Viridiana

 
THE COURTYARD AND CLOISTER OF A CONVENT. 

A group of LITTLE BOYS, walking two by two in line, are led across the 
courtyard by some NUNS. Other nuns are coming and going in the courtyard or 
along the cloister, where a priest is also passing.

In a corner of the courtyard a group of nuns are chatting. One of them is 
VIRIDIANA. The MOTHER SUPERIOR comes toward her. The film opens to the 
strains of Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus," which accompany the credits. Then 
the music fades as the first picture comes on.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		Sister Viridiana.

The young nun breaks away from the group and comes toward the MOTHER 
SUPERIOR. She bows.
 
				VIRIDIANA
		Mother?

				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		I've just had a letter from your uncle. He 
		won't be able to come when you take your vows. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(indifferent)
		All right, Mother.

The MOTHER SUPERIOR is astonished at her lack of concern. 

				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		You don't seem to mind very much.
 
Both have begun to walk along the cloister.

				VIRIDIANA
		I hardly know him. I saw him only once, some 
		years ago. I can't even remember him.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		In any case he's asking you to come and stay 
		with him.

				VIRIDIANA
		I don't want to leave the convent, Mother. 

				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		I'm afraid that his health is not good. He's 
		your only relative and you ought to say 
		farewell to him before taking your vows. You 
		will certainly never see him again.

They stop and face each other.
 
				VIRIDIANA
		But why does he want to see me? He has never 
		bothered about me.

				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		He has paid for your studies and your 
		maintenance, and he has just sent your dowry. 
		Does that mean so little to you, Viridiana?
 
VIRIDIANA, taken aback, seems to reflect. They start walking again.
 
				VIRIDIANA
		I have no desire to see the world again, but if 
		you order me to...

				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		The retreat will start soon. You can leave 
		tomorrow morning. 

They stop and face each other again; VIRIDIANA looks dejectedly at the MOTHER 
SUPERIOR.

				MOTHER SUPERIOR
		Everything you need for the journey has been 
		put in your cell. Go get yourself ready, and 
		try to show him some affection.
 
She smiles at her again and leaves. VIRIDIANA, looking worried, watches her 
go.




PRIVATE PARK. 

Close-up of the dirty, skinny legs of little RITA, who is jumping rope. They 
come forward and go back, opening and shutting like compasses. RITA jumps 
from one bare foot to the other. Nearby, behind her, the legs of a man are 
seen passing. As they recede, the chest, then the face, of DON JAIME appear. 
He watches the little girl's legs.
 
The head of the breathless little girl is tousled, her eyes shining and her 
lips moist. She bites her lower lip. DON JAIME comes toward her.
 
The noise of a horse and carriage stopping is heard nearby. RITA stops 
skipping and looks toward the carriage.
 
				DON JAIME 
		That's enough for today, Rita. Do you like that 
		rope I gave you?

				RITA
		It's easier to jump with: it's got handles. 

				DON JAIME
		Go away now. Go and play.
 
RITA hands the rope to DON JAIME, who hangs it on a nail fixed to the trunk 
of a big tree which overshadows them. DON JAIME then turns his attention to 
the carriage and begins to walk toward it. RITA also goes toward the 
carriage. VIRIDIANA is getting out. The COACHMAN hands down her small bag.
 
				RITA
		Hello.

				VIRIDIANA
		Hello.

				RAMONA
		Welcome, miss. I'm Ramona, Don Jaime's servant. 

				VIRIDIANA
		Ah! Pleased to meet you.
 
DON JAIME arrives now.
 
				DON JAIME
		Viridiana!
 
The young girl leaves the maid and moves to face her uncle. They look at each 
other with curiosity. The novice's expression is what one would expect in 
such circumstances, but DON JAIME shows a more lively interest.
 
				VIRIDIANA
		Yes, Uncle. How are you?

				DON JAIME
		I'm well ... The bus was late, wasn't it? ... 
		What was the journey like? 

				VIRIDIANA
		Excellent. What a charming, peaceful place, 
		Uncle. 

				DON JAIME
		You'll think you're still at the convent.
 
In spite of a total lack of cordiality and warmth on both sides, DON JAIME's 
face now registers the great interest his niece has aroused in him.
 
The camera frames the legs of VIRIDIANA and DON JAIME, who are moving forward 
side by side. They stop occasionally, as people do when they are walking and 
talking together. At first we only hear their voices. Then the camera shows 
them both completely. The tone of the conversation is normal, except that 
DON JAIME voice shows evident interest. Hers has less expression.
  
				DON JAIME
		How long are you staying?

				VIRIDIANA 
		A very short while, Uncle. I've been given 
		permission to stay only a few days.

				DON JAIME
		Was that difficult to get?

				VIRIDIANA
		No. Mother Superior told me to come.
 
DON JAIME stops.
 
				DON JAIME 
			(crestfallen)
		Did you have so little interest in seeing me? 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(smiling, sincere)
		To tell you the truth, not very much. I cannot 
		lie. I respect you and I am grateful to you 
		because I owe you everything materially, but 
		otherwise ...

				DON JAIME 
			(sadly)
		You have no feelings toward ... 

				VIRIDIANA
		No.
 
They start walking again. He begins to show pleasure, as well as surprise, at 
the frankness of the young girl.

				DON JAIME
		You are right. Being alone has made me 
		self-centered. Now I am sorry we have not seen 
		more of each other. It's too late, isn't it? 

She makes a gesture of resignation and indifference. 

				VIRIDIANA
		Yes. It's too late.
 
Now they are passing under a big tree, the branches and trunk of which 
overshadow the two stories of the house. In the distance are the fields of 
the estate, lying waste and fallow.
 
				VIRIDIANA
		You've been neglecting the farm, Uncle. 

				DON JAIME
		In twenty years the grass has invaded 
		everything. There are spiders all over the 
		house except on the first floor. I hardly ever 
		go out.

				RITA'S VOICE 
			(from the thickest part of the tree)
		It's true. When he goes out he makes me jump 
		rope.
 
Astonished, VIRIDIANA looks up into the branches. The head of the little girl 
appears among the leaves.
 
				DON JAIME
		Come down here, you scamp. 

				VIRIDIANA
		Who is she?
 
				DON JAIME
		My maid Ramona's daughter. She's a little animal. 

				VIRIDIANA
		Come down.

The little girl disappears again among the leaves. VIRIDIANA walks on, 
drawing ahead of her uncle.

				DON JAIME
		How like your aunt you are, even in your walk. 

				VIRIDIANA
		I know, Uncle, you've told me that already. 

				DON JAIME
		You see, even the voice. 

They walk on under the trees of the estate.



 
DON JAIME'S SITTING ROOM AT NIGHT. 

Close-up of DON JAIME's feet slowly working the pedals of a harmonium; his 
hands playing on the keyboard. He is playing a piece of classical music.
 



DOÑA ELVIRA'S BEDROOM. 

VIRIDIANA is undressing. She takes off her dress and then sits on the edge 
of the bed to take off her black stockings. Her legs, white and perfectly 
shaped, appear in full light.
 



THE SITTING ROOM. 

DON JAIME, with an ecstatic faraway look on his face, continues to play the 
harmonium.
 



THE HALL. 

RAMONA moves a few paces and stops. She hesitates for a moment, and then 
comes back toward Viridiana's room. She looks through the keyhole. The sound 
of the harmonium comes from the sitting room.
 



THE SITTING ROOM. 

DON JAIME is still in his musical ecstasy. RAMONA comes in and goes quietly 
to her master. She stops near him and, for a moment, watches his hands on the 
keys.
 
				RAMONA
		She has made her bed on the floor, sir! 

The old man continues to play without answering.

				RAMONA
		She has something in her suitcase that looks 
		like thorns. Her nightgown is made of some 
		rough cloth. It really must tear her skin! 
			(pause) 
		Such beautiful skin, sir.
 
DON JAIME, his attention suddenly caught, continues to play. 

				DON JAIME 
		Leave me now. You can go to bed. 

				RAMONA 
		Yes, sir. Good night. 

DON JAIME goes on playing.




DOÑA ELVIRA'S BEDROOM. 

Close-up of a crucifix of rough wood, surrounded by replicas of the 
instruments of the crucifixion: the crown of thorns, the hammer, the nails, 
the sponge. These are all placed on a cushion on the ground. VIRIDIANA, clad 
in a nightgown, is crouched in front of these things praying.
 



INTERIOR OF A STABLE, DAYTIME. 

Close-up of the udder of a cow and the hand of the man who is milking it. It 
is the SERVANT whom we have already seen as the coachman. Little RITA is 
perched on the wooden partition to which the cow is tied. VIRIDIANA, carrying 
a basket, joins the group.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Good morning. 

The servant answers politely.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Good morning, Rita. How are we today? 

				RITA 
		Today, a good girl.

				VIRIDIANA 
			(to the servant)
		Could I trouble you for my glass of milk?
 
				SERVANT
		Certainly, miss.
 
She takes a glass out of her basket and hands it to the SERVANT. The man 
fills the glass straight from the udder. VIRIDIANA watches him with 
curiosity.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Is that difficult?

He looks at her for a moment as if he does not understand how anybody could 
ask him such a silly question.
 
				SERVANT
		Here, try it yourself.

The suggestion amuses VIRIDIANA, but she declines.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		But I wouldn't know how.
 
He insists.

				SERVANT
		I'll show you. Hold here.

He grasps a teat and motions VIRIDIANA to take it. Hesitating, she finally 
does so timidly. She sits on the stool that the SERVANT pushes toward her. 
She blushes. She begins pulling the teat. RITA watches her clumsiness with 
contempt.

VIRIDIANA obviously finds the sensation of the teat in her hand unpleasant. 
When no milk comes the SERVANT insists, guiding her hand.

				SERVANT
		Pull hard like that and squeeze.

But VIRIDIANA gives up the struggle with a gesture of disgust. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I can't. It makes me ... 

The servant looks at her without understanding.

				VIRIDIANA 
		It makes me feel ...

She trails off and goes to RITA. At the end of the stable the other servant, 
old MONCHO, is carrying straw. 

				RITA 
		I saw you in your nightgown! 

VIRIDIANA looks at her angrily. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		What? 

				RITA 
		Yes, yes, I saw you!

				MONCHO 
		Don't take her seriously, she's a liar. 

The little girl turns to the old man furiously.

				RITA 
		I saw her! I saw her ... When she was dressing, 
		her pins fell out and she picked them up.

VIRIDIANA knows this is true. She takes RITA by the arm and speaks to her 
seriously.

				VIRIDIANA 
		How did you see me? 

				RITA 
		From the terrace.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		It's very wicked to spy. Why did you do it? 

MONCHO shocked, bows his head resignedly. Viridiana smiles and addresses the 
little girl.

				VIRIDIANA 
		I'm going to the hen house. Are you coming with 
		me? 

				RITA 
		No, I don't want to.
 
RITA sulkily comes down from her perch and goes away. VIRIDIANA thanks the 
SERVANT, who hands her the glass of milk which she drinks.
 



INTERIOR OF THE HENHOUSE. 

VIRIDIANA takes the eggs that she finds in the nests and puts them in her 
basket.
 
				DON JAIME'S VOICE
		Hello!

There is a pause; VIRIDIANA stops collecting the eggs. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Good morning, Uncle. You're very early this morning. 

				DON JAIME (off)
		So that I can see a little bit more of you. 

The camera moves around the scene. The house is filled with egg crates and 
pigeons' nests. The pigeons fly in and out beneath the stone arcades. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I'm going to make you a nun's cake. It will 
		make your mouth water.

				DON JAIME
		You are spoiling me too much. I won't know what 
		to do with myself when you've gone.

				VIRIDIANA 
			(deliberately)
		Only because you want it. 

DON JAIME walks up and down. 

				DON JAIME 
		What do you mean?

				VIRIDIANA 
		Nothing. I didn't say anything. 

A silence.
 
				DON JAIME 
		You don't trust me, do you? What do you want to 
		know? 

She hesitates for a moment.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Very well! I'm talking to you like this because 
		I can't keep things to myself. 

She goes up to him and looks him straight in the eye.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Is it true that you have a son?
 
DON JAIME is left momentarily speechless. He blushes.
 
				DON JAIME 
		How did you know about that?

				VIRIDIANA 
		Oh, some years ago I heard my mother talking 
		about it. But is it true?

				DON JAIME 
		Yes, it is.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Don't you ever see him?

				DON JAIME 
		Never.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		How could anybody behave like that?

				DON JAIME 
		Sometimes these things happen because of 
		inexperience. Sometimes it's because of... 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(interrupting)
		Evil.

				DON JAIME
		And what do you know about life? When all is 
		said and done you couldn't possibly understand.
 
He walks forward a few steps looking worried.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		I understand perfectly. But even if you were 
		not entirely blameworthy, you should have 
		brought up the child.
 
VIRIDIANA's expression becomes harder. DON JAIME begins to pace again 
nervously. He passes in front of his niece, speaking with a certain 
embarrassment.
 
Nearby is a basin of water. While they are speaking, DON JAIME looks down 
into the basin, on the edge of which a bee has settled.
 
				DON JAIME 
		His mother wanted to keep him. She came from a 
		poor family. I was in love with your aunt. I 
		would like to have acknowledged him but I was 
		afraid of losing her. That's why I didn't say 
		anything.

				VIRIDIANA 
		And this innocent child. 

				DON JAIME 
		Don't worry. He won't be forgotten.
 
There is silence. VIRIDIANA picks up her basket again. DON JAIME stares 
obstinately at the basin. The bee is still there.
 
				DON JAIME 
		You must think I am a monster. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		No, but what a pity life is like that.
 
The bee falls into the water. It flounders there, beating its legs and wings. 
DON JAIME puts a bit of bamboo into the water and lets the bee climb onto it.
 
				DON JAIME 
		The poor little beast. It was going to drown.
 



INTERIOR OF THE SITTING ROOM. 

It is two o'clock in the morning. The chimes dominate the music of the 
phonograph which plays a muted Ninth Symphony (fourth movement). The clock 
then strikes two.
 
The sitting room is lit only by the cheerful light of the wood burning in the 
hearth. Don Jaime's bedroom, opening off the end of the sitting room and lit 
by an oil lamp, appears to be empty. The camera pulls us into this room.
 


INTERIOR OF DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

DON JAIME is sitting in front of a large carved wooden chest which he has 
just opened. He seems to be concentrating but his expression is impassive. He 
is looking at the wedding attire he has kept, and judging from the cut of the 
clothes, they are the ones his dead wife Doña Elvira wore on her wedding day. 
DON JAIME gradually takes out the different parts of the outfit. He gazes at 
some of them for a moment; others he hardly looks at at all. There is the 
veil, the bodice, the skirt, the crown of artificial orange blossoms, the 
satin slippers.
 
He looks at some of these voluptuously. He throws the crown of orange 
blossoms onto his bed. He takes off his shoes and tries to put his bare foot 
into one of the delicate feminine slippers. Now he takes a satin corset with 
ribbons out of the chest. The chorus of the Ninth Symphony is still heard. 
With difficulty, DON JAIME gets up and, with the corset in his hands, goes 
toward his mirror. He draws on the corset and gazes at his face.
 
DON JAIME's head and shoulders are reflected in the glass. His expression is 
blank. The music continues.
 
The log fire in the fireplace makes leaping shadows on the walls.
 
As DON JAIME is standing in front of the mirror a sudden noise makes him 
start. He rapidly hides the corset which he had wrapped around him and goes 
to the door.
 
				DON JAIME 
			(in a broken voice)
		Who's there?
 
He hears the sound of furniture being knocked against. He sees VIRIDIANA pass 
two steps in front of him. She is barefoot. She has thrown over her nightgown 
a large woolen shawl which covers her shoulders. The girl does not seem to 
notice her uncle watching her and she continues to move toward the door of 
the sitting room. Crossing his room simultaneously, DON JAIME goes into the 
sitting room by the door which joins the two rooms.
 



THE SITTING ROOM. 

VIRIDIANA is carrying a wicker workbasket. Her eyes are open but the 
expression on her face is cold, distant, statuesque. She goes directly to one 
of the armchairs near the fireplace and sits down.
 
DON JAIME comes into the sitting room. He follows the girl's movements with a 
dismayed look. He goes and stands in front of her. He sees that VIRIDIANA is 
sleepwalking. He makes every effort to avoid making a noise but never takes 
his eyes off of her.

As VIRIDIANA sits down, her nightgown is disarranged and her leg and the 
beginning of her thigh are uncovered. DON JAIME stares at the white, finely 
grained flesh, unable to look away. He is visibly agitated.
 
VIRIDIANA takes the things that are in the workbasket -- needles, balls of 
wool, skeins, and so on -- and throws them into the fire. But her eyes do not 
see what her hands are doing. The precision of her movements is admirable; 
but as she makes another movement to draw nearer the fire, more of her thigh 
is exposed.

DON JAIME sadly closes his eyes. What a torment, to have so near his grasp 
the young woman he wishes to possess and yet dares not take in his arms!
He opens his eyes again. Apparently what he sees gives him an idea. But for 
the moment he is worried about what the young novice is doing.
 
VIRIDIANA, kneeling now in front of the fire, takes handfuls of ashes and 
sprinkles them into her basket. Then she gets up and walks slowly toward Don 
Jaime's room and goes in. After a moment of astonished hesitation, he follows 
her. As VIRIDIANA reaches the bed, she empties the ashes from her basket, 
with a slow movement, onto the bedspread beside the orange blossoms DON JAIME 
threw there.
 
DON JAIME is startled; the expression on his face, seen in close-up, shows 
horror at the girl's apparently absurd conduct.
 
VIRIDIANA walks back across the room. As she passes DON JAIME, the basket in 
her hand brushes against him. Her eyes, still open, have a dead look in them, 
and since she is barefoot and walks slowly she seems to glide rather than 
walk. She leaves the room. DON JAIME goes to the bed and looks, in a 
distracted and incredulous way, at the ashes she has left there.
 



THE HALL. 

VIRIDIANA walks toward her room. DON JAIME stands in the doorway of his 
bedroom watching his niece until she disappears into Doña Elvira's room.
 
The door of Doña Elvira's room closes very slowly. A faint click is heard as 
it is locked from the inside.
 



INTERIOR OF DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

Through the window which opens onto the balcony, the trees of the drive are 
seen standing out against the bright daytime sky.
 
RAMONA is busy brushing a suit. 

				DON JAIME'S VOICE
		Is she up yet?

				RAMONA 
		She's been up for some time. 

She looks toward the bed where doubtless her master is and speaks, watching 
to see what his reaction will be.

				RAMONA 
		She asked me to get her things ready.

DON JAIME is shown sitting on his bed eating breakfast. What the servant has 
just said makes him start.

				DON JAIME 
		Her last day in this house! I'll never see her 
		again if she leaves.

At the other end of the room, RAMONA is now dusting a shelf. 

				RAMONA 
		Why don't you ask her to stay on for a few 
		days?
 
				DON JAIME 
			(put out)
		I have asked her but she's ungrateful. 
		Sometimes I feel like hitting her. When I talk 
		to her about the convent, she turns to stone. 

He is frowning and seems to be thinking of something important. 

				DON JAIME 
			(almost pleading) 
		Ramona! 

She stops dusting and looks intently at her master. He taps the edge of the 
bed.

				DON JAIME 
		Come here, Ramona. 

The servant lays down her duster and shyly goes over to the bed. 

				DON JAIME 
		Sit down, I'm going to need your help. 

				RAMONA 
		What's the matter?

She hesitates; he takes her hand, forcing her to sit down on the edge of the 
bed.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Sit down, woman, sit down. 
			(looks into her eyes gently) 
		You like me, don't you?
 
				RAMONA 
		I'd be really ungrateful, if I didn't like you, 
		sir; you took me and my little girl in when I 
		didn't know where to turn. 

				DON JAIME 
		Yes, yes, but there's no need to bring that up. 
		How far are you prepared to help me?

				RAMONA 
		Just say the word, sir, and I'll do anything.
 
Without a doubt there is something at the back of his mind but he wants to 
feel his way first.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Why don't you speak to her, Ramona? Women are 
		good at that sort of thing. Think of something 
		that will make her stay a few more days. 
			(again takes her hand 
			 and caresses it) 
		You are kind, Ramona! Speak to her. I know I 
		don't need to offer you anything, but, if 
		you're successful in this, I'll not forget you 
		or your little girl. 

				RAMONA 
		But sir, what can I say to her? And why should 
		she pay any attention to what a servant tells 
		her?
 
DON JAIME twists his hands anxiously.

				DON JAIME 
		You're right, but we must do something. 

He continues to think thoughts that he dare not express. 

				RAMONA 
		You must think what the best thing to do is, 
		and I'll help you to my utmost.
 
DON JAIME looks at his servant enigmatically, then speaks, without seeming to 
attach much importance to what he says.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Look in the cupboard. On the upper shelf, 
		there's a little blue bottle. There's no label 
		on it. You'll find some white pills inside. 

While DON JAIME is speaking the cupboard is shown in close-up, half-open. 
Among other articles there are some bottles on one of the shelves. RAMONA 
fully opens the cupboard door and takes one of the bottles. She turns to 
DON JAIME. 

				RAMONA 
		This one, sir?
 
DON JAIME nods in affirmation.

				DON JAIME 
		Yes, leave it there. Go on with what you were 
		doing. I'll tell you what to do later.
 
RAMONA goes out of the room. DON JAIME puts down his tray on the small 
breakfast table and gets out of bed. He is in pajamas. He puts on his 
slippers and goes to the window. He looks out at the drive.
 



THE PARK. 

Below DON JAIME'S window, RITA is jumping rope. VIRIDIANA is standing nearby. 
She stops the little girl. They talk for a moment, then the girl takes the 
rope and they begin to jump together very skillfully.
 
DON JAIME is watching the scene with the same enigmatic look on his face that 
he had a moment before and his eyes are full of tenderness.
 



THE DRAWING ROOM, DAYTIME. 

Close-up of a woman's hands peeling fruit. The peel unrolls in a long spiral. 
It is VIRIDIANA who is executing this work of art. She puts the fruit on a 
saucer and carries it to DON JAIME, who is sitting beside the fireplace where 
a good fire is blazing. On the little round table there are the remains of a 
meal which is just ending.
 
DON JAIME, his back turned three-quarters to the fireplace, is cleaning his 
pipes. He abandons them to thank his niece for her kindness. He admires the 
spiral.
 
				DON JAIME 
		I have never been able to do that. I'm too 
		nervous. 

VIRIDIANA, her back to the camera and to her uncle, gazes at the fire, lost 
for a moment in thought. She then turns and goes to DON JAIME and raises her 
arms in a gesture of incomprehension. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Why didn't you wake me? 

DON JAIME is eating the fruit. 

				DON JAIME 
		They say it's dangerous.

VIRIDIANA seems to be ashamed of her bout of sleepwalking. She reacts 
energetically. She is trying to dismiss the matter as unimportant. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I don't believe it. A few years ago -- the last 
		time I walked in my sleep -- they woke me up by 
		slapping my face. And you can see I'm still 
		alive. 
			(her face darkens) 
		What worries me is that I put ashes on your 
		bed.

DON JAIME is busy munching a piece of fruit.

				DON JAIME 
		Why? It's no more odd than anything else. 
		People who walk in their sleep don't know what 
		they're doing. 

VIRIDIANA, worried, shakes her head in disagreement. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		No, Uncle; ashes mean penance and death. 

				DON JAIME 
			(laughing)
		Then it's penance for you who are going to be a 
		nun; and for me, who am old, it's death ... 

VIRIDIANA sits down. RAMONA, who has come into the room a second before, 
serves a cup of coffee to DON JAIME.

				DON JAIME 
		If you like, I will come with you tomorrow to 
		the village when you leave.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Thank you, Uncle.

DON JAIME examines the pipe which he is filling.

				DON JAIME 
		This evening we must do something special by 
		way of a farewell.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Whatever you like.

DON JAIME offers a piece of fruit to his niece. She takes it.
 
				DON JAIME 
			(trying to appear detached about it)
		I should like you to do something for me. It's 
		an innocent sort of thing but I'm very set on 
		it.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Today I can refuse you nothing.

DON JAIME, surprised and happy, gets up and comes over to her.
 
				DON JAIME 
		You'll do what I ask, then?

VIRIDIANA, not at all alarmed, bites the fruit which her uncle has given her.

				VIRIDIANA
		Whatever you wish. I'm at your command. 

He looks at her with gratitude. At the same time he is sincerely modest 
and shy.
 
				DON JAIME 
		No, wait ... 
			(he smiles awkwardly) 
		What a silly thing! It's quite difficult for me 
		to tell you what it is.

He takes a mouthful of coffee and relights his pipe. He shakes his head as if 
he is sorry for himself.
 



THE PARK AT NIGHT. 

The façade of the house is lit by the moon. The windows of the only two rooms 
which show light stand out in the darkness. Slowly, the light fades in the 
window of Doña Elvira's room as if someone is carrying the light away. A dog 
is heard barking.

 


THE HALL. 

VIRIDIANA, who appears clothed in the wedding dress previously seen in Don 
Jaime's hands leaves Doña Elvira's room. She is holding a lit candelabra in 
her hand. She advances as if walking to the altar. Although the situation is 
not to her liking, she is a little amused by it. RAMONA helps by carrying her 
train. They move toward the sitting room.
 



THE SITTING ROOM. 

DON JAIME looks toward the door as the radiantly beautiful VIRIDIANA enters 
the room. His hand shakes; he is motionless for a second. Then he goes toward 
her, takes the candelabra from her, and gazes at her in admiration. RAMONA 
lets go of the train and goes off the frame.
 
				DON JAIME 
			(very tenderly)
		How strange you are! When I asked you to do 
		this favor for me you refused. You seemed 
		almost offended. And now, here you are, making 
		me so very happy all of a sudden. Thank you, 
		my child!

				VIRIDIANA 
			(a bit oppressed)
		I don't like masquerading, but as you see I 
		decided to give in to your whim.
 
DON JAIME frees the girl's hand; he looks bitter.
 
				DON JAIME 
		It's not a masquerade, nor is it a whim. 
			(silence for a moment) 
		I'm going to tell you something that few people 
		know. 

He takes a few steps with his fists clenched, stops, and turns to her.

				DON JAIME 
		Your aunt died of a heart attack, in my arms, 
		on our wedding night, wearing that dress, and 
		you look so like her ...
 
As he speaks he goes to the table, on which he places the candelabra. His 
words have moved the girl. DON JAIME follows her with his eyes.
 
				DON JAIME 
		You must think I'm mad.

				VIRIDIANA 
		No, Uncle, and now I'm pleased to have been 
		able to do this favor, because, although I 
		didn't think so at first, you are really a good 
		man.

VIRIDIANA adjusts her veil. DON JAIME has gone to another table near which 
RAMONA is hovering. He lights the spirit lamp under a samovar.

				DON JAIME 
		If you only knew ... When I was young I was 
		full of idealism. I wanted to do something on a 
		big scale for others, something to show my 
		great love for humanity. But as soon as I tried 
		to do something about it, I became afraid that 
		I would be laughed at and I felt like a fool 
		... and so I went back into my shell. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Wasn't that cowardice?

				DON JAIME 
		No, it isn't that, I can assure you. I wouldn't 
		be afraid in the face of real danger. I've 
		proved that to myself. On the other hand, if a 
		stranger visited me simply to say hello, I'd be 
		alarmed. 

There is silence for a moment. DON JAIME looks at VIRIDIANA almost lovingly.

				DON JAIME 
		I can't take my eyes off you. Come, let's sit 
		down. 

They sit side by side.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Uncle, you mustn't think that I won't be sad to 
		leave you. 

				DON JAIME 
			(eagerly)
		It's up to you entirely. Don't leave, then ... 

VIRIDIANA shakes her head.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Unfortunately ...
 
				DON JAIME 
			(discouraged)
		It's my fault. If I'd come to see you more 
		often, if I'd invited you here for holidays, 
		maybe everything would be different.

				VIRIDIANA
			(smiling)
		Maybe ...
 
DON JAIME gazes at his niece. His tension is at a peak. His whole future 
depends on what he is about to say; he is convinced of that.
 
				DON JAIME 
		There's one way you could stay. If I asked ... 

He stops in front of her; he lowers his eyes.

				DON JAIME  
		I mean .. . if I said to you ... 

He cannot go on. His mouth is dry and he is flushed, his muscles contracting. 

				DON JAIME 
		No, I can't ... I can't ...
 
VIRIDIANA looks at him in amazement.
 
RAMONA comes up to them. The servant has followed the conversation with 
interest and anxiety. She comes to her master's assistance. She quickly 
intervenes to address the girl in a firm tone.
 
				RAMONA
		What he wants, miss, is to marry you. 

This remark leaves the girl stunned.

				RAMONA
		Excuse me, sir, but I only said what you didn't 
		dare say yourself. 

DON JAIME is ashamed and looks at the servant reproachfully.

				RAMONA
		He loves you very much and he deserves to be 
		loved in return, because he is a very good man.
 
VIRIDIANA has not yet got over her surprise. Perhaps she is even more upset 
than he is. But, gradually, she frowns and shows her irritation.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		You're really serious?
 
DON JAIME answers in a determined voice but with his eyes lowered.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Yes, I don't want you ever to leave this house. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(getting up)
		You must be out of your mind. I've been so 
		happy these last few days -- now you've spoiled 
		it all. 

A silence. VIRIDIANA pulls off her veil angrily.

				VIRIDIANA 
		I think it would be better if I went to my 
		room.
 
She moves toward the door. DON JAIME rushes forward to restrain her.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Wait! Forgive me! Honestly, I really beg your 
		pardon. Stay a few more minutes! If you go now, 
		I'm afraid you'll always resent me. I promise 
		not to say anything that might annoy you. I'll 
		put some music on and we'll have a cup of 
		coffee.
 
DON JAIME makes a sign to RAMONA, who has gone over to the sideboard where 
the coffeepot is. VIRIDIANA is motionless, her head hangs, she refuses to say 
a word. RAMONA looks at DON JAIME, who signals to her almost imperceptibly. 
He goes to the phonograph and puts on a classical record, as usual. 
VIRIDIANA, head still down, has just sat down in the armchair. RAMONA fills 
the coffee cups. The phonograph begins to play.

				RAMONA 
		Take this, miss, it'll do you good.
 
RAMONA offers a cup of coffee to the girl. Gazing in front of her, she drinks 
almost the whole cup in a quick gulp.
 



THE SERVANTS' QUARTERS, NIGHTTIME. 

A very simple room on the ground floor of the house. An old sideboard and a 
rough kitchen table. MONCHO is sitting near the table mending a strap. Beside 
him is a piece of paper with lumps of sugar on it. He eats them with 
enthusiasm, munching noisily. The door opens and little RITA comes in, 
sobbing and frightened. She is barefoot, dressed in a skirt and an old ragged 
blanket which covers the upper part of her body. The old servant looks at her 
disapprovingly.
 
				MONCHO 
		Why are you crying?

				RITA 
		I'm afraid.
 
				MONCHO 
		Don't invent stories; go to bed.
 
				RITA 
		A black bull came.
 
				MONCHO 
			(laughing mockingly)
		A black bull! 

RITA approaches him. Her fear is disappearing. 

				RITA 
		It's a very big one. 

				MONCHO 
		Very, very?
 
				RITA 
			(with an air of defiance)
		Yes -- very, very big! 

				MONCHO 
		He couldn't get through the door, then? 

RITA shakes her head vigorously. MONCHO laughs with an air of "Now you've 
been caught in a barefaced lie." 

				MONCHO 
		Then how did it get in, silly?

The little girl thinks for a moment.

				RITA 
			(energetically)
		He came in through the cupboard. 

				MONCHO 
		You little liar! Get out of here!
 
RITA starts crying again. 

				RITA 
		I'm afraid.

MONCHO holds out a piece of sugar to her.

				MONCHO 
		Here! And call your mother if you're having 
		nightmares. Now go away and don't annoy me.

RITA accepts the gifts and lingers for a moment. The servant carries on with 
his work and finally the girl leaves, munching her lump of sugar.
 



THE SITTING ROOM. 

RAMONA puts down her cup. Then DON JAIME gives her his. They look at each 
other in silence. The music has stopped. DON JAIME goes to the phonograph and 
switches it on again. VIRIDIANA is still sitting, with her back to the 
camera, holding the empty cup in her hand. DON JAIME comes up behind her.
 
Close-up of VIRIDIANA's right hand holding the cup and saucer. Her fingers 
slacken and she lets go of them. DON JAIME holds his breath. He is just 
behind her. He stops to watch her reactions. He looks at RAMONA. Then he
speaks.
 
				DON JAIME 
			(in a shaky voice)
		You look very tired. Perhaps you'd better go to 
		bed.

There is no reply. VIRIDIANA'S head falls on her shoulders. DON JAIME comes 
toward her slowly until he is standing in front of her. He shakes her gently.

				DON JAIME 
		Viridiana! Viridiana! ... 

There is no reply.
 



THE HALL. 

The only light comes from the sitting room. At the end of the hall, the small 
silhouette of RITA appears as she comes upstairs. She carefully enters the 
hall, going in the direction of the sitting room, from which muffled voices 
are heard.
 
				DON JAIME'S VOICE
		Help me ...Take her by the legs. 

				RAMONA'S VOICE
		Lift her a little more, sir...
 
A pause. There is the sound of a chair being overturned. 

				DON JAIME'S VOICE
		Don't think too badly of me, Ramona; I only 
		want to have her close to me.
 
The camera reaches RITA. There is the sound of footsteps approaching the door 
and the child runs and hides herself behind the staircase, from where, 
timorously, she watches the scene. DON JAIME and his servant appear from the 
sitting room, carrying VIRIDIANA who appears to be dead. They go toward Doña 
Elvira's room and enter it. RITA comes out of her hiding place. Her curiosity 
aroused, she would like to see more but she is afraid of being discovered. 
She withdraws gradually and starts to go downstairs again.
 



INSIDE DOÑA ELVIRA'S ROOM. 

DON JAIME and RAMONA have laid VIRIDIANA motionless on the bed. RAMONA lights 
the candles. 

				DON JAIME'S VOICE
		That will be all, Ramona.
 
She obeys in silence.
 
VIRIDIANA remains lying on her back motionless. Her hair is slightly untidy, 
as it was a few minutes before in the sitting room. DON JAIME, feverishly, 
with an artist's meticulousness, begins to perfect his masterpiece. He 
crosses the girl's arms over her breast, puts her feet together, arranges the 
pleats of her dress. Lying thus, VIRIDIANA has the look of a lovely figure on 
a tomb.
 
The scene switches to the big tree which dominates the grounds. We see RITA 
going toward it, looking up from time to time at the feebly lit window of 
Doña Elvira's room. After a moment's hesitation, the little girl begins to 
climb the tree. As she ascends, the sound of a dog barking is heard in the 
night.
 



DOÑA ELVIRA'S ROOM. 

DON JAIME, sitting on the edge of the bed, stands up. For a moment he walks 
up and down in front of the motionless body, without taking his eyes off it. 
He stops for a second, then goes over and sits on the bed again. He caresses 
VIRIDIANA'S hair and forehead. He is terribly affected. Then he puts his arms 
around the girl's shoulders and lifts her gently into a sitting position. He 
draws his face close to hers and joins his lips to hers in a sweet, prolonged 
kiss.
 
The window, through which little RITA, who has reached the terrace, looks 
curiously in at the scene.
 
With trembling hands, DON JAIME unfastens the neck of VIRIDIANA'S dress. Her 
throat and the top of her breasts are exposed. The body he has been yearning 
for, now defenseless, is at his mercy. He is completely beside himself. He 
lays his cheek against VIRIDIANA'S breast. He feels the softness of the skin 
and its warmth. He kisses it once, twice. Suddenly, he reacts. He gets up 
with a start and looks, almost with terror, at the body. He sees the calm, 
serene expression on the girl's face. DON JAIME now passes from the realm 
of blind instinct to the realm of conscience. He realizes the meanness of his 
actions. Basically, he is a good and kindly man. Nevertheless his hands reach 
out to her again. Then suddenly, decisively, as if moved by fear of himself; 
he runs to the door, opens it, and goes out into the hall, taking the lit 
candelabra with him on the way. The music has not stopped throughout.

RITA climbs down from the branches of the tree and jumps to the ground. She 
sees her mother waiting for her and runs to join her. 

				RAMONA 
		What are you doing? 

				RITA 
		Don Jaime was kissing the lady.
 
RAMONA, with a somber look, stares at her child. Then she sees how RITA has 
come to know this. She frowns, annoyed.
 
				RAMONA 
		He only kisses her because she's his niece. 
		Don't I kiss you? You should be in bed.

				RITA 
		A black bull came into my room. 

				RAMONA 
		Be quiet. I'm going to put you to bed. 

She takes her by the hand and leads her to the servants' door. Again the 
barking of a dog is heard.

DON JAIME passes down the hall on his way to his room, walking quickly and 
nervously. He opens the door, enters, and closes it with a bang. Absolute 
silence then reigns in the house.
 



INTERIOR OF DOÑA ELVIRA'S ROOM, THE NEXT DAY. 

RAMONA, standing in front of the window, closes it. We hear the moaning voice 
of VIRIDIANA.
 
				VIRIDIANA (off) 
		I'm thirsty.

RAMONA gives her a glass of water from a bottle that is on the console. 
VIRIDIANA drinks it greedily. 

				RAMONA 
		How do you feel? 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I have a headache.
 
				RAMONA 
		That will soon pass. It's nothing.
 
VIRIDIANA notices her exposed body and covers herself modestly -- ill at ease.
  
				VIRIDIANA 
		What happened to me?

				RAMONA 
		You fainted last night after supper. The master 
		and I carried you here.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Have I slept long?

				RAMONA 
		Oh, you slept well; don't worry.
 
The sound of footsteps is heard approaching the bedroom. VIRIDIANA covers 
herself under the bedclothes. The door opens and DON JAIME appears. His face 
and the untidiness of his clothes show clearly that he must have spent a 
sleepless night. Seeing him, VIRIDIANA wants to protest but does not dare. 
DON JAIME comes in.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Leave us alone, Ramona. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(vehemently)
		Don't go!
 
DON JAIME makes a sign with his head and the servant obeys. She leaves the 
room, closing the door behind her. The uncle and niece remain, facing one 
another.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Leave me alone, uncle, please. I want to get up.
 
She receives no reply. The old man walks up and down the room, deep in 
thought, obviously not knowing how to begin. She insists, in an irritated 
manner.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		I have to go!

DON JAIME sits down on the edge of the bed. He answers very decisively. 

				DON JAIME 
		No. You can never go away now.

There is a sudden look of impatience, almost of real fear, in the girl's 
eyes. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Last night you promised never to speak of that 
		again. I beg you, leave me alone. 

The old man does not budge.
 
				DON JAIME 
		What could be more unlike than an old man who 
		lives alone and a young woman like you, 
		consecrated to God. However ... 

The girl, exasperated, almost sits up in bed.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(violently)
		Be quiet! I don't want to listen to you! Don't 
		you understand that I want to get dressed?
 
He, lost in thought, does not seem to hear her.
 
				DON JAIME 
		I forgot everything because of you, even the 
		passion that has kept me going all these years 
		... everything.

He gets up and walks around the room. VIRIDIANA would like to get up and 
force him to leave the room, but her state of semi-nudity prevents her.
 
				DON JAIME 
		I must have been mad. I thought that you would 
		agree to marry me, but naturally you refused. 
		And now it's the day that you must leave.
 
She looks at him, wondering how the discussion is going to end. DON JAIME 
comes to the bed and leans over her. He stares at her.
 
				DON JAIME 
			(coldly)
		I had to force you. 
			(pause) 
		That was the only way I could find to have you 
		in my arms.
 
VIRIDIANA evidences growing dismay and anxiety.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(shouting)
		You're lying.

				DON JAIME 
		No, it's true. 
			(speaking each word distinctly) 
		Last night when you were sleeping, I had you 
		all to myself.
 
She opens her eyes wide in horror. She can't believe what he's saying. She 
feels a cold sweat breaking out on her forehead. DON JAIME starts pacing back 
and forth again in front of her, sometimes staring at her and sometimes 
obstinately lowering his eyes.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Now you won't be able to go back to your 
		convent. You're not the same woman who left it 
		a few days ago. Now, you'll have to stay with 
		me here forever.
 
He stops comes back to the bed, and sits down. There is a pleading note in 
his voice.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Everything I have will be yours, and if you 
		don't want to marry me, if you prefer to live 
		as we have up to now, provided you're close to 
		me, I'll content myself with ...
 
She visibly takes time to understand her uncle's words. The blow is so hard 
that she hardly even reacts. Her plight moves DON JAIME to sympathy.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Think about it. Don't hurry. Think it over. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(with a start, almost shouting)
		Go away! Leave me alone.
 
She looks at him with hate and disgust. DON JAIME is affected. He hesitates. 
He starts to speak to her again but does not do so. He finally gets up and 
goes to the door. He feels VIRIDIANA's eyes, blazing with anger, upon him. He 
leaves the room, head hanging, shattered. Immediately, VIRIDIANA leaps out 
of bed, grabs her bag, and wildly begins to throw her clothes into it.
 



AT THE DOOR OF DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

RAMONA is waiting for DON JAIME, whom we see coming from the hall. He passes 
the servant without noticing her. He goes into the room. RAMONA goes up to 
him slowly.
 
				RAMONA 
		What did you say to her, sir?
 
He looks at her.
 
 				DON JAIME 
		The way she looked at me, Ramona! She hates me 
		now. I think I've made a great mistake. She's 
		going away, she's going away and nothing will 
		stop her.

				RAMONA 
			(without conviction)
		Speak to her again. Explain everything to her 
		seriously.

				DON JAIME 
		What for? She'll only look at me that way again 
		... I couldn't. You go. Perhaps she'll listen 
		to you. Try to convince her. 

				RAMONA 
		But what can I say to her, sir?

				DON JAIME 
		Tell her I lied, that I didn't take advantage 
		of her. 

Ramona looks at him, stunned, incredulous. He continues with sincerity.

				DON JAIME 
		I did mean to do it, Ramona. But I realized in 
		time what I was doing. I spent the whole night 
		turning my thoughts over in my mind ... and I 
		lied to her so she wouldn't go back to the 
		convent. 
			(taking RAMONA by the arm) 
		Go on, explain to her.
 
He almost pushes her to the door. She goes against her will, hesitating. He 
watches her from the doorway.
 



IN DOÑA ELVIRA'S ROOM. 

VIRIDIANA has dressed and is closing her bag. RAMONA comes in stealthily 
through the half-open door. VIRIDIANA's eyes are full of tears. In the 
background, RAMONA hesitates for a moment, then half turns and goes back 
quickly to DON JAIME's room.
 



IN DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

DON JAIME is leaning against the bed. RAMONA appears in the doorway.

				RAMONA 
		Sir, come right away.

DON JAIME straightens himself with a start. He stares at the servant for a 
second. Then he walks quickly to the door and goes out.
 



DOÑA ELVIRA'S ROOM. 
 
VIRIDIANA grabs her bag and is just about to go as her uncle enters. He 
blocks her way and locks the door, taking the key from the lock. The girl 
still has signs of tears on her face.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Let me pass!

				DON JAIME 
		You must listen to me before you go. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(angrily)
		I've listened to you long enough. Let me out.
 
VIRIDIANA goes back a couple of steps and puts down her bag. She is no longer 
afraid. She can hardly feel any emotion except anger mingled with disgust. 
DON JAIME remains standing beside her.
 
				DON JAIME 
		All that I said just now was a lie. I said it 
		so you wouldn't leave. I only molested you in 
		my thoughts ... I can't bear to have you leave 
		me, hating me like this. 
			(pleadingly) 
		Tell me you believe what I'm saying and I'll 
		let you go.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		You disgust me... even if what you say is true. 

				DON JAIME 
			(in a quieter voice)
		Then you won't forgive me?
 
The young woman's look shatters DON JAIME. With difficulty, VIRIDIANA, who 
has turned her back to her uncle, holds back the sobs which are choking her. 
After a moment's anguished silence, DON JAIME, resigned to his fate, holds 
the key out to the girl. She snatches it from him, takes up her suitcase, and 
makes for the door; she goes out without a glance in his direction.
 
As VIRIDIANA comes out of Doña Elvira's room into the hall, RAMONA is seen 
walking toward her away from the camera. DON JAIME's silhouette hovers on the 
threshold which the girl has just crossed. VIRIDIANA passes in front of the 
camera and her rushing footsteps are heard descending the staircase.




 
DOÑA ELVIRA'S ROOM. 

DON JAIME is looking out from the balcony. RAMONA enters, shaken by all that 
has happened. Hearing her footsteps, DON JAIME turns around. His expression 
is not what one would expect. He seems calm, without the slightest trace 
of disappointment. He seems even to be smiling. Now that what he has feared 
so much has occurred, he is recovering his former courage. The servant stops 
a few feet away, her eyes lowered, not daring to look at him. DON JAIME goes 
to her.
 
				DON JAIME 
		You believe me, don't you? 

				RAMONA 
		Yes, sir.
 
Her voice is low, utterly without conviction. DON JAIME notices this. He 
smiles.
 
				DON JAIME 
		Don't lie. You don't believe me either.

				RAMONA 
			(trying to find an excuse)
		It's only that ... It's all very odd, sir.
 
DON JAIME nods his head sympathetically. 

				DON JAIME 
		It's all right, my girl, it's all right.

He makes for the hall. RAMONA goes to the unmade bed and examines the sheets, 
as if trying to discover the truth. Seeing nothing, she sits on the edge of 
the bed with a thoughtful air.
 



THE PARK. 

THE COACHMAN finishes preparing the carriage. Some yards away VIRIDIANA is 
waiting, seated on a stone bench with her back to the camera. Her bag is at 
her side. Nearby, RITA is playing diabolo. The toys DON JAIME gives her 
indicate how old-fashioned he is. 

				RITA 
		See how high I can throw it!

VIRIDIANA does not even look around. In order to attract her attention, RITA 
collects the spool which has fallen back onto the string. She turns it and 
puts it into place with the aid of one of the sticks. 

				RITA 
		Look! You can't do that!

As VIRIDIANA remains sunk deep in thought, RITA loses heart and tries to 
interest MONCHO, who has just picked up VIRIDIANA's bag and is taking it to 
the carriage.

				RITA 
		Look! Moncho! Look how high it is! 

As usual, he answers her in a surly manner. 

				MONCHO 
		Let me have a little peace, won't you?

RITA goes on playing without paying any attention to his bad temper. MONCHO 
approaches VIRIDIANA. 

				MONCHO 
		When you're ready, miss. 

The girl stands up and goes to the carriage.
 



THE BALCONY OUTSIDE DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

DON JAIME watches his niece's departure. As VIRIDIANA goes to the carriage,
RITA says something to her, but she merely caresses her head with her hand as 
a sign of farewell. She gets in and the coachman gives the horse the whip. 
The little girl waves goodbye, then begins to run after the carriage.
 
DON JAIME sadly watches the carriage disappear. But he recovers quickly and 
his face takes on a calm, almost indifferent look. He goes to the desk which 
is in the corner of the room and sits down at it. He rubs his forehead. The 
writing materials on the table are lying in disorder. Several months must 
certainly have passed since he has been near his desk. Carefully, he begins 
to make order out of the chaos. He rubs his fingers along the table to see 
if there is any dust on it. Seeing that it is clean, he smiles at the thought 
of Ramona's conscientiousness. Finally, he takes a pen and a sheet of 
notepaper and begins to write. He smiles quietly, rubbing his beard dreamily. 
He appears to have thought of something that pleases him very much.
 



THE VILLAGE SQUARE. 

Under the arcade which borders the square, VIRIDIANA is waiting for her bus 
to arrive; its approach is heralded by the sound of its engine. She goes to 
the bus stop, where others are waiting. As the bus stops, passengers get off 
and those who were waiting get on. The driver comes up to VIRIDIANA.
 
				DRIVER
		I'll take your bag, please, miss.
 
At this moment, an important-looking middle-class gentleman -- the MAYOR --
comes along the arcade, followed by two uniformed POLICEMEN and a PEASANT.
The group comes up to VIRIDIANA, to whom the man holds out his hand.
 
				MAYOR
		How do you do, Miss Viridiana! 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Is anything the matter, Mr. Mayor? 

				MAYOR
		You cannot leave ... 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(surprised)
		Why not? 

				MAYOR
		There's been an accident. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Where? 

				MAYOR
		Come with me.
 
He takes her by the arm. VIRIDIANA neither protests nor asks any further 
questions.
 



DON JAIME'S ESTATE. 

A car stops in the drive. The MAYOR gets out, followed by the group which was 
with him in the village. All come toward the camera, eyes trained on the 
branches of the big tree beside which Rita likes to play. MONCHO rushes up to 
meet them.

Near the tree, RAMONA and her daughter, clinging to one another watch the 
people arrive.
 
The big tree, through whose foliage hang the feet of a man. Close-up of 
VIRIDIANA, who has just got out of the car and sees the body. Overcome, she 
leans her forehead against the car door and remains like that for a moment, 
motionless and silent.
 
Close-up of the branch from which DON JAIME is hanging. The only part of him 
that is visible is the back of his head. The body itself is outside the 
frame. The rope which is tied to the branch has a wooden handle. It is 
Rita's jump rope.
 
 


THE TURRETS OF THE HOUSE AND THE TREES OF THE PARK. 

The same picture of little RITA's legs skipping under the big tree as at the 
beginning of the film.

MONCHO, who is leading a horse, stops upon seeing RITA. He lets go of the 
animal's halter and goes up to the little girl. Brutally, he takes hold of 
the jump rope and tries to snatch it from her. RITA struggles with him 
fiercely.

				RITA 
		Give it to me. It's mine! 

The old man elbows her aside.
 
				MONCHO 
		I'll box your ears if you don't show some 
		respect for the dead! You mustn't play under 
		this tree. 

				RITA 
		Don Jaime loved to watch me skip. 

The servant finally seizes the rope and throws it away. 

				MONCHO 
		If something terrible happens now it will be 
		your fault. 

He leaves. As soon as his back is turned, RITA picks up the rope and with the 
same liveliness begins to skip. The picture of her legs again.
 



VIRIDIANA'S ROOM. 

Close-up of her black wooden cross and the crown of thorns hooked across the 
end of the bed. The room has a red brick floor and white-washed walls.
 
VIRIDIANA, who undoubtedly did not want to keep the room she was in before, 
is now in a less elaborate room on the ground floor. The furniture consists 
of an iron bed, two chairs, and a white wooden table. In the corner there is 
a very simple dressing-table without a mirror. VIRIDIANA, with bucket and 
broom, is washing the floor. The young woman's face is more drawn and she is 
no longer smiling. Something seems to have happened to her: she appears 
youthful, and with a certain balance that she lacked before.
 
RAMONA comes into the room and puts a tray on the table. She lifts off the 
napkin, revealing the meal of a plate of vegetables, a glass of milk, and a 
piece of bread.
 
				RAMONA 
		You aren't eating enough. I've given you a 
		glass of milk, and this evening I'll bring you 
		some meat. 

VIRIDIANA stops working and goes to wash her hands in a basin on the dressing 
table.

				RAMONA 
		You don't look at all well! 
			(Viridiana does not answer) 
		The mayor told me that he's dealing with the 
		problems you were talking about. You can go to 
		the village when you want to. It'll do you good 
		to see the world.
 
In the distance a car is heard: it stops. RAMONA looks out the open window 
... Two nuns pass outside and into the building. One of them is the MOTHER 
SUPERIOR of VIRIDIANA's convent.
 
VIRIDIANA goes to the door. Unruffled, she watches the MOTHER SUPERIOR enter. 
RAMONA moves back to let the visitor pass and then leaves the room.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		Good morning. You weren't expecting me, were 
		you?

				VIRIDIANA 
		Mother.
 
The MOTHER SUPERIOR looks at VIRIDIANA with compassion. She shakes her head 
with pity.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		You must have suffered, my child! 

The young girl goes up to her, but instead of throwing herself into her arms 
weeping, as her Superior seems to expect, she bows deeply and calmly kisses 
the crucifix on the Mother Superior's rosary. This calm somewhat disconcerts 
her visitor.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		Ever since yesterday, when we heard by chance 
		about the tragedy, we have been very anxious 
		for you. Why didn't you write? I would have 
		come immediately. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I had so many things to think about!

				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		A suicide is horrible. I know. But you should 
		have told me. 

She looks around her and seems to approve of the simplicity of the room.

				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		I talked for a few minutes to the parish priest 
		in the village and he told me how it happened. 
		Everybody is asking why this horrible offense 
		was committed against Our Lord. Do you know the 
		reason?
 
VIRIDIANA remains standing.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		I only know that my uncle was a grave sinner 
		and I feel guilty for his death.

The MOTHER SUPERIOR'S face darkens. She moves toward VIRIDIANA.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		How can you say that! You, responsible for the 
		suicide of a man? I want a complete confession 
		from you.
 
VIRIDIANA lowers her eyes.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(firmly)
		I'm not going back to the convent; therefore 
		I'm no longer under obedience to anyone.

She says this calmly, almost humbly, but there is an element of revolt in her 
voice which angers her SUPERIOR, who struggles to control herself. The 
SUPERIOR swallows hard and speaks without raising her voice. 

				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		Is there some grave impediment which prevents 
		you from taking your vows? There must be 
		something. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I have nothing to reproach myself for. All I 
		know is that I've changed. With all my 
		strength, which is not much, I will follow the 
		road that the Lord has shown me. One can also 
		serve outside a convent.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		Are you aware of the pride there is in what 
		you're saying?
 
VIRIDIANA does not answer. She continues to look down. The nun changes her 
tone. She tries irony.
 
				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		What great plans are you thinking of dedicating 
		yourself to now?
 
VIRIDIANA looks her in the eye.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		I know my own weakness, and whatever I do will 
		be humble. But, however little it is, I want to 
		do it alone.

There is a moment of silence while the MOTHER SUPERIOR tries to follow
VIRIDIANA's train of thought. Her amazement prevails over her indignation. 
She does not know what to think. Finally she speaks, very dryly.

				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		Very well. As you won't let me help you, I must 
		leave you. I'm very sorry I came and disturbed 
		you. Goodbye. 

She half turns and goes to the door.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Mother! 

The MOTHER SUPERIOR stops.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Forgive me if I have offended you.

				MOTHER SUPERIOR 
		You are forgiven. Goodbye. 

She goes out, closing the door behind her.
 



THE CHURCH SQUARE OF THE VILLAGE. 

It is flooded with sunlight. A little old man dressed in rags half-walks, 
half-runs, up to a group of beggars as shabbily dressed as himself who are 
standing in the doorway of the church. The beggars are DON AMALIO, blind, 
about 45; EL PELÓN (BALDY), a rather alarming character of about 40; ENEDINA, 
who is carrying a two-year-old girl in her arms; REFUGIO, a woman of 
uncertain age, showing obvious signs of pregnancy; and finally, the little 
old man who has just arrived and who answers to the nickname "El POCA".
 
DON AMALIO, who has the hard, sharp features of a countryman, is sitting with 
his back against the stone steps of the church, his face absorbing the sun. 
Near him lies a long white stick which acts as a guide when he walks. In his 
arms, he holds ENEDINA's second little girl, who is about a year old. As 
people pass him on their way into the church, he calls out sonorously for 
alms.
 
				PELÓN 
		Why isn't she coming? 

				POCA 
		She has already crossed herself. 

				REFUGIO 
		She's a very firm believer.

There is a silence. Some of them look toward the church door.
 
				ENEDINA 
		I've heard she's even going to pay us to go and 
		live with her.
 
Two women pass.

				DON AMALIO 
		Kind people! Don't forget a poor blind man. 

In the background, VIRIDIANA comes out of the church. The beggars are in 
confusion. POCA grasps the blind man by the arm and pulls him to his feet.

				POCA 
		There she is. Hurry up, come on. You've had it 
		if you totter around like that and fool with 
		the kids.

VIRIDIANA joins them. She takes the child from AMALIO. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Give the little girl to me. Come here, 
		sweetheart. Are you ready?

				PELÓN 
		When you are, miss. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Good, then let's go!

POCA, who is leading the old man, comes up to VIRIDIANA. He looks at her and 
speaks to DON AMALIO.
 
				POCA 
		She has the face of an angel. What a pity you 
		can't see her. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Right, let's go. 
			(to Poca) 
		And keep the compliments to yourself. I don't 
		like them.
 
The beggars get their belongings together, then join up.
 



IN ANOTHER LITTLE SQUARE OF THE VILLAGE. 

Two more beggars are waiting: one is DON ZEQUIEL, an old man of about sixty 
whose full white beard gives him the look of a patriarch; the other is a man 
of about forty, with a black beard. He moves with the help of a stick and is 
known by the name of HOBBLY. He is drinking from the fountain of the small 
square when the group led by VIRIDIANA comes toward them.
 
				DON ZEQUIEL 
		Here they come.
 
HOBBLY turns away from the fountain to look at them.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Are you the other two? 

				DON ZEQUIEL 
		Yes, miss, that's us, yes. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Good, come with me.
 



INTERIOR OF DON JAIME'S SITTING ROOM. 

Close-up of an oil portrait of Don Jaime.
 
				JORGE'S VOICE (off)
		What a strange man! I wish I knew what he was 
		like.
 
				LUCIA'S VOICE (off) 
		As far as you're concerned, worthless. You can 
		see how much he cared about you.
 
The people who are speaking come into view. JORGE, Don Jaime's son, no more 
than thirty, is a well-built energetic type. Not overimaginative or a 
dreamer, he is a practical man of action. His custom-made clothes look 
recently cleaned and pressed. LUCIA is younger. She is pretty and pleasant 
but there is nothing to distinguish her from many other women. She too seems 
dressed in her Sunday best.
 
				JORGE 
		I'm not at all bitter about it. Anyone can love 
		and forget. But ... Why did he acknowledge me 
		at the last moment? What was going through his 
		mind?
 
RAMONA, who is coming out of Don Jaime's room, is listening. She looks at the
portrait tenderly.
 
				RAMONA 
		He was very good. Better than some people would 
		think. 

				JORGE
		Why did he kill himself? 

RAMONA tries not to show anything of what she knows, or her sorrow. 

				RAMONA 
		I don't know, sir.
 
				JORGE 
			(nodding)
		One shouldn't be alone the whole time. 
			(looks at Lucia; laughing) 
		I'm not like him, am I? 

He goes to the harmonium. LUCIA follows him. 

				LUCIA 
		Not in that way; you're always looking for 
		company. 

				JORGE 
		Why do you say that? Perhaps the young girl is 
		a bit jealous. 

				LUCIA (off)
		I know what I mean.

JORGE pedals the harmonium and runs his hands across the keyboard, causing a 
series of discords. RAMONA cannot bear this profanation and interrupts.

				RAMONA 
		Don't play, sir.
 
He takes his hands from the keyboard and looks at the servant in 
astonishment.

				RAMONA 
			(respectfully)
		I beg your pardon, sir. The master used to play 
		here by the hour. It was a real delight to 
		listen to him. 

She closes the harmonium slowly. JORGE leans against the instrument and 
stares at her, looking half the seducer and half ironic. The servant, 
disturbed, slips away.
 
				RAMONA 
		If you don't mind, I'll go get the other 
		suitcase. 

LUCIA, looking sulky, goes past them onto the balcony. JORGE follows her.

The balcony looks out on a wasteland: scorched terrain, with some scrub and 
weeds; some trees and among them some dilapidated outhouses of the old farm. 
There are mountains in the background.

				JORGE 
		Look at these beautiful fields! And behind 
		those pines the fields, dried up and abandoned. 
		There's so much to do here and it's all mine. 
		We won't have time to get bored.

LUCIA smiles. JORGE takes the young girl by the shoulders and draws her to 
him. He wants to embrace her, but she pulls away. 

				JORGE 
		Aren't you happy? 

She seems rather sad, in fact.
 
				LUCIA 
		Yes. But I don't know ... I wish I hadn't come.
 
Obviously, her lover is everything to her, but she fears that this unexpected 
prosperity might separate them. Something happening in the drive attracts 
Lucia's attention and she points.
 
				LUCIA 
		Look at that.
 
JORGE leans over the balcony and looks at what is happening below.

 


THE PARK. 

VIRIDIANA is coming into the park followed by her troupe of beggars. The 
beggars, in little groups, are looking around with curiosity. POCA and the 
blind man DON AMALIO are among them. POCA is telling the blind man what he 
sees.
 
				POCA 
			(full of admiration for the house)
		It's very big ...
 
The blind man hits the ground with his stick.

				DON AMALIO 
		So much the better. We'll all fit. How many 
		floors are there?
 
				POCA 
		Two.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		Are there many windows? 

				POCA 
		Lots. It's got balconies and two big towers. 

				DON AMALIO 
			(sententiously)
		Then it's a respectable house.
 
The old servant MONCHO comes out of the house and approaches the arrivals.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Have you repaired the windows of the 
		dormitories?
 
				MONCHO 
		They shut all right now. And the blankets are 
		ready.
 
ENEDINA and REFUGIO bring up the end of the line. 

				REFUGIO 
		That miss is as good as gold. 

				ENEDINA 
		She's very good, but a bit of a simpleton.
 
The group stops near the house.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		The men will sleep on one side, the women on 
		the other, but we will eat together. We'll try 
		to get you some decent clothes tomorrow. Moncho, 
		show them where they'll be. I'll take the 
		women. 

JORGE and LUCIA have come out of the house and are looking with curiosity and 
astonishment at this tattered group. They go up to VIRIDIANA.

				JORGE 
		Viridiana. 

VIRIDIANA turns and notices the couple without showing any surprise. JORGE bows.

				JORGE 
 		Miss Viridiana ... 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Are you Jorge? 

She shakes the hand he is stretching out. 

				JORGE
		Jorge, Don Jaime's son, at your service.

				VIRIDIANA 
		I've been expecting you; I got a letter from 
		the lawyer.
 
She looks at LUCIA.

				JORGE 
			(smiling)
		This is Lucia; she's a good girl. You'll get to 
		know each other very quickly. 

They shake hands.
 
Little RITA has come out of the house and rushes toward the beggars, brushing 
past LUCIA. The beggars are waiting near the house. MONCHO goes through them 
to get in front. Old DON ZEQUIEL paternally puts his hand on RITA's head. 

				DON ZEQUIEL 
		What's your name?
 
				RITA
			(lively)
		Don't touch me! You're going to sleep in the 
		farmyard with the chickens!

MONCHO gestures to the men to follow him.
 
				MONCHO 
		Get moving! Anyone who pokes around where he 
		shouldn't be will pay for it.

They begin walking, but the blind man is offended by these words. 

				DON AMALIO 
		Listen, although we may be poor, every man has 
		his dignity, brother.

				MONCHO 
		Don't "brother" me: there aren't any scum in my 
		family. 

PELÓN, who doesn't inspire sympathy, understands the allusion. 

				PELÓN 
		Well now, even the servants put on airs here, 
		don't they?

MONCHO stops and turns around.
 
				MONCHO 
			(angrily)
		Do you want me to smash your face? 

VIRIDIANA, who is following with the women, hears the exchange and goes up to 
the beggars.

				VIRIDIANA 
		What's going on, Moncho?

				MONCHO 
		This louse is looking for trouble. 

PELÓN hardly lets him finish. 

				PELÓN 
		You runt.
 
MONCHO is about to attack but VIRIDIANA stops him. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(to Pelón)
		Don't talk like that!

				PELÓN 
		I'll talk the way I want to. I've had enough of 
		this. 

The blind man, guided by the voices, is angered by PELÓN's lack of respect 
and hits him with his stick.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		That'll teach you some manners. 

				PELÓN 
		Blind, shit! You can see now.
 
He attacks DON AMALIO. All of them intervene to separate the two. VIRIDIANA 
fearlessly stands between them.
 
				VIRIDIANA
		(shouting with authority)
		In you go! Moncho, lead the way! 
			(to Pelón) 
		You stay here. 

				MONCHO 
		But, miss ...
 
JORGE and LUCIA are anxiously watching the absurd proceedings. JORGE is about 
to intervene but LUCIA stops him. 

				LUCIA 
		Leave her.
 
The beggars, both men and women, are calmer. The blind man is muttering. 
PELÓN looks at VIRIDIANA venomously.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Keep calm, Moncho. And you...
			(to the blind man)
		...don't be quarrelsome!

MONCHO, unwillingly resigning himself to the situation, goes forward followed 
by the beggars. VIRIDIANA calmly goes up to PELÓN.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Would you mind telling me what I did wrong to 
		you to deserve your insults?

				PELÓN 
		I've had a gutful of this.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		If you want to stay you'll have to exercise a 
		little self-control, and be a bit more humble 
		to everybody.
 
The beggar shrugs his shoulders contemptuously.
 
				PELÓN 
		If that's the way, it's better to leave. 

He half turns and walks away a few steps, but then he hesitates a moment and 
turns around again, facing the young woman.

				PELÓN 
		Give me something to go on with. 

Viridiana reaches in her pocket and gives PELÓN some money.

				PELÓN 
		Because we are poor, without it ...

He leaves. In the background, JORGE and LUCIA go back into the house.
 
The beggars split up into two groups. On the left the men are led by MONCHO 
and on the right are the women; VIRIDIANA joins them.
 



THE SITTING ROOM AT NIGHT. 

Close-up of a basin of hot water which is still steaming. In the water are 
the feet of JORGE, who has rolled up his trousers. He is dressed for the 
country. He is sitting on Don Jaime's special armchair and smoking one of his 
pipes. LUCIA, sitting on a small low chair in front of him, has just finished 
polishing his boots. They are silent. She looks at him now and then.
 
				LUCIA (off) 
		Are you tired?
  
 				JORGE 
		I nearly walked my legs off today. 
			(rubs his legs, points to the basin) 
		That has done me good.

There is a silence. RAMONA comes in with a towel in her hand. She hands it to 
JORGE and then looks at LUCIA, who goes on wiping the boots which have been 
waxed.
 
				RAMONA 
		Why don't you let me do that, miss? 

				LUCIA 
			(dryly)
		Because I've got him into bad habits.
 
JORGE begins to dry his feet. The maid bends down to pick up the basin, gets 
up, and turns. She goes to the door but stops before going out.
 
				RAMONA 
		Whenever you're ready I can serve supper. 

				LUCIA 
		Right, we'll have it now.
 
The maid leaves the room after glancing at the little table which is already 
laid. JORGE, suddenly in a bad mood, flings his towel to the floor. LUCIA 
looks at him in surprise.
 
				LUCIA 
			(harshly)
		What's the matter with you? 

				JORGE 
		Nothing.

				LUCIA 
		Why the bad temper?
 
				JORGE 
		It's Viridiana. She's getting on my nerves.
 
LUCIA has finished his shoes and puts them in a corner.
 
				LUCIA
			(shrugging)
		She's mad.
 
				JORGE 
		No, not mad at all: she's rotten with religion. 

				LUCIA 
		Let her do what she wants. She doesn't bother 
		us in any way. She minds her business and we 
		... 

They fall silent. LUCIA goes up to JORGE and looks at him meaningfully.

				LUCIA 
		Do you know what I think? What's annoying you 
		is that she pays so little attention to you.
 
He looks at her furiously, which seems to indicate that she has touched a 
sore spot ... She moves away to the other side of the room and, at that 
moment, RAMONA comes in carrying a tureen of soup. LUCIA leaves the room.
 
JORGE goes over to the table, sits down, and opens his napkin with 
irritation. RAMONA has put the soup tureen on the edge of a sideboard.
 
JORGE turns his back to her so that she has only to turn her head to see him. 
She gives him a look that is both tender and submissive. She is obviously 
disturbed by the presence of Don Jaime's son. Without taking her eyes of him, 
she goes to pick up the tureen again and prepares to bring it over to the 
table, but at that moment LUCIA's voice is heard.
 
				LUCIA 
		Ramona!
 
She starts as if she has been caught doing something wrong. For a moment, she 
tries to catch the tureen, which is about to fall, but only succeeds in 
making matters worse. The soup tureen smashes onto the floor, its contents 
spreading out.
 
				LUCIA 
		That's the last straw! What were you looking 
		at, woman? Look what you've done!

JORGE has got up to look at the disaster. He looks at the maid, nodding his 
head in commiseration.
 
				JORGE 
		So, Ramona!
 
				LUCIA 
		Run and get something to mop it up with, 
		quickly. 

RAMONA obeys, fleeing. LUCIA begins to pick up the pieces.

				LUCIA
		That woman's getting more and more stupid every 
		day. 

JORGE sits down again, looking resigned.
 
 				JORGE
		What of it?
 



THE BEGGARS' REFECTORY: NIGHTTIME. 

The beggars are eating at a rough table made of planks. Surprisingly, they 
are respectfully dressed. Their clothes are worn out but clean. Their 
appearance is relatively washed and tidy. DON AMALIO, POCA, DON ZEQUIEL, 
HOBBLY, ENEDINA, and REFUGIO are there; also three other wretches, a man and 
two women. One of the women is a DWARF, the other, whom we will call the 
GARDENER, is a nondescript, middle-aged woman. The last character, who is 
named PACO, is a man of about fifty with a shaggy beard but no scar or 
physical deformity. They are all eating heartily.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		When I wasn't so miserable I used to sell pigs. 
		Begging your pardon, I was more honest than my 
		holy Mother. 

				POCA 
			(swallowing)
		So you didn't come from the poorhouse! 

The blind man puts his plate on the table and grasps his stick. 

				DON AMALIO 
		I'll hit whoever said that.

DON AMALIO seems to mean what he says.
 
				ENEDINA 
		Don't pay any attention to him, Don Amalio, 
		he's a rogue. 

Other voices are raised.

				VOICES
		Good evening, miss.
 
VIRIDIANA has just appeared on the threshold with two new guests, the woman 
SINGER and the LEPER.
 
				DON ZEQUIEL 
			(standing up with respect)
		Benedictus!
 
VIRIDIANA smiles at this incongruity. The SINGER looks distrustfully at the 
others; she didn't expect such a great number. The LEPER holds back as if 
uncertain of the reception he will receive. All keep silent for the moment 
and the noise of eating is heard. VIRIDIANA makes the new guests sit down and 
gives them each a spoon and a plate.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Make room for your new companions. You sit 
		there, you there. I guess they're hungry, 
		aren't they? 

				SINGER
		God will reward you.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Have you eaten well? Did you like it?
 
				DON ZEQUIEL 
		I don't want to criticize the saintly miss who 
		is so good to us, but I would take the liberty 
		of saying that the beans were acid.

				REFUGIO 
		What does that mean? 

				POCA 
		Sour, idiot.
 
				REFUGIO 
		Don't pay any attention to them, they're 
		peasants.

VIRIDIANA silences them.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		If Don Zequiel says the beans were bad it must 
		be true. We'll do something about it tomorrow.

They all look at the LEPER with disgust. VIRIDIANA helps him to something and
the man begins to eat hungrily. VIRIDIANA places the bread basket near him.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(smiling)
		Now I've got some good news for you. From 
		tomorrow on, everyone will have some work to do.
 
This is a disagreeable surprise. They look at each other. POCA is 
flabbergasted and terrified.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Don't worry, you won't be asked to do anything 
		impossible or anything you won't want to do. I 
		only want you to have a bit of a change and to 
		take some exercise.
 
				ENEDINA 
		I'm a cook, miss, I'm good at roasts and 
		vanilla puddings. Last year I made pastry for 
		the Companza people. They can still remember 
		it.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Good. 

She goes up to each of them in turn. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(to the Dwarf) 
		You can help me with the accounts. 

				DWARF
		Yes, miss.
 
				HOBBLY
		I can paint religious pictures ... Before, I 
		used to be able to write, but now with this 
		leg I've forgotten ...

				PACO
		I can weave hemp, but with the rheumatism in my 
		fingers ... 

				VIRIDIANA 
		What about you, Manuel?

				POCA 
		I'm only good at making people laugh.

				VIRIDIANA 
		That's all right; we all laugh here, but not at 
		you; I'll see to that.

The LEPER is eating beside the woman GARDENER who sees him stretch out his 
arm for a piece of bread.
 
				GARDENER 
		I've got green fingers. The priest will tell 
		you ... 

				VIRIDIANA 
		So you won't get bored here, there'll be more 
		than enough for you to do!
 
The GARDENER suddenly points to the LEPER's arm.
 
				GARDENER 
		Look! It's disgusting.
 
He immediately conceals his arm. Everybody looks at him. 

				HOBBLY 
		Let's see it.
 
POCA, standing up to see better, tries to get a look at the sores. 

				GARDENER 
		That's leprosy.

				REFUGIO 
		Throw him out, miss! We're all clean here.
 
VIRIDIANA goes up to the LEPER, who has stood up, and calmly takes his arm. 
He resists a bit, but she succeeds in examining a sore. At her gesture, they 
all fall silent and watch with revulsion.
 
				LEPER 
		They're varicose veins, miss, but some days I 
		can't take care of them.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Are you sure it isn't contagious? 

				LEPER 
		They told me it isn't at the hospital.

				VOICE
		Don't listen to him, miss. I've known him for a 
		long time.

The LEPER looks at his companions.
 
				LEPER 
			(angrily)
		They're varicose veins. It isn't leprosy. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(to all)
		I'll take him to the doctor tomorrow. Come on 
		now, sit down and go on eating. And you, look 
		after him as if he were a sick brother. Be 
		understanding. Now finish eating and then go 
		to bed. Everyone in bed by eight o'clock!
 
VIRIDIANA shows the newcomers where to sleep. With varied inflections the 
beggars bid her good night. HOBBLY goes to the door, opens it for VIRIDIANA 
and wishes her good night. The LEPER sits down again in his place. VIRIDIANA 
goes out.
 
HOBBLY turns back and approaches the LEPER. He pushes him with his stick and 
motions him to get up.
 
				HOBBLY 
		If you don't disappear, I'll make holes in your 
		belly. 

				LEPER 
			(frightened)
		You're not the one to make me move. 

HOBBLY pulls out a knife.

				LEPER 
		The miss, she understands, she told me I could 
		stay.
 
There is a scuffle.
 
				ENEDINA 
		Hit him if he doesn't get out! 

The blind man beats the table with his stick.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		Calm down, people, calm down. Somebody will get 
		hurt. If anything happens, we'll all be thrown 
		out. 

				SINGER
		Out, the turd!
 
The LEPER relents and begins to leave.
 
				LEPER 
		Okay, that's it, I give in, but I'm staying on 
		the grounds. All together you'd be able ... 

He begins to walk away, goes a few paces, but then turns around. He indicates 
the table, ashamed.

				LEPER 
		Give me something for tomorrow morning.

The GARDENER, more compassionate than the others, takes a piece of bread and 
hands it to him at arm's length. The LEPER puts it in his pocket and goes to
the door.

The blind man, who has not left his place, has ENEDINA at his side. He is 
pawing her thighs. They whisper.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		I'll come to you tonight. 

				ENEDINA 
		No, the children sleep with me. 

				DON AMALIO 
		Give them to Refugio.

				ENEDINA 
		No, I don't want to because they yell. And I've 
		got news for you too.

				DON AMALIO 
		Then I'll get you in the fields tomorrow ... 

				VOICE (off)
		Pass me the salt.

They all get up. HOBBLY sees RITA's jump rope on the table and takes it to 
tie up his trousers.
 



VIRIDIANA'S ROOM. 

The room is lit by a candle. The young girl is kneeling on the floor like a 
countrywoman, telling her beads. There is a knock at the door.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Who's there?
 
Without answering, JORGE comes into the room with a cigar between his lips. 
Looking annoyed, VIRIDIANA gets up quickly.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Jorge. You frightened me. What's happening to 
		you? 

				JORGE
		It's about time we spoke to each other, isn't 
		it? 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Well... is it so urgent?

				JORGE 
		If I wait until tomorrow, it'll be the same as 
		yesterday and the day before and all the other 
		days. When you're not with your poor people, 
		you're praying or you disappear, I never see 
		you.
 
Both furious and ill at ease at being surprised, VIRIDIANA rushes to the 
chest of drawers on top of which is her wooden cross, the crown of thorns, 
and the hammer. She quickly hides them in a drawer.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		What's the matter?

				JORGE (off) 
		I want to put in some electricity, change the 
		habits ... well, to make some improvements. 

Viridiana listens as if this were foreign to her.

				JORGE (off) 
		Then there's the land. It really hurts me to 
		think of its not producing anything.

				VIRIDIANA 
		I don't know anything about these things, 
		Jorge ... 

				JORGE 
		But you have a right to let us know what you 
		think. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I'm not interested. Do what you think's best. 

She steps forward as if to show that the conversation has come to an end.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Is that everything?
 
JORGE has no intention of ending the conversation so abruptly. He goes on,
irritably.
 
				JORGE 
		No, it isn't; there's much more. It seems 
		absurd for us to be staying here so near each 
		other in this situation without knowing each 
		other.

He plants himself near her and leans on the bed.

				JORGE 
		What do you know about me?

				VIRIDIANA 
		I know that you used to work with an architect. 

				JORGE 
		And do you know that my mother and I had to 
		suffer? If my father had bothered himself a 
		little more about us, I'd be an architect now.
 
She does not reply and so does not encourage him to talk further. JORGE looks 
around with curiosity. He sits on the bed and is suddenly aware of its 
hardness. He punches the blanket. There is a board underneath instead of a 
mattress. JORGE underlines his discovery with irony. 

				JORGE 
		I don't understand how you can like being 
		alone so much. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I'm not like you, you have your wife.
 
This gives JORGE an opportunity to hurt her. He gets up and goes up behind 
her.
 
				JORGE 
		We're not married. I don't need anybody's 
		blessing to live with a woman. 

VIRIDIANA does not blink. If she is embarrassed she does not show it.

				JORGE 
		I see that you ... I ought to go. Good night.
 
He goes to the door.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(dryly)
		The next time you come, knock first and wait 
		until I tell you to come in.

This remark, made perfectly naturally, produces an unexpected reaction in 
JORGE and restores all his aplomb. Before leaving he runs his eyes over the 
young woman's body. With a mocking smile he blows a puff of smoke toward her 
and leaves.

VIRIDIANA locks the door with the key and brushes the smoke away with her 
hand. She goes to the window and opens it wide, to let in some air. Then she 
moves to the center of the room again, while the camera frames the open 
window.
 



THE PARK. 

The SINGER is heard, off, humming a couplet. Close-up of a sheet of tin plate 
on which is painted in a very primitive style the scene of a miracle: a sick 
woman lying on a bed, with the Virgin and two angels on one side. The painter 
is adding the last touches to the face of the sick woman. We see the artist's
arm, then his face: it is HOBBLY. A few feet away, sitting on an old 
wheelbarrow, is the SINGER, who is posing for him. Behind her ENEDINA is 
hanging out laundry on a line.
 
				HOBBLY 
		I'll put some yellow in her face to show she is 
		ill. 

				SINGER
		Hurry up, I'm cramped all over. 

				HOBBLY 
		It's nearly finished, sweetheart.
 
In the background, from near the house, DON AMALIO approaches, led by REFUGIO.

 				SINGER 
		I don't like having to stay still for so long.

				HOBBLY 
		It seems to me that you ought to know damn well 
		how to swing your...
 
VIRIDIANA appears a few yards behind the painter with POCA, both come 
forward to inspect the painting. POCA looks at the masterpiece and begins to 
laugh.
 
				POCA
			(referring to the sick woman)
		She looks like a sick marrow! 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Don't pay any attention to him. It's very good. 

				SINGER 
		I don't like having to be the Virgin.

				HOBBLY 
		You ought to be the one in bed. I'd like to ask 
		you, miss, to pose...
 
HOBBLY stands up in his turn.
 
				VIRIDIANA
			(amused)
		Me?

				HOBBLY 
		Come on, miss. Just so the Virgin can be really 
		pretty. 

VIRIDIANA doesn't seem convinced. HOBBLY insists.

				HOBBLY 
		It won't take but a minute. It's a votive 
		offering for a lady who was cured just when she 
		was dying of fever. Our Lady of the Helpless 
		granted her a favor. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Do you have great devotion for the Virgin?
 
HOBBLY sits down again.
 
				HOBBLY 
		I'm not a bigot, miss, but everybody has his 
		own beliefs ... and then ...with this terrible 
		thing ...
			(points to his legs)
		... if I didn't have faith ...
 
VIRIDIANA is sitting on a wheelbarrow. Nearby REFUGIO is adjusting DON 
AMALIO's clothes.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(to Refugio)
		I must know when you expect to give birth. 

				REFUGIO 
		Why?

				VIRIDIANA 
		Heavens! So the doctor can be warned. 

				REFUGIO 
		In that case in about four months, but I can't 
		tell you exactly. 

				POCA 
			(chiming in insolently)
		She doesn't even know who the father was. She 
		said that it was night and she couldn't even 
		see his head. 

				REFUGIO 
			(vexed)
		I didn't expect you to scream it from the house 
		tops.
 
				DON AMALIO 
			(with authority)
		Shut up. You shouldn't speak like that in front 
		of our holy protector who is a well-bred person.
 
VIRIDIANA gets up and arranges REFUGIO's clothes. She is astonished. She had 
never imagined that such people existed. She finds this contact with 
decadence both seductive and horrifying.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(to Refugio)
		I'm very sorry for you. Have you any other 
		children!

				REFUGIO 
		No, miss, it will be the first. Do you mind...?
 
VIRIDIANA sits down again. At that moment DON ZEQUIEL, the bearded patriarch, 
and the DWARF arrive. HOBBLY continues working. VIRIDIANA is posing. The 
others are silent.
 
				DWARF 
		We're going to the village, miss ... 

				DON ZEQUIEL 
		With God's and your own permission. 

				ENEDINA 
			(to Viridiana)
		They must bring me some potatoes, bacon, and 
		rice.
 
VIRIDIANA gives DON ZEQUIEL some money.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Take it and be careful not to be as late as you 
		were yesterday.

				DON AMALIO 
			(with a sickly smile)
		Could they bring me some tobacco?

				POCA 
		No, miss. Smoking makes him spit and feel ill. 

				DON AMALIO 
			(furiously)
		Smoking makes me feel ill? It's these filthy 
		fag ends. I won't mention in this company 
		what's upsetting you.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(conciliatory)
		That'll do. Bring the tobacco and I'll 
		distribute it.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		Thank you, miss.
 
The DWARF and DON ZEQUIEL leave.
 
				HOBBLY (off)
		Come over here and see the picture.
 
He has finished his work. VIRIDIANA gets up and goes over to see the result. 
All of them gather around to look at the artist's work.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		It's very good.

				HOBBLY 
		Thank you; but it's missing something. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		That doesn't matter; I like it.
 


A ROAD BORDERING ON DON JAIME'S PROPERTY. 

JORGE and his FOREMAN are standing near an electric pole. They are measuring 
the ground with a tape.
 
				JORGE 
		How much is that?

 				FOREMAN 
		Fifteen yards. 

				JORGE 
		That's fifteen by seven? 

				FOREMAN 
		That's it. 

				JORGE 
		Good.
 
JORGE jots the figures down in his little notebook and rolls up the tape. They 
are both walking toward the road. A little covered wagon pulled by a mule is 
coming along the road in their direction. The wagon passes. Inside it, under 
the canvas, are TWO POLICEMEN in uniform and another MAN. Behind them the 
driver's back is visible. A dog is attached to the axle of the wagon by about 
three feet of string.
 
The dog runs along panting, its tongue hanging out. It seems to be exhausted 
and can hardly keep up with the mule. If it stopped, it would be pulled along 
and strangled by the rope.
 
The dog recedes from the camera, framed between the two threatening wheels of 
the wagon. It reaches JORGE and passes him and his companion. The wagon stops 
at a fork in the road about a hundred yards farther on. JORGE goes toward it, 
intrigued. As he approaches, the TWO POLICEMEN jump down and speak to the 
PEASANT who owns the wagon.
 
				ONE POLICEMAN 
		Thanks, pal, see you later. 

				PEASANT
		Goodbye: if you ever need anything ...
 
The TWO POLICEMEN go off. The PEASANT goes in back of the wagon to inspect 
the brakes. JORGE, sickened by the cruelty of the scene, comes up to the 
wagon. He is frowning and speaks harshly to the peasant.
 
				JORGE 
		That animal can't take any more. Now that the 
		wagon's empty, why don't you let him ride?
 
The PEASANT straightens up and stares at JORGE.
 
				PEASANT
		It's for people!

				JORGE 
		Then let him go and he'll follow you. 

				PEASANT
		And let him get run over by somebody else?
 
The apparent contrast between the PEASANT'S cruelty and his care for the dog 
bewilders JORGE. He bends down and strokes the animal.
 
				JORGE 
		I'll buy him.

The PEASANT looks at him for a moment. He is perplexed but reacts 
immediately.
 
				PEASANT
		He's good at rabbiting and he knows it. When 
		we're in the country, if he doesn't hunt he 
		doesn't get fed. 

				JORGE
		How much do you want for him?

				PEASANT 
			(hesitating)
		I wasn't thinking of selling him, but if you 
		want ... I'll leave it to you.

JORGE pulls some notes out of his pockets and gives two to the PEASANT.
 
				JORGE 
		All right, untie him.

The PEASANT does so and hands the string, which is used as a lead, to JORGE.

				PEASANT 
		Thank you, and God keep you and bless you. 
			(taps the wagon and addresses the driver)
		Get moving. 

He gets onto the wagon and sits down where the policemen had been. The wagon 
moves off. 

				PEASANT 
			(to Jorge) 
		And remember, the less he eats, the better he 
		runs. 

				JORGE 
			(as the cart is going away)
		What's he called?
 
				PEASANT
			(shouting)
		Canelo!

On hearing his name, the dog tries to jump toward his master, but JORGE pulls 
him back with the string.

				JORGE 
		Be quiet! Where are you going? Come here, 
		Canelo! Canelo! Come on!
 
JORGE and his companion leave the road and cross the field toward their 
workers. The wagon continues on its way. Another carriage comes from the 
opposite direction toward the camera. Neither JORGE nor the FOREMAN pays any 
attention to it.
 
The second carriage, with another miserable dog attached to its axle, passes 
in front of the camera. The two men do not notice the unhappy dog as the cart 
goes by.
 
In the field, two or three WORKMEN are loading a truck with stones. Beyond 
them, about twenty FARM WORKERS are clearing the land for plowing. It is full 
of stones and brushwood. They are wielding hoes and mattocks and tearing out 
bushes and weeds. JORGE and the FOREMAN stop to watch the men work.
 
				FOREMAN 
		Have you thought of what you want planted yet? 

				JORGE
		The fields have been left so long; with a good 
		manuring anything will grow.

				FOREMAN 
		It's for wheat. We've always grown maize in the 
		strip above the vegetables.

				JORGE
		And in the vegetable plot? 

				FOREMAN 
		That's good land.

Suddenly, the young man sees VIRIDIANA passing nearby on the road. VIRIDIANA 
comes up, followed by POCA. She is holding a white box which she had near her 
when she was posing for HOBBLY's picture a short time before. JORGE goes
forward to meet her.
 
				JORGE 
		What a miracle, you let yourself be seen. Have 
		you come to look at the work?
 
POCA passes discreetly, giving JORGE a wide berth to avoid meeting him.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		I've told you before I'm not interested in this.
 
JORGE looks around with the satisfied expression of a landlord.
 
				JORGE 
		The best thing my father left me was the land. 
		You can see the result of the work on it, and 
		if you helped me it wouldn't take long to 
		change it even more. 

VIRIDIANA does not reply and tries to move on. 

				JORGE 
			(to Poca) 
		What are you doing here? Get out. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Leave him alone.

				JORGE
		You won't get much done with those people. 
		Those times are over! You ought to let me kick 
		them out. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Do they worry you that much, then?

				JORGE
		They worry me a great deal, and especially 
		because of you.
 
VIRIDIANA keeps walking. JORGE walks beside her. He still has the dog with 
him.

				JORGE 
		There's no point in helping some of them when 
		there are so many others.

				VIRIDIANA 
		I know perfectly well how little I can do. What 
		I want to do is give passing beggars a roof, 
		some food, and a bit of human warmth.

				JORGE 
		Is that all you're going to devote your life to? 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I'm not sure yet. I've had a shock recently, 
		and I'm only beginning to get over it. Perhaps 
		I'll go back to the convent one day.
 
At this point there is a strange intermittent noise as if a bit of tin plate 
were being knocked against stones. There is also shouting.
 
				WORKMEN'S VOICES 
			(shouting)
		Put your things somewhere else! Get out of here!
 
VIRIDIANA looks toward the commotion. The LEPER comes up. He is afraid to 
come too close to her because of the people who are there. He is pulling 
along an empty can which is attached to his belt by a piece of string: it is 
the can hitting against the stones which is making the noise. On hearing the 
shouts of the workmen, the beggar reacts with gestures of contempt.

				LEPER 
		Swine.
 
				VIRIDIANA (off)
		Why are they shouting at him? Haven't they any 
		pity?

JORGE, who has witnessed this scene, shrugs his shoulders.
 
				JORGE 
		I don't know what's going on; ask him.

VIRIDIANA goes to the LEPER. The cruel mocking of the workmen can still be 
heard. The FOREMAN goes up to JORGE, smiling. 

				FOREMAN 
		These rascals are demons. They've tied a can to 
		him. Because they find the poor guy revolting, 
		they make him walk with this can so they know 
		when he's coming.

VIRIDIANA, with POCA just behind her, goes up to the LEPER and unties the can 
while she is talking.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Why did you come here, José? I told you where 
		to go until you're cured.

José the LEPER kicks the can away angrily.

				LEPER 
		The weather is wonderful, the sun is warm, so I 
		keep on walking and walking ... then you see ...

VIRIDIANA doesn't reproach him, on the contrary she replies gently.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		How are you today? 

				LEPER 
		Things seem to be getting better.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Hold your arm out. You can't hope to be cured 
		quickly. You heard what the doctor said. If it 
		had been seen to in time ...This'll take time. 
		But with the help of God, we'll pull through. 

They go up to a clump of trees. POCA keeps his distance and then hides behind 
a bush. JORGE, very unhappy, watches them go. But he recovers immediately and 
goes up to the workmen. VIRIDIANA sits down on a big stone and makes the 
LEPER sit beside her.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Stretch out your arm.

While he is obeying, she takes a tube of ointment and some gauze from the box 
she is carrying. She begins to treat the arm. During this process the LEPER 
talks.
 
				LEPER 
		It all started one unlucky day. A punishment 
		from God because one windy day I was with a 
		woman and after that I started to be punished. 
		You're the first good woman I've seen; if all 
		women were as bad as the priests say, you 
		wouldn't take care of me. You, bad? He shakes 
		his head and laughs stupidly. 

VIRIDIANA does not seem to hear and goes on with her task calmly.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Are your parents alive?

				LEPER 
		Parents? Nobody cares a damn, what's the use of 
		them! 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Don't say that.

				LEPER 
		Right, I won't say that, but I still think 
		they're no use.
 
POCA, who has been listening to the conversation, comes out of hiding and 
intervenes angrily. He waves his arms around like a windmill.
 
				POCA 
		Don't pay any attention, miss; this man's no 
		good. He wants you to catch it too. At church, 
		he puts his arm into the Holy Water and seems 
		to say would to God all those damn women got it. 
		The priest won't let him in.
 
The LEPER gets up mad with rage. The young woman can hardly hold him back.
 
				LEPER 
		You'll soon find out, you liar! 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Stop this!

				LEPER 
		He's lying through his ass! 

				POCA 
		Ask the priest, miss.

				VIRIDIANA 
		That's enough. 
			(to Poca) 
		Go join the others, and don't come back here. 
			(to the leper) 
		And you'll have to control your temper.
 
Peace reigns. POCA leaves, annoyed. VIRIDIANA finishes bandaging the LEPER'S 
arm. He bows his head, not daring to protest, in spite of his urge to do so.
 



DON JAIME'S ROOM AT NIGHT. 

An oil lamp is burning. JORGE is sitting at a table holding an old gold 
watch. He is winding it carefully. His face expresses curiosity and pleasure.
 
				JORGE 
			(looking at the watch)
		This must have been my grandfather's.
 
LUCIA is getting ready for bed. She is sitting on the edge of the bed in her 
nightgown. There is an atmosphere of cold conjugal routine. 

				JORGE 
		If you wake first, wake me up. 

				LUCIA 
		What are you going to do? 

She gets up and comes over to him.

				JORGE 
		What I do every day, but I want to do it 
		earlier. 

				LUCIA 
			(slightly reproachful)
		You're happy, aren't you! 

JORGE inserts a little gold key into the watch. 

				JORGE 
		Shouldn't I be? You, on the other hand ... 

				LUCIA 
		I'm bored. I'm alone all day and I don't know 
		what to do. 

				JORGE 
		You should have enough to do in this house ... 
		Come here and listen to this.
 
She comes to him and he puts the watch to her ear, winding a little spring. A 
tiny chime is heard. He is pleased with his discovery. She listens, frowning. 
The tiny musical sound stops.
 
				JORGE 
		What are you thinking about?

				LUCIA 
			(harshly)
		That your cousin is more to your taste.
 
JORGE is startled. He hesitates, then tries to change the subject.
 
				JORGE 
		She isn't my cousin.

				LUCIA 
		It doesn't make any difference what she is: you 
		like her. 

JORGE puts the watch in a box.

				LUCIA 
		I had a feeling I shouldn't have come here. I'd 
		better get out, fast ...
 
She goes back to the bed. JORGE, who does not like the way this conversation 
is going, wants to divert it.
 
				JORGE 
		We ought to talk about that some other time. 

She gets into bed. JORGE, paying no attention, continues to play with the 
watch.

				JORGE
		How in hell does it wind up?
 
				LUCIA 
		I think I'd better go tomorrow.
 
				JORGE 
		Don't be a fool! Why rush away from something 
		which couldn't happen?
 
He hums. LUCIA slips between the sheets. 

				LUCIA 
		You see how much you like her?

 				JORGE 
		That's life. Some people are brought together, 
		others are separated. What can we do, if that's 
		the way it happens? 

LUCIA, under the blankets, sobs.

 				JORGE 
		Lucia! Don't cry! Come on, darling, don't cry 
		like that!
 
He is still very busy with his father's trinkets. He suddenly comes across a 
small jeweled crucifix. With his left hand, he gets hold of the little blade 
which is set into one side of it: the crucifix is in fact the handle of a 
dagger.
 
				JORGE 
		What a thing! Where did Father find that?

LUCIA is still sobbing. JORGE tries to open a watch case with the point of 
the dagger.
 



A SMALL WOOD A HUNDRED YARDS BEHIND THE HOUSE. 

There are several buildings, mostly in ruins, all scattered. One of them 
serves as the living quarters and dormitory of the beggars. Another building,
in equally bad repair, is some sort of storehouse where a group of about 
fifteen MASONS and LABORERS are working. A truck is standing in the yard with 
a load of materials; the FOREMAN is supervising the unloading. JORGE comes 
out of the house with Canelo, still on the end of the string.

				JORGE 
			(pointing to the truck)
		Hold on, Ramon! Is there time to make another 
		trip?
 
				FOREMAN 
		No, sir, it's nearly six o'clock. 
			(to the workmen unloading the truck) 
		Okay, let's get a move on! 
			(to Jorge) 
		When are you leaving?
 
				JORGE 
		Tonight, but I'll be back tomorrow afternoon.
 
The village clock chimes six.




ROWS OF ALMOND TREES. 

Most of VIRIDIANA's beggars are sitting there on the ground or standing 
around. DON AMALIO comes from the path, led by the DWARF. From afar, the six 
strokes of the village clock finish chiming. VIRIDIANA arrives. She claps her 
hands.
 
				VIRIDIANA
		The Angelus.
 
Hurrying, the beggars kneel, with the exception of HOBBLY who remains 
standing, leaning on his stick. VIRIDIANA also remains standing. The LEPER, 
seeing what is happening, moves quickly past the group and goes away. In a 
quick montage, there follow alternated shots of the beggars praying quietly 
under the blossoms of the almond trees and the work in full swing: close-up 
of cement slapped onto a dilapidated wall, a tub full of water in which some 
lime falls, sand being sifted, logs piling up on the ground, a wheelbarrow 
full of stones being tipped out, planks beings sawed. The sounds underline 
the contrast: the otherworldly muttering of VIRIDIANA and the beggars; the 
very actual and rhythmic sound of the activity in the work yard.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(praying)
		The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary.
 
There is a subdued murmur in which the voices of women, who are more familiar 
with the words, are prominent.
 
				BEGGARS  
		And she conceived by the Holy Ghost.

				ALL
		Hail Mary full of grace the Lord is with thee 
		blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is 
		the fruit of thy womb Jesus. Holy Mary Mother 
		of God pray for us sinners now and at the hour 
		of our death. Amen.
 
The camera moves to dump truck noisily emptying its load onto the ground. Two 
MASONS are stacking bricks. The beggars are heard in the distance reciting 
the Hail Mary. JORGE walks in front of a heap of cement and sand, where there 
are two MEN shoveling.
 
				VIRIDIANA'S VOICE 
		Behold the handmaid of the Lord. 

				BEGGARS' VOICES 
		Be it done unto me according to thy word. Hail 
		Mary full of grace ...

				VIRIDIANA'S VOICE 
		And the word was made flesh. 

				BEGGARS' VOICES 
		And dwelt among us. Hail Mary full of grace ...
 
The camera shifts back to VIRIDIANA in prayer. She prays without ostentation, 
very simply. A few feet away from her, HOBBLY leans on his stick, 
contemplatively.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God.

				BEGGARS
		That we may be made worthy of the promises of 
		Christ.
 
The BEGGARS cross themselves, stand up, and go away. VIRIDIANA walks in the 
direction of the work yard.

JORGE sees the young woman coming toward him smiling. He feels sorry for her. 
To a man of action like himself, his feet well on the ground, VIRIDIANA seems 
to be behaving absurdly: but he is strongly attracted by her gentleness and 
beauty.

As the two young people approach each other, the WORKERS and the FOREMAN, who 
have finished work and changed their clothes, come out of the building and 
pass in front of them. They wave to JORGE and leave.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(indicating the building 
			 and the beggars' house)
		Are they going to work here too? 

				JORGE 
		Don't worry. Nobody's going to disturb you. 

His eyes run quickly over her body. He can't hide the ironic reaction he 
experiences upon completing this examination.

				JORGE 
		Don't forget the meeting with the lawyer. The 
		car will pick you up tomorrow morning. 

				VIRIDIANA 
		I'll be ready.
 
				JORGE 
			(nodding toward the dormitories)
		Do you intend to stay here for some time?
 
The BEGGARS pass to and fro.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Yes. Why?

				JORGE
		You can come and live again in the big house if 
		you want. Now that I'm alone, I can settle 
		down anywhere.
 
VIRIDIANA lowers her eyes shyly. 

				VIRIDIANA
		And ...your friend?

				JORGE 
		She's left.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Is she coming back? 

				JORGE 
		No.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Why?
 
JORGE stares at her with a certain amount of insolence.
 
				JORGE 
		Why does any man leave a woman? 

She shrugs and purses her lips, indicating her lack of experience.

				JORGE 
		If you don't understand, I don't want to 
		explain it to you. You're too cold and 
		religious; you'd be shocked. 

VIRIDIANA blushes. He bursts out laughing and walks off toward the work yard.
 
				VOICE (off) 
		Miss!

Old MONCHO and the COACHMAN, looking awkward, are waiting nearby. VIRIDIANA 
goes up to them. We can see RAMONA'S back behind them. She is fidgeting with 
a bunch of keys. She seems to be waiting for something.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		You have decided to leave, Moncho. 

				MONCHO 
		Yes!

				VIRIDIANA 
		I can't do anything to make you stay? These 
		people annoy you, isn't that it? 

The two men don't answer but look down.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Well, what are you going to do?
 
JORGE passes near the group and goes to RAMONA. 

				COACHMAN 
		He's coming to live with me, miss.

				VIRIDIANA 
		If that's what you want ... But I'm very sorry 
		you're leaving. Thank you for everything, 
		Moncho. God bless you. 

She shakes hands with them. They go off toward the village. RAMONA hands 
JORGE the bunch of keys when he comes up to her. Without saying anything, 
they go off toward the house.
 



THE ATTIC AT THE TOP OF THE HOUSE. 

There is a bizarre collection of junk: an ancient worm-eaten piano, some old 
suitcases, some broken chairs, various boxes, unsteady-looking piles of 
crates, a burst mattress, a once elegant couch, now torn and dirty. The 
voices of JORGE and RAMONA are heard coming from another room.
 
				JORGE'S VOICE 
		Obviously! Here's the missing furniture! What a 
		state it's in! Father must have been a peculiar 
		type. 

				RAMONA'S VOICE 
		I don't think the master ever came here. 

They both appear. JORGE is carrying the keys RAMONA gave him earlier, in the 
field. He looks at the couch cover.
 
 				JORGE 
		And this chest?
 
				RAMONA 
		There are some curtains and drapes, but they're 
		all very old.

A cat makes its way through the piled-up crates.

				JORGE 
		There must be some rat's nest in there! I'd 
		like to ask you something. You worked for my 
		father for seven years, didn't you? Did he ever 
		mention me?

RAMONA's eyes follow him tenderly.

				RAMONA 
		I don't know; I can't remember. But I'm sure he 
		loved you.

 				JORGE 
		Why?
 
				RAMONA 
		You wouldn't be here otherwise.
 
				JORGE 
			(hitting a chair)
		These chairs are in good condition. With a 
		little varnish and some new covers this one 
		will be quite presentable. 

JORGE continues to poke around. Again, RAMONA looks at him with the willing 
submission evident before. JORGE goes to another corner of the attic where, 
on one side, sacks are heaped against the wall. The camera frames a door and 
a few beams. JORGE goes up to a heap of sacks.
 
				JORGE 
		What are these sacks doing here?
 
He half lifts them.
 
				RAMONA 
		I don't know -- they've always been there. 

				JORGE 
		That's stupid! Plaster! It can still be used. 

He goes up to another pile of sacks. Ramona follows him, fascinated.

				JORGE 
		And those! That's sand. As I won't be here 
		tomorrow, tell the foreman to take them.
 
He shows the sacks to RAMONA. Turning suddenly, his eyes meet hers. He 
understands everything. Frightened by the discovery, she avoids his glance. 
JORGE begins to laugh.
 
				JORGE 
		What's wrong with you, woman? Why are you 
		looking at me like that?
 
RAMONA tries to escape, but the young man catches her by the arm. He pulls 
her around to face him and looks at her for a moment, in silence, smiling. 
Then he holds her chin.
 
				JORGE 
		Do you know something, Ramona? If you took some 
		trouble, you'd be quite pretty ... Small teeth, 
		a good mouth -- what more do you want?

Without further ado, he kisses her on the lips, not even bothering to hold 
her. Feeling his lips on hers, she shuts her eyes. Her eyelids quiver. She 
gives herself up to the long awaited pleasure. JORGE looks around.
 
				JORGE 
			(pulling her with him)
		Let's sit down a moment.
 
They go over to a pile of sacks.

Close-up of the piled-up furniture. The camera frames a big rat busy by an 
old sack. With a bound, the cat is on it.
 



IN FRONT OF THE HOUSE. 

A car stops near VIRIDIANA, who is waiting. The driver gets out.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Are we leaving?

				DRIVER
		Don Jorge said he'd be waiting for you at the 
		lawyer's at four o'clock.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		Good. 

She goes up to DON ZEQUIEL and the SINGER, who are waiting nearby. 

				VIRIDIANA 
			(to Don Zequiel) 
		You're the most responsible here. I'm handing 
		them over to you. Make sure they all behave 
		themselves.
 
				DON ZEQUIEL (off)
		Don't worry, miss, I'll look after things. 

				VIRIDIANA (off)
		Do you want anything else?

				DON ZEQUIEL (off) 
		Bring me a flute if you see one. I'd like to 
		learn music.
 
RAMONA, together with RITA who has her face bandaged as if she has a 
toothache, comes out of the house and shuts the door. 

				RITA 
			(weeping)
		They're going to hurt me.

				RAMONA 
		Well if they hurt you, put up with it! Let's 
		go! 

RAMONA and RITA get into the car, followed by VIRIDIANA. 

				BEGGARS' VOICES 
		Good luck, miss!
 



THE KITCHEN. 

ENEDINA is cradling her yelling baby in her arms.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		Keep quiet. These miserable brats only get in 
		the way. 

				ENEDINA 
		You'd like me to kill them?

				POCA 
		With the life that's ahead of them they'd be 
		better off being sent to Paradise.

ENEDINA goes up to PACO and hands him the child.
 
				ENEDINA 
		Put her in the sun with her sister.
 
PACO takes the little girl, who is still crying, and leaves. 

HOBBLY, who has been standing at the door watching the car go, comes back 
into the kitchen rubbing his hands.

				HOBBLY 
		Now to knock off a couple of lambs. We'll have 
		them roasted. 

This idea obviously amazes ENEDINA. She looks at the blind man and POCA, who 
are enjoying themselves.

				HOBBLY 
		What do you think of that?

				DON AMALIO 
		I'll go along with it ... if it's being 
		respectful enough. 

				ENEDINA 
		What will the lady say? 

				POCA 
		She won't even know.

				ENEDINA 
		If everybody agrees, but to make a roast takes 
		four hours. 

				HOBBLY 
		Well, what's all the hurry?
 
The blind man turns to ENEDINA.
 
				DON AMALIO
		Didn't you say you know how to make vanilla 
		pudding?
 
				ENEDINA 
		Yes, yes.
 
				HOBBLY 
		You hear that, Poca? Get the eggs and milk. 
		I'll see to the lambs.
 
POCA takes a pail and PACO hands him a basket. The blind man sits down on a 
bench and breaks out into merry idiotic laughter.
 



THE PARK. 

REFUGIO, the pregnant woman, is busy collecting dead wood. The SINGER is 
sitting near her on a bench. She sings a few bars of a song in a grating 
voice, accompanying herself on a guitar. DON ZEQUIEL is not far away. Unlike 
her normal self, REFUGIO is very active. She moves with great ease. The 
SINGER interrupts her song and addresses her companion.
 
				SINGER 
		Don't kill yourself, Refugio! Can't you see 
		we're alone? 

				REFUGIO 
		What's that got to do with it? 

				SINGER 
		What's the good of working? 

DON ZEQUIEL, scandalized, goes up to them.
 
				DON ZEQUIEL 
		You keep quiet. The miss left me in charge here 
		and nobody is going to upset things. You, stick 
		to your singing! 

				SINGER 
		Look at us now! What made you think that I was 
		up to something?
 
There are shouts from the house. They look around. The DWARF and the GARDENER 
are gesturing from the doorway. 

				GARDENER 
		Don Zequiel! Refugio! Come here! 

				DON ZEQUIEL 
		Damn women! How did you get in there? 

				DWARF 
		Through a back window.

REFUGIO and the GARDENER rush toward the house. DON ZEQUIEL follows them 
uncertainly. 

				DON ZEQUIEL 
		Where are you going? 

The SINGER has reached the door.
 
				SINGER 
		Come here, Don Zequiel. I was here with the 
		lady. There're wonderful things inside!

DON ZEQUIEL seems unconvinced.
 
 				DON ZEQUIEL 
		If it's only to have a look ... 

He moves toward the house.

 				DON ZEQUIEL 
		But don't touch anything. Leave everything 
		where it is! 

The three beggars, one behind another, itching to have what has been 
forbidden them, join the others in the house.
 



THE FIELD. 

Close-up of a dove working its way awkwardly over the grass. The LEPER, who 
is following it, throws himself forward and traps it in his hands.

				LEPER 
		Little dove from the south, you're hurt. What 
		are you called? 
			(stroking it) 
		My little dove! My dear dove! My darling, sweet 
		dove! 

Suddenly, he is struck on the shoulder by a stone. He gets to his feet. 
Without realizing it, he has come to the place where the men are working. The 
laborers have seen him and are warning him in this crude way.
 
				FIRST WORKER 
		Get out!

				SECOND WORKER 
		Come any nearer and I'll bust your head in! 

				THIRD WORKER 
		Get lost.

One of them picks up a stone and hurls it at him. The LEPER, furious, makes 
obscene gestures at them and pours out insults while he rubs the place where 
the stone hit him.

				LEPER 
		You bastards! I hope you get what I've got!

But while he is shouting, he is making off. Foaming with rage, he disappears 
into the trees, jabbering incoherently.

 


INTERIOR OF THE SITTING ROOM. 

Close-up of the portrait of Doña Elvira. While the camera pulls back to 
include the portrait of Don Jaime, the comments of the beggars, who have just 
come into the house, are heard off.

				SINGER
		That woman, the one who looks like our Miss 
		Viridiana, she's the wife of the man who hanged 
		himself.

Among the first group of beggars, DON ZEQUIEL is in the act of filling one of 
Don Jaime's pipes.
 
				DON ZEQUIEL 
		Think of hanging yourself, with all that money! 

				SINGER 
		He must have had asthma. All those loaded old 
		men have asthma.
 
They stop examining the picture and begin exploring the drawing room. The 
women go up to the cupboard which holds tablecloths and silver. The SINGER 
opens it. They stand, gaping.
 
				DWARF 
		What stuff!

				GARDENER 
		Jesus, Mary, and Joseph.
 
The SINGER takes out a heavily embroidered tablecloth which she has seen 
among others at the bottom of the cupboard. DON ZEQUIEL, smoking the pipe, 
comes up to look.
 
				SINGER 
		Look at that. How's that for a tablecloth! 

				GARDENER 
		Come on, let's put it out.
 
Excited, she puts it on the table and begins to spread it. The others help 
her.
 
				REFUGIO 
		That must have cost a fortune. At least a 
		thousand. 

				SINGER 
		A thousand! More like ten thousand! Can't you 
		see it's French lace?

				DON ZEQUIEL 
		Go on, fold it up, you're going to spoil it. 

				SINGER 
		Keep on smoking and shut up. We're not doing 
		any harm. It's not as bad as smoking his 
		tobacco.

				REFUGIO 
		Don Zequiel's right. If those people come back 
		and we don't hear them, God help you.

				GARDENER 
		They won't get back before tomorrow. I heard 
		them tell the driver.
 
				REFUGIO 
		If you haven't eaten on lace like that, you 
		haven't lived.
 



THE DINING ROOM THAT NIGHT. 

Close-up of a shaking hand trying to pick up a full glass of wine from the 
laid table. The sumptuous tablecloth is stained with wine and grease. The 
hand knocks the glass over. Scraps of talk are heard.
 
				VOICE (off)
		Watch it, Don Zequiel!

				REFUGIO 
		Don't worry! We'll all clean it up; it'll be as 
		right as rain.
 
The camera reveals an extraordinary scene. The BEGGARS are sitting at the 
table; the LEPER is by himself at a small adjacent table. They have got 
through two roast lambs, the remains of which are scattered over the table. 
There is an extraordinary confusion of glasses, plates, and bottles; the 
"guests" are unhampered by any formality, and some of them -- like the 
patriarchal DON ZEQUIEL, who has just knocked over the glass -- are really 
drunk, others only "lit-up."
 
				PACO
		Pass me that bottle. 

				SINGER 
		Go on, Don Amalio!
 
				DON AMALIO 
		They've got a real hen house here! You can't 
		hear yourself speak.

				POCA 
		Tell me the answer to this! What bird lays eggs 
		in a barn? 

				VOICE 
		Shut up, let's hear Don Amalio!

				DON AMALIO 
		Quiet! Now we're gathered together to beg under 
		the porches. But only in the churches of the 
		rich! The girls passing by smelled so sweet 
		that you felt them on you.

POCA is chewing a hunk of mutton. His hands and chin are shiny with fat.

				POCA 
		That's great! You can smell them but you can't 
		lay your hands on them! Is that it?

The LEPER is sitting some feet away from the others, but as the drinking goes 
on he gradually works his way in until finally he joins the group; the others 
are beyond noticing his sores. The LEPER claps his hands to show his 
appreciation of the blind man's story.
 
				LEPER 
		Why did you split up?

DON AMALIO grimaces at the sound of the LEPER's voice. He half turns toward 
him.

				DON AMALIO 
		You, shut your face! I won't have questions 
		from any one!
 
Most of them are not listening; they are talking to each other, eating 
noisily, pouring out wine for themselves and each other.
 
				VOICE (off) 
		Go on with the story!

				DON AMALIO 
			(heavily)
		Okay, it broke up when this deaf fellow started 
		on the collection boxes in the churches with a 
		knife.
 
ENEDINA has finished eating and is picking her teeth with her fingers, 
unconcernedly.
 
				SINGER 
		How did you know?

				DON AMALIO 
		The noise of the money in his pocket gave him 
		away. We hardly got a sou that day. 

He strikes the table to get silence and attention.

				DON AMALIO 
		You know what I did? I told the police about 
		him! 

				HOBBLY 
		You sang because he didn't cut you in, you rat! 

The blind man reacts, seizing his stick. Then he decides to talk his way out.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		The judges thanked me very much, and one of 
		them, who was a gentleman, said I was ...
 
The old man, DON ZEQUIEL, who is half slumped over the table, comes around 
sufficiently to pick up the blind man's story.
 
				DON ZEQUIEL 
			(muttering)
		Shitty bastard, that's what I'd call you!
 
DON AMALIO goes on as if he has not heard. The SINGER, his neighbor, leaves 
the table.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		He said "Honest citizen," if you want to know. 

The SINGER takes up her guitar and begins to sing a popular song. Most of 
them join in. DON ZEQUIEL is slumped over the table, trying to sleep. POCA is 
drinking heavily with one of the women. One of ENEDINA's daughters, who is 
sleeping on a couch, wakes up frightened and begins to bawl. REFUGIO, who is 
tight, cannot bear the din and lurches toward the little girl.
 
				REFUGIO 
			(shouting)
		You filthy little brat. Shut up or watch out! 

She picks up the whining child and shakes her brutally.

				REFUGIO 
		What's up with you? Why are you screaming? I'll 
		belt you one!
 
ENEDINA rushes up furiously and takes the child out of her arms.
 
				ENEDINA 
		Don't you touch my little girl.

				REFUGIO 
		Keep the brat quiet so we can hear what's going 
		on. 

				ENEDINA 
		I'll bust your face.
 
				REFUGIO 
		Keep your hands off me, you filthy whore!

ENEDINA hits her powerfully. REFUGIO jumps on her like a tigress and grabs 
her hair. The crying of the children gets louder. The others go on singing, 
apparently unperturbed by the fight. The two women hit each other in a blind 
fury. POCA and PACO try in vain to separate them, under the glassy stare of 
DON ZEQUIEL. But it takes DON AMALIO to calm them. He takes ENEDINA and 
protects her with his body.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		Stop this, stop this.

				ENEDINA 
		Let me go, Don Amalio, I'll tear her apart. 

During the brawl, the LEPER goes up to the table to get a bottle. HOBBLY, 
without leaving his place, pokes him viciously with his stick.
 
DON AMALIO does not let ENEDINA go.

				DON AMALIO 
		Keep quiet, Enedina, she's not worth paying 
		attention to. Let's behave ourselves nicely. 
			(to Refugio) 
		Stick to your place.
 
There is calm once again. They all go back to their places and adjust their 
clothes.

POCA goes up to the sideboard where he finds the plate of vanilla pudding. He 
sticks in his finger and licks it greedily. 

				ENEDINA (off)
		My pudding! Leave it, you thief!

She pushes POCA's hand into the plate. He pulls it out covered with cream.

				VOICES (off)
		Bring in the pudding, enough of the brawling. 

ENEDINA, still puffing and blowing, takes the plate of pudding, walks to the 
table, and puts the pudding down. There are claps and murmurs of 
satisfaction. There is no more singing. The children are quiet. They all help 
themselves to pudding and there is quiet while they all taste the dessert. 
The LEPER prowls around the table with a plate in his hand, not daring to 
take any. Once again HOBBLY drives him away. The GARDENER realizes what is 
going on, fills a plate and brings it to him. Then she sits down again and 
helps herself. POCA catches ENEDINA's eye.
 
				POCA 
		Enedina?
 
				ENEDINA (off)
		What do you want? 

				POCA 
		Is it all right? 

				ENEDINA 
		Yes.
 
				POCA 
			(addressing all of them)
		Enedina's going to take a picture. So we'll 
		have a souvenir.

				DON AMALIO 
		Where's the camera?

				ENEDINA 
			(laughing cagily)
		It's a present from my parents.
 
They go to one side of the table. The LEPER places himself near the blind 
man, who sits in the middle. The blind man sits very straight, with his arms 
stretched out and his two hands on the table. The others arrange themselves 
on either side of him, striking different poses. In honor of the occasion, 
DON ZEQUIEL has come out of his stupor. When everyone is ready, ENEDINA 
stands in front of them. She turns her back to the camera. In a flash the 
still scene suddenly conjures up the scene of another Supper.
 
ENEDINA sweeps her very ample skirt up to her face. The photograph is taken. 
She chokes with laughter behind her skirt. They all relax their poses and 
break out into disordered babbling. The group comes to life again and the 
hubbub reigns supreme.
 
The LEPER now appears lecherous and gay. He goes up to the phonograph, takes 
a record, puts it down dissatisfied, and then picks up another at random. He 
puts it on the record player. It is the "Hallelujah Chorus" from Handel's 
Messiah. He plays it very loud and this seems to give him pleasure and even 
more strength. He glides toward Don Jaime's room. Before going in, he looks 
at them defiantly but they don't seem to notice.
 
ENEDINA helps shake DON ZEQUIEL, who has fallen asleep again.
 
				REFUGIO 
		The lousy man. Tables aren't meant to lie on.
 
				SINGER 
		Eat your pudding. It's a dream.

Handel's music fills the room with sound. DON ZEQUIEL opens an eye and looks 
bleary. He sees the plate which is being handed to him. The SINGER, laughing, 
spoon-feeds him like a child.

				DON ZEQUIEL 
			(half unconscious)
		You're a dainty piece. How spry you are, 
		Enedina.
 
They all burst out laughing. 

				SINGER 
		This isn't Enedina.

In the middle of the hubbub, the LEPER appears at the door of Don Jaime's 
room in Doña Elvira's veil and corset. He begins to dance to the music of the
"Hallelujah Chorus." It is a wild, grotesque dance, with movements of the 
fandango and an expression of inane merriment. His incongruous toothless 
mouth makes it slightly sinister. He pulls tufts of feathers out from his 
jacket and throws them around the room onto the guests. His entry causes some 
surprise. The women scream and the men jeer. Soon the SINGER gets up and goes 
to dance with the LEPER. She takes of his veil and puts it around herself. It
begins to look like a witches' sabbath. 

				LEPER 
			(throwing the feathers) 
		Little dove of the south. Little dove.
 
The blind man, still sitting, pulls ENEDINA onto his knee. 

				DON AMALIO 
		Enedina, come here. Sit down. Come on, drink up!
 
ENEDINA drinks.
 
POCA joins the others. He pulls his beret over his eyes and goes into a 
series of contortions, moving his arms and legs with a frenzied agility 
remarkable for a man of his age, gyrating in a mad jig. He dances with the 
GARDENER. REFUGIO joins in to dance with the LEPER, keeping her distance, 
however.
 
While the couples are dancing, HOBBLY, DON ZEQUIEL, and DON AMALIO still sit 
around the table. One of ENEDINA's little girls has begun to cry again. DON 
ZEQUIEL, who has finished his dessert, contemplates the show without 
understanding clearly what is going on.
 
ENEDINA goes to the couch, carrying the weeping little girl in her arms. 

				ENEDINA 
		There, there, don't cry.

She puts the child on the couch; the crying stops. PACO appears behind the 
couch, gesturing to ENEDINA, and points to where he is. 

				PACO
		Look at this, Enedina.

ENEDINA goes around the couch to PACO, curious to see what it is. 

				ENEDINA 
		What is it?

				PACO 
		Get down, you won't see it otherwise.

The woman does so. PACO grabs her and makes her fall behind the couch; they 
roll over each other. Their legs stick out behind one end of the couch. 
Sometimes hers are on top, sometimes his. They roll around on the floor, PACO 
laughing, ENEDINA protesting. The GARDENER sees what is happening behind the 
couch and waves DON ZEQUIEL over. 

				GARDENER 
		Just look at this, Don Zequiel! Isn't it awful! 

He looks and sees. The legs of the couple struggle behind the couch. Close-up 
of the scared face of the little child stretched out on the couch. 

				ENEDINA'S VOICE 
		Get off, let me go! Let me go! Let me go! 

DON ZEQUIEL vigorously thumps the table.

				DON ZEQUIEL 
		Leave them alone! It'll make them sorrier 
		later! 

HOBBLY hurls a plate of pudding into the "patriarch's" face. DON ZEQUIEL 
wipes his face with his hands, trying to get the stuff off his beard. 
Meanwhile, POCA, who has just seen what is happening behind the couch, passes 
near DON ZEQUIEL and laughs at the state he is in.

				GARDENER (off)
		That's just the thing for you, Don Zequiel! 
		Ecce Homo, that's what I'd say!

DON ZEQUIEL tries to get to his feet to defend himself; but he wobbles and
falls back heavily onto his chair. POCA, who is looking cautiously over his 
shoulder, comes up to DON AMALIO who is still in his place and touches him on 
the shoulder.
 
				POCA 
		Don Amalio!

				DON AMALIO 
		What's that? 

				POCA 
		Enedina and Paco ... 

				DON AMALIO 
		What about them?

				POCA 
		They're playing games behind the couch ...
 
The blind man starts. His jaw trembles and anger takes hold of him. He seizes 
his stick and gets up. 

				DON AMALIO 
		Which couch? 

				POCA 
			(vaguely)
		That one.
 
DON AMALIO puts his hand on POCA's shoulder.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		Take me there.

				POCA 
		Really, Don AMALIO, there's not much point in 
		making a fuss.
 
POCA, who does not seem to be too happy about this turn of events, walks 
toward the couch, followed by the blind man who is gripping him. POCA does 
not seem keen on getting involved in the events he stirred up and slithers 
out of the way, leaving his jacket in the hands of AMALIO, whose fury is 
mounting.
 
				DON AMALIO 
		Where are you, you swine? I'll crack your skull 
		in. Take me to them and I'll kill him.

Without his guide, he loses all sense of direction. He moves from one side to 
the other. In vain, HOBBLY tries to stop him. Overcome with rage, the blind 
man clutches his cane and, facing the banquet table, lays about him with all 
his strength. His flaying creates havoc with the contents of the table: 
plates, glasses, bottles. Wines, sauces, and puddings are spilled. Very soon 
the beautiful embroidered tablecloth becomes a battlefield of destruction.

PACO and ENEDINA, terrified, get up from behind the couch.
 
REFUGIO and the GARDENER begin to be troubled by the turn of events. 
Disorderliness has turned into an orgy without anyone's really being aware 
of what is happening. A glimmer of sense in their befuddled minds makes the 
two women aware of the possible consequences.
 
In the middle of the room, ENEDINA tidies herself up. The LEPER tries to 
extricate himself from the corset that he has wrapped himself in.
 
				REFUGIO 
			(whispering to the Gardener)
		Things are going to be worse than the Cuban 
		War ...

				GARDENER 
		You're right. We'll be better off if we're seen 
		in the village tonight.
 
They slip into the hall.
 
The blind man is finally in command. DON ZEQUIEL falls face down and gets 
entangled in Doña Elvira's wedding veil as he tries in vain to stand up 
again.
 
				LEPER 
		Now he has spoiled the party.
 
				SINGER (off)
		Holy Virgin, how can we fix up this brothel? 

All of them have stopped dancing although the phonograph is still playing.

ENEDINA tries to justify herself.

				ENEDINA 
			(apropos the blind man)
		If he were my man, he'd have his rights; but as 
		it is, why?

				SINGER 
		You're quite right, old dear. The way he treats 
		you ...
 
REFUGIO and the GARDENER rush down the stairs into the lower hall. When they 
reach the big front door, they open it and go out into the park.
 
They have hardly left the building when they hear the noise of a car, and 
almost at once the headlights appear, making them hesitate for a moment and 
try to hide in the shadow. The music of Handel's Messiah is still playing.
 



THE CAR ROUNDS THE TURN IN THE ROAD. 

It comes to a halt in front of the house. JORGE, RAMONA, then VIRIDIANA and 
RITA get out one at a time. VIRIDIANA, noting the two beggars running away, 
takes a few steps in their direction. JORGE realizes immediately that 
something abnormal has been going on. He sees a woman running away and hears 
the solemn chorus of Handel's Messiah. Without pausing a moment to reflect, 
he goes into the house.

The camera switches to the beggars grouped in the sitting room.
 
				POCA 
		Now it's every man for himself. Let's go.

The camera shifts back to JORGE, entering the house. One by one the beggars 
pass him in the hall, looking crestfallen and as innocent as the situation 
allows. The first one he meets is POCA, who with great difficulty is 
supporting the almost completely unconscious DON ZEQUIEL. 

				PACO 
		Good night ... He doesn't feel too well.
 
Appalled, JORGE stands in the hall and watches the strange herd pass by. The 
SINGER, carrying one of the little girls who is bawling, goes by with the
DWARF. 

				SINGER 
		Good night, Don Jorge. We're leaving now... 

Then it is POCA's and ENEDINA's turn. The latter has another infant in her 
arms.
 
				ENEDINA 
			(pathetically)
		They told us you'd be back tomorrow ... 

				POCA 
		I didn't want to do it, Don Jorge. They made 
		me ...
 
JORGE, quite beside himself, takes POCA by the arm.
 
				JORGE 
		Get out of here! Out!

The blind man, led on as if by instinct and by the noise of the departing 
fugitives, goes toward the exit with the aid of his stick. He marches along, 
head high, his stick in front of him. It is difficult to know whether he is 
aware of JORGE's presence or not. On passing in front of him, he intones in a 
sonorous voice.

				DON AMALIO 
		Blessed are the generous, master, who take into
		their respectable house a poor defenseless 
		blind man. God will reward them.
 
He advances while he speaks. His feet get entangled in the wedding veil which 
was left on the floor. Finally he gets rid of it with his stick and goes out 
as quickly as his blindness allows.
 
The room is now empty. JORGE, frowning, takes in the carnage caused by the 
senseless orgy. He advances toward the record player, where the "Hallelujah 
Chorus" is still playing, and turns it off. He starts suddenly on hearing the 
noise of furniture being knocked against in Don Jaime's room.
 
JORGE enters Don Jaime room and gropes around in the half light. The room 
is faintly lit by one chandelier with the six candles which are still intact. 
JORGE looks around. At first he does not see anybody. But then a curtain 
moves and he goes toward it.
 
				JORGE 
			(shouting)
		Didn't you hear me? Beat it. 

HOBBLY appears from behind the curtain.

				JORGE 
 		Okay, get out, you.
 
HOBBLY smiles in a sinister way.
 
				HOBBLY 
		Your Lordship must not get annoyed: I have not 
		done anything wrong . ..
 
Without saying a word, JORGE advances on him, ready to seize his arm and put 
him out. HOBBLY, now alert, suddenly pulls out a dagger. JORGE is undecided 
for a moment, but soon reacts by finding a chair in the passage and 
brandishing it, ready to attack his opponent. In a flash, a raised arm behind 
him swings a bottle. Before he is aware of the danger, JORGE is hit by the 
bottle, staggers, and falls heavily to the floor. The LEPER, looking happy and 
proud of himself, leans over his victim.
 
				LEPER 
		I got him, comrade. I got him!

At this point, VIRIDIANA appears at the door and is frightened by what she 
sees.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
		My God, what have you done to him! 

				HOBBLY 
		He was asking for it.

				VIRIDIANA 
		But why? Why? 

She rushes to him and leans over him, calling him in anguish.

				VIRIDIANA 
		Jorge! Jorge!
 
HOBBLY stops her and takes her by the arm.

				HOBBLY 
		You shouldn't cry over that. If you're without 
		one man you can always find another to console 
		you.

He embraces her, crushing her cheek with his lips. She screams and looks 
around for a means of escape. She sees the LEPER and there is a glimmer of 
hope in her eyes.

				VIRIDIANA 
		José, José! For the love of God, don't let 
		him... 

The LEPER empties a bottle and begins to jeer again without moving an inch.

				LEPER 
		Nothing will happen to you, miss. We're all good 
		folk here. Aren't we, Hobbly?

It is apparent from VIRIDIANA's expression that she feels lost. She tries to 
escape but HOBBLY takes hold of her again. She looks at him in terror.
 



IN THE PARK. 

The beggars have disappeared except for the old man DON ZEQUIEL, who is 
staggering along the wall, helped by PACO. RAMONA and her daughter are 
standing in front of the car and have seen them coming out of the house. So 
has the DRIVER. RAMONA makes up her mind and quickly gets back into the car 
with RITA.
 
				RAMONA 
			(to the driver)
		To the village! We've got to warn ... 

				DRIVER
		They'll get them in no time. If they've stolen 
		anything, it won't do them any good.
 
The car starts up and moves quickly away from the estate.
 



DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

JORGE is stretched out unconscious. The LEPER, kneeling, is tying up his legs 
with a curtain cord. He ties one end to the wardrobe.

				HOBBLY (off)
		Why all the fuss? It had to happen sooner or 
		later! 

				VIRIDIANA 
		Ramona! Help!
 
They can be heard struggling. A chair crashes to the ground. The LEPER 
finishes tying up JORGE. His livid face looks ghostly in the half light. He 
laughs, jerking his head back as if he is having a fit of St. Vitus' dance. 
His work finished, he gets up and with the look of an impartial spectator 
watches the struggle between his benefactress and the beggar.
 
VIRIDIANA is defending herself with more energy than she ever looked capable 
of. HOBBLY is strong, but despair provides the young woman with equal 
strength. HOBBLY pushes her onto the bed and then jumps on her, but VIRIDIANA 
reacts quickly and flees toward the door. But the LEPER is waiting for her 
there and blocks her passage with folded arms. HOBBLY catches his prey again 
and, holding her tightly in his arms, takes her once again to the bed.
 
				VIRIDIANA 
			(screaming)
		Ramona! Ramona!

				HOBBLY 
			(between his teeth, with rage)
		Quiet, my dove. Quiet, or I'll ...
 
JORGE opens his eyes and, only half conscious, becomes aware of the struggle. 
He desperately tries to free himself from his bonds but they do not give way. 
With muffled voice, he calls to the LEPER.
 
				JORGE 
		Come here! 

The LEPER jeers foolishly.

				JORGE 
		Come here, you rogue! Come here!
 
The LEPER goes up to him and speaks in confidence, with a greedy laugh, 
indicating the struggling couple.

				LEPER 
		Maybe afterwards he'll let me ... 

				JORGE 
		If you free me, you'll be a rich man ... 

The LEPER shrugs his shoulders, laughing. 

				LEPER 
		Me, rich? Come on!

				JORGE 
		There's plenty of money in this house. Piles of 
		it. 

The LEPER becomes serious and leans a little lower in order to hear better. 

				LEPER 
		Where?
 
Meanwhile, in the fight, VIRIDIANA ends up by falling on the bed under 
HOBBLY. Her arms flail furiously in resistance. Her clenched hand grips the 
cord that the beggar is using as a belt. It is Rita's jump rope, the same one 
Don Jaime hanged himself with. As her hand touches the handle of the rope, 
her gesture freezes. Then she lets go, dropping her arms as if giving up the 
struggle. HOBBLY brutally turns her face to his and avidly kisses her.
 
But Jorge's words seem to have had an effect on the LEPER.
 
				JORGE 
		I don't want you to untie me. Kill him and then 
		I'll give you the money.

				LEPER 
		Where's the dough?

				JORGE 
		Kill him and I'll tell you. If I don't keep my 
		word, you can kill me too. There are thousands 
		of pesetas. Kill him, idiot!
 
The LEPER trembles with cupidity. He gets up, seizing an iron fire shovel. He 
goes toward the bed, where VIRIDIANA seems to have fainted. HOBBLY is 
embracing her. At this point the LEPER hits HOBBLY's head with all his 
strength. There is the sound of heavy blows then nothing more ...

				JORGE 
			(through clenched teeth)
		Kill him.

				LEPER 
			(with a ferocious laugh)
		That will teach you not to bother me any more, 
		you son of a bitch.

The LEPER, having satisfied his vengeance in order to gratify his avarice, 
turns to JORGE. Pointing the shovel at him, he reminds him savagely of his 
situation.

				LEPER 
		Where's the cash?

JORGE realizes that the LEPER is quite likely to finish him off too. He is 
even more afraid that, now that the LEPER is master of the house, he might 
try to do something to VIRIDIANA.

				JORGE 
		There in the cupboard. It's open. 

The LEPER quickly opens the cupboard and begins looking.

				JORGE 
		On the top shelf under the linen.
 
The LEPER looks there. He seizes piles of linen and throws them on the floor. 
Finally he finds a bundle of notes and counts them avidly.
 
Outside the house, the car is back and stops in front of the door. RAMONA and 
RITA get out, with the MAYOR and two POLICEMEN. They rush into the house. The 
DRIVER is the last.
 
				RAMONA 
		Up there. 

				MAYOR
		Let's go!
 



THE PARK, THE NEXT DAY. 

Two cows are being led toward the fields by the COACHMAN, who has returned. 
RITA is walking behind, playing with a stick and jumping happily in the 
grass. Old MONCHO, who has also returned, is pushing the wheelbarrow beside 
them.

 


INSIDE THE HOUSE. 

JORGE stands near a door to one of the rooms with a MAN who is taking 
measurements and writing them down in a notebook.
 
				JORGE 
		I want a switch here; and put a plug over there.
 
The MAN indicates the fitting on the other wall with chalk marks. He crosses 
the room. JORGE then turns to VIRIDIANA, whose presence in the room is 
apparent only now. She is seated a few steps away, sewing, dressed in a print 
blouse, which gives her an unexpectedly youthful air. She seems finally to 
have become just like any other young woman.
 
				JORGE 
			(amiably but insistently)
		Have you got over the scare you had yesterday?
 
VIRIDIANA, her eyes lowered, does not reply. JORGE turns around again and
joins the MAN who was accompanying him. Their conversation continues, off.
 
				JORGE 
		You can put the other plug there at the bottom 
		for the two floor lamps that I've bought.
 
With her eyes, VIRIDIANA follows the young man who no longer pays any 
attention to her. It is a look we have never seen in her. It is undefinable, 
but seems full of gratitude, apology, and tenderness -- a woman's look.




VIRIDIANA'S ROOM, NIGHTTIME. 

VIRIDIANA pulls out a small broken mirror from a drawer. By the light of a 
single candle, she smooths her loose hair. She has cried and there are traces 
of tears on her cheeks. Without a doubt she is undergoing some internal 
struggle. She stands up, picks up a garment, and leaves.
 



ON THE DRIVE, NEAR VIRIDIANA'S CELL-LIKE ROOM. 

A brushwood fire has been lit. MONCHO puts some leaves on it. It is cool and 
the old servant warms his hands over the flames and then goes off to find 
some more dry leaves.
 
Some jazz, in contrast with Handel's Messiah, begins to play. This continues 
until the end of the film.
 
Little RITA, her shoulders covered by the old blanket already seen on her, is 
sitting on a big stone near the fire. She is holding the crown of thorns dear 
to Viridiana, looking at it curiously. While she is handling it, she pricks 
her finger and a drop of blood appears. She sucks it. And, after looking 
sorrowfully at the crown of thorns, she throws it onto the fire with an air 
of detachment. The crown of thorns very soon becomes a crown of fire. Jazz 
music.
 



DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

JORGE with his sleeves rolled up is washing his hands and arms. RAMONA is 
sitting on the edge of the turned-back bed, sewing a button on JORGE's 
jacket. It is a peaceful family scene.
 
				JORGE 
			(off)
		The towel.

RAMONA puts the jacket on the bed and goes to look for the towel. She hands 
it to him. JORGE looks at her, smiling, while he is drying himself. He 
strokes her cheek. RAMONA happily lets his hand run across her face to her 
mouth. She covers his hand with little kisses and nibbles it gently.
 
The jazz music gets louder; it is coming from the phonograph. The camera 
switches briefly to the crown of thorns in flames. With a stick, a hand takes 
it out of the flames and puts it on the ground, where it goes on burning and 
crackling.
 



IN DON JAIME'S ROOM. 

JORGE and RAMONA are startled by the noise of light rapid knocks on the door. 

				JORGE 
		Who's there?
 
RAMONA starts to leave the room but JORGE stops her. 

				JORGE
		 Where are you going? Wait!
 
Nobody appears or replies and he goes to the door himself. VIRIDIANA is 
there. Her expression is strange. She is apparently very calm but she betrays 
a great inner agitation. Her hair hangs loosely on her shoulders. She has 
never looked so feminine. Her appearance takes him by surprise. 

				JORGE 
		Come in, Viridiana. Has something happened? 

She does not reply. She tries to look him in the eye but, overcome, soon 
lowers her gaze. She stands still and silent on the threshold.
 
				JORGE 
		Did you want to speak to me? Is there anything 
		I can do? 

JORGE tries to penetrate her thoughts but does not succeed. VIRIDIANA finally 
looks at him imploringly as if asking to be understood and pardoned. JORGE's 
concentrated gaze relaxes. As if by instinct, he suddenly realizes that the 
long desired moment has arrived. The girl is at his mercy.
 
His smile is ironic but friendly as he moves back to let her in. Seeing 
RAMONA there, she is taken aback. Her face hardens and her body stiffens as 
she stares at the servant and then JORGE. RAMONA herself seems petrified, 
while JORGE, apparently at ease, tries to relax the atmosphere.
 
				JORGE
		I must say, I was not expecting you. We are 
		playing cards ... 

While he is talking he moves toward the table.
 
				JORGE 
		I hope you are not surprised by this pastime, 
		but the evenings are long and they must be got 
		through, somehow. But ... do sit down ...
 
VIRIDIANA, who is a little reassured, but not completely at home, taut, with 
a fixed look and without a word, follows him. RAMONA, who feels she is not 
wanted, is about to leave.
 
				JORGE 
		Don't leave, Ramona. Come here! Mademoiselle is 
		not proud and she doesn't mind your staying 
		here. Isn't that so?
 
RAMONA goes timorously to the table. VIRIDIANA's expression is blank. JORGE 
takes up the cards and shuffles them rigorously. He does not seem to find the 
situation at all unnatural.

				JORGE 
		You know how to play cards, cousin? No? Then sit 
		down. I'm sure you'll like it.

VIRIDIANA, still detached, decides to sit down. RAMONA remains standing, 
partly out of distress and partly out of respect. 

				JORGE 
		You too, sit down. Come on, sit down. All cats 
		are gray at night...

RAMONA sits down and JORGE finishes shuffling the cards. 

				JORGE 
		Do you like this music, Viridiana? It's popular 
		now. 

He puts the cards on the table in front of VIRIDIANA. She is still taut and 
silent.

				JORGE 
		Cut. Like that ...
 
Close-up of JORGE's hand, which quietly takes VIRIDIANA's limp hand and puts 
it on the cards, helping her with a light pressure to divide the pack. JORGE 
then puts the cards together and begins dealing to each according to the 
rules of the game ...
 
				JORGE
		You won't believe me, but the first time I met 
		you I said to myself: "My cousin Viridiana will 
		end up playing cards with me."
 
He finishes dealing. RAMONA is slightly animated. VIRIDIANA, who seems to be 
paying no attention to what she is doing, with the tips of her fingers starts 
playing her cards.
 
The camera now recedes at top speed, showing the room in immense perspective. 
At the end of it, the three players are soon almost indistinct in the center 
of the image. The shooting angle widens more and more and in the center of 
the image, while the music continues its euphoric and frenzied rhythm, there 
appear the words: 



				the end.
 
 




Screenplay by Luis Buñuel (in collaboration with Julio Alejandro)
Translated by Piergiuseppe Bozzetti


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