
CLOSER SHOT, FEATURING THE MINE HEAD.

At closer range we see the head frame, power house and 
Administration Building.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Now it belongs to the company. Eighteen 
	years my husband has given to that mine.
 
INT., MINE. CLOSE SHOT, RAMÓN QUINTERO 

at work. He is lighting fuses of dynamite charges which are 
packed into the rock face of a narrow drift. There are a 
dozen such fuses. The drift is lighted only by the lamp on 
Ramón's hat.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Living half his life with dynamite and 
	darkness.
 
CLOSE-UP: A FUSE.
 
It sputters, runs.

THE DRIFT, WIDER ANGLE 

to include Ramón's wild face as he turns and runs. We see 
only a bobbing lamp and the long shadow of a man running. 
We see a flash of light, hear muffled thunder.
 
EXT., BACKYARD. MEDIUM SHOT, DAY.

Esperanza has paused a moment in her work, looking off 
toward the mine with a worried frown. Now she picks up the 
heavy clothes-basket and walks toward the cottage. The 
little Estella is not in sight.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Who can say where it began, my story? I 
	do not know. But this day I remember as 
	the beginning of an end.
 
INT., QUINTERO KITCHEN. MEDIUM SHOT, DAY.
 
It is no more than a narrow passageway, dominated by an 
ancient wood-burning stove. There is no running water. 
Esperanza sets the basket down beside an ironing board, 
picks up an iron from the stove and tests it with a 
moistened finger.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	It was my Saint's Day. I was thirty-five 
	years old. A day of celebration. And I 
	was seven months gone with my third child.
 
Estella has run into shot, presenting her mother with a 
rose. Esperanza pins the rose in Estella's hair, with a 
small smile, then returns to her ironing. As she irons, 
her face becomes more and more desolate.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And on that day -- I remember I had a 
	wish ... a thought so sinful ...

In a convulsive gesture her fingers go to her lips. She drops 
the iron and hurries from the kitchen.
 
INT., PARLOR. MEDIUM CLOSE SHOT AT SHRINE.
 
We see only a corner of the small cramped parlor where 
Esperanza, with bowed head and clenched hands, stands 
before a shrine to the Virgin.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	... a thought so evil that I prayed God 
	to forgive me for it. I wished ... I 
	wished that my child would never be born. 
	No. Not into this world. 

Esperanza covers her face with her hands. The little girl 
enters scene, stares gravely at her.
 
			ESTELLA 
	Are you sick, Mama?
 
			ESPERANZA 
	No, Estellita. 

			ESTELLA 
	Are you sad? 
		(As Esperanza doesn't answer) 
	Are we going to church? For your 
	confession?
 
			ESPERANZA 
	Later. When I finish the ironing. 

She goes out.
 
FULL SHOT: KITCHEN.

As Esperanza starts ironing again, her son Luís enters by 
the back door. A handsome boy of 13, but now panting and 
bedraggled, he pours himself a glass of water and gulps it 
down. Esperanza watches him sidelong. 

			ESPERANZA 
	Fighting again? 
		(No response.) 
	With those Anglo kids? 

			LUIS
	Aah, they think they're tough.

			ESPERANZA 
	But you promised you wouldn't.

			LUIS 
		(unrepentant)
	Papa says if an Anglo makes fun of you to 
	let him have it.

Esperanza suddenly seizes his shoulder, spinning him around 
as if about to slap him, crying simultaneously:
 
			ESPERANZA 
	Never mind what your papa ...

For the first time she (and we) see that the boy's mouth is 
bleeding. Her anger is washed away in a wave of concern, 
and she picks up a cloth and wipes the blood.

			ESPERANZA 
	Hold still ... does it hurt?
 
			LUIS 
		(pulling away)
	Naah.
 
He spies a birthday cake on the drainboard, sticks his 
finger in the icing. 

			LUIS 
	How come the cake? 

Esperanza grabs the cake, puts it in the cupboard.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	Never mind. Go get your father when he 
	comes off shift. Tell him to come 
	straight home.

Glad to be released, the boy darts off as we:
 
						DISSOLVE TO: 

EXT., DELAWARE ZINC CO. MINE. LONG SHOT, DAY.

In deep b.g. stands the head frame of the mine. We hear 
one shrill blast of a steam whistle, and as this sound dies 
away we hear the rattling hoist and conveyor belt, 
punctuated occasionally by the loud crash of ore from the 
bucket into the crusher. In right f.g. stands the 
Administration Building, a long wooden bungalow.
 
MOVING WITH A GROUP OF MINERS 

striding in a body toward the Administration Building. They 
appear angry and determined. Ramón Quintero is in the lead. 
The others are Antonio Morales, Alfredo Diaz, Sebastian 
Prieto, Jenkins and Kalinsky. They all wear tin hats and 
grimy work clothes.

ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

as Chief Foreman Barton emerges from the Superintendent's 
office. He wears khaki and a Stetson. Seeing the 
approaching miners, he moves out to intercept them.
 
GROUP SHOT: BARTON AND MINERS. 

The miners stop as Barton, hands in his hip pockets, blocks 
their way. Barton is a rangy Texan with a perpetual 
half-smile on his lips. Ramón, the miners' spokesman, is 
rugged, handsome, younger in appearance than Esperanza, 
although he is a year older. There is a smoldering 
intensity in his manner and speech. During the following 
the boy Luís enters scene, coming up behind his father. 
The men ignore him.
 
			BARTON 
	Hear you had a little trouble, Quintero. 
	Defective fuse? 
		(Ramón nods.) 
	Well, you're all in one piece. So what's 
	the beef?
 
			RAMÓN
	You know the beef. This new rule of 
	yours, that we work alone. We're taking 
	it up with the Super.

			BARTON 
	Super's busy -- with your Negotiatin' 
	Committee. 

			RAMÓN 
	So much the better. 

He starts off, but Barton blocks his path again.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE. 

			BARTON 
	Now wait a minute. Super's the one made 
	the rule. He ain't gonna give you no 
	helper.
 
			RAMÓN 
	He will if he wants us to go on blasting.
 
The other miners step forward in support of Ramón. They 
protest excitedly, their speeches overlapping.

			ANTONIO 
	Listen, Mr. Barton -- there's blood in 
	that mine. The blood of my friends. All 
	because they had to work alone ... 

			JENKINS 
	That's how ya get splattered over the 
	rocks, when there's nobody to help you 
	check your fuses...

			ALFREDO 
		(breaking in)
	And nobody to warn the other men to stay 
	clear.

			BARTON 
	Warning's the shift foreman's job.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Foreman wants to get the ore out. Miner 
	wants to get his brothers out. In one 
	piece. 

			BARTON 
	You work alone, savvy? You can't handle 
	the job, I'll find someone who can. 

			RAMÓN
	Who? A scab?
 
			BARTON 
	An American.
 
Ramón stands there, taut. He exits.
 
						DISSOLVE TO:
 
INT., KITCHEN OF QUINTERO COTTAGE. FULL SHOT, EVENING.

Esperanza enters from the parlor with some dirty dishes 
followed by Estella, who carries her own plate. As 
Esperanza picks up the coffee pot, she spies Estella 
holding a candle over the frosting of the cake on the 
drainboard.
 
			ESTELLA 
	Mama, can I put the candles ...
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(a fierce whisper) 
	Hush... not a word about the cake, hear? 
 
INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT.
 
The room is small, cramped. The plaster walls are cracked 
and peeling. Most of the furnishings are faded and old. 
Nevertheless, the cottage is tidy and gives evidence of 
considerable care. A dilapidated couch is covered with a 
fine Mexican blanket. In one corner of the room stands a 
shrine to the Virgin. A vase of fresh-cut flowers stands 
on the mantlepiece beneath a framed portrait of Benito 
Juárez. The only item of splendor in the room is a
high-polished radio-phonograph console. Over scene we hear 
a tin-pan-alley compost of "Western" music sung by cowboy 
entertainers.

Ramón sits with Luís at a small table near the kitchen 
door. Esperanza enters with the coffee pot, pours his 
coffee. Estella follows her, climbing onto her father's 
lap.

			LUIS 
	Papa ... is there gonna be a strike?
 
Ramón ignores the question, brooding. Esperanza, who would 
also like to hear an answer, watches his face as he sips 
his coffee.

			ESPERANZA 
		(finally, timidly) 
	Ramón ... I don't like to bother you ... 
	but the store lady said if we don't make 
	a payment on the radio this month, 
	they'll take it away.

Ramón's forehead falls against his upraised palm, as if to 
say it's too much to bear. The little girl looks at him 
gravely.

			ESPERANZA
	We're only one payment behind. I argued 
	with her. It isn't right.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(softly, imploring heaven)
	It isn't right, she says. Was it right 
	that we bought this ... this instrument? 

He rises, holding Estella.

			RAMÓN
	But you had to have it, didn't you? It 
	was so nice to listen

			ESPERANZA 
		(quietly) 
	I listen to it. Every night. When 
	you're out to the beer parlor.
 
Ignoring this mild rebuke, Ramón crosses to the radio. 
CAMERA PANS with him. He glares at the console, mimicking 
an announcer's commercial. 

			RAMÓN 
	"No money down. Easy term payments." I 
	tell you something: this installment 
	plan, it's the curse of the working man.

He slams his coffee cup down on the console, sets his 
daughter down and goes to the kitchen. Esperanza quickly
polishes the console where he struck it.

INT., KITCHEN. MEDIUM CLOSE SHOT. 

Ramón strips to the waist, pours some water from the tub on 
the stove into a pan on the drainboard. Esperanza appears 
in the doorway, watching him her heart sinking. Her fingers 
go to her lips in a characteristic gesture.

			ESPERANZA 
	Where you going?
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Got to talk to the brothers.
 
Esperanza bites her finger, trying to hide her 
disappointment. Ramón bends over the pan to wash. He has 
not noticed the cake. Esperanza picks it up quickly, hides 
it in a cupboard. Ramón splashes his face and neck with 
water, looks up in irritation.

			RAMÓN 
	This water's cold again. 

			ESPERANZA 
	I'm sorry. The fire's gone out.

She begins to stoke the stove.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Forget it.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	Forget it? I chop wood for the stove 
	five times a day. Every time I remember. 
	I remember that across the tracks the 
	Anglo miners have hot water in pipes. And 
	bathrooms. Inside.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(bitterly) 
	Do you think I like living this way? 
	What do you want of me?! 

He reaches for a towel. Esperanza hands him one.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	But if your union... if you're asking for 
	better conditions ... why can't you ask 
	for decent plumbing, too?
 
Frustrated, evasive, Ramón turns away, buttoning his shirt.
 
			RAMÓN 
	We did. It got lost in the shuffle.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	What?
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(shrugging) 
	We can't get everything at once. Right 
	now we've got more important demands.

			ESPERANZA 
		(timidly)
	What's more important than sanitation? 

			RAMÓN 
		(flaring) 
	The safety of the men -- that's more 
	important! Five accidents this week -- 
	all because of speed-up. You're a woman, 
	you don't know what it's like up there. 

She bows her head without answering and picks up the heavy 
tub of water on the stove. Unassisted, she lugs it to the 
dishpan in the sink and fills it. Ramón begins to comb his 
hair, adding in a more subdued tone:
 
			RAMÓN 
	First we got to get equality on the job. 
	Then we'll work on these other things. 
	Leave it to the men.
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(quietly)
	I see. The men. You'll strike, maybe, for 
	your demands -- but what the wives want, 
	that comes later, always later.

			RAMÓN 
		(darkly) 
	Now don't start talking against the union 
	again.
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(a shrug of defeat) 
	What has it got me, your union?
 
Ramón looks at her in amazement, not with anger, but with 
deep concern.

			RAMÓN 
	Esperanza, have you forgotten what it was 
	like before the union came? 
		(Points toward parlor.) 
	When Estella was a baby, and we couldn't 
	even afford a doctor when she got sick? 
	It was for our families! We met in 
	graveyards to build that union!
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(lapsing into despair) 
	All right. Have your strike. I'll have 
	my baby. But no hospital will take me, 
	because I'll be a striker's wife. The 
	store will cut off our credit, and the 
	kids will go hungry. And we'll get 
	behind on the payments again, and then 
	they'll come and take away the radio...

			RAMÓN 
		(furiously) 
	Is that all you care about? That radio? 
	Can't you think of anything except 
	yourself?
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(breaking)
	If I think of myself it's because you 
	never think of me. Never. Never. Never...
 
REVERSE ANGLE, SHOOTING TOWARD PARLOR.

She covers her face with her hands, begins to sob violently. 
Ramón seizes her arms, shakes her. In b.g. we see the two 
children, still at table.
 
			RAMÓN 
	Stop it! The children are watching. Stop 
	it!

			ESPERANZA 
		(sobbing uncontrollably) 
	Never... never... never!

			RAMÓN 
	Aaah, what's the use?

He drops her arms abruptly, almost flinging her aside, and 
stalks out of the kitchen, out of the house. Esperanza 
remains leaning against the cupboard, sobbing. CAMERA HOLDS. 
The boy Luís rises from the table, comes to the kitchen 
door, looks at his mother. Then he, too, turns and leaves 
the house.
 
						QUICK DISSOLVE TO: 

EXT., BEER PARLOR, ZINC TOWN. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.

The place is lighted by a neon sign. From within we hear a 
juke box playing ersatz Mexican music. The boy approaches 
the door, pauses and e"enters.

INT., BEER PARLOR. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.

It is nondescript, small, dingy, dimly lighted, 
indistinguishable from a hundred other small-town bars. A 
half dozen miners, including Antonio Morales, Sebastian 
Prieto, and Alfredo Diaz stand at the bar rail, drinking 
beer. The bartender is an Anglo. We hear:
 
	We know it's not safe for miners to work alone! 
	The boss will always tell you things like that!
 
Luís has reached a post near a table at the far end of the 
room. Four men are seated around the table: Sal Ruiz, Frank 
Barnes, Charley Vidal and Ramón -- whose back is to Camera. 
Sal is drinking coffee; the other three are drinking beer. 
Luís stops and, as CAMERA MOVES IN ON GROUP, we pick up:
 
			RAMÓN 
		(angrily) 
	They don't work alone in other mines! 
	Anglos always work in pairs. So why 
	should I risk my life? Because I'm only a 
	Mexican?
 
			SAL AND CHARLEY
	But that's in the demands... we're 
	negotiating...

			RAMÓN
	Three months of negotiations! And 
	nothing happens! 
		(Indicates Frank.) 
	Even with Brother Barnes here from the 
	International, what've we got? 
		(Ticks them off.) 
	No raise. No seniority. No safety code. 
	Nothing.
 
REVERSE ANGLE, SHOOTING TOWARD RAMÓN.
 
The boy Luís can be seen in b.g., but everyone ignores him. 
During the previous speech Sebastian Prieto and Antonio 
Morales have approached the table. Antonio sets a fresh 
bottle of beer before Ramón.
 
			ANTONIO
	Take a drink. Calm down!

			RAMÓN 
		(to Frank, ignoring Antonio) 
	I say we gotta take action. Now.

			FRANK 
	Rest of the men feel like you?
 
Ramón glances over his shoulder at the standing miners. 
Sebastian glances uncertainly at Antonio.
 
			ANTONIO 
		(firmly) 
	He speaks for all of us.
 
			CHARLEY 
	Ever stop to think maybe they want us to 
	strike? 

			RAMÓN 
	Don't horse me. Price of zinc's never 
	been higher. They don't want no strike --
	not with their war boom on.

			FRANK 
	Then why's the company hanging tough? 
	They've signed contracts with other 
	locals -- why not this one?

			RAMÓN 
		(strikes the table) 
	Because most of us here are Mexican-
	Americans! Because we want equality with 
	Anglo miners -- the same pay, the same 
	conditions. 

			FRANK 
	Exactly. And equality's the one thing the 
	bosses can't afford. The biggest club 
	they have over the Anglo locals is, "Well
	-- at least you get more than the 
	Mexicans." 

			RAMÓN 
	Okay, so discrimination hurts the Anglo 
	too, but it hurts me more. And I've had 
	enough of it!

			SAL 
	But you don't pull a strike when the 
	bosses want it -- so they can smash your 
	union. You wait till you're ready, so you 
	can win.

			RAMÓN 
	Do the bosses wait? No sanitation. So my 
	kids get sick. Does the company doctor 
	wait? Twenty bucks. So we miss one 
	payment on the radio I bought for my 
	wife. Does the company store wait? "Pay
	-- or we take it away." Why they in such 
	a hurry, the bosses' store? They're 
	trying to scare us, that's why -- to make 
	us afraid to move. To hang on to what we 
	got -- and like it! Well, I don't like 
	it I'm not scared ... and I'm fed up -- 
	to here! 

His hand goes a foot over his head.
 
			ANTONIO
	Hey Ramón -- te buscan!
 
With a jerk of his head he indicates Luís. Ramón turns 
around, spots his son. He rises, frowning, and moves 
toward him.
 
TWO SHOT: RAMÓN AND LUIS.
 
			RAMÓN
		(roughly) 
	What are you doing here? 
		(Suddenly worried.) 
	Something wrong with Mama?
 
			LUIS 
		(deadpan) 
	I thought maybe you forgot...
 
			RAMÓN 
	Forgot what?
 
			LUIS 
	It's Mama's Saint's Day.
 
Ramón is stunned, as though from a slap across the face. At 
last he works up a travesty of a grin.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	You think I forgot? I was planning a 
	surprise...
 
Ramón turns back to the men. CAMERA FOLLOWS HIM, HOLDING on 
the group.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(chuckling) 
	What a kid. He can't wait. It's my 
	wife's Saint's Day. I was gonna ask you, 
	brothers -- how about a mañanita, huh?
 
			AD LIBS 
		(eagerly) 
	Sure. 
	What time?
	The later the better... 
	Wait'll she's asleep...
 
 						DISSOLVE TO:
 
EXT., QUINTERO COTTAGE. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.

No lights are visible in the cottage, or in those adjoining 
it. A cluster of men, women and children can be seen in the 
front yard, serenading by moonlight. The song is called 
"Las Mañanitas." Two of the men are strumming guitars.
 
CLOSER ANGLE: THE SERENADERS. 

They include Ramón and Luís, Antonio and Luz Morales, Sal 
and Consuelo Ruiz, Charley and Teresa Vidal, Frank and Ruth 
Barnes, Alfredo Diaz and his wife, Sebastian Prieto and a 
silver-haired old lady of great dignity, Mrs. Salazar. The 
children range from 2 to 15, and there are many of them. 
Except for the youngest they sing as lustily as their 
parents.
 
INT., BEDROOM, QUINTERO HOUSE. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.

The small bedroom is partitioned by a screen, separating 
the children's cots from the parents' bed. A crucifix hangs 
over the bed. The room is feebly lighted by one small lamp. 
Esperanza lies in bed, an arm flung across her eyes. The 
sound of the singing comes faintly over scene. CAMERA MOVES 
IN SLOWLY on Esperanza. Her arm falls to her side. She 
opens her eyes. She listens, motionless.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE: THE BEDROOM 

as Estella emerges from behind the screen and climbs onto 
her mother's bed, with a kind of sleepy-eyed wonder.
 
			ESTELLA 
	Why are they singing, Mama?
 
			ESPERANZA 
	They are singing for me.
 
			ESTELLA 
	Can we light the candles now? On the cake?
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(smiles) 
	Yes. We will light the candles.
 
Suddenly she flings back the bed covers, reaches for a 
dressing gown and puts it on.
 
EXT., QUINTERO COTTAGE. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.
 
The lights come up in the parlor. The front door opens, 
revealing Esperanza and Estella. They smile, remain in the 
open doorway as the serenaders go into a final chorus. The 
song ends in laughter and applause. They swarm into the 
house.
 
INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.
 
A merry bedlam, with Esperanza receiving her guests. Sal 
Ruiz starts up a bawdy folk song on his guitar. He is urged 
on by Charley Vidal's wild falsetto. Antonio lugs a case of 
beer into the house and immediately starts uncapping it, 
passing foaming bottles to everyone. The women gather 
around Esperanza, embracing her, wishing her a happy 
birthday in English and Spanish. Ramón is the last to 
enter.
 
CLOSER ANGLE, FEATURING ESPERANZA AND RAMÓN 

confronting one another in the center of the room. Ramón 
gazes at her in silence, repentant. She returns his gaze, 
for the moment oblivious of her guests, who gracefully 
withdraw from the situation. Esperanza's eyes fill with 
tears, she smiles tremulously, and her fingers go to her 
lips.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	I ... I must get dressed.
 
She flees from the room. Ramón follows her, gesturing to 
men to keep on with their singing.
 
INT., BEDROOM. TWO SHOT: RAMÓN AND ESPERANZA.

He puts his arms around her, tentatively. Her forehead 
falls against his shoulder.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	I did not mean to weep again. Why should I 
	weep for joy?
 
			RAMÓN 
	I'm a fool.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	No, no ...
 
She raises her head, brushing her cheek against his.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	Was it expensive, the beer?
 
			RAMÓN 
	Antonio paid for it. 

			ESPERANZA 
	Forgive me ... for saying you never 
	thought of me. 

			RAMÓN 
		(with effort) 
	I did forget. Luís told me.
 
Grateful for his honesty, she pulls his head down, kisses 
him. He returns her kiss passionately.
 
						DISSOLVE TO: 

A MONTAGE, SHOWING 

Esperanza chopping wood outside her kitchen door. The 
carefree guitar music of the mañanita carries over scene --
and Esperanza pauses in her labors, seeming to hear it 
again.
 
 			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	All the next week I kept thinking about my 
	mañanita. I had never had so nice a 
	party ...
 
The image on the screen gives way to another as Esperanza 
recollects the occasion: we see Esperanza and Estella 
blowing out the candles the birthday cake, surrounded 
their beaming guests.
 
 			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	It was like a song running through my 
	mind, a humming in my heart, a daydream to 
	lighten the long days' work ...
 
EXT., QUINTERO BACKYARD. CLOSE SHOT: ESPERANZA 

bending over a large tub, scrubbing clothes. She pauses, 
smiles reflectively.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	We forgot our troubles at the mañanita 
	-- even Ramón ...

A NEW IMAGE IS SUPERIMPOSED ON THE SCREEN.

Now we see Ramón dancing with Consuelo Ruiz, while Esperanza 
looks on, smiling.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	I couldn't dance that night -- not in my 
	condition. But I wasn't really jealous 
	when he danced with the others ... 
	because it was good just to see him smile 
	again ...
 
EXT., QUINTERO YARD, CLOTHESLINE. FULL SHOT, DAY.

Esperanza and Luz are hanging clothes and talking across 
the fence between them. Their two children are playing 
together in f.g.
 
 			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And then one morning I was hanging out my 
	wash.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE: THE YARD, SHOOTING TOWARD FRONT GATE.
 
In deep b.g. we see three women enter the Morales yard and 
approach Luz. They beckon to Esperanza.
 
 			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And while we were talking the ladies came. 
	They were a kind of delegation. It was 
	about the sanitation, they said ...
 
CLOSER ANGLE: THE GROUP AT FENCE 

as Esperanza comes over. Throughout this scene the two 
children climb up, down and sideways on the fence in an 
intricate little geometric dance. Luz goes on hanging up 
her clothes. We see the delegation talking earnestly to 
Esperanza and Luz but we hear only:
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE
	The Anglo miners have bathrooms and hot 
	running water, Consuelo said, why 
	shouldn't we?
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(sighing)
	I know, I spoke to Ramón about it -- only 
	a week ago.
 
			RUTH 
	And what did he say?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	They dropped it from their demands.
 
 			CONSUELO 
		(sighs) 
	Es lo de siempre.
 
			TERESA 
		(the militant) 
	We got to make them understand -- make 
	the men face up to it. 
		(To Ruth) 
	Show her the sign.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE: THE GROUP 

as Ruth lifts up a placard, hitherto unseen, which she has 
been holding at her side. It reads:
 
		WE WANT SANITATION
		NOT DISCRIMINATION 

			CONSUELO 
	We'll make a lot of signs like this. 
	Then we'll get all the wives together and 
	go right up to the mine.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	To the mine?
 
			TERESA 
	Sure. Where they're negotiating. In the 
	company office. We'll go up there and
	picket the place.
 
			CONSUELO 
	Then both sides will see we mean business.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(thunderstruck)
	A picket line? Of ... of ladies? 
 
			RUTH 
	Sure. Why not?

Luz flings a pair of damp pants on the clothes line without 
hanging them up.
 
 			LUZ 
	You can count me in.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(scandalized) 
	Luz!
 
 			LUZ 
	Listen, we ought to be in the wood 
	choppers' union. Chop wood for breakfast. 
	Chop wood to wash his clothes. Chop wood, 
	heat the iron. Chop wood, scrub the floor. 
	Chop wood, cook his dinner. And you know 
	what he'll say when he gets home ...
		(Mimics Antonio) 
	"What you been doing all day? Reading the 
	funny papers?"
 
The women laugh softly -- all except Esperanza.
 
 			TERESA 
	Come on, Esperanza -- how about it? We 
	got to. 

			ESPERANZA
	No. No. I can't. If Ramón ever found me on 
	a picket line ... 

Her voice trails off.
 
 			CONSUELO 
	He'd what? Beat you? 

			ESPERANZA 
	No ... No ...
 
Suddenly we hear, from far off, five short blasts of a 
steam whistle. The women fall silent instantly, listening. 
Then it comes again. Five short blasts.
 
EXT., MINE HEAD. LONG SHOT, DAY. 

We can see little puff`s of steam from the whistle on the 
head frame, and again we hear five short blasts.
 
BACK TO THE WOMEN 

frozen, apprehensive. Luz expels the word that has already 
crossed their minds.
 
			LUZ
	... accidente ...
 
She grabs her son from off the fence and hurries with him 
to the gate and out on to the road. The others begin to 
follow, as though magnetized. The signal continues over:
 
A SERIES OF SHOTS, SHOWING 

women emerging from their houses, looking off at the mine.
 
Women strung out along the dirt road lending to the mine.
 
Esperanza, slowed down by her unborn child, tagging along 
behind, holding Estella's hand.
 
EXT., MINE HEAD. MEDIUM LONG SHOT, DAY.
 
Men are scurrying toward the head frame from all directions. 
Two of them carry a stretcher. At this distance the whistle 
blast is much louder.
 
EXT., ADMINISTRATION OFFICE. MEDIUM LONG SHOT, DAY.

The union negotiators, Ruiz, Vidal and Barnes, emerge from 
the company office and walk swiftly toward the mine head. 
Superintendent Alexander and two company men follow.
 
EXT., ROAD LEADING TOWARD MINE. LONG PANNING SHOT.

An ancient, dusty ambulance, its siren wailing, bounces 
along the narrow road leading to the mine. The advancing 
women make way for it.
 
EXT. HEAD FRAME OF MINE. MEDIUM SHOT, AT HOIST.

A cluster of miners wait tensely around the hoist as the 
cage rises to ground level. Several miners wearing tin hats 
are crowded inside the cage, but their faces are so grimy 
we cannot make out who they are.
 
MEDIUM LONG SHOT: WOMEN AND CHILDREN

who have stopped on a little knoll at some distance from 
the mine head. They are looking down at:
 
THE MINE HEAD, FROM THEIR ANGLE. 

So many men gather around the injured man or men that we 
can still not distinguish them. But we see a body placed 
on a stretcher. Two men carry it toward the waiting 
ambulance.
 
BACK TO WOMEN. CLOSE GROUP SHOT. 

One woman breaks away and plunges down the hill. The others 
heave a collective sigh -- a sigh of relief, anguish, 
compassion.

			LUZ 
	It's Mr. Kalinsky.
 
REAR OF AMBULANCE. MEDIUM SHOT. 

A large number of miners are milling about. The injured man 
is lifted into the ambulance and the doors are shut. Just 
then Mrs. Kalinsky runs up. She pounds on the doors.
 
 			MRS. KALINSKY 
		(hysterically) 
	Let me see him! Let me see him! 

Several miners try to calm her. They lead her away as the 
ambulance starts up. 

			AD LIBS
	Now Mrs. Kalinsky, he's gonna be all right ... 
	His leg's broken, that's all ... 
	Come on now, you can see him in the hospital ...
 
THE MILLING CROWD. ANOTHER ANGLE 

as Superintendent Alexander comes up to the chief foreman. 
Ramón is close by. He is dirty, sweating, furious.
 
			ALEXANDER
	How did it happen?
 
			BARTON 
	He wandered into a drift -- when this 
	fellow was blasting. 

He indicates Ramón.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(seething) 
	I told you it would happen. It's bound 
	to happen when a man works alone!
 
 			ALEXANDER 
		(to Ramón) 
	Why didn't you give a warning signal?
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(indicates Barton, bitterly) 
	Your foreman says that's a foreman's job.
 
			BARTON 
	I checked the drift just before he blasted. 
	It was all clear ... The man must have 
	been asleep or something.
 
			RAMÓN 
	You weren't even there. You were back at 
	the station. Kalinsky told me ...

			BARTON 
		(softly) 
	You're a liar, Pancho. A no-good, dirty ...
 
Ramón lunges at him. Barton fends him off. Ramón keeps 
boring in, but Sal Ruiz and Frank Barnes grab him. We hear 
an angry bedlam.
 
 			AD LIBS 
		(in Spanish and English)
	Déjame! I'll kill him! 
	Hold him! Hold him! ...
 	Basta, Ramón!
 	All right, all right. Break it up ...
 
 			ALEXANDER 
		(pointing at Ramón) 
	You, there. Get a hold on yourself. A 
	man's been hurt. I'm as sorry about it as 
	you are. Savvy?
 
Ramón finally quiets down. By now the miners have formed a 
ragged phalanx in b.g. The three union negotiators, Ramón, 
the Superintendent and the Chief Foreman form a group in 
f.g. Alexander speaks to all of them.
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	Accidents are costly to everyone -- and 
	to the company most of all. 
		(glances at his watch) 
	And now, I see no reason to treat the 
	occasion like a paid holiday. Suppose we 
	all get back to work.
 
He takes a couple of steps, stops, noting that no one has 
moved. 

			ALEXANDER 
		(an order) 
	Mr. Barton.
 
 			BARTON 
		(a bluff approach) 
	All right, fellows, the excitement's over. 
	Let's get to it.
 
Barton starts toward the mine head. But the men do not 
move. Faintly we hear mutterings in Spanish from the 
miners' ranks. 

			AD LIBS
	...'hora.
	... Sí, yo creo que sí.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING ALEXANDER.
 
 			ALEXANDER 
		(exasperated, to Vidal)
	What are they saying?
 
 			CHARLEY 
	No savvy.

			ALEXANDER 
		(turning to Frank) 
	Well, Barnes? How about it? Tell them to 
	get back to work. 

 			FRANK 
		(grinning) 
	They don't work for me. I work for them.
 
			ALEXANDER 
		(sharply) 
	Ruiz? 

WIDER ANGLE SHOOTING TOWARD MINERS.

Sal Ruiz takes his time. He lights a cigarette. Then he 
calls out in Spanish:
 
 			SAL 
	It's up to you, brothers.
 
A murmur runs through the ranks, "si, si." Several miners 
glance at Ramón. Suddenly Ramón wheels, strides toward the 
power house, which is adjacent to the head frame of the 
mine. Passing through the miner's ranks, he bellows at the 
top of his lungs:
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Cente!
 
EXT., POWER HOUSE. CLOSE SHOT, AT DOOR.
 
As the man named Cente (Vicente) sticks his head out the 
doorway of a galvanized tin shack, we hear a yell from off 
scene.
 
 			RAMÓN'S VOICE 
	Apágalo!
 
Cente's head disappears.
 
A CONTROL BOARD. CLOSE SHOT 

containing several big industrial circuit breakers. Cente's 
hand comes up, pulls the switch.
 
EXT., HEAD FRAME, FEATURING CRUSHER.

The gigantic primary crusher, with rock rattling around in 
it, suddenly stops.
 
EXT., HEAD FRAME: AT CONVEYOR 

carrying small lumps of ore from the crusher. The belt 
stops.

BACK TO MEN. FULL SHOT.
 
The stillness is vast and sudden. Ramón walks back to the 
massed ranks of his fellow miners. He halts beside Antonio 
at the end of the file. No one else moves or speaks.
 
CLOSER ANGLE: THE MINERS' RANKS. 

Antonio nudges Ramón, indicating, something o.s. Ramón's 
head turns, looking off scene. One by one, the heads of the 
other miners turn, glancing o.s.

MEDIUM SHOT: FOREMAN AND SUPERINTENDENT 

standing before the silent miners. Barton realizes that 
the men are not looking at him, but at something above and 
beyond him. Barton looks over his shoulder. Alexander 
slowly follows suit.
 
FROM THEIR ANGLE, LONG SHOT: THE WOMEN AND CHILDREN
 
standing on the knoll above the mine. They are silent and 
grave. The women's skirts billow in the wind, like unfurled 
flags, like the tattered banners of a guerrilla band that 
has come to offer its services to the regular army.
 
						FADE OUT.
 
FADE IN:
 
CLOSE-UP: A LICENSE PLATE. 

It is a New Mexico plate, and though it is night we can 
make out clearly the words on the white background on the 
plate:
 
	LAND OF ENCHANTMENT
 
CAMERA PULLS BACK SLOWLY TO DISCLOSE

Cowboy boot perched on a car bumper.
 
CAMERA PULLS BACK FURTHER, DISCLOSING 

a khaki-clad leg, a pearl-handled revolver in a holster -- 
then the full figure of a deputy leaning on the fender of 
his car. He is picking his teeth with a matchstick and 
gazing at:
 
EXT., UNION HALL, SHOOTING PAST SHERIFF'S CAR, NIGHT.

The car is parked provocatively near the entrance to the 
building. A sign over the doorway, lighted by reflectors, 
identifies the place as the union hall. From within we hear 
the muted tumult of a packed house. In near f.g. is another 
parked car containing several women and children.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	That night the men held a union meeting ... 
	just to make the walk-out official.
 
Suddenly we hear a roar of applause from inside the hall. 
The door opens; Luís and a tow-headed youngster come 
bounding out, run toward the car, CAMERA PANNING with them.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	It didn't take them long. They voted to 
	strike -- 93 to 5.
 
We see the car door open: Ruth Barnes and Teresa emerge 
from the front seat; Consuelo, holding a sleeping infant, 
gets out of the back. Esperanza is the last to appear. 
Estella is asleep in her arms.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	... And Teresa said now was the time for 
	us to go in. I didn't want to ... I had 
	never been to a union meeting. But the 
	others said, one go, all go ...
 
We see the women coaxing Esperanza. She follows them 
reluctantly toward the union hall.
 
FULL SHOT, NIGHT: INT., UNION HALL 

as seen from the entrance. A hundred miners are packed 
densely on the center block of benches, facing the union 
officers in b.g. Sal Ruiz is presiding; Frank Barnes sits 
at the table beside him. Charley Vidal stands near the 
chairman, delivering an impassioned speech.
 
			CHARLEY VIDAL 
	We have many complaints, brothers, and 
	many demands. But they all add up to one 
	word: Equality!
 
Over sound track we hear the Spanish of Charley's speech, 
but it is modulated to:
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	The meeting was nearly over when we came 
	in. Charley Vidal was making a speech. 
	He said there was only one issue in this 
	strike -- equality. But the mine owners 
	would stop at nothing to keep them from 
	getting equality.
 
THE HALL. ANOTHER ANGLE, INCLUDING THE WOMEN.
 
The men are so intent on Charley Vidal's speech that they 
do not notice the entrance of the women, who tip-toe 
unobtrusively to the side of the room where they take seats 
on the unoccupied wall bench. Estella wakes up, blinking in 
the bright lights.
 
THE HALL. FULL SHOT, FEATURING CHARLEY.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	He said the bosses would try to split the
	Anglo and Mexican-American workers and 
	offer rewards to one man if he would sell 
	out his brother... There was only one 
	answer to that, Charley said -- solidarity. 
	The solidarity of working men.
 
Charley concludes his speech.
 
			CHARLEY VIDAL 
	To all this, brothers, there is only one 
	answer, the solidarity of working men!
 
He sits down to loud applause which comes up over sound 
track. Sal Ruiz rises, bangs his gavel.
 
GROUP SHOT: THE WOMEN.
 
Ruth and Teresa nudge Consuelo, trying to get her to rise 
-- but Consuelo, frightened, clings to her sleeping infant. 
Ruth grabs the baby and Teresa practically pushes Consuelo 
to her feet.
 
WIDER ANGLE, SHOOTING PAST SAL, INCLUDING WOMEN.

Charley Vidal plucks at Sal's sleeve, points in the 
direction of the women. 

			SAL 
	Yes? You ladies have an announcement?
 
			CONSUELO 
		(haltingly) 
	Well -- it's not an announcement, I guess. 
	The ladies wanted me to ... 

			VOICE FROM THE FLOOR
	Louder! 

			SAL 
	Consuelo, will you speak from over here?
 
Painfully self-conscious, Consuelo moves toward camera in 
f.g. She faces the men and begins again, nervous, but 
trying to speak louder.
 
			CONSUELO
	The ladies have been talking about 
	sanitation ... and we were thinking ... 
	if the issue is equality, like you say it 
	is, then maybe we ought to have equality 
	in plumbing too ...
 
CLOSE GROUP SHOT: MINERS.
 
Some appear resentful of the women's intrusion; others seem 
amused. Antonio whispers something to Alfredo. Alfredo 
laughs. Frowning, Ramón looks around at Esperanza, as he 
might look at a woman who entered church uncovered.
 
			CONSUELO'S VOICE 
	I mean, maybe it could be a strike demand 
	... and some of the ladies thought -- it 
	might be a good idea to have a ladies 
	auxiliary! Well, we would like to help 
	out .. . if we can ...

FULL SHOT: THE HALL, FEATURING CONSUELO.

We hear mild, scattered applause, and then a male falsetto 
giggle sets off a wave of laughter. Ruiz rises, grins 
sheepishly. Consuelo hurries back to her seat. CAMERA HOLDS.

			SAL 
	I'm sure I can speak for all of the 
	brothers. We appreciate the ladies 
	offering to help, but it's getting late 
	and I suggest we table it. The chair 
	will entertain a motion to adjourn.
 
			FIRST MINER 
		(from the floor) 
	Move to adjourn!

			SECOND MINER
	Second! 

			SAL 
	So ordered.

He brings down his gavel, and the meeting ends. Some of the 
miners break for the door, others begin to mill about. 
Ruth and Consuelo walk to the front of the hall. Now, in 
quick succession we see four vignettes: 

TWO SHOT: SAL AND CONSUELO. 

He meets her near the speaker's table, flings out his arms 
in a helpless gesture.

			SAL 
	Why didn't you check with me? It's 
	embarrassing!
 
TWO SHOT: RUTH AND FRANK. 

She leans across the speaker's table before Frank can rise 
and remarks acidly:
 
			RUTH 
	Why didn't you support her? You're the 
	worst of the lot. 

			FRANK
	But honey ...

			RUTH 
	Or why don't you just put a sign outside? 
	"No dogs or women allowed!"
 
ANOTHER PART OF THE HALL. CHARLEY AND TERESA.
 
			CHARLEY 
	But, Teresa, you can't push these things 
	too fast. 

			TERESA 
		(fiercely) 
	You were pushing all right -- pushing us 
	right back in our place.
 
ESPERANZA AND RAMÓN, NEAR DOORWAY.
 
Esperanza is holding Estella, who is asleep again. Ramón is 
at the rear of a group of miners filing out of the hall. As 
two of the miners pass Camera, we hear one say to the other:
 
			FIRST MINER
	That's a pretty good idea -- making
	sanitation one of the demands again. 

As Ramón moves into f.g., he indicates with the slightest 
of gestures for Esperanza to follow. She obeys.
 
EXT., UNION HALL. MEDIUM PANNING SHOT, NIGHT.

Ramón emerges from the hall, moves to a corner of the 
building in f.g. Esperanza joins him there in the darkness. 
Ramón speaks softly.
 
			RAMÓN 
	At least you didn't make a fool of 
	yourself -- like Consuelo.
 
						SLOW DISSOLVE TO: 

EXT., PICKET LINE. LONG ESTABLISHING SHOT.

This panorama should be as inclusive as the location site 
permits. Thirty or more miners march counter-clockwise on 
a dirt road. Beyond this elliptical picket line on either 
side of the road are two signs:
 
	DELAWARE ZINC CO., INC. 
		KEEP OUT 

	MINERS ON STRIKE 
	WE WANT EQUALITY
 
Though the area is unfenced, these signs mark an imaginary 
boundary. But access to the mine is difficult except by way 
of the road. To the right of the road is a steep wooded 
hillside. The road skirts this hill till it reaches the 
mountain of waste in deep b.g., then winds uphill to the 
knoll on which the mine stands. To the left of the road is 
a railroad spur and a gully. The gully is bridged by 
trestles, beyond which a fork of the road leads to Zinc 
Town. Two sheriff's cars are parked on the road near the 
picket post. No women are visible in this scene.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And so it began -- much like any other 
	strike. There would be no settlement, 
	the company said, till the men returned 
	to their jobs. But their back-to-work 
	movement didn't work.

						WIPE TO:

THE PICKET LINE. CLOSER ANGLE. 

Two open touring cars loaded with strike-breakers slowly 
approach the picket line. The lead car stops before this 
human wall. The pickets make no menacing gestures, but 
they are ominous in massed silence. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And so the company recruited a few 
	strike-breakers from out of town.
 
We see the lead car make a U-turn and withdraw the way it 
came. It is followed by the second car.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	But they usually lost their nerve when 
	they saw the size of the picket line.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING SHERIFF'S CARS
 
parked near the picket line. A half-dozen deputies stand 
around idly. They are khaki-clad, booted, wearing their 
Stetsons with the brims rolled up. They display their 
side-arms ostentatiously, their holsters hanging low in the 
fashion of storybook gunmen.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	The Sheriff's men were always there. They 
	stood around, showing off their weapons. 
	But the men only marched, day after day, 
	week after week ...

						WIPE TO: 

EXT., ROAD, OUTSIDE QUINTERO COTTAGE. FULL SHOT, DAY.

Charley Vidal and another miner stand in the back of a 
pick-up, distributing rations to Esperanza and Luz Morales. 
The small sacks contain beans, corn meal, coffee, etc.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	At first it was a kind of unwritten rule 
	that the women stay at home. The union 
	gave us rations and we had to figure out 
	how to feed our families on them ...
 
EXT., PICKET LINE. MEDIUM SHOT, DAY.

There are fewer pickets now, and the miners, weary of the 
monotony, march in a more leisurely fashion. We see Mrs. 
Salazar (the old lady introduced at the mañanita) standing 
close by the picket line. She is crocheting. Ramón, the 
picket captain, and other miners glance uncomfortably at 
her.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	But then one morning Mrs. Salazar went to 
	the picket line. Her husband had been 
	killed in a strike many years before ... 
	and she wanted to be there.
 
						WIPE TO:
 
THE PICKET LINE. MATCHING SHOT, ON ANOTHER DAY.
 
Mrs. Salazar is now marching with the men. She is still 
crocheting. Her expression of calm determination is 
unchanging.
 
 			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Nobody remembers just how it happened, 
	but one day Mrs. Salazar started marching 
	with them ... and she kept on marching 
	with them.
 
						WIPE TO:

THE PICKET POST. ANOTHER ANGLE. 

We see Teresa Vidal standing beside an old jalopy, pouring 
a cup of coffee for her husband.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	After a while some of the women began to
	bring coffee for their husbands ... and 
	maybe a couple of tacos -- because a man 
	gets tired and hungry on picket duty ...
 
						WIPE TO: 

THE PICKETS. GROUP SHOT.
 
Several pickets gape ravenously at Antonio as he bites into 
the tacos given him by Luz.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	It was about that time the union decided 
	maybe they'd better set up a Ladies 
	Auxiliary after all.
 
						WIPE TO:
 
THE PICKET POST. ANOTHER ANGLE 

and another day. A number of miners have turned carpenter,
erecting a shack of scrap lumber and galvanized tin close 
by the picket line. Several women have set up a table 
outside the unfinished shack on which we see a pot of 
beans, a coffee pot, etc. Esperanza is not among them.
 
						WIPE TO: 

EXT., COFFEE SHACK. MEDIUM SHOT, DAY.
 
The shack is now complete. We see Ramón approach the 
doorway, where a woman hands him a cup of coffee. He tastes 
it, makes a wry face.
 
 			ESPERANZA'S VOICE
	I didn't come to the lines at first. My 
	time was near -- and besides, Ramón 
	didn't approve. But Ramón is a man who 
	loves good coffee. And he swore the 
	other ladies made it taste like zinc 
	sludge ...
 
						WIPE TO: 

MATCHING SHOT: THE COFFEE SHACK, FEATURING ESPERANZA.

Standing in the doorway, her pregnancy is more evident than 
ever. But her face is alight with one of her rare smiles as 
she pours a cup of coffee and hands it to Ramón. Estella 
can be seen peeking out from behind her mother's skirt.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	So one day I made the coffee ...
 
CAMERA PANS with Ramón as he strolls back toward the picket 
line, sipping his coffee.
 
GROUP SHOTS AT PICKET LINE. 

The men are not marching now, but standing in groups on the 
road. Kalinsky is among them, on crutches, his leg in a 
cast. Ramón takes a sheet of paper from his shirt pocket 
and checks it.

			RAMÓN
	Now let's see ... who's missing? Prieto, 
	Sebastian. Prieto? 

			SECOND MINER
	Haven't seen him for two days.
 
 			JENKINS
		(entering scene, grinning) 
	Hey, Ramón -- listen to this. The chief 
	foreman come to me last night, said he'd 
	make me shift foreman if I'd start a 
	back-to-work movement. "Jenkins," he says, 
	"why string along with them tamale 
	eaters?" I just told him I come to like 
	tamales fine. 
 
The men laugh, Ramón smiles, but the look he gives Jenkins 
is tinged with speculative suspicion. Just then a patrol 
of three miners led by Alfredo Diaz enters scene from the 
hillslope. Alfredo reports to Ramón. He is breathing hard.
 
 			ALFREDO 
	Two scabs got through on the other side 
	of the hill. We chased the rest back. 

			RAMÓN 
	Recognize them?
 
 			ALFREDO 
		(shaking head) 
	Anglos. From out of town. But they're not 
	miners -- I could tell that. They don't 
	know zinc from Shinola.
 
			RAMÓN
	Okay. Take five. Get yourself some coffee.
 
As the three men of the patrol walk off to the coffee 
shack, one of the miners on the picket line calls out:
 
			FIRST MINER 
	Hey, Ramón, here comes the super ...
 
EXT., WINDING ROAD. LONG SHOT: PICKETS' ANGLE.

On the road from Zinc Town, across the trestle, we see a 
shiny new Cadillac crawling along the dusty road. It draws 
to a stop some distance away.

CLOSE SHOT: CADILLAC.
 
Superintendent Alexander sits at the wheel. Beside him is 
George Hartwell, a company representative from New York. 
Hartwell is impeccably dressed in a gabardine suit and 
Panama hat. He peers over Alexander's shoulder as the 
superintendent points out:
 
			ALEXANDER
	You can get the best view of the layout 
	from here. That's their main picket line. 
	They have another post on the back road, 
	and roving patrols ...
 
REVERSE PANNING SHOT: THEIR ANGLE, 

showing the Sheriff's cars, the picket line, the unfenced 
hill, and the mountain of waste beyond it.
 
			HARTWELL'S VOICE 
	On company property? Why don't you have 
	them thrown off?
 
 			ALEXANDER'S VOICE 
	But it's all company property, Mr. Hartwell 
	-- the stores, the housing area, everything. 
	Where do you throw them? And who does the 
	throwing?
 
Alexander nods, shifts the car into gear, and they move off.
 
EXT., ROAD. MEDIUM LONG SHOT: THE MOVING CADILLAC.

It makes the bend, comes on up the hill and stops again 
near the Sheriff's cars, which are parked some thirty paces
from the picket line. The Sheriff walks toward the Cadillac.
 
CLOSE SHOT: CADILLAC 

as the Sheriff comes up to Alexander's side of the car. The 
Sheriff has the appearance and speech of a New Mexican 
rancher, which he is. He touches his Stetson in a gesture 
of respect.
 
			SHERIFF 
	Mornin'.
 
			ALEXANDER 
	How's it going? 

			SHERIFF 
	Well, those new fellows you hired from 
	out of town -- we brought 'em up here in 
	a truck this morning, but they took one 
	look at that picket line and turned tail.
 
			HARTWELL 
		(looking at pickets) 
	They don't look so rough to me.
 
 			SHERIFF 
		(skeptically)
	Well, Mr. Hartwell, they've got some 
	pretty tough hombres, 'specially that 
	picket captain there -- what's his name 
	... Ray, Raymond something-or-other ...
 
			ALEXANDER 
	Oh yes. I know that one.
 
He shifts into gear and drives off. The Sheriff touches his 
Stetson courteously.
 
BACK TO PICKET LINE.
 
The men are marching now, moving in a tight ellipse across 
the road. Kalinsky hobbles along beside them on his 
crutches. Ramón stands in the middle of the road, facing 
the picket line, his back to the approaching Cadillac. He 
lectures the men with mock severity.
 
			RAMÓN 
	Now why don't you let these gentlemen 
	pass? Don't you know who's in that car?
 
 			ANTONIO 
		(shouting) 
	It's the paymaster from Moscow -- with
 	our gold.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	No, no, it's the president of the company 
	himself -- come all the way out here to 
	make Jenkins general manager. So why you 
	acting so mean? 

The miners grin as they march, one of them slapping Jenkins 
on the back.
 
INT., CADILLAC. TWO SHOT, THROUGH WINDSHIELD.
 
The car is halted again, and the picket line can be seen in 
b.g. Alexander is used to this treatment, but Hartwell is 
annoyed.
 
			HARTWELL
	Aren't they going to let us pass?
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	Eventually. This is just a little ritual 
	to impress us with their power. 

			HARTWELL 
	Childish.
 
			ALEXANDER 
	Well, they're like children in many ways. 
	Sometimes you have to humor them, 
	sometimes you have to spank them -- and 
	sometimes you have to take their food 
	away. 
		(Points off scene.) 
	Here comes the one we were talking about.
 
We see Ramón leave the picket line and come toward the car. 
He is still sipping his coffee. Alexander chuckles.
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	He's quite a character. Claims his 
	grandfather once owned the land where the 
	mine is now. 

Both men laugh.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE: AT CAR 

as Ramón comes up. He leans down and peers inside.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(politely) 
	Want to go up to your office, Mr. 
	Alexander? 

			ALEXANDER 
		(a half-smile)
	Naturally. You think I parked here for a 
	cup of coffee?
 
			RAMÓN 
	You're welcome to one. 
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	No thanks.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(glancing at Hartwell) 
	The men would like to know who this 
	gentleman is.
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	That's none of their affair.

			HARTWELL 
		(quickly) 
	That's all right -- it's no secret. My 
	name's Hartwell. I'm from the company's 
	Eastern office.
 
			RAMÓN 
	You mean Delaware? 

			HARTWELL 
	No. New York.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(With mock awe) 
	New York? You're not the Company President 
	by any chance?
 
 			HARTWELL 
		(smiles faintly) 
	No ...
 
			RAMÓN 
	Too bad. The men've always wanted to get 
	a look at the President. 
		(eagerly) 
	But you've come out here to settle the 
	strike?
 
 			HARTWELL 
		(shrugging) 
	Well, if that's possible ...

			RAMÓN 
	It's possible. Just negotiate.
 
 			HARTWELL 
		(coolly, to Alexander) 
	Are we talking to a union spokesman?
 
			ALEXANDER
	Not exactly. But I wish he were one. He 
	knows more about mining than those 
	pie-cards we've had to deal with.
 
Hartwell is unprepared for Alexander's gambit -- but a mask 
falls suddenly over Ramón's face. Alexander looks at Ramón, 
continuing with all the sincerity he can muster.
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	I mean it. I know your work record. You 
	were in line for foreman when this trouble 
	started -- did you know that? You had a 
	real future with this company, but you 
	let those Reds stir you up. And now 
	they'll sell you down the river. Why 
	don't you wake up, Ray? 
		(A pause) 
	That's your name, isn't it, Ray?
 
			RAMÓN
	No. My name is Quintero. Mister Quintero.
 
There is a moment's silence. Alexander compresses his lips, 
chagrined at the rebuff.
 
			ALEXANDER 
	Are you going to let us pass -- or do I 
	have to call the Sheriff?
 
 			RAMÓN 
	There's nothing stopping you. 

He steps back, indicating.
 
THE ROAD, FROM THEIR ANGLE. 

The road is clear. The pickets are no longer marching, but 
are lined up facing each other on both sides of the road. 
We hear the Cadillac accelerate. It plunges forward into 
scene, moves on past the pickets in a cloud of dust. Ramón 
comes into scene, moving toward the picket post. He 
bellows at the miners:
 
			RAMÓN 
	I was wrong! They don't want Jenkins for 
	general manager -- they want me!
 
The men laugh, re-form in groups on the road.
 
EXT., COFFEE SHACK. MEDIUM SHOT. 

Ramón, grinning, strolls over to Esperanza, who is standing 
in the doorway.
 
			RAMÓN
	You shoulda heard that guy. What a line! 
	I was up for foreman, he says. Fíjate!
 
Esperanza smiles, then suddenly winces. Her hand goes to 
her midriff. Ramón is alarmed.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	What's the matter?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(smiles again) 
	It's nothing. Just a little catch ... 

She takes Estella by the hand and starts to walk down the 
road toward the Sheriff's cars. Ramón escorts her. CAMERA 
PANS with them. Suddenly we hear from very far off a boy's 
voice calling:
 
			VOICE 
	Papa! Papa! Over here!

			RAMÓN 
		(looking hack) 
	Is that Luís? What's he doing? Playing 
	hookey again?
 
THE WOODED HILL. LONG SHOT FROM THEIR ANGLE.
 
In a thicket of juniper far up the slope we can make out 
two boys: Luís and a comrade of the same age. They are 
waving their arms frantically. Ramón walks into scene in 
f.g., cups his hands, bellows:
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Luís! Come down here! 

			LUIS 
		(barely audible) 
	Papa! We seen 'em! Two scabs! Over there!
 
CLOSER ANGLE: LUIS AND COMPANION. 

			SECOND BOY 
		(pointing) 
	They're hiding in the gully. Over there!
 
BACK TO PICKET POST.
 
The miners are trying to spot the scabs. They mill about 
restlessly, all talking at once:
 
 			AD LIBS 
	Qué dijo?
 	He's spotted two scabs ...
	Where?
 	Over in the gully ... 
	Come on, let's get 'em ...
 
	 		RAMÓN 
		(yelling) 
	Hold it, brothers! You -- Antonio -- 
	Alfredo -- Cente -- you come with me. The 
	rest stay on the line.
 
The four men set off at a run on the road paralleling the 
railroad tracks. CAMERA HOLDS. Esperanza comes into scene 
in f.g. She calls in exasperation:
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	Luís! Luís! Come back here!
 
Esperanza walks on, passing through the picket line.
 
THE HILLSIDE. LONG SHOT, 

as Luís and his companion run diagonally down the slope.
 
THE GULLY. LONG PANNING SHOT. 

Two figures scramble out of the gully. They run toward the 
railroad track, cross it and head for the uphill road to 
the mine.
 
LONG PANNING SHOT: RAMÓN AND HIS MEN 

running, fanning out, trying to cut off the strike-breakers. 
Cente makes for the tracks. Ramón stays on the road. 
Antonio and Alfredo dart up the hill.
 
GROUP SHOT: AT SHERIFF'S CARS. 

The deputies have roused themselves. The Sheriff smiles, 
gives them a sign. Four deputies climb into a sedan and 
drive off.
 
CLOSER ANGLE: THE TWO STRIKEBREAKERS 

running. One of them, a blond Anglo, stops suddenly, then 
runs back the way he came. CAMERA FOLLOWS the other man. He 
reaches the road leading up through the mountain of waste 
to the mine.
 
BACK TO ESPERANZA
 
far behind the others, but coming on steadily, walking 
alone, as though in a trance.
 
THE WINDING ROAD. HIGHER UP. 

Antonio emerges onto the road above the strike-breaker, 
cutting him off.
 
THE STRIKE-BREAKER: SHOOTING TOWARD WASTE HEAP.
 
He veers off the road, tries to evade his pursuers by 
climbing the steep pile of waste, but makes no headway in 
the powdery dust. Slipping, clawing, he creates a small 
avalanche, plunges back to the road below.
 
THE ROAD, NEAR FOOT OF WASTE HEAP.
 
The strike-breaker comes tumbling down, scrambles to his 
feet, runs back toward the tracks. CAMERA PANS with him. 
Cente suddenly appears, blocking his way. Then Ramón 
appears, trapping the strike-breaker on the railroad 
trestle. The two miners advance slowly toward him.
 
CLOSER ANGLE: AT TRESTLE. 

The strike-breaker stands there, panting, terrified. We 
are close enough now to recognize him. It is Sebastian 
Prieto.

REVERSE ANGLE, SHOOTING TOWARD RAMÓN 

who stops, stunned by this unexpected betrayal.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(panting) 
	Prieto ... Sebastian Prieto ...
 
He comes on slowly toward Sebastian. There is murder in his 
eyes. 

			SEBASTIAN
	Ramón ... listen for the love of God ...
 
 			RAMÓN 
	You ... You ... I'd expect it of an Anglo, 
	yes ... but you ...
 
 			SEBASTIAN
	Ramón ... listen to me ... I'm in a	jam 
	... I had to get a job ... 

			RAMÓN 
	You Judas ... blood-sucker ...

			SEBASTIAN
	Ramón -- listen my kids ...

			RAMÓN 
		(seizing his collar) 
	Tú! Traidor a tu gente! Rompehuelga! 
	Desgraciado!

			SEBASTIAN
	My kids don't have enough to eat!
 
			RAMÓN 
		(shaking him) 
	You think my kids have enough to eat, you 
	rat?
 
			SEBASTIAN
	I know, it's wrong. Just let me go. I'll 
	leave town ... just let me go.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(contemptuously) 
	You think I was going to work you over? I 
	wouldn't dirty my hands with you ...
 
He spits in the man's face and shoves him away. Sebastian 
trips on the railroad track and falls.
 
MEDIUM LONG SHOT: THE TRESTLE 

as seen from the road. The Sheriff's car plunges into 
scene in f.g., skids to a stop. The deputies pile out, 
run toward the trestle. In the distance we see Sebastian 
scramble to his feet, cross the railroad spur and retreat 
to the gully out of which he came. Ramón stands watching 
him. The deputies are almost on him before he turns. One of 
them seizes him by the arm. He appears to be protesting, 
but the men are out of ear-shot. Suddenly we see the flash 
of handcuffs snapped on Ramón's right wrist. Ramón, 
offering no resistance, holds up his left hand -- but a 
deputy spins him around with an arm lock and snaps Ramón's 
wrists together behind his back. It all happens very 
quickly, and they lead him off.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING MINERS AND BOYS
 
standing in a group now, watching the arrest. Luís starts 
to run to his father, but Antonio holds him back.
 
MEDIUM SHOT: AT SHERIFF'S CAR. 

Ramón is thrust roughly into the back seat of the car 
between two deputies. The other two get in front. The 
driver turns the car around, raising a great cloud of dust.
The car speeds off. CAMERA PANS with it, holds on Esperanza 
watching at the side of the road. Suddenly ESPERANZA
winces. Her hands go to her belly, and she bends slightly, 
as though from a severe cramp.

CLOSE SHOT: ESPERANZA.

Her face contorted with pain, with the realization that her 
labor has begun. She looks around helplessly, calls:
 
			ESPERANZA 
	Luís! Luís! The baby ...
 
MEDIUM LONG SHOT FROM HER ANGLE: LUIS AND MEN
 
listening, paralyzed, as we hear in Spanish:
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	The baby! Get the women! Quick!
 
EXT., BACK ROAD. MEDIUM LONG SHOT.

The Sheriff's car speeds toward us down the road, stops 
suddenly in a swirl of dust. This is an isolated area near 
the mine; no observers can be seen.

INT., BACK SEAT OF SHERIFF'S CAR. MED. CLOSE SHOT.
 
Ramón sits very straight, his wrists locked behind his back. 
The deputy on his left is a freckled-faced youth named 
Kimbrough. The deputy on his right is a pale, cavernous, 
slack-jawed man named Vance. Vance is slowly drawing on a 
pigskin glove. Ramón glances at the glove. Then he looks 
out the window.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(his voice loud, tremulous) 
	Why do you stop?
 
 			KIMBROUGH 
		(grins)
	Wanna have a talk with you -- 'bout why 
	you slugged that fellow back there.
 
			RAMÓN 
	That's a lie. I didn't--
 
The gloved hand comes up, swipes Ramón across the mouth.
 
 			VANCE 
		(softly) 
	Now you know that ain't no way to talk to 
	a white man.
 
EXT., ROAD, NEAR PICKET POST. MEDIUM LONG SHOT.

We can see Mrs. Salazar and several other women running to 
meet Esperanza. A couple of pickets follow along. Mrs. 
Salazar shouts back at them in Spanish:
 
			MRS. SALAZAR 
	Go back and get a blanket, you idiots! So 
	we can carry her!
 
INT., SHERIFF'S CAR. MEDIUM FULL SHOT.
 
Ramón sits tense now, awaiting the next blow. A trickle of 
blood runs down his chin. The two deputies in front sit 
like wax dummies, paying no attention to what is going on 
in back. 

			KIMBROUGH 
	Hey, Vance. You said this bull-fighter 
	was full of pepper. He don't look so 
	peppery now.

			VANCE 
	Oh, but he is. He's full of chile, this 
	boy.
 
He drives a gloved fist into Ramón's belly. Ramón gasps, 
his eyes bulge. 

			VANCE 
	He likes it hot. His chiquita makes it 
	good and hot for him -- don't she, 
	Pancho? 

Vance strikes him in the abdomen again. Kimbrough snickers.

EXT., ROAD: ANOTHER SHERIFF'S CAR 
NEAR PICKET LINE. MEDIUM SHOT. 

The Sheriff is standing there with his other two deputies 
when Kalinsky hobbles up.

			KALINSKY 
		(breathlessly) 
	Sheriff ... we need a doctor -- quick. A 
	lady's gonna have a baby ...

			SHERIFF 
	What d'ya take me for? An ambulance 
	driver?
 
 			KALINSKY
	But there's a company doctor in town. We 
	don't have a car. If you'd just go, get 
	him ...

			SHERIFF 
	You kiddin'? Company doctor won't come to 
	no picket line.
 
Kalinsky clenches his fists, furious, helpless. Then he 
labors back toward the coffee shack. CAMERA PANS with him. 
In the distance we see four men carrying Esperanza on a 
folded blanket.
 
EXT., COFFEE SHACK. FULL SHOT. 

Mrs. Salazar is walking beside the improvised stretcher. 
She directs the men to enter the shack.
 
 			MRS. SALAZAR 
	We can't get her home ... there isn't 
	time. Take her inside ...
 
INT., SHERIFF'S CAR. CLOSE SHOT. 

Ramón is doubled up, his head between his legs. Vance pulls 
him erect. 

			VANCE 
	Hold your head up, Pancho. That ain't no 
	way to sit. 

			RAMÓN 
		(a mutter in Spanish) 
	I'll outlive you all, you lice. 

			VANCE 
		(softly) 
	How's that? What's that Spic talk?

He strikes Ramón in the belly. Ramón gives a choked cry.
 
NOW THE INTERCUTTING BECOMES VERY RAPID. 
THE SHOTS ARE BRIEF FLASHES. 

CLOSE UP: ESPERANZA 

lying on a cot in the coffee shack, her face contorted with 
pain. She gasps:
 
			ESPERANZA 
	God forgive me ... wishing ... this child 
	would never be born.
 
BACK TO RAMÓN.
 
Kimbrough holds up Ramón's head while Vance punches him 
methodically. Ramón gasps in Spanish: 

			RAMÓN 
	Mother of God ...have mercy ...
 
CLOSE UP: ESPERANZA.
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(in Spanish) 
	Have mercy on this child ... let this 
	child live ...

CLOSE UP: RAMÓN 

biting his lip in agony.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(in Spanish) 
	Oh, my God ... Esperanza ... Esperanza ... 

Ramón's voice carries over to:

CLOSE UP: ESPERANZA. 

			ESPERANZA 
	Ramón ...

A contraction seizes her and she screams, her scream 
carrying over. 

CLOSE UP: RAMÓN.

Now the two images merge, and undulate, and blur, as with 
receding consciousness. And then darkness on the screen. 
We hear the feeble wail of a new-born infant.

						DISSOLVE TO: 

INT., CATHOLIC CHURCH. FULL SHOT, DAY.

Except for the altar lights in deep b.g. the church is in 
shadow. A group of five men and five women are silhouetted 
at the altar rail, facing the priest. We cannot immediately 
identify them.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Ramón was in the hospital for a week ... 
	and then in the county jail for thirty 
	days ... charged with assault and 
	resisting arrest. But I made up my mind 
	to postpone the christening till he could
	be there.

GROUP SHOT: AT ALTAR RAIL 

including not only the Quintero family but also Antonio and 
Luz, Teresa and Charley, Ruth and Frank, Sal and Consuelo. 
Antonio holds the baby up to the priest, who makes the sign 
of the cross. His lips move in prayer. Ramón peers fondly 
at the baby over Antonio's shoulder.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	... And so the baby was baptized the day 
	Ramón got out of jail. Antonio was his 
	godfather, and Teresa Vidal his godmother. 
	We christened him Juan.
 
The priest sprinkles holy water over the infant's head.

						WIPE TO:
 
INT., QUINTERO COTTAGE: PARLOR. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.

The same men are seated around the parlor table, playing 
poker. From the phonograph we hear Mexican dance music. 
Consuelo bustles in with coffee for the men.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	That night we had a double celebration: 
	Juanito's christening, Ramón's homecoming.
 
INT., BEDROOM. FULL SHOT.
 
The room is almost completely dark but we can make out the 
forms of six children sleeping crossways on the bed. The 
baby's crib is beside the bed.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And we put all the children to sleep in 
	the bedroom, as usual.
 
INT., KITCHEN. FULL SHOT.

The five wives are gathered there, preparing sandwiches, 
talking. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And the ladies adjourned to the kitchen 
	-- as usual.
 
INT., PARLOR: AT POKER TABLE. 

The CAMERA ANGLE is that of a standing kibitzer. Ramón is 
nearest the kitchen. Around him clockwise sit Antonio, Sal, 
Charley and Frank. Sal is dealing the fifth card of a stud 
poker hand. The play is continuous and fast, a counterpoint 
to the more serious discussion.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And the men took over the parlor -- as 
	usual.
 
Her voice fades, and now we hear: 

			CHARLEY 
		(throwing in matches) 
	Five thousand dollars. 

			FRANK 
	Beats.
 
 			ANTONIO 
	Raise you ten thousand.
 
 			CHARLEY 
	You dog. All right, let's see them.

			ANTONIO 
	Aces, wired. 
		(Scooping up pile of matches) 
	Come to papa.
 
While Charley gathers the cards and shuffles, Frank turns to 
Ramón. 

			RAMÓN 
	Hear those deputies slugged 'Cente.
 
 			FRANK 
	Yeah. Lots of provocation lately. They 
	figure if they can lock up the leadership 
	on some phony riot charge, maybe they can 
	bust the strike.
 
INT., KITCHEN. FULL SHOT
 
as Teresa reenters from the parlor. Ruth Barnes is tapping 
her foot restlessly to the radio music which continues over 
scene.

			RUTH
	Are we gonna let them play poker all 
	night? I want to dance.
 
			LUZ 
		(roguishly) 
	With whose husband?
 
 			RUTH 
	With any of them -- even my own.

			LUZ 
	If you dance with my husband, you'll have 
	to put up with this ...
 
She grabs Ruth and dances her around in a lascivious parody 
of Antonio's style. The women giggle. Esperanza's head 
turns at the sound of an infant's wail.
 
INT., PARLOR: AT THE POKER TABLE.
 
Frank is shuffling the cards. Esperanza is seen crossing 
to the bedroom in b.g.

			SAL 
		(to Ramón) 
	And another thing. Your attitude toward
 	Anglos. If you're gonna be a leader ...
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(cutting in) 
	What attitude?
 
 			SAL 
	You lump them all together -- Anglo 
	workers and Anglo bosses.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(indicating Frank) 
	He's a guest in my house, isn't he? 

			SAL 
	Sure. But you want the truth? You're 
	even suspicious of him.
 
			RAMÓN 
	Maybe. I think he's got a few things to 
	learn about our people.
 
There is a rather uneasy pause. Esperanza is seen 
re-crossing from bedroom to kitchen, the baby in her arms.
Frank continues shuffling. 

			FRANK 
	Go on. Spill it.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(slowly) 
	Well, you're the organizer. You work out
	strike strategy -- and most of the time 
	you're dead right. But when you figure 
	everything the rank-and-file's to do down 
	to the last detail, you don't give us 
	anything to think about. You afraid we're 
	too lazy to take initiative?
 
			FRANK 
		(defensively) 
	You know I don't think that.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Maybe not. But there's another thing ... 
	like when you came in tonight -- 
		(indicates picture) 
	I heard you ask your wife, "Who's that? 
	His grandfather?"
 
CLOSE SHOT: PORTRAIT OF JUÁREZ. 

			RAMÓN'S VOICE 
	That's Juárez -- the father of Mexico. If 
	I didn't know a picture of George 
	Washington, you'd say I was an awful dumb 
	Mexican.
 
BACK TO GROUP.
 
			CHARLEY 
		(softening the blow) 
	I've never seen it fail. Try to give 
	Ramón a friendly criticism and he throws 
	it right back in your face.
 
			FRANK 
	No. He's right. I've got a lot to learn.

			ANTONIO 
	Now we've got that settled, deal the 
	cards.
 
Frank deals. Sal grins at Frank. 

			SAL 
	If it makes you feel any better, he's got 
	even less use for women.
 
BACK TO KITCHEN. FULL SHOT. 

Esperanza sits on a stool near the stove, her back to 
camera and the other women, nursing the baby. Teresa and 
Consuelo are sampling the sandwiches they have made.

 			CONSUELO 
	What are they talking about in there?

			RUTH 
		(from the doorway) 
	Discussing each other's weaknesses. 

			LUZ 
		(mock surprise) 
	I didn't know they had any.

			RUTH 
		(looking o.s.) 
	Right now, Ramón's on the receiving end.
 
 			TERESA 
	Let's break up that game.
 
BACK TO MEN AT POKER TABLE.
 
			FRANK 
		(earnestly to Ramón) 
	If the women are shut off from life in 
	the union ...

			ANTONIO 
	Bet your hand!
 
Ruth enters scene with coffee for the men. The other women, 
save Esperanza, trail in behind her. Frank is so intent on 
his point that he ignores Ruth's presence.
 
			FRANK 
	We can't think of them just as housewives
	-- but as allies. And we've got to treat 
	them as such.
 
 			RUTH 
		(snorts) 
	Look who's talking! The Great White 
	Father, and World's Champion of Women's 
	Rights.
 
 			FRANK 
	Aw, cut it out, Ruth.
 
 			RUTH 
		(to Ramón) 
	Me, I'm a camp follower -- following this 
	organizer from one mining camp to another
	-- Montana, Colorado, Idaho. But did he 
	ever think to organize the women? No. 
	Wives don't count in the Anglo locals 
	either.
 
Ramón laughs. Ruth turns back to him.
 
			RUTH 
	Not that I like the way you treat your 
	wife. But when Doctor Barnes gives you 
	his cure-all for female troubles, ask him 
	if he's tried it at home.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(grinning) 
	Hey, Esperanza!
 
 			RUTH 
	Esperanza's nursing the baby.
 
A glow of eagerness brightens Ramón's face. He flings down 
the cards and goes out to the kitchen. The exasperated 
Antonio tosses his cards aside.

			ANTONIO 
	There goes the game.
 
 			LUZ 
	Good. Consuelo, turn up the radio 
		(To Antonio) 
	Come on, Papa, on your feet.
 
Antonio gets up and begins to dance with his wife. We mark 
how accurate a parody his wife made of his style. Charley 
dances with Teresa. Ruth folds her arms, glaring at Frank.
 
INT., KITCHEN. CLOSE TWO SHOT. 

Ramón stands beside his wife, looking over her shoulder at 
the suckling child. The CAMERA Ah.ANGLE is such that we 
cannot see Juanito.

			RAMÓN 
		(proudly)
	Look at him ...
 
Ramón clenches his fists, tenses his forearms, grunts 
approvingly. 

			RAMÓN
	A fighter, huh?
 
			ESPERANZA 
	He was born fighting. And born hungry.

			RAMÓN 
	Drink, drink, Juanito. You'll never have 
	it so good. 

			ESPERANZA 
	He'll have it good. Some day.
 
For a moment they say nothing, watching the baby. Then, 
with a sidelong worried glance:

			ESPERANZA 
	What were they saying? About you? In there? 

			RAMÓN
	They say I am no good to you.
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(shrugs) 
	You are no good to me -- in jail.

			RAMÓN 
		(musing) 
	I'd lie on my cot in the cell and I 
	couldn't sleep with the bugs and the 
	stink and the heat. And I'd say to myself, 
	think of something nice. Something 
	beautiful. And then I'd think of you. And 
	my heart would pound against the cot for 
	love of you.
 
Esperanza is deeply moved, but she does not show him her 
face. Ramón's face becomes tense with determination.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(half-whispering) 
	Not just Juanito. You'll have it good too, 
	Esperanza. We're going to win this 
	strike.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	What makes you so sure?
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(brooding) 
	Because if we lose, we lose more than a 
	strike. We lose the union. And the men 
	know this. And if we win, we win more 
	than a few demands. We win...
		(groping for words)
	... something bigger. Hope. Hope for our 
	kids. Juanito can't grow strong on milk 
	alone.
 
His words are shattered by a loud knock at the front door. 
Ramón turns, listening. We hear the door open and voices 
indistinctly. CAMERA HOLDS On Ramón and Esperanza. 

			VOICES:
 	This the Quintero place? 

	What do you want? 

	Got a court order ...
 
	You don't get in here without a warrant.
 
	We got the warrant too ... 

	We don't want no trouble. All we want's 
	the radio.
 
Ramón goes abruptly. CAMERA HOLDS on Esperanza, listening.

			KIMBROUGH'S VOICE 
	We don't like to break in on you like 
	this, but this fella owns the radio 
	store, he got himself a repossession 
	order on this radio here. 

			RAMÓN'S VOICE 
	Don't touch it. 

			KIMBROUGH'S VOICE 
	I don't want no trouble, Quintero. We got 
	orders to repossess this machine.
 
Esperanza rises swiftly, moves toward the parlor with the baby.

			RAMÓN'S VOICE 
	I said ... don't touch it.
 
INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT.
 
Everyone is standing. Several armed deputies stand around 
the radio console, ready to move it, but checked 
momentarily by Ramón. Kimbrough's right hand is on the butt 
of his revolver. Esperanza enters scene. In one continuous 
movement, she hands the baby to Consuelo and blocks Ramón, 
clutching him, and speaking with a new-found fierceness.

			ESPERANZA 
	Let them take it!
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Over my dead body.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	I don't want your dead body. I don't want 
	you back in jail either.
 
 			RAMÓN
	But it's yours. I won't let them ...
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(savagely, in Spanish) 
	Can't you see they want to start a fight 
	so that they can lock you all up at one 
	time?
 
Slowly, Ramón goes lax, and Esperanza relaxes her hold on 
him. The deputies pick up the heavy console, lug it toward 
the front door. The Quinteros' guests are glum and silent. 
The deputies leave, closing the door behind them.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(bitterly) 
	What are you so sad about?
 
He crosses to a shelf, picks up a dusty guitar and tosses it 
to Sal.
 
			RAMÓN 
	Let's hear some real music for a change.
 
Sal grins. He begins to improvise as we 

						DISSOLVE TO:
 
EXT., MINE AND PICKET POST. LONG PANORAMIC SHOT, DAY.
 
In the distance we can see the tiny figures of the strikers 
maintaining their vigil on the picket line. Behind them 
looms the lifeless head frame of the mine.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	But the strike did not end. Ramón was 
	wrong. It went on and on, into the fourth 
	month, the fifth, the sixth. The company 
	still refused to negotiate. We couldn't 
	buy food at the company store ...
 
EXT., STORE WINDOW. MEDIUM CLOSE SHOT, DAY.
 
A Mexican-American woman is looking at a display of canned 
foods in the window of a small town store. We see a hand
place a small placard in the store window. It reads: NO 
CREDIT TO STRIKERS. CAMERA MOVES IN till the sign fills the 
screen, and we 

						WIPE TO:
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE
	They tried to turn people against us. 
	They printed lies about us in their 
	newspapers ...

THE PICKET LINE. MEDIUM SHOT, DAY.
 
A dozen or so pickets march counter-clockwise in a 
leisurely fashion. Antonio holds an unfolded newspaper 
which he appears to be reading to the others, but we hear:

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	They tried to turn the Anglo millers 
	against us. They said that all the 
	Mexicans ought to be sent back where they 
	came from. But the men said ...
 
Esperanza's voice fades, and now we hear from the picket 
line:
 
			ANTONIO 
		(slapping newspaper) 
	How can I go back where I came from? The 
	shack I was born in is buried under 
	company property. 

			KALINSKY
	Why don't nobody ever tell the bosses to 
	go back where they came from?
 
			CENTE
	Wouldn't be no bosses in the state of New 
	Mexico if they did.
 
 			ALFREDO 
		(dreamily)
	Brother! Live to see the day.
 
			ANTONIO 
	Jenkins ain't no boss. 
		(Winking) 
	Mean we're gonna let people like Jenkins 
	stay here? 

			RAMÓN 
	You can't send him back to Oklahoma. It'd 
	be inhumane.
 
			JENKINS 
		(grinning) 
	But I was born in Texas.
 
			ANTONIO AND ALFREDO 
		(mock horror) 
	Oh no. That's even worse.
 
They all start laughing, pummeling Jenkins as they march.

						WIPE TO:
 
AN ANCIENT JALOPY. FULL SHOT, DAY 

on a dirt road outside an adobe house. The car is piled 
high with the belongings of a Mexican-American family. The 
mother and her children are in the car. The man is shaking 
hands with the neighbors in a sad goodbye. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And the seventh month came. By now the 
	strike fund was nearly gone. A few 
	families couldn't take it any longer. 
	They packed up and moved away -- and 
	where they went we do not know ...
 
INT., UNION HALL. MEDIUM SHOT AT DESK, DAY.
 
Sal and Charley are seated behind the desk. A number of 
miners stand opposite them. One by one, the miners count 
out money, hand it to the union officers. Ramón stands 
nearby, watching.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And so it was decided by the union that 
	hardship cases should seek work in other 
	mines. And this was done. And the 
	strikers who found jobs divided their pay 
	with the union, so the rest of us might 
	eat. 

INT., QUINTERO COTTAGE. MEDIUM SHOT, EVENING.

The Quintero family is seated at the table. Their plates 
are empty. Esperanza picks up a bowl containing two 
spoonfuls of beans. She divides them among the children.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Ramón was not a hardship case. Only three 
	children to feed. No -- the Quintero 
	family was not hungry all the time. Just 
	most of the time.
 
EXT., UNION HALL. FULL SHOT: A TRUCK, DAY.

Two men stand in the back of the truck, handing down cases 
of food to the miners. One of the men in the truck is a 
Negro. When Charley Vidal comes over, the Negro leans down 
and shakes his hand warmly.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Even so, the mine owners might have 
	starved us out were it not for the help 
	we got from our International in Denver, 
	and from the other locals. ... And we who 
	thought no one outside our county knew of 
	our troubles, or cared if they did know 
	-- found we were wrong.
 
INT., UNION HALL. CLOSE SHOT AT DESK, DAY.

The desk is piled high with mail. Sal and Frank are opening 
it. We see dollar bills, loose change, checks. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Letters came. From our own people, the 
	Spanish-speaking people of the Southwest 
	... and from far away -- Butte, Chicago,
	Birmingham, New York -- messages of 
	solidarity and the crumpled dollar bills 
	of working men.
 
CAMERA PULLS BACK SLOWLY TO DISCLOSE 

two women at a mimeograph machine.
 
CAMERA PANS SLOWLY AROUND 

the union hall, disclosing other women at work -- cutting 
stencils, filing papers, sealing envelopes, etc. Several 
small children romp and climb over the benches.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	But that was not all -- we women were 
	helping. And not just as cooks and coffee 
	makers. A few of the men made jokes about 
	it, but the work had to be done -- so 
	they let us stay.
 
MEDIUM SHOT, FEATURING ESPERANZA 

standing behind a desk, sealing envelopes. The infant 
Juanito lies on an improvised pallet beside her, hemmed in 
by piles of leaflets. Estella is licking stamps.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	No one knew how great a change it was, 
	till the day of the crisis ...
 
FULL SHOT: THE UNION HALL. 

The Sheriff, a U.S. Marshall, and several deputies appear 
suddenly in the entrance to the hall. They cross the room 
to Sal Ruiz' desk. The Sheriff is grinning broadly.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	That was the day when the Sheriff and the 
	Marshall came. The Sheriff was smiling --
	so we knew he brought bad news.
 
CLOSER ANGLE: GROUP AT TABLE. 

Sal takes the paper, reads it gravely. The Sheriff grins 
triumphantly and leaves, followed by his entourage. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	The company had got a court injunction 
	ordering the strikers to stop picketing. 
	A Taft-Hartley injunction, they called it. 
	It meant heavy fines and jail sentences 
	for the strikers if they disobeyed.
 
Sal rises slowly, re-reading the court order as Frank and 
Charley join him, reading over his shoulder. Their faces 
express worry, defeat.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	A decision had to be made at once --
	whether to obey the order, or not.
 
 						WIPE TO:
 
INT., UNION HALL. FULL PANNING SHOT, NIGHT.
 
The hall is packed. The striking miners, as usual, occupy 
the center bloc of seats. But this time there are almost as 
many women as men in the hall. They sit with their 
children in the rear or on benches against the side walls.
CAMERA HOLDS on Frank Barnes,standing at the front of the 
hall, addressing the miners.

			FRANK 
		(as Esperanza's voice fades) 
	If we obey the court, the strike will be 
	lost ... the scabs would move in as soon 
	as the pickets disappear. If we defy the 
	court, the pickets will be arrested and 
	the strike will be lost anyway.
 
CLOSER ANGLE, FEATURING FRANK. 

			FRANK 
	So there it is brothers. The bosses have 
	us coming and going. I just want to say 
	this -- no matter which way you decide, 
	the International will back you up -- as 
	it's always backed you up. This is a 
	democratic union. The decision's up to 
	you.
 
REVERSE ANGLE, SHOOTING PAST FRANK AT MINERS.
 
We hear a rumble of dissatisfaction as Frank sits down. 
There is no applause. Heads huddling, the miners grapple 
with the dilemma. Ramón rises angrily.

			RAMÓN 
	If we give up now, if we obey this rotten 
	Taft-Hartley law, we give up everything 
	it's taken us fifty years to gain. There
	is only one answer: fight them! Fight 
	them all!
 
			OTHER MINERS: 
	How?
	They'll arrest us! 
	We gain nothing.
 
Their voices fade. Ramón, still on his feet, turns on his 
critics, lashing them. Another miner rises, extending his 
arms in a gesture of helplessness. Over this we hear:
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	The men quarreled. They made brave 
	speeches. It seemed that Brother Barnes 
	was right -- the company had them coming 
	and going. It seemed the strike was lost.
 
FULL SHOT: THE UNION HALL. ANOTHER ANGLE.
 
In near f.g. Chairman Ruiz is on his feet, pounding his 
gavel. In b.g. we can see Teresa Vidal waving for 
recognition. The chair recognizes her. Teresa has advanced 
to the speakers table in f.g. Though obviously scared, she 
is not as inarticulate or halting as Consuelo had been.
 
			TERESA 
	Brother Chairman, if you read the court 
	injunction carefully you will see that it 
	only prohibits striking miners from 
	picketing. 
		(A pause.) 
	We women are not striking miners. We will 
	take over your picket line.
 
We hear a stirring, then a raucous male laugh.
 
			TERESA 
	Don't laugh. We have a solution. You have 
	none. Brother Quintero was right when he 
	said we'll lose fifty years of gains if 
	we lose this strike. Your wives and 
	children too. But this we promise -- if 
	the women take your places on the picket 
	line, the strike will not be broken, and 
	no scabs will take your jobs.
 
There is silence in the hall now. Teresa starts to walk 
back to her seat when Sal's voice checks her.
 
			SAL 
	If that's a motion ... only members of 
	the union can make a motion.
 
Sal glances at Charley Vidal, who sits beside him. Charley 
hesitates. Teresa glares at her husband. Charley takes a 
deep breath, yells:

			CHARLEY 
	I so move!
 
 			VOICE 
		(from the floor) 
	Second! 

			SAL 
		(uneasy) 
	You've heard the motion. The floor is 
	open for debate.
 
			MINER 
	If we allow our women to help us, we'll 
	be the joke of the whole labor movement!
 
 			ANOTHER MINER 
	Look, brother, our women are ours, our 
	countrywomen! Why shouldn't they help us?
 
THE HALL. ANOTHER ANGLE.
 
We see miners with their heads together in heated argument, 
grimaces and gestures of disapproval, individual miners 
rising to address the chair.

ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING LUZ MORALES.
 
Eyes flashing, she addresses the men. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And Luz asked which was worse, to hide 
	behind a woman's skirt, or go down on his 
	knees before the boss?
 
ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING GONZALES.
 
			GONZALES
	We haven't counted enough on our women. 
	The bosses haven't counted on them at all.

ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING CHARLEY VIDAL.
 
			CHARLEY 
	Will the bosses win now because we have 
	no unity between the men and their wives 
	and sisters?
 
ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING A MINER AND HIS WIFE.
 
A husky miner named José Sánchez can be seen goading his 
wife to speak. The frightened woman finally obeys.
 
 			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And Carlotta Sánchez said she didn't think 
	picketing was proper for ladies. It 
	wasn't nice. Maybe even a sin.
 
ANOTHER ANGLE, FEATURING GONZALES AND RAMÓN.
 
 			GONZALES
	I say give the sisters a chance ...
 
Gonzales' voice fades, and Ramón rises, glancing angrily at 
Gonzales, and begins to speak.
 
			RAMÓN 
	And what will happen when the cops come, 
	and beat our women up? Will we stand 
	there? Watch them? No. We'll take over 
	anyway, and we'll be right back where we 
	are now. Only worse. Even more humiliated. 
	Brothers, I beg you -- don't allow this.
 
Ramón sits down. There is scattered applause from the men. 
Someone calls the question.
 
REVERSE ANGLE, SHOOTING TOWARD CHAIRMAN.
 
 			SAL 
		(rapping his gavel) 
	All right. The question's been called. 
	You brothers know what you're voting on 
	-- that the sisters of the auxiliary take 
	over the picket line. All those in favor 
	will so signify ...
 
 			TERESA'S VOICE 
		(a bellow)
	Brother Chairman! A point of order!
 
WIDER ANGLE, SHOOTING TOWARD TERESA AND ESPERANZA.

Teresa nudges Esperanza. She rises shyly. It seems that 
Esperanza's stage fright will leave her mute -- but at last 
she finds her voice:
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	I don't know anything ... about these 
	questions of parliament. But you men are 
	voting on something the women are to do, 
	or not to do. So I think it's only fair 
	the women be allowed to vote -- 
	especially if they have to do the job. 
	
We hear cries of approval from the women's section, 
intermingled with shouted objections from some men.
 
GROUP SHOT: AT CHAIRMAN'S TABLE.

Sal has to make a ruling, but he seems undecided. He 
glances at Charley. Charley winks, nods. He glances at 
Frank. Frank grins and nods. He clears his throat. 

			SAL 
	Brothers ... and sisters. It would be 
	unconstitutional to permit women to vote 
	at a union meeting. 
		(Male applause.) 
	If there's no objection, we could adjourn 
	this meeting ... 

There are cries of protest from men and women alike. He 
holds up his hand. 

			SAL 
	No, wait, wait ... and reconvene this 
	meeting as a community mass meeting with 
	every adult entitled to a vote!
 
 			VOICE 
	I so move! 

			SECOND VOICE 
	Second!

			SAL 
	All those in favor will raise their hands. 
		(Most of the hands are raised.) 
	Now those opposed ...
		(Only a few hands are raised.) 
	The ayes have it! Now, every adult is 
	entitled to a vote!
 
 			WOMEN'S VOICES
	Question! Question! Call the question!
 
 			SAL 
		(grinning) 
	Those in favor that the sisters take over
	the picket line will so signify by 
	raising their hands.
 
THE HALL. FULL PANNING SHOT FROM SAL'S ANGLE.
 
An overwhelming majority of the women are voting for the 
plan. About a third of the men raise their hands -- but 
some of them lower their arms when nudged angrily by their 
neighbors. Tellers move through the hall counting hands. 
CAMERA HOLDS on Ramón, who is practically sitting on his 
hands. He frowns at:
 
ESPERANZA, FROM HIS ANGLE, 

her eyes averted, but her hand defiantly up.
 
BACK TO CHAIRMAN.
 
The tellers approach Sal, whisper the affirmative vote. He 
adds the totals, then pounds his gavel.

			SAL 
	Okay. All those opposed?
 
FULL PANNING SHOT: AS BEFORE. 

Most of the women sit with their fingers intertwined, as
though in prayer. A few weaker sisters raise their hands 
uncertainly. Their neighbors nudge then. The hands come 
down again. CAMERA PANS to the men as the tellers count. 
We see a forest of raised hands. Some miners are 
frantically holding up both arms.

BACK TO CHAIRMAN. MEDIUM SHOT. 

The tellers give Sal their figures. Sal's face is grave, 
reveals nothing. He rises, announces quietly:
 
			SAL 
	The motion has carried -- a hundred and 
	three to eighty-five. 

No applause.
 
REVERSE ANGLE. FULL PANNING SHOT. 

A profound stillness has settled over the hall. The men 
turn in their places, looking at their womenfolk with doubt, 
apprehension, expectancy. CAMERA PANS to the women who 
line the side wall. They look at each other with a 
breathless wonder as the full import of their undertaking 
dawns on them.
 
						FADE OUT.
 
FADE IN:
 
EXT., PICKET LINE. LONG PANORAMIC SHOT, MORNING.

This panorama should be as sweeping a vista as the first 
scene of the picket line. We get the sense of women 
streaming toward the picket post from four points of the 
compass. Some arrive in ancient cars, others walk by way of 
the road or foot paths or the railroad tracks. There are 
so many women on the line that even though they march two 
abreast they overlap the road.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And so they came, the women ... they rose 
	before dawn and they came, wives, 
	daughters, grandmothers. They came from 
	Zinc Town and the hills beyond, from other 
	mining camps, ten, twenty, thirty miles 
	away ...
 
CLOSER VIEW: THE PICKET LINE. 

The women march in an orderly, determined fashion. There is 
no gaiety. Teresa and Mrs. Salazar are in charge. They are 
as bold and self-assured as two drill sergeants. Most of 
the women are dressed for the occasion -- wearing shirts, 
jeans and sneakers or saddle shoes.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	By sun-up there were a hundred on the 
	line. And they kept coming--women we had 
	never seen before, women who had nothing 
	to do with the strike. Somehow they heard 
	about a women's picket line -- and they 
	came.
 
MEDIUM LONG SHOT: MINERS ON HILLSIDE.

On the steep wooded slope above the picket post the varsity 
squats on its collective haunches. The men smoke, watching 
the picket line with mingled awe and apprehension.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And the men came too. They looked unhappy. 
	I think they were afraid. Afraid the 
	women wouldn't stand fast -- or maybe 
	afraid they would.
 
THE HILLSIDE. ANOTHER ANGLE, HIGHER UP THE SLOPE.

Several miners stand here with their families. They, too, 
look unhappy. Jenkins and his wife are among them.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	But not all the women went to the picket 
	post. Some were forbidden by their 
	husbands. 
		(A pause.) 
	I was one of these.
 
CLOSE GROUP SHOT: THE QUINTERO FAMILY

standing apart from the others, near a clump of juniper. 
Luís stands beside his father, whose uneasy frown is 
directed at the picket line. Estella stands beside her 
mother, who holds the baby Juanito in her arms. Esperanza 
keeps gazing at the picket line off scene, never at Ramón.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	It's not fair ... I should be there with 
	them. After all, I'm the one who got the 
	women the vote.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(stubbornly) 
	No.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	But the motion passed. It's ... it's not 
	democratic of you to ...

			RAMÓN 
		(interrupting)
	The union don't run my house. 
		(After a long pause.) 
	Those Anglo dames stirred you up to make
	fools of yourselves -- but you don't 
	see any of them down there.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(squinting, peering)
	Yes, I do. There's Ruth Barnes. 

			RAMÓN 
	She's the organizer's, wife. She's got to 
	be there. 

			ESPERANZA 
	NO, she wants to be there. 
		(Looking off) 
	And there's Mrs. Kalinsky.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(pointing off scene)
	There's Jenkins' wife. You don't see her 
	on no picket line. 

			ESPERANZA 
		(quietly) 
	Anglo husbands can also be backward. 

			RAMÓN 
	Can be what? 

			ESPERANZA 
	Backward.
 
He glances quizzically at her. She keeps staring at:
 
THE PICKET LINE FROM THEIR ANGLE. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
		(plaintively) 
	Can't I even put in an appearance?
 
 			RAMÓN'S VOICE 
	In heaven's name, woman, with a baby in 
	your arms?
 
BACK TO FAMILY GROUP.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	The baby likes to be walked. It helps him 
	burp.
 
Ramón shakes his head. He looks off at:
 
THE SHERIFF'S CONVOY. LONG SHOT. 

Some fifty paces beyond the picket line we can see two 
open trucks and two sheriff's cars. The trucks are loaded 
with men.
 
EXT., SHERIFF'S CAR. MEDIUM SHOT. 

Superintendent Alexander, Chief Foreman Barton, the Sheriff 
and the deputy Vance are standing beside the car. 
Alexander is in a petulant mood, but the Sheriff and Vance 
seem amused by the situation. Three pretty Mexican-American 
girls pass by on their way to the picket line. Vance 
whistles at them. As they move out of the scene Vance 
calls:
 
			VANCE 
	Hey, girls! Wait a minute! Don't you 
	wanta see my pistol?
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	Shut up. 
		(As the Sheriff chuckles)
	What's so amusing? They're flaunting a 
	court order.
 
 			SHERIFF 
		(grins) 
	Not so sure about that. Letter of the 
	Law, you know. All the injunction says 
	is no picketing by miners. 

			ALEXANDER 
		(furious)
	Whose side are you on anyway?
 
	 		SHERIFF 
	Now don't get excited, Mr. Alexander. 
	They'll scatter like a covey of quail.
 
 			BARTON 
		(impatiently)
	Well, let's get at it -- before another 
	hundred dames show up.
 
 			SHERIFF 
		(rouses himself, calls) 
	All right, boys.
 
WIDER ANGLE: THE CONVOY. 

Drivers and deputies climb into the cab of each truck. 
Barton, Vance and two other deputies get into the lead car. 
Vance holds up his tear gas gun.
 
 			VANCE 
	What about these?
 
 			SHERIFF 
	Forget it. They'll scatter like quail.

Barton starts the motor. He waves at the truck drivers and 
the other sheriff's car. They wave back. The convoy starts 
up, gathering speed rapidly.
 
FULL SHOT: MINERS ON THE HILLSLOPE.
 
They spring to their feet, tense. 

FULL SHOT: THE PICKET LINE. 

The women stop marching, turn in unison to face the 
oncoming convoy.
 
FULL PANNING SHOT: THE CONVOY 

hurtling toward the picket line.
 
CLOSE SHOT: FACES OF MINERS. 

They groan involuntarily.
 
CLOSE SHOT: FACES OF WOMEN PICKETS

steady, unflinching.
 
THE SHERIFF'S CAR FROM THEIR ANGLE, 

horn blowing, speeding directly at them, looming bigger, 
closer.
 
FULL SHOT: THE PICKET LINE. 

At the last split second, Barton jams on his brakes, and 
the car skids. The women have not moved.

CLOSE SHOT: WOMEN AND CAR.

The car skids into the picket line. A woman is swiped by 
the front fender, flung on to the road.
 
FULL SHOT: THE PICKET LINE.
 
We hear a collective gasp from the women. Then they scream.
Two women run to their injured sister. The others swarm 
around the car. The deputies are trying to get the doors 
open. The women begin to rock the car. Finally the deputies 
manage to get out. They flail the women with their fists, 
their gun stocks. But there are four women to each deputy, 
and they cling to the men, grabbing at their weapons.
 
MEDIUM SHOT: THE FIRST TRUCK. 

The Anglo scabs standing in the back of the truck react in 
fear and consternation. But they stay where they are.
 
MEDIUM LONG SHOT: MINERS ON HILLSIDE.

A group of them start coming down the hill. We can see 
Charley and Frank gesturing, trying to restrain them -- but 
the miners come on.
 
BACK TO THE PICKET POST.

Vance kicks out at woman who is trying to tear off his 
cartridge-belt, sends her sprawling. He backs off, 
panic-stricken, and fires a tear gas shell into a mass of 
women pickets. The exploding shell disperses them 
momentarily. The women fan out, coughing and choking.
 
THE PICKET POST, SHOOTING FROM HILL ABOVE.

At Mrs. Salazar's command, the women form into two platoons; 
the larger group remains on the road, blocking the convoy, 
despite the fact that other deputies open fire with tear 
gas; but another line has formed at the side of the road, 
facing the miners bent on entering the fray.
 
CLOSER ANGLE: THE SECOND PICKET LINE.

As the miners coming down the slope reach the road, Mrs. 
Salazar waves them back angrily, yells in Spanish: 

			MRS. SALAZAR 
	Get back! Get back! Stay out of this!
 
			FIRST MINER 
		(desperately) 
	But they're beating up my wife! 

			WOMEN 
		(simultaneously in 
		 English and Spanish) 
	It'll be worse if you get in it.
 	Then they'll start shooting ... 
	They'll throw you in jail!
 	We can take care of ourselves ... 
	You're not needed here
 	Get back! Get back!
 
The men fall back, nonplussed by the vehemence of the women.
 
BACK TO PICKET POST. LONG SHOT FROM HILLSIDE.

Other deputies have come running from the rear of the 
convoy to support the four outnumbered deputies. The scabs 
remain in their trucks. But the wind is blowing the wrong 
way, and the tear gas drifts back toward the trucks. The 
scabs begin to cough. A couple of them jump over the 
tailgate of the first truck and run. That starts a panicky 
rout. Other scabs tumble out of the trucks and run back 
down the road to escape the tear gas.
 
GROUP SHOT: THE QUINTERO FAMILY 

staring at the action. Esperanza can't stand it any longer.
She hands the baby to Ramón and is gone before he realizes 
her intent.
 
HIS VIEW: ESPERANZA 

running diagonally down the slope toward the picket post. 
In the distance we see deputies still battling the women. 
The deputies seem to have lost their heads. They lash out 
viciously at any woman who confronts them, in a vain 
attempt to scatter the women and clear the road. 

CLOSER ANGLE: THE PICKET POST. 

Luz Morales is climbing Vance's back, clinging to his arms. 
Another woman clutches at his gun hand, trying to prevent 
him from drawing his pistol. Esperanza comes running up.
She stops for a second, slips off her right shoe. Vance 
knocks the other women down, pulls his revolver from his a 
holster. Esperanza whacks him over the wrist with her shoe, 
knocking the weapon out of his hand. Luz digs into his hair 
with both hands.
 
BACK TO RAMÓN ON HILLSIDE,
 
helpless, speechless, holding the baby. Suddenly he runs 
out of scene. Luís grabs Estella's hand, follows.
 
ANOTHER PART OF THE HILL: THE LOWER SLOPE.
 
Charley and Frank are watching the action. Ramón comes 
running into scene.

			RAMÓN
	Why are you standing there? Do something! 

 			CHARLEY 
		(looking o.s.) 
	Relax.

			RAMÓN 
	But women are getting hurt! We've gotta 
	take over!

			CHARLEY 
	They're doing all right.
 
 			FRANK 
		(grins, looks at baby) 
	Anyway, looks like you've got your hands 
	full.

Completely frustrated, Ramón looks down at the tiny bundle 
in his arms. Then he looks off at:
 
THE PICKET POST: LONG SHOT FROM RAMÓN'S ANGLE.
 
We can see Barton calling his men off. He jumps in the car, 
turns it around. Several deputies climb aboard as he drives 
off. The others retreat on foot, leaving the two abandoned 
trucks. The women re-form their lines, and begin to sing 
"The Union Is Our Leader."
 
						DISSOLVE TO: 

INT., QUINTERO COTTAGE. FULL SHOT: PARLOR, LATE AFTERNOON.
 
Ramón paces the floor fretfully, puffing on a cigarette. 
The baby crib is in a corner, and Juanito is wailing. 
Estella tries to match her father's caged-lion stride.
 
			ESTELLA 
	Papa, I'm hungry.
 
 			RAMÓN
 		(a growl) 
	So'm I.
 
Luís enters from the front door. Ramón glares at him.

			RAMÓN 
	Where's your mama? 

			LUIS
	She's coming. Charley Vidal gave her a 
	lift.
 
The boy starts off, then turns back again, his eyes glowing.
 
 			LUIS 
	Boy! Did you see the way Mama whopped that 
	deputy with her shoe? Knocked the gun 
	right out ...
 
			RAMÓN 
		(thundering) 
	I don't want you hanging around there, 
	hear?
 
We hear the sound of a chugging truck outside. Ramón goes 
to the window, peers out.
 
EXT., ROAD OUTSIDE QUINTERO COTTAGE. MEDIUM SHOT.
 
The union pick-up, full of women, stops at the gate. 
Esperanza and Luz sit beside Charley in the cab. They get 
out. All the women are laughing and smiling.
 
INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT 

as Esperanza enters. She is dirty, bedraggled, and 
bone-tired -- but there is a new light in her eyes, and 
when she smiles she grins.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(hoping for the worst) 
	You all right?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	Sure.
 
She kisses him lightly on the cheek, kisses Estella and 
Luís, crosses immediately to the crib, glances at Juanito
and enters the kitchen. CAMERA PANS with her. Ramón follows 
slowly, halts in the kitchen doorway.
 
			RAMÓN
	Must've been some experience for you, huh?

			ESPERANZA 
		(from kitchen) 
	Yes.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	I guess you got enough today to last a 
	lifetime, huh? 

			ESPERANZA 
		(from kitchen) 
	I'm going back tomorrow.
 
She emerges from the kitchen with the baby's bottle, 
crosses to the crib. The infant's wailing ceases abruptly. 
Ramón comes over, scowling.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	You might get hurt. 
		(No response)
	Listen, if you think I'm gonna play 
	nursemaid from now on, you're crazy ... 
	I've had these kids all day! 

			ESPERANZA 
		(simply) 
	I've had them since the day they were 
	born.
 
She exits to the kitchen. Ramón trails after her.
 
INT., KITCHEN. MEDIUM SHOT. 

Esperanza works swiftly, putting pots and pans on the 
stove, preparing supper, etc. Ramón continues to scowl at 
her.
 
			RAMÓN 
	I'm telling you. I don't stay home with 
	these kids tomorrow.
 
 			ESPERANZA
		(calmly)
	Okay. Then, tomorrow, I take the kids 
	with me to the picket line.
 
 						DISSOLVE TO:
 
EXT., PICKET LINE. FULL PANNING SHOT, DAY.

There are fewer women on the line than on the first day, 
but they march with the same assurance and discipline as 
before. A good half of them crochet as they march.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	And so I came back the next day -- and 
	every day for the next month ...
 
CAMERA PANS past the picket line to the coffee shack, 
MOVES ON to pick up a group of small children playing near 
the road.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	I kept Juanito in the coffee shack, and 
	when the weather was good and there was 
	peace on the line I brought his crib 
	outside. Estella played with the little 
	ones, and Luís ...
 
CAMERA SWISH PANS to a clump of juniper on the hillside in 
deep b.g. We can make out Luís, crouching there with 
several cronies, apparently plotting something.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE
	... Luís was in school.
 
CAMERA SWISH PANS to another part of the hill, closer to 
the picket post. Ramón can be seen reclining on the slope 
with several cronies. The men appear moody and depressed.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Ramón came every day and sat on the 
	hillside, just watching. The ladies -- 
	well, they criticized Ramón for not 
	keeping the kids.
 
BACK TO PICKET POST. FULL SHOT. 

In b.g. women are crocheting, chatting as they march. The 
baby's crib, sheathed in mosquito netting, lies on a table
outside coffee shack in f.g. Esperanza is changing the 
baby's diaper. Mrs. Salazar and Teresa are talking to her.
 
						WIPE TO:
 
ANOTHER ANGLE.

Trucks and sheriff's cars can be seen parked near the 
picket line. The scabs and deputies stand in the trucks,
jeering at the marching women.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	For a while the Sheriff's men left us 
	alone. But then it started again. They 
	cursed us, insulted us, called us foul 
	names. It started again.
 
						WIPE TO: 

THE PICKET POST. WIDER ANGLE 

as a moving truck loaded with scabs tries to force its way 
through the living wall of women. The women try to push the 
truck back. They cling to it, and the scabs lean down and 
beat them off. The truck lurches forward, striking a woman 
and flinging her onto the road. Several other women have 
opened the hood of the truck. They rip out ignition wires.
The truck stalls.
 
						WIPE TO:
 
THE PICKET POST. LONG SHOT. 

The truck is gone. Four deputies wearing gas masks are 
firing tear gas shells into the picket line. The women 
retreat, fan out in a great arc.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	They used tear gas again. This time the 
	wind was against us.

ANOTHER ANGLE, SHOOTING TOWARD HILLSLOPE.
 
Esperanza and Estella can be seen running up the slope away 
from the gas. Esperanza carries the baby. 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	When that happened we spread out, as we 
	had planned, and I took the baby away 
	from the danger, as we had planned.
 
BACK To PICKET POST. MEDIUM LONG SHOT.
 
Instead of tear gas enveloping the picket line, the picket 
line envelops the drifting gas, re-forms again downwind.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE
	But they couldn't break our line. They 
	couldn't break it ...
 
						DISSOLVE TO: 
 
FULL SHOT: THE ROAD, BELOW PICKET POST, 

where a small army of scabs and deputies is gathered. The 
scabs stand sheepishly beside the trucks. The Sheriff, 
Barton, and several deputies are gazing off at the picket 
line. They are no longer amused. The superintendent's 
Cadillac enters scene, coming up the road. It rolls to a 
stop near the Sheriff's party.
 
CLOSE GROUP SHOT: AT CAR.

			ALEXANDER 
		(to Sheriff) 
	Well?
 
 			SHERIFF 
		(hopelessly) 
	I've tried everything but shootin' 'em 
	down.
 
 			ALEXANDER 
	You haven't tried locking them up!

			SHERIFF 
		(doubtfully) 
	You want 'em all arrested?
 
			ALEXANDER 
	No, just the ring leaders. The 
	fire-eaters. And the ones with big 
	families ... 
		(to Barton)
	Barton -- where's that boy?

			BARTON 
		(waves, shouts) 
	Hey, you -- c'mere.
 
Sebastian Prieto, the fingerman, leaves a group of deputies 
in b.g. and comes over. The Sheriff glances at him with 
contempt, then starts toward the picket line, Prieto and 
the deputies moving with him.
 
THE PICKET LINE. FULL SHOT 

as they approach the line. The women keep on marching. 
Esperanza is among them, carrying the baby.
 
			SHERIFF
		(shouting at them) 
	Awright, girls -- I'm gonna give you a 
	choice -- you can go home or you can go 
	to jail. No ifs, ands or buts. Git off 
	the picket line or git arrested.
 
Silence. The women keep on marching. The Sheriff turns to 
Sebastian. 

			SHERIFF 
	Okay. Point 'em out.
 
 			SEBASTIAN 
		(a furtive mumble) 
	That one -- Teresa Vidal. She's the 
	leader.
 
Kimbrough walks over to the line, grabs Teresa's arm as she 
marches by.
 
CLOSER ANGLE, FEATURING KIMBROUGH AND TERESA.

			KIMBROUGH 
	You're under arrest. Home or the hoosegow 
	-- what's it gonna be?
 
Several of the women stop marching. Mrs. Kalinsky picks up 
a stick. They approach Kimbrough menacingly.
 
 			TERESA 
	Keep marching sisters. Let's show some 
	discipline.
 
			MRS. KALINSKY
	But Teresa, we ...
 
 			TERESA 
	They'll charge us with resisting arrest. 
	Keep marching!
 
She jerks loose from Kimbrough and walks alone toward the 
trucks. 

BACK TO SHERIFF'S GROUP. MEDIUM SHOT

as Sebastian fingers other women the deputies walk off one
by one to arrest them.

			SEBASTIAN
	And Mrs. Salazar ... the old one. And 
	Chana Díaz -- that one, in the blue dress. 
	And Luz Morales, the little one, shaking 
	her fist ... and Mrs. Kalinsky, the Anglo
	... and Ruth Barnes, she's the 
	organizer's wife ...
 
THE PICKET LINE. MEDIUM SHOT

the women are plucked off the line, one by one. They do not 
resist. We call see Esperanza still marching. She seems to 
clutch the baby more tightly to her. Estella tags along 
beside her mother.

REVERSE ANGLE, SHOOTING TOWARD TRUCKS.

The back of one truck is already filled with women, and the 
other is filling rapidly.
 
TWO SHOT: SHERIFF AND SEBASTIAN.
 
			SEBASTIAN: 
	... And Lala Alvarez, the pretty one over 
	there. And that one.
 
 			SHERIFF 
		(irritably) 
	With the baby?
 
			SEBASTIAN
		(a sly grin) 
	She's Ramón Quintero's wife. He don't 
	like her being here at all.
 
The Sheriff hesitates a moment, his eyes narrowed in 
thought, then gives Vance the nod. Vance approaches the 
line.
 
MEDIUM SHOT: AT PICKET LINE. 

Vance plucks at Esperanza's sleeve. She stops for a second, 
frightened, wavering. The women remaining on the line call 
out to her: 

			AD LIBS 
		(in Spanish)
	We'll take the baby, Esperanza ...
	Don't worry about Juanito ...
 	We'll keep Estella too ...
 
Vance pulls at her arm again. Esperanza stiffens with a 
sudden fierceness. 

			ESPERANZA 
	No. The baby stays with me. 
		(She stoops down to Estella.) 
	Go to Papa. You stay with Papa, hear?
 
Head high, carrying the baby, Esperanza walks off toward 
the waiting trucks. The little girl watches her go, bereft, 
perplexed.
 
EXT., HILLSIDE. CLOSE SHOT: RAMÓN. 

He comes to his feet, tense with anxiety.
 
EXT., PICKET LINE. LONG PANNING SHOT FROM HIS ANGLE.

Suddenly Estella breaks away from the picket line and runs 
after her mother. Esperanza is climbing into the back of 
the second truck, which is now full. Estella jumps onto the 
tailgate and a woman pulls her up. We hear motors starting. 
The trucks pull off slowly. At the same instant we hear 
Teresa's clear voice, singing "Solidarity Forever." The 
other women join her. The chorus swells. CAMERA HOLDS on 
the receding trucks, and the singing fades. Now the CAMERA 
PANS SLOWLY BACK to the picket line. There are only a 
handful of women remaining. But from somewhere we hear the 
song again. CAMERA PANS ON, HOLDS on a view of the wooded 
hillside. Suddenly we see twenty or more women coming down 
the slope with Consuelo Ruiz in the lead. They are singing, 
these reserves, coming to replenish the gaps in the line.
 
						SLOW DISSOLVE TO:
 
INT., COUNTY JAIL: TWO CELLS. FULL SHOT, NIGHT.

Over the DISSOLVE WE HEAR the rhythmic clank of tin cups 
against steel bars. Lights come up slowly to reveal two 
adjacent jail cells packed with women. All are standing, 
for there is no room to sit down. The women in f.g. bang on 
the bars, and all of them chant rhythmically in Spanish:
 
			WOMEN
	Queremos comida ...
	Queremos camas ...
	Queremos baños ...
	Queremos comida ...
 
REVERSE TWO SHOT: TURNKEY AND VANCE 

as seen from the cell. The two deputies are leaning back 
in their chairs against a blank wall opposite the cells. 
The deafening chant is driving the turnkey to distraction. 
He puts his hands to his ears. Suddenly he rises and comes 
over, holding up his hands for quiet. Vance follows.

			TURNKEY
	Now listen! Please, girls! Be quiet! 
	Listen! 
		(The din subsides.) 
	I've told you ten times. We don't have no 
	food. We don't have no beds. We don't 
	have no baths. So please -- please -- 
	shut up!
 
Vance grins at Luz Morales, whose face can be seen behind 
the bars in close foreground. He reaches out, chucks her
under the chin. Luz scratches at his hand, and he withdraws 
it. The chant is resumed.
 
INT., REAR OF CELL. CLOSE GROUP SHOT.

The one cot in the cell is occupied by Estella and the 
infant Juanito. Juanito is crying. Esperanza hovers 
worriedly over him, trying to get him a take a nippled 
bottle, which he rejects.
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(to Teresa) 
	He can't drink this milk. It'll make him 
	sick. He's on a formula. 
		(In a panic of guilt) 
	I was a fool! I shouldn't have kept him 
	with me.
 
			TERESA 
	Don't you worry. We'll get some action.
 
She moves off to the front of the cell, calling for quiet.
 
FRONT OF CELL, FEATURING TERESA. 

The women stop their clamor for a moment. Teresa calls out 
to Vance: 

			TERESA 
	The baby can't drink this store milk.
	We want his formula!
 
			VANCE 
		(puzzled) 
	You want what?
 
 			RUTH 
	The formula, the formula ...
 
The women begin banging away with their cups again taking 
up the chant: 

			WOMEN
	We want the formula! We want the formula!
 
Vance winces at the noise.
 
INT., COURT HOUSE HALLWAY. MEDIUM SHOT, NIGHT.

Ramón can be seen coming slowly up the hall. Luís trails 
behind him. Ramón walks like a man in enemy territory.
From off scene the sound of the women's chant carries over:
"We want the formula ..."
 
THE HALL. ANOTHER ANGLE.
 
Ramón is passing a door marked: OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT 
ATTORNEY. The door is slightly ajar. Ramón stops, turns 
back, looks inside.
 
INT., DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE FROM RAMÓN'S ANGLE.

All that can be seen in Ramón's cone of vision is a desk 
across the room. The D.A.'s feet are on the desk. He is in 
his shirt sleeves, but wearing his hat. Alexander sits on 
the corner of the desk. Hartwell and the sheriff wander in 
and out of scene, pacing the floor.

			D.A.
	Well, you can get the J.P. to swear out 
	peace bonds. Or heist the bail high 
	enough so you can keep 'em in jail.
 
			SHERIFF
		(exasperated)
	Keep 'em? What am I supposed to do -- feed 
	'em outa my own pocket?
 
BACK TO HALLWAY. RAMÓN AND LUIS. 

Ramón's hand is half-raised to the doorknob. It falls to 
his side. He listens.
 
			D.A.'s VOICE 
	What I want to know, Mr. Hartwell, is 
	when you gonna settle this thing. You 
	won't negotiate with 'em. What are you 
	after, anyway?
 
MEDIUM SHOT: HARTWELL FROM RAMÓN'S ANGLE.
 
			HARTWELL 
		(pacing) 
	The company has other mines. You've got 
	to see the larger picture. Once these 
	people get out of hand ...
 
Without noticing Ramón, but conscious of the need to keep 
what he is saying confidential, Hartwell has moved to the 
door and closed it, cutting off the rest of his sentence.
 
BACK TO RAMÓN,
 
frustrated in his desire to hear more. Just then Vance 
rounds a corner in b.g. and enters scene, walking toward 
CAMERA. He stops short, seeing Ramón. For a moment they 
stare at one another. Vance looks scared, despite the fact 
that he is armed and within his own bastille.
 
			VANCE 
	What you doin' here? Ain't you seen 
	enough of me?
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(scarcely audible) 
	I come for my kids. They're in your jail.
 
Vance warily brushes past Ramón and opens the office door, 
gesturing for the Sheriff. During the few moments the door 
is open, we hear:
 
			D.A.'s VOICE 
	But you've played every trump in your 
	hand and they're not dead yet.
 
 			HARTWELL'S VOICE 
	Not every trump.
 
			D.A.'s VOICE 
	Such as what? 

The Sheriff comes out, closing the door behind him, 
cutting off the inside conversation again.

			VANCE 
	I can't shut them dames up. They keep 
	yellin' about the formula.
 
			SHERIFF 
	The what?
 
			VANCE 
	Formula for the baby or somethin'. 
		(Indicates Ramón) 
	His kid.
 
The Sheriff glances at Ramón and stalks off down the hall.
Vance follows.
 
INT., JAIL CORRIDOR, SHOOTING TOWARD CELLS,

as the Sheriff and Vance enter. The women's clamor is as 
loud as ever. The Sheriff holds up his hands for quiet.
 
			SHERIFF 
	Now look here. I got you some milk for 
	the baby. So what's all the belly-achin' 
	about? 
 
 			AD LIB
	It's no good, the milk... 
	Queremos la formula ... 
	The baby has a formula ... 
	If Juanito gets sick you'll be 
	responsible ...
 
 			SHERIFF 
		(exasperated) 
	I'm not running a drug store. You girls 
	got nobody but yourselves to 1 blame 
	and you can be home with your families in 
	an hour. All you have to do is sign a 
	pledge that you won't go back to the 
	picket line.
 
 			MANY VOICES 
		(in English and Spanish) 
	Don't sign nothin' for the stinker. 
	No, no deals, no deals ... 
	Make him get the formula.
 
They start banging on the bars again. The sheriff turns 
angrily to Vance. 

			SHERIFF 
	Where'd that fellow go?
 
Vance takes a few steps, shouts around a corner, beckoning.
 
			VANCE
	Hey, Pancho, c'mere!

Ramón enters scene, walking slowly into f.g. Luís tags 
along behind. The women fall silent abruptly. It is very 
still.

CLOSE GROUP SHOT: AT CELL DOOR. 

The Sheriff motions to the turnkey to unlock one of the 
cells. He obeys.

			SHERIFF 
	Awright. Where's the baby? And the 
	little girl?
 
Esperanza brings the baby from the rear of the cell. 
Estella squeezes past the tightly packed women, joins her 
mother. Ramón and Esperanza gaze at one another with deep 
poignancy, unsmiling. He holds out his hands. She gives 
the baby to him. Estella looks up at her mother. Esperanza
nods, gives her a little push. Estella walks outside. Luís 
takes her hand. The father and his children walk off slowly,
out of scene. The women watch them go. The turnkey locks 
the cell again. Suddenly they start banging on the bars.
 
			VOICES
	Queremos comida ... 
	Queremos camas ...
	Queremos baños ... 
	Queremos comida ...
 
 						DISSOLVE TO:
 
EXT., QUINTERO BACK YARD. FULL SHOT, DAY.

The shot matches the earlier scene of Luz and Esperanza -- 
but now Ramón and Antonio are hanging out the wash. 
Estella and the little Morales boy are there. Ramón sees 
them playing in the baskets.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Will you kids get out of those baskets!
 
There are two large wicker baskets beside the fence: one 
contains Juanito, the other a mountain of damp clothes. As 
he works, Antonio calls from across the fence:
 
			ANTONIO 
		(in Spanish ) 
	How goes it?
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(in Spanish) 
	It never ends.
 
He snaps out a damp undershirt, hangs it up. Suddenly he 
explodes:
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Three hours! Just to heat enough water to 
	wash this stuff! 
		(A pause. He goes on working.) 
	I tell you something. If this strike is 
	ever settled -- which I doubt -- I don't 
	go back to work unless the company 
	installs hot running water for us. 
		(Another pause.) 
	It should've been a union demand from the 
	beginning.
 
 			ANTONIO 
	Yeah.
 
We hear the baby wail. Ramón walks over to the basket, puts 
the nipple of the bottle back in Juanito's mouth. Then he 
resumes his chores. Antonio muses as he works.
 
 			ANTONIO 
	It's like Charley Vidal says -- there's
	two kinds of slavery, wage slavery and 
	domestic slavery. The Woman Question, he 
	calls it. 

			RAMÓN 
	The woman question?
 
 			ANTONIO 
	Question, question -- the problem, what 
	to do about 'em.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(cautious) 
	So? What does he want to do about 'em?
 
 			ANTONIO 
	He says give 'em equality. Equality in 
	jobs, equality in the home. Also sex 
	equality.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(a long pause) 
	What do you mean -- sex equality? 

			ANTONIO 
	You know ... 
		(Leers, shifts into Spanish.) 
	What's good for the goose is good for the 
	gander.
 
CLOSE SHOT: RAMÓN 

with a clothespin in his mouth, mulling over this concept.
His imagination runs away with him. He scowls thoughtfully.
 
			ANTONIO'S VOICE
	He's some organizer, that Charley. He can 
	organize a wife right out of your home.
 
Ramón bites viciously on a clothespin and hangs up a pair 
of diapers.
 
						DISSOLVE TO:
 
INT., QUINTERO KITCHEN. MEDIUM SHOT, NIGHT.

There are two large tubs on the cluttered drainboard -- 
one of soapy water, one of rinse water. Ramón is washing 
the dishes. Luís is drying them. Ramón is sweaty and 
sullen. Luís is bored and impatient.
 
			LUIS 
	Papa, can't I leave now? There's a 
	meeting of the Junior Shop Stewards ... 

			RAMÓN 
	The what!
 
			LUIS 
	The Junior Shop Stewards. There's lots of 
	ways we can help.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(exploding) 
	Don't I have enough troubles without them 
	shipping you off to reform school?
 
 			LUIS 
		(earnestly) 
	But Papa -- you need all the help you can 
	get. 

			RAMÓN 
	You've got to help around the house!

			LUIS 
	But you've got me doing everything. Mama 
	never used to make me dry the ...
 
			RAMÓN 
		(cutting him off) 
	You should have helped her without being 
	asked.
 
At that moment we hear the raucous braying of an automobile 
horn from outside. Luís dashes into the parlor. Ramón stands 
there scrubbing a greasy dish. Now we hear gay laughter, 
and then, in Spanish:

			CHARLEY'S VOICE 
	Buenas noches! 

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Hasta mañana, Charley.

INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT: SHOOTING TOWARD FRONT DOOR.
 
Ramón enters scene f.g., stops. The front door bursts open, 
Esperanza enters. She embraces Luís. He grins, responding 
with a shy, awkward hug. Esperanza looks at Ramón. Her face 
is aglow. She looks younger and heartier than we have ever 
seen her. She comes quickly into close foreground, 
embracing Ramón. He puts his arms around her -- but 
stiffly, withholding himself. She looks up at him lovingly.
 
			RAMÓN 
	How do you feel? 

			ESPERANZA 
	I'm okay. But it's nice to be home. 

			RAMÓN 
	Four nights. How did you sleep?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	We raised such a fuss they finally 
	brought cots in. 

She laughs; her hand goes to her throat.

 			ESPERANZA 
	I nearly lost my voice, yelling so much. 
		(Suddenly) 
	How's Estellita? And the baby? 

She goes out.

			RAMÓN 
		(following her) 
	They're asleep.
 
INT., BEDROOM. MEDIUM SHOT. 

The bedroom is dark. Esperanza and Ramón are only moving 
shadows. Dimly we see her hovering over the crib. Ramón 
whispers.
 
			RAMÓN 
	Did you have to sign a pledge? Not to go 
	back to the line?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(a whisper) 
	No, no ... we wouldn't do it.

From off scene we hear a knock at the front door. Esperanza 
crosses the dark room to answer it, Ramón following.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(a whisper) 
	But if you go back they'll lock you up 
	again.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(whispering) 
	No, no ... the Sheriff had enough of us. 
	We drove him crazy. 

She goes out.

INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT.
 
Esperanza opens the front door, admitting three women: 
Teresa, Ruth and Consuelo. They enter beaming, excited.
 
			TERESA 
	It's all set. Consuelo's squad can take 
	they day off tomorrow. We're taking over.
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(ushering them in) 
	Good. Come in, we'll work it out. Sit 
	down, sit down.
 
The three women sit down on the couch. Esperanza crosses to 
the dining table to get a chair for herself. Ramón is 
standing there. 
 
TWO SHOT: RAMÓN AND ESPERANZA. 
 
He is the stern patriarch now. As she reaches for the chair 
he says, sotto voce:

			RAMÓN 
	We've got to have a talk, you and me.

			ESPERANZA 
	All right, but later. I've got a meeting 
	now.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(suppressed outrage) 
	A meeting?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	Yes. To plan for the picket line tomorrow.

She walks off with her chair. CAMERA HOLDS on Ramón. He is 
fuming. We hear:

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Now -- let's see ... who's available? 
 
			TERESA'S VOICE 
	Chana's husband is out of town -- on that
	delegation to see the governor. And Anita 
	Gonzales' husband, too ...
 
 			CONSUELO'S VOICE 
	And six or seven others -- Lala's husband 
	and Mariana's ...
 
Ramón looks like he's about to explode.
 
INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT.
 
As Ramón strides toward the front door, we hear:
 
			RUTH 
	And there's a whole bunch of men going on 
	a fuel hunting expedition -- thirty or
	forty of them -- so their wives are out 
	too.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	But we can ask them to keep our kids, so 
	the rest of us can ...
 
Ramón exits, slamming the door loudly behind him. The women 
react with a what's-eating-him look. Teresa turns 
sympathetically to Esperanza.

			TERESA 
	What are you going to do about him, 
	Esperanza? 
 
			CONSUELO 
	It's time he was house broken. Maybe if a 
	delegation of us talked to him ...
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(deeply upset) 
	No, no ... I have to work it out with him 
	myself.
 
 						DISSOLVE TO:
 
INT., BEER PARLOR. FULL SHOT: THE BAR, NIGHT.
 
Seven miners are seated on stools at the bar, drinking beer. 
These are the disconsolate ones -- the defeated and the 
perplexed, the traditionalist hold-outs and the unwilling
babysitters. An atmosphere of gloom pervades the place. 
Their backs are to CAMERA, but seated from left to right 
they are: Jenkins, Antonio, two unidentified miners (whom
we have seen around the picket line), Cente Cavazos, José 
Sanchez and Ramón. The bartender, an Anglo, is a beefy, 
easy-going fellow with a friendly manner. He sets fresh 
beers before a couple of miners, but no money changes hands.
We see the bartender mark something on a tab at the 
register. CAMERA MOVES ON to the next miner, an Anglo, 
leaning moodily on his elbow.
 
			ANGLO MINER
	I got a friend, he's got a friend in the 
	Bureau of Mines. Know what he says? They 
	ain't never gonna open up that mine again.

			FOURTH MINER 
	How come? 

			ANGLO MINER 
		(as CAMERA MOVES past him) 
	He says the ore's played out. So help me. 

			CENTE
	Could be.
 
CAMERA HOLDS on Ramón. There's a whiskey glass and a bottle 
of beer before him. Ramón is in a sodden blue funk.
 
			RAMÓN 
	Bull. Lotta bull. That's a rich mine. I 
	know.
 
He drinks off his whiskey, chases it down with beer, then 
stares moodily at the empty glass.
 
			RAMÓN 
	But what's the difference? They'll never 
	settle with us. Never.
 
Suddenly we hear an excited shout: 

			ANTONIO'S VOICE 
	Hey! Hey! What d'ya know!
 
FULL SHOT: MINERS AT BAR. 

Antonio holds up a magazine, stabbing a picture with his 
finger.
 
			ANTONIO 
	It's him! It's him! El Presidente! The 
	President of the Company.
 
All the miners except Ramón get off their stools and come 
over, looking at the picture.

			ANTONIO 
	Listen to this: 
		(reading) 
	"MAN OF DISTINCTION. J. Hamilton Miller, 
	financier, Business executive, Board 
	Chairman of Continental Factors, and 
	president of Delaware Zinc Incorporated.
	An enthusiastic sportsman and expert 
	marksman, Mr. Miller manages to find 
	time every year for an African safari.
	He leaves this month for Kenya, where he 
	hopes to bag his thirteenth lion!"

There is a long silence. The men stare at the portrait -- 
with hatred, with despair. Antonio rips the page out of the 
magazine.

			ANTONIO 
	I'm gonna frame this. 
		(Turning) 
	Hey, Ramón -- look.
 
Ramón just grunts with disgust. He sips his beer.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(absently) 
	Got to look at the larger picture.
 
A pall falls over the group again. The miners return to 
their bar stools.

CLOSE MOVING SHOT (AS BEFORE).
 
 			JENKINS 
		(staring into space)
	How do you like that? The guy is a lion 
	hunter.

			ANTONIO 
	What d'you expect him to hunt -- rabbits?
 
			FOURTH MINER 
	Man, oh man, I'd sure like to get me some 
	venison.
 
			CENTE
	I ain't tasted meat in four weeks. 
		(Suddenly) 
	How about it, Ramón? Let's take off for a 
	couple of days, huh?
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(after a long pause) 
 	Why ask me? Am I runnin' this strike? If 
	you want permission to go over the hill, 
	go ask the Ladies Auxiliary.

He drains his beer, rises and stalks off.
 
 						DISSOLVE TO:
 
FULL SHOT, NIGHT: INT., QUINTERO BEDROOM, 

dimly lit by one small lamp. Esperanza appears to be asleep. 
Ramón enters, crosses to the bed and sits down a heavily. 
He begins to remove his shoes. CAMERA MOVES IN. Esperanza's 
eyes come open, in the way of one who has been wide awake. 
Without moving she says in quiet reproach: 

			ESPERANZA 
	I waited up till midnight.

			RAMÓN 
		(not looking at her)
	You weren't waiting for me. 

			ESPERANZA 
	That meeting only lasted ten minutes.
		(A pause. Then quietly) 
	The first night I'm home, and you run to 
	the beer parlor. What is it? Can't you 
	bear the sight of me?
 
			RAMÓN 
		(fierce whisper) 
	Be still ...
 
			ESPERANZA 
	But you wanted to talk. Tell me.

He rises suddenly and goes out. Esperanza slips out of bed, 
flings on a dressing gown.

INT., KITCHEN. MEDIUM SHOT, NIGHT. 
 
Ramón has a cup and is pouring coffee from the pot on the 
stove. Esperanza enters scene, stands in the doorway.

			ESPERANZA 
	Tell me.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(not looking at her) 
	We can't go on this way. I just can't go 
	on living with you. Not this way.

			ESPERANZA 
		(softly) 
	No. We can't can't go on this way. We 
	can't go back to the old way either.
 
Ramón sips his coffee, glares at her.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	The old way? What's your "new way"? 
	What's it mean? Your "right" to neglect 
	your kids?
 
He goes abruptly to the parlor. Esperanza stands there a 
moment, then slowly follows him.
 
INT., PARLOR. FULL SHOT.
 
Ramón goes to a closet, gets a rifle and a box of shells 
off the shelf. He sits down on the edge of a chair and 
begins to clean the rifle with an oily rag. Esperanza 
enters scene, watching him. There is a long silence.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	Where are you going?
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Hunting. 

			ESPERANZA 
	When? 

			RAMÓN 
	Sun up. 

			ESPERANZA 
	Alone? 

			RAMÓN 
	No.
 
			ESPERANZA 
		(after a pause) 
	Ramón -- you can't.

			RAMÓN 
	Why not? I'm not needed here.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	But you are needed. Especially now -- 
	with most of the other men away. You're 
	captain of the stand-by squad.
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(bitterly)
	Sure, the standby squad. Stand-by for the 
	funeral.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	Whose funeral? We're doing all right. 
	There hasn't been a scab near the picket 
	line for three days.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	And you know why? Because the company 
	knows they can starve us out -- even if 
	it takes another two, three months. 
	What's it to them if the mine's shut down 
	a little longer?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	It's a lot to them. They'd do anything to 
	open that mine.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Aah! They've got other mines. You don't 
	see the larger picture. 
		(A pause.) 
	They've got millions. Millions. They can 
	outlast us, and they know it. 

			ESPERANZA
	You mean you're ready to give up?
 
			RAMÓN 
		(flaring) 
	Who said anything about giving up? I'll 
	never go back to the company on my knees.
	Never.

He pulls back the bolt of the rifle, inserts a cartridge, 
tests the bolt. 

			ESPERANZA 
	You want to go down fighting, is that it? 
		(He shrugs.) 
 	I don't want to go down fighting. I want 
	to win.
 
No response. She walks over to him, CAMERA FOLLOWING.

			ESPERANZA 
	Ramón were not getting weaker. We're 
	stronger than ever before.
		(He snorts with disgust.) 
	They're getting weaker. They thought they 
	could break our picket line. And they 
	failed. And now they can't win unless they
	pull off something big, and pull it off 
	fast.
 
 			RAMÓN 
	Like what?
 
			ESPERANZA 
	I don't know. But I can feel it coming. 
	It's like ... like a lull before the 
	storm. Charley Vidal says ...

			RAMÓN 
		(exploding) 
	Charley Vidal says! 
		(He rises, flinging rifle aside.) 
	Don't throw Charley Vidal up to me!
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	Charley's my friend. I need friends. 
		(She looks at him strangely.)
	Why are you afraid to have me as your 
	friend?
 
 			RAMÓN 
	I don't know what you're talking about.
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	No, you don't. Have you learned nothing 
	from this strike? Why are you afraid to 
	have me at your side? Do you still think 
	you can have dignity only if I have none?
 
			RAMÓN
	You talk of dignity? After what you've 
	been doing?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
	Yes. I talk of dignity. The Anglo bosses 
	look down on you, and you hate them for 
	it. "Stay in your place, you dirty 
	Mexican" -- that's what they tell you.
	But why must you say to me, "Stay in your 
	place." Do you feel better having someone 
	lower than you?
 
			RAMÓN 
	Shut up, you're talking crazy.
 
But Esperanza moves right up to him, speaking now with 
great passion. 

			ESPERANZA 
	Whose neck shall I stand on, to make me 
	feel superior? And what will I get out 
	of it? I don't want anything lower than I 
	am. I'm low enough already. I want to 
	rise. And push everything up with me as I 
	go ...
 
			RAMÓN 
		(fiercely) 
	Will you be still?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(shouting) 
	And if you can't understand this you're a 
	fool -- because you can't win this strike 
	without me! You can't win anything without 
	me!
 
He seizes her shoulder with one hand, half raises the other 
to slap her. Esperanza's body goes rigid. She stares 
straight at him, defiant and unflinching. Ramón drops his 
hand.

			ESPERANZA
	That would be the old way. Never try it 
	on me again -- never.

She crosses to the doorway, then turns back.
 
			ESPERANZA 
	I am going to bed now. Sleep where you 
	please -- but not with me.
 
She goes out.
 
						FADE OUT.

FADE IN: 
 
EXT., PICKET POST. FULL SHOT, EARLY MORNING.

Dispirited and shivering, the women march, hunched against 
the wind. Near the coffee shack is an oil drum in which a 
wood fire is burning. Teresa, the picket captain, walks
toward Esperanza. Teresa closely watches Esperanza's 
dejected face.
 
TWO SHOT: AT OIL DRUM.
 
The two women warm their hands over the fire. Theresa muses:
 
			TERESA 
	So they had a little taste of what its 
	like to be a woman ... and they run away. 

			ESPERANZA 
	With Ramón it's ... pride. I spoke out of 
	the bitterness in me. And he was hurt.
 
Esperanza stares at the fire. Teresa looks at her with deep 
sympathy. 

			TERESA 
	Anything worth learning is a hurt. These 
	changes come with pain ... for other 
	husbands too ... not just Ramón.
 
						DISSOLVE TO: 

EXT., MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE. LONG PANNING SHOT, DAY.
 
A vista of wild and lonely beauty. A cold wind rustles the 
junipers and pine of a steep boulder-strewn arroyo. The 
deer hunters can be seen walking up a narrow trail in 
single file. They are bunched together, save for Ramón, who 
lags behind.
 
MEDIUM PANNING. SHOT, FEATURING RAMÓN.

He walks slowly up the trail into f.g., brooding. As he 
walks he hears Esperanza's voice of the preceding night, 
hauntingly.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	You mean you're ready to give up? 
		(Pause) 
	I don't want to go down fighting. I want 
	to win. 
		(Pause) 
	Have you learned nothing from this strike? 
		(Pause) 
	I can feel it coming. It's like a lull 
	before the storm. 
		(Pause) 
	And now they can't win unless they pull 
	off something big and pull it off fast.
 
A shot is heard ringing through the arroyo. It pulls Ramón 
up short. He calls to the other men, suddenly:
 
			RAMÓN 
	Brothers, we've got to go back!
 
EXT., PICKET POST: WIDE ANGLE AT DRUM, INCLUDING TRUCK.
 
Charley is at the wheel, Sal besides him. The truck stops 
near the oil drum. Charley leans out, calls urgently.

			CHARLEY 
	Esperanza! Where's Ramón?
 
 			ESPERANZA 
		(dully)
	Ramón? 

			SAL 
	Did he go hunting with the others?
 
 			CHARLEY 
		(as Esperanza nods) 
	Where? Where can we find him? Do you know? 

			ESPERANZA 
	No.
 
During this exchange several women have left the picket 
line and come over.
 
 			SAL 
		(muttering bitterly) 
	Deer hunters! Deserters, that's what they 
	are.
 
			TERESA 
	Something wrong? 
		(Insistently) 
	Charley, tell us.
 
 			CHARLEY 
		(reluctantly)
	Company's got an eviction order.
 
						DISSOLVE TO: 

SERIES OF SHOTS: Large close shot of young woman crying: 
"EVICTION! EVICTION!" Large close shot young boy crying 
"EVICTION! EVICTION! EVICTION!" Woman at clothesline
hearing the call and leaving. Woman at kitchen door 
calling out "Where?" and leaving. Truck on road stops. Man 
runs in, calls, "EVICTION! At the Quintero place." Car on 
road is stopped by several women; they pile in, the car 
pulls away. Shots of people walking, by twos and by groups, 
finally passing the car in which are seated Alexander and 
Hartwell.
 
			ALEXANDER 
		(to a perturbed Hartwell) 
	Don't worry. Quintero's gone hunting with 
	the others. Evict him first; the rest 
	will be easy. Let their neighbors watch.
	Scare some sense into them.
 
 						DISSOLVE TO:
 
EXT., ROAD AND COMPANY HOUSING. LONG SHOT.
 
The sheriff's convoy is drawn up outside a row of company 
houses. We can see deputies milling about in the front yard 
of one of the cottages, and a cluster of women watching 
them from outside the fence.
 
EXT., COTTAGE: CLOSER ANGLE. 

It is the Quintero place. The Sheriff stands in the front 
yard, directing operations. His deputies are lugging 
furniture out of the house. They dump it in the yard or at
the side of the road. Several of them emerge from the front 
door with the Quinteros' bed. Esperanza, Luz and a dozen 
other women silently watch the eviction from outside the
fence. Mrs. Salazar is there with a bevy of kids (including 
Juanito whom she holds in her arms). The only man present 
is the parish priest.
 
EXT., MAIN ROAD, ZINC TOWN. LONG PANNING SHOT.
 
We pick up Jenkins' car loaded with the stand-by squad 
roaring toward the housing area. The car passes the store, 
the church, the school. As the car comes into f.g., and 
moves on out of scene, CAMERA HOLDS on the school 
playground. In the distance we see Luís beckoning to a 
number of his companions. The boys set off at a run up the 
road.
 
BACK TO COMPANY HOUSING. GROUP SHOT: WOMEN
 
featuring Esperanza and Luz.
 
			LUZ 
	Can't we do something?
 
No answer from Esperanza. She moves toward the front gate. 
Other women follow her. CAMERA PANS with them. Just then 
the deputy Kimbrough comes through the gate carrying a lamp 
and a vase. He dumps them onto the road. The vase breaks. 
He shoves Esperanza roughly away from the gate.
 
			KIMBROUGH 
	All right, girls -- get back, get back.
 
REVERSE ANGLE: SHOOTING PAST CONVOY 

as Jenkins' car swerves around the tail of the convoy, 
comes on up the road, stops near the cottage. Ramón and the 
others pile out. They join the throng of women. Ramón 
carries his rifle purposefully.

GROUP SHOT: WOMEN AND PRIEST
 
watching the deputies as Ramón comes to Esperanza's side. 
She sees him. Her face lights up. Ramón's eyes meet hers 
for a moment. He is unsmiling. Then he looks away at:
 
THE DEPUTIES, FROM HIS ANGLE,
 
dumping the precious accumulations of a lifetime onto the 
road: the shrine, a kewpie doll, a faded photograph.
 
CLOSE SHOT: PORTRAIT OF JUÁREZ.
 
It falls in the dust. The frame breaks. 

BACK TO WATCHERS, FEATURING RAMÓN, 

his face working in hatred and anger. Esperanza is beside 
him now. He brings the barrel of his rifle up as if to 
level it. She glances at him in terror. Suddenly Ramón goes 
slack; the shadow of defeat crosses his face. With an abrupt 
movement he thrusts the rifle on Mrs. Salazar -- who takes 
it, blinking with surprise.

EXT., COTTAGE. FULL SHOT FROM THEIR ANGLE.
 
Four deputies are emerging from the front door burdened 
with the ancient iron stove. CAMERA PANS away from them, 
holds on the fence separating the Quintero and Morales 
yards. Now we see Luís and his cronies pop up from behind 
the fence. Each boy holds a grass-tailed clod. They let 
fly. CAMERA SWISH PANS BACK to the porch -- and we see 
two of the clods hit their target, spattering the deputies 
with dirt. One deputy drops his corner of the stove, and it 
crashes down the steps. Several other deputies take off 
after the boys, leaving the gate unguarded. The sheriff 
yells:
 
			SHERIFF 
	Never mind them brats! Come on -- get the 
	work done.
 
REVERSE ANGLE, FEATURING TENANTS. 

Other women, children and old men are arriving on the scene. 
There are now over twenty women watching the eviction but 
there is no excitement, no talk.
 
CLOSER ANGLE, FEATURING RAMÓN AD ESPERANZA.
 
Ramón is calmer now, but alert, planning, thinking. He 
looks around at their gathering forces -- not yet 
impressive, but growing every moment. He almost smiles with 
slow realization. 

			RAMÓN 
		(half to himself) 
	This is what we've been waiting for. 

			ESPERANZA 
		(anxious, puzzled) 
	What are you saying?
 
			RAMÓN 
	This means they've given up trying to 
	break the picket line. 
		(A pause.) 
	Now we can all fight together -- all of 
	us.
 
Suddenly he draws Esperanza close, whispers something in 
her ear. She nods, turns swiftly to several other women, 
huddles with them a moment. 

CAMERA PANS with the women as they enter the yard, 
swooping down to pick up household belongings on their way.

EXT., FRONT YARD. FULL SHOT. 

Other women, seeing what Esperanza and her sisters are up 
to, swiftly join them in the yard, begin to pick up 
furniture and carry it back into the house by way of the 
rear door. Deputies emerging from the house, loaded down 
with furniture and bric-a-brac, find themselves passing 
women loaded with objects they have just deposited in the 
yard. One of the deputies stops in close f.g., staring at 
the women in slack-jawed bafflement. Ramón glances at Mrs. 
Salazar. He winks. Mrs. Salazar smiles. It is the first 
time we have seen her smile.
 
BACK TO YARD, FEATURING SHERIFF. 

His deputies are hopelessly dispersed. Half of them are 
chasing the boys, while the furniture-moving contingent is 
out-numbered by women crowding into the yard. The Sheriff 
wheels right and left in helpless exasperation. He spots 
Ramón near the front fence, strides over to him.

			SHERIFF 
		(bellowing) 
	Now see here, Quintero! These women are 
	obstructin' justice. You make 'em behave, 
	savvy?
 
 			RAMÓN 
	I can't do nothing, sheriff. You know how 
	it is -- they won't listen to a man any 
	more.
 
 			SHERIFF 
		(blustering) 
	You want me to lock 'em up again?
 
 			RAMÓN 
		(smiles) 
	You want 'em in your lock-up again?
 
The Sheriff stalks off, fuming.
 
EXT., ROAD AND YARD. FULL SHOT. 

More women keep arriving all the time. Several small fry, 
imitating their mothers, run into the yard, pick up lamps, 
pots, pans, etc., and return them to the house.
 
A SIDE ROAD. MEDIUM LONG SHOT. 

Two cars pull up and stop near the convoy. Consuelo Ruiz and 
six other women get out, approach the cottage. 

THE YARD. FULL SHOT.
 
From off scene we hear the blast of an automobile horn, 
while from the middle of the yard the sheriff bellows at 
his men:

			SHERIFF 
	Form a cordon! Keep 'em away from the 
	house! Form a cordon!
 
EXT., ROAD. MEDIUM LONG SHOT: PAST CONVOY.
 
Two other cars pull up at the tail of the convoy. Frank 
Barnes and a half dozen miners get out, hurry toward the 
Quintero cottage.
 
BACK TO YARD. FULL SHOT.
 
By now the sheriff's men have reassembled and are forming a 
cordon, from the porch steps to the front gate, permitting 
no one else to enter the yard. Four deputies pick up the 
Quinteros' bed and begin to carry it toward the truck. When 
they reach the gate they find it blocked by the six new 
miners and four of Ramón's stand-by squad. The deputies 
stop, ease their burden to the ground. Just then we hear a 
klaxon from o.s. Everyone turns to see:
 
ANOTHER CONVOY. LONG PANNING SHOT.
 
The union truck is in the lead. Charley Vidal is at the 
wheel, and the back of the truck is loaded with a dozen 
miners. Following it are a half-dozen miners' cars. The 
union convoy rolls past the parked sheriff's convoy, draws 
to a stop in f.g. The miners tumble out, move in a body 
toward the gate of the Quintero cottage. They are all big 
men, and their faces are grim and determined. We count 15, 
20, 25, 30 of them.

CLOSE GROUP SHOT: MINERS AT GATE 

looking at their approaching brothers. Alfredo nudges 
Gonzales.
 
			ALFREDO 
	Hey! The guys from the open pit ...

			GONZALES
	And the guys from the mill.
 
EXT., COTTAGE AND YARD. FULL SHOT (BOOM SHOT IF POSSIBLE).
 
Ramón, Esperanza and other women and children re-emerge 
from the house, stop on the porch in a compact mass. Facing 
them outside the gate are forty miners. The deputies are in 
between. They stir nervously, glancing from side to side. 
No one says anything. A heavy stillness falls over the yard. 
Now we see other women and children closing in at the side 
fence: then Luís and a half-dozen other boys appear at the 
opposite fence. The Sheriff is in dead center of this shot. 
Without realizing it he makes a full turn of 360, looking 
at his adversaries.
 
HIS ANGLE. SLOW PANNING SHOT.
 
The Sheriff's forces are completely surrounded by over a 
hundred men, women and children. Appearing on the 
surrounding hills, on every side, are other miners, other 
women, other kids -- massed, impassive.

FULL SHOT: THE SHERIFF

turning, staring at the massed power against 
him. With an abrupt, frustrated gesture the Sheriff waves 
to his men to follow and walks out the gate. The miners 
break ranks to let him pass. When the last deputy has left 
the yard the men close ranks and face the convoy. Still 
there is no voice, no sound save the starting motors.
 
THE ROAD AND YARD. FULL SHOT 

as seen from the porch, SHOOTING PAST the miners outside 
the gate. The convoy lurches into motion. The men watch it 
till the last car has passed. Then they turn to face the 
women, who enter scene f.g., moving down the steps, meeting 
the men in the yard. Suddenly someone laughs and then there 
is a release in laughter running through the crowd, and we 
hear half-whispered, awed comment. 

			AD LIBS 
		(English and Spanish) 
	We stopped them ... 
	It took all we had, but we stopped them ... 
	When we heard about it at the mill, we 
	just walked off ... 
	Did you see their faces? .. .
 
THE RECEDING CONVOY. LONG PANNING SHOT.
 
The convoy approaches a crossroad a quarter of a mile 
downhill from the Quintero house. We see a Cadillac parked 
there at the corner. The lead car of the convoy stops and 
the sheriff gets out. He walks over to the Cadillac.
 
CLOSE SHOT: AT CADILLAC.
 
Alexander and Hartwell are sitting there. The sheriff 
starts to speak, then closes his mouth again. He indicates 
his empty trucks with a helpless gesture.
 
			SHERIFF
	Got any more ideas? 

			ALEXANDER 
		(defensively, passing the buck) 
	I don't make policy.
 
He looks at Hartwell. Hartwell puffs on a cigarette. After 
a long pause he says:
 
			HARTWELL 
	I'll talk to New York. Maybe we better 
	settle this thing. 
		(Another puff) 
	For the present. 
 
BACK TO QUINTERO YARD. FULL SHOT.
 
Part of the milling throng has already dispersed; those who 
remain are carrying the last of the Quinteros' possessions 
back into the house. We see Luís jump the fence and run 
toward his mother in f.g. She gives him a fierce hug.
 
MEDIUM SHOTS AT FRONT GATE.

Ramón approaches Mrs. Salazar. He takes the baby from her 
arms. Estella enters the gate, dragging the portrait of 
Juárez. Solemnly she lifts up the portrait. Ramón takes 
it. He walks back toward the porch, Estella at his side.
 
THE YARD, SWOOPING FROM THE PORCH.

Esperanza and Luís stand on the porch steps in f.g. 
Reaching them, Ramón turns, looks back at his friends, 
some of whom are still in the yard. They seem to be 
waiting for him to speak.

			ESPERANZA'S VOICE
	We did not know then that we had won the 
	strike. But our hearts were full. And 
	when Ramón said.
 
			RAMÓN 
		(Simply) 
	Thanks ... sisters... and brothers.
 
The people smile softly. A few of them lift their hands in 
a wave of acknowledgment. They begin to leave. 

CLOSE UP SHOT: THE QUINTERO FAMILY ON PORCH.

Ramón holds the baby in the crook of his arm. He hands the 
portrait of Juárez to Luís. The boy gazes at it with 
respect, wipes the dust off it, and readjusts the torn 
frame. Ramón heaves a long sigh. Unsmiling, he looks off at 
the receding convoy. Esperanza watches him. There is a 
pause. Still not looking at her, Ramón says haltingly:

			RAMÓN 
	Esperanza ... thank you ... for your 
	dignity.
 
Esperanza's eyes fill with tears. 

			RAMÓN 
	You were right. Together we can push 
	everything up with us as we go.
 
			ESPERANZA'S VOICE 
	Then I knew we had won something they 
	could never take away -- something I 
	could leave to our children -- and they, 
	the salt of the earth, would inherit it.
 
Esperanza places her hand in Ramón's. With the children they 
walk into the house.
 
 						FADE OUT.
 

 
 




Screenplay by Michael Wilson





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