A Time to be Born, and a Time to Die

Episode #92
Date: 27 March 1949

CHAPPELL: Quiet, please. Quiet, please.

(MUSIC ... THEME ... FADE FOR)

ANNOUNCER: The American Broadcasting Company presents "Quiet, Please!" which 
is written and directed by Wyllis Cooper and which features Ernest Chappell. 
"Quiet, Please!" for today is called "A Time to be Born, and a Time to Die."

(MUSIC ... THEME ... ENDS, UNUSUALLY, ON A HUSHED GONG)

THE READER: To every thing there is a season, and a time for every purpose 
under the heaven:

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING IN AND UNDER)

THE READER: A time to be born, and a time to die;

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: Begin.

THE MAN: (RELUCTANT) I am afraid.

THE READER: Begin, I say.

THE MAN: I am born. 

I am a man. 

And the world lies before me, before my eyes and under my hands. 

I am in the midst of life and yet I am alone.

THE READER: A time to plant ...

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE MAN: (YOUTHFUL, BRIGHT) May I come in, please? 

Thank you.

No, I have had no experience. I'm willing to start at the bottom and work up - 
in life.

Yes, I have certain ambitions.

Yes, I will work hard -- for whatever you want to pay me.

I'll do as you say and I'll live modestly and save my money and I'll not waste 
my time. Nor yours, sir.

I'll work and study and try to be useful -- to you and to me. And you'll find 
I'm a hard worker and honest and conscientious. And, when the time comes, 
you'll promote me and you'll find that I'm a very good man to have in your 
organization, sir.

Oh, yes, thank you.

Thank YOU. I'm not afraid of work.

(MUSIC ..."HEIGH HO, IT'S OFF TO WORK WE GO"...THEN IN BG, INCREASINGLY SOUR)

THE MAN: I'm always here on time in the morning. 

I'm here before nine o'clock and you're no better than I am.

You see that you're here at nine o'clock, too, or I'll tell the boss and he'll 
fire you.

I'm not gonna let you stand in my way. I'm gonna be a success in life.

I want a better job -- and the only better job in this place is HIS job.

I'm tired of living in a little hall bedroom and never having any money to 
enjoy myself. I want to be rich -- and happy.

I'm not getting ahead FAST enough in this place.

I've GOT to get ahead.

(MUSIC ... FILLS A PAUSE)

THE MAN: Why, no, sir. I - I like John all right. I - I think he's a fine 
young man. But I COULD do his work better than he can. I - I told you I'd work 
and study and try to be useful to you, sir. I'm only being useful when I say 
John ISN'T doing his work as efficiently as he should.

Why, thank you, sir. I - I'm sure you know I'm thinking only of the business. 
After all, I have worked hard on your behalf ... sir.

(MUSIC ... SWELLING IN AND UNDER)

THE READER: A time to plant and a time to pluck up that which is planted;

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE MAN: (DELIVERS A SPEECH, POMPOUS) Gentlemen of the Board of Directors, I 
am humbly grateful for this high honor you have bestowed on me. When I first 
came to this wonderful organization as a seeker after employment, I said to 
myself, "The highest honor I could ever hope to attain is to be a hard working 
member of that great happy family."

SOUND: (APPLAUSE)

THE MAN: For that -- that is how I think of this great organization - of which 
I am now humbly happy - to be the president.

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to kill ...

THE MAN: (COOL) No, Marilyn. There's no way out.

MARILYN: (TEARFUL) But I've tried so hard.

THE MAN: I know. I give you credit for that, Marilyn. But it won't work. I'm 
not being tough about it, my dear, but it just has to happen this way. 

MARILYN: When did you stop loving me?

THE MAN: Why, my dear, don't ask such silly questions.

MARILYN: Tell me when.

THE MAN: I said, don't be silly, please. Don't be dramatic, my dear.

MARILYN: I - I've given you--

THE MAN: I know. "The best years of your life." Really?

MARILYN: I loved you so very much.

THE MAN: I wasn't-- I mean, you shouldn't have loved me, Marilyn.

MARILYN: I - I know I'm not the glamorous type and - I know -

THE MAN: Well ... It's all over now, Marilyn.

MARILYN: Must it be all over? Must we--?

THE MAN: I've been over all that before, my dear. Now, if you don't mind.

MARILYN: When did you stop loving me?

THE MAN: I told you not to ask that.

MARILYN: I've got to know.

THE MAN: Please.

MARILYN: I got a new dress.

THE MAN: A new dress ISN'T enough. I'm sorry, Marilyn. You've got to remember 
my position.

MARILYN: I loved you.

THE MAN: I'm sorry. Now, let's not get emotional, shall we, please? For my 
sake.

MARILYN: When did you stop loving me?

THE MAN: Why, if you must know, Marilyn, I never loved you at all.

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to kill, and a time to heal; 

(MUSIC ... SWELLS, THEN SADLY IN BG)

THE MAN: (CASUAL) Naw, it's only tax money. I pay Marilyn a very substantial 
sum of money each month. I don't know what else she needs to keep her happy.

Why, I think I've been very generous with Marilyn. She has the house, the 
money. What more does she want?

Let's not worry about Marilyn. SHE'S all right.

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to break down ...

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

EDGAR: What do you want me to do?

THE MAN: I don't care what you do, Edgar. It makes no difference at all to me.

EDGAR: I've got to get out?

THE MAN: No. You - you don't really have to get out, Edgar. You still have 
some stock in the business.

EDGAR: Some stock.

THE MAN: I said "some."

EDGAR: But you have most of it.

THE MAN: Certainly I have most of it, Edgar. Certainly I have. When you made 
me president of the company, I made up my mind that by hook or by crook ...

EDGAR: (SIMULTANEOUSLY) ... by crook ...

THE MAN: ... I was gonna get a controlling interest in the company. Now, I 
have it and -- that's all.

EDGAR: I founded this company forty-five years ago.

THE MAN: And you can have a job with it as long as you live, Edgar, that I 
promise you.

EDGAR: I remember you when you first came to me. You said you'd start at the 
bottom and work your way up.

THE MAN: That I did, Edgar.

EDGAR: You said you were industrious.

THE MAN: Haven't I been industrious, Edgar?

EDGAR: And honest. And conscientious.

THE MAN: (LAUGHS)

EDGAR: And today you sit in my chair, in my office, and you tell me that 
there'll ALWAYS be a job for me in my own company.

THE MAN: And that I mean, Edgar. There'll be a job for you in this company 
just as long as you live.

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to break down and a time to build up;

EDGAR: (ON THE PHONE, POLITE) Why, no, Mr. Turtle, I don't have a controlling 
interest in the business any more. No.

Yes, yes. Oh, I look on the company of today with some pride, of course, but 
it isn't like the old days when I was-- I beg your pardon?

Oh, yes. Yes, we have branches all over the world now. Under the new 
management, we've expanded amazingly.

Yes, indeed, I'd be very glad to see you but I think that you should see the 
chairman of our board of directors. Uh, he's a very remarkable man. Ah, he's 
personally responsible for the expansion of the company.

Oh, no, no. I haven't retired. I'm still with the company. As I said, I don't 
have a controlling interest any more but you can't miss me when you call. I'm 
in charge of the reception desk just as you come in the front door.

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to weep ...

THE MAN: (SORROWFUL, ON THE PHONE) I'm very, very sorry.

Oh. Really, I'm all broken up.

Yes, it's been years since I've seen Marilyn but I was very fond of her.

Oh, I'm deeply desolated to hear of her death.

Yes, we were separated several years ago. A matter of incompatibility, I 
suppose you'd say. But I've always maintained a high regard for her.

I'm very sorry she died.

SOUND: (HANGS UP PHONE)

THE MAN: (MATTER-OF-FACT) Miss Iverson! 

Have some flowers sent to this address.

Oh, about twenty dollars worth, will you?

Some funeral parlor uptown.

Thanks.

THE READER: A time to weep, and a time to laugh; 

THE MAN: And, Miss Iverson, you won't have to send any more of those checks. 
You know. (CHUCKLES, TO HIMSELF) Yeah, that's over with, at last. (LAUGHS 
HAPPILY)

THE READER: A time to mourn ...

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE MAN: (INEBRIATED) That? That's a mourning band.

Don't you know what a mourning band is?

Well, it used to be, when somebody died, everybody wore black clothes, see? 
Old custom. Nowadays, you just get a piece of black cloth and have your tailor 
sew it on the sleeve of your coat. (CHUCKLES) I got a fine tailor.

(MUSIC ... IN BG, BARROOM PIANIST MOURNFULLY PLAYS SERIES THEME ... FROM THE 
2ND MOVEMENT OF FRANCK'S "SYMPHONY IN D MINOR")

THE MAN: What's that fella playin' piano for? He gonna sing? 

Oh. Just play, huh?

Yeah, that's fine. Play sad music for me! I'm in mourning, see? My wife died.

Oh, we'd separated but-- SHE died.

Ehh, gal I went to school with. Just a little dumpy kind o' country girl, 
nothin' special. 

She died.

Listen to the music.

Yeah. Sad.

THE READER: A time to mourn, and a time to dance;

(MUSIC ... IN BG, BARROOM PIANIST PICKS UP THE TEMPO)

THE MAN: Why, he ain't gonna sing. That's dance music. Listen. (HUMS 
WORDLESSLY) Tum tum tum tum. Sure, that's dance music. Come on, let's you and 
me dance!

(MUSIC ... THE PIANO AND THE GONG HIT THE SAME NOTE, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to cast away stones ...

(MUSIC ... IN BG)

THE MAN: (ANGRY) All right! All right, if that's the way you want it, you can 
have it!

EDGAR: (MILD, POLITE) You don't understand.

THE MAN: I understand all right, Edgar. You and your friends have connived and 
plotted! And worked behind my back!

EDGAR: You haven't been watching the business, you know.

THE MAN: I thought I was surrounded by loyal co-workers!

EDGAR: You weren't very loyal to me when you took the company away from me 
behind my back, were you?

THE MAN: That's an entirely different situation, Edgar! You know that!

EDGAR: It WAS behind my back.

THE MAN: You can't accuse me of dishonesty!

EDGAR: I didn't.

THE MAN: Well ...

EDGAR: If you hadn't been spending so much time--

THE MAN: Don't you say a word about my fiancee!

EDGAR: I had no intention of speaking of her. But you KNOW you haven't been 
paying much attention to the business.

THE MAN: All right! I don't want to talk about it.

EDGAR: Well, now, listen to me, we're perfectly willing to have you stay on as 
general manager -- at a salary.

THE MAN: Ha ha!

EDGAR: A very generous salary because we know your ability. But, as to 
control--

THE MAN: I don't want any part of it! You've outsmarted me this time and I'm 
leaving! I built this place up from--!

EDGAR: I had a part in that, too, you must remember.

THE MAN: Well, I don't want any more of it! I'm through! I'm getting out! Do 
you understand?!

(MUSIC ... READER'S THEME SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to throw away stones, and a time to gather stones together; 

(MUSIC ... READER'S THEME OUT ... SORROWFUL IN BG)

EDGAR: (PLEASANT) Why, of course. I'm glad to see you at any time.

THE MAN: (A BROKEN MAN, DESPERATE) I've come back with my hat in my hand, 
Edgar.

EDGAR: (CLEARS HIS THROAT)

THE MAN: Uh, Mr. Harrison.

EDGAR: I don't mean to rub it in, of course, but you understand, don't you?

THE MAN: Yes, sir.

EDGAR: Now, what was it you, er, wanted?

THE MAN: Will you give me a job?

EDGAR: Why, uh--

THE MAN: I - I've learned my lesson, Edgar, uh, Mr. Harrison.

EDGAR: Good.

THE MAN: Er, have you got anything for me?

EDGAR: Well, let's see.

THE MAN: I - I've GOT to get another start, Mr.--

EDGAR: Yes, of course. Well, I'll tell you what I'll do. You were a very 
valuable man to us once, my boy.

THE MAN: I need a job awfully bad. I - I've been around everywhere and I--

EDGAR: I'm afraid your old job is filled.

THE MAN: I know.

EDGAR: And we've a very good sales manager.

THE MAN: Anything, Edgar.

EDGAR: I'll tell you what I'll do. If you wanted to go out on the road for 
us--

THE MAN: Yes, of course. Anything.

EDGAR: On commission, of course.

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to embrace ...

THE MAN: (BRIGHTLY, ON THE PHONE) Hello, Julia?

You know who this is, Julia?

Ha ha, that's right.

Yes, I know it's been a long time.

Yeah, sure.

Well, I've had a rough time, Julia. That's why I haven't called you or 
anything, you see.

Oh, yes, yes. Yes, I got a new, uh-- I - I made a new connection today. 

Yes, the old company, they finally came around after me. (CHUCKLES) You know. 
(LAUGHS)

Well - well, I was wondering -- I- I've got to go out - out of town tonight 
and I - I thought maybe we could have dinner together or--

What? 

Oh. Uh, well, I drew my expense money and I--

(CHUCKLES) H-how 'bout it?

THE READER: A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

THE MAN: (CONTINUES HIS PHONE CONVERSATION) Oh. Well, I'm sorry, too. Well, 
uh, that's too bad you couldn't break it.

Well, all right, but I wish you could.

Well, when I come back then.

Mm, in a bout two months, I'm afraid. Oh, two months'll go by awfully fast 
though.

Yeah, sure.

Yes, of course.

All right, Julia, I'll call ya.

SOUND: (HANGS UP PHONE)

THE MAN: (TO HIMSELF, DOWNCAST) Well ...

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to seek ...

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME OUT ... MUSIC IN BG)

THE MAN: (GOOD SALESMANSHIP) So, if you'll just sign the order blank right 
here. That's right, this line, uh ... Yeah, thank you very much indeed. We're 
always grateful for business and I'll personally see that delivery's made 
within ten days.

Yeah, that's fine. Thank you very much indeed. I'll wire the office tonight 
and get things started right away, Mr. Jacobson.

Yes, thanks a lot, Mr. Jacobson. Uh, good day, sir. Oh, if you'll have someone 
give me a certified check, sir.

Oh, good! Well, thanks a lot. Well, uh, goodbye, Mr. Jacobson.

SOUND: (DOOR CLOSES)

THE MAN: (SIGHS HAPPILY) Ten thousand four hundred and ten dollars. Mm! Man, I 
wish that was mine. Well, thirteen percent.

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to seek, and a time to lose; 

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME OUT)

SOUND: (PHONE RINGS)

(MUSIC ... IN BG)

SOUND: (PICKS UP PHONE)

THE MAN: Yes?

Yes.

Oh, hello, Mr. Jacobson!

I beg your pardon?

I mean-- What--? Canceling?

Oh, no, Mr. Jacobson! Why?

Oh. Well, but, Mr. Jacobson, I--

Well, that was my first--

I beg pardon?

Yes, sir.

Oh, yes, of course. I understand.

Uh, yes, of course. 

Well, I'm sorry, too, Mr. Jacobson.

What's that?

Uh, yes, sir. 

Oh, of course. I haven't mailed the check back to the factory.

I'll - I'll put in the mail to you right away.

Uh, I'm sorry, sir.

Goodbye.

SOUND: (HANGS UP PHONE)

THE MAN: (TO HIMSELF, SADLY) Ten thousand dollars and--

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to keep ...

THE MAN: (INCREASINGLY BRAZEN AND UPBEAT, INTO PHONE) Hello?

Hello? Hello, Julia?

Yes, it's me.

Julia, what are you doing?

I mean now.

Julia, listen to me.

Do you love me, Julia?

Depends on what?

Heh. Well, listen, I got an idea.

Sure, I get ideas.

What's this one? Well, let's you and me get married.

I have, too, got a cent.

I got a lot o' money. I - I've got a certified check for ten thousand dollars 
in my hand right now.

Sure, it's mine.

Sure, it's mine. I can afford to maintain you in the style you've been acc-- 
What?

Why, I thought maybe we'd take a little honeymoon to Mexico, darling. Heh!

I'll tell you what you do. You put on your pretty new suit. Ah, you got a 
pretty new suit, haven't ya?

Yeah. And you get on an airplane and you fly out here and I'll have a private 
plane all waitin' for ya. We'll fly down to Mexico, we'll get married, we'll 
have a honeymoon that's--

It's a deal?

Okay, darling! I'll meetcha at the airport!

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to keep, and a time to cast away;

SOUND: (ROULETTE WHEEL)

(MUSIC ... PLEASANT MEXICAN TUNE IN BG)

JULIA: (EXCITED) Seventeen!

THE MAN: (SOBER) Grab your chips, darling.

JULIA: How much have we got left?

THE MAN: Mm, plenty.

JULIA: All right, then! I'm gonna put it all on thirteen!

THE MAN: No, now, wait.

JULIA: (LAUGHS) Too late, darling!

SOUND: (ROULETTE WHEEL)

JULIA: Thirteen! Thirteen! Oh, look what I've won!

THE MAN: You'd better save some out now, Julia.

JULIA: Don't be so stingy! You said we got lots left!

THE MAN: Well, yes, but--

JULIA: Oh, no, I'm shot with luck this time, darling. An even number this 
time-- Uh, four. Four! Four!

SOUND: (ROULETTE WHEEL)

THE MAN: I wish you wouldn't put it--

JULIA: Oh, be still!

SOUND: (ROULETTE WHEEL STOPS)

JULIA: Aw, thirteen. (SIGHS) Well, give me some more money. (PAUSE) Give me 
more money, darling.

SOUND: (ROULETTE WHEEL)

THE MAN: (DARKLY) There - there isn't any more money.

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to rend ...

(MUSIC ... IN BG)

THE MAN: (DISTRAUGHT) Why? Why? Why did I do it?

JULIA: (ANGRY AND CRUEL) Because you were a fool, darling. Because you were a 
simpleminded, utter, absolute fool, that's why!

THE MAN: I was getting a good start again. I let this thing go to my head and 
I--

JULIA: Made a fool of yourself! And you made a fool of me!

THE MAN: I'm sorry, Julia. I'm so sorry.

JULIA: I married you thinking that you-- Oh, you utter, stupid fool!

THE MAN: I love you, Julia.

JULIA: Ah, stop talking about love! You - you - you thief!

THE MAN: I did it for you.

JULIA: And look what you did! Why, couldn't you be--? Oh, there's no use 
talking to you. You ought to be put in jail!

THE MAN: Well, they can't get me out of here -- that's one thing. They don't 
know where I am. Oh, but if I hadn't let you play--

JULIA: Dragging me down here to this godforsaken place and then making a fool 
of me! Not wanting me to have a little fun! Oh, what you've done to me, I'll 
never--

THE MAN: What am I going to do, Julia? What am I going to do?

JULIA: Well, if you're any kind of man at all, you'll go back--

THE MAN: I'll never go back!

SOUND: (KNOCK AT THE DOOR)

(MUSIC ... OUT)

THE READER: A time to rend, and a time to sew; 

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN SOMBER MUSIC IN BG)

EDGAR: (SYMPATHETIC) I'm sorry to see you here. No, really I am.

THE MAN: (MEEK, WEARY) It was very good of you to come way up here to see me, 
Edgar. I don't have to call you Mr. Harrison, here, do I, Edgar?

EDGAR: No, no, of course not. I'm sorry.

THE MAN: I haven't got any name here, either, Edgar. Just Number One-One-Six-
Three-Oh.

EDGAR: I really am, sorry. There was - There was nothing I could do, you know.

THE MAN: Would you have done anything if you could, Edgar?

EDGAR: I - I don't know, my boy. You stole, after all.

THE MAN: I know. And I'm paying for it.

EDGAR: Are you being treated all right?

THE MAN: Oh, yes. I've learned to sew jute bags. I'm a very good jute sewer, 
Edgar. I - I didn't know what jute was before they sent me here. I know now. 
Look at my fingers.

EDGAR: Oh, I - I'm so sorry.

THE MAN: Oh, it's only another five years, another five billion jute bags to 
sew, that's all.

EDGAR: Is there anything you want?

THE MAN: (SIGHS) I want to get out. It's what we all want.

EDGAR: I know.

THE MAN: I lie in my bunk at night and think if - if there wasn't just some 
way I could undo what I did all my life. ... There isn't.

EDGAR: Oh, excuse me, ma'am.

JULIA: (HARSH) Would you go away, please?

EDGAR: Who are you?

JULIA: I'm his wife.

EDGAR: Oh. Good bye, my boy.

THE MAN: Goodbye, Edgar.

(MUSIC ... OUT)

JULIA: (AFTER A PAUSE) Well ...

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to keep silence ...

(MUSIC ... IN BG)

JULIA: (CONTINUES CONVERSATION, SPITEFUL) Well, you look fine sitting there in 
that fine outfit. You're the great big sportsman, the big shot, the money man 
... the thief!

You gonna sit there like a dummy? Why don't you say something?

You know what I've been doing? I've been working. I'm a convict's wife -- I 
have to work. Not a single one of my friends'll speak to me. I don't dare to 
be seen in public. Do you know what you've done to me, you - you - you 
convict?! You've ruined my life! You're the man I thought I loved. You know 
why I came up here? Do you know why? 

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to keep silence, and a time to speak;

THE MAN: Why, I thought at first you came to see me - because you loved me, 
Julia.

(MUSIC ... THE READER'S THEME ... SWELLING)

THE READER: A time to love ...

(MUSIC ... A BRIDGE, THEN IN BG)

THE MAN: (GENUINELY) Four years and seven months.

Five years and five precious months off for good behavior.

Four years and seven months, Warden.

Four years and seven months, Chicago Red.

Four years and seven months, all you tall men with the rifles and the blue 
suits.

Thank you, Warden. I've learned my lesson at such long last.

Thank you, Society. I paid my debt to you.

Thank you, high stone walls and iron gates.

Thank you ...

... and goodbye.

And thank you, dear Julia, for remembering me just once in a while. The fruit 
at Christmastime - with the apples and the oranges all neatly sliced in half 
to show there wasn't a little file stuck into them.

And thank you, Edgar, for the messages and the visits that were so far apart 
and that I waited for so eagerly. (CHUCKLES) I thought you were an old man, 
Edgar. But I remember now you were only a few years older than I am. I suppose 
the business has been going better and better while I've been behind the high 
walls. And, I suppose, that's why you look so much happier and so much 
younger. 

Or, maybe it's only because I've been so unhappy and because I've been growing 
older so fast, so fast behind the high stone walls.

And, now, thank you for closing the gate behind me and-- The air is so fine 
and so fresh. And I'm so happy, Edgar. 

(MUSIC OUT)

THE MAN: Aren't you happy?

EDGAR: I'm very glad you're out now, son. I wanted to be the first to shake 
your hand.

THE MAN: Ah, you've been a good friend, Edgar.

EDGAR: No, no, it's not that. I'm sorry for what's happened to ya.

THE MAN: That's enough.

EDGAR: Have you decided what you're going to do now?

THE MAN: All I know is I want to see Julia.

EDGAR: Do - you think that would be wise?

THE MAN: That's all I've thought about all those years back there, Edgar. 
Julia sent me packages once in a while, you know, even if she didn't write. 
Maybe--

EDGAR: Maybe what?

THE MAN: Maybe she - she doesn't hate me.

EDGAR: Son, you've been through a lot.

THE MAN: Yes, I have.

EDGAR: And what, um, what if you don't find, Julia?

THE MAN: I'll find her.

EDGAR: What if you don't?

THE MAN: Why, I - I hadn't thought of that.

EDGAR: You've been away a long time.

THE MAN: Yeah, a long time.

EDGAR: Why don't you go away from here and try to start all over again?

THE MAN: Without Julia?

EDGAR: Without Julia.

THE MAN: No. No, I won't do that.

EDGAR: It might be better that way, son.

THE MAN: No.

EDGAR: It might be the better way. It might be bad enough to want to see her.

THE MAN: I don't know what you mean-- Is she -- dead? 

(MUSIC ... A BRIEF ACCENT)

EDGAR: No. Julia isn't dead.

THE MAN: (SIGHS IN RELIEF) I - I was afraid--

EDGAR: Maybe - she doesn't want to see you.

THE MAN: Maybe she won't right at first but - but I'll tell her. I'll show 
her. She'll want to see me all right. She'll remember and she'll love--

EDGAR: No!

THE MAN: What?

EDGAR: I said, no.

THE MAN: Well, how do you know? How do you know?, I said.

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: A time to love ...

EDGAR: Because - she married me, son.

THE READER: ... and a time to hate; 

(MUSIC ... HUGE ACCENT, THEN OUT)

THE MAN: (BREATHING HARD, DESPERATE) Edgar! Edgar! Listen to me, Edgar! Open 
your eyes, Edgar, and look at me! I didn't mean-- My hands are stronger than I 
thought, Edgar, I - I didn't mean to kill you, Edgar! I couldn't help it! But 
- but you're dead, Edgar. It was - it was her hands, I swear, she-- Julia! Oh, 
Julia! Julia, I love--! 

(MUSIC ... UNDER, BUILDING TO AN ACCENT)

THE MAN: I hate you, Julia! Let me never see you again! Faithless, 
unspeakable--! Punishment! Julia! Juliaaaaaaaa!

(MUSIC ... THE ACCENT)

THE READER: To every thing there is a season, and a time for every purpose 
under the heaven: A time to be born, and a time to die;

(MUSIC ... THE GONG, THEN OUT)

THE READER: Begin.

THE MAN: (RELUCTANT) No. I am afraid.

THE READER: You must begin.

(MUSIC ... THEME ... FADE FOR)
ANNOUNCER: The title of today's "Quiet, Please!" story is "A Time to be Born, 
and a Time to Die." It was written and directed by Wyllis Cooper and the man 
who spoke to you was Ernest Chappell.

CHAPPELL: And Edgar Stehli played Edgar. Marilyn was Joyce Gordon and Julia 
was played by Helen Choate. The Reader from the Book of Ecclesiastes was 
Athena Lord. Music for "Quiet, Please!" is played by Albert Buhrmann and sound 
today was by William McClintock. 

Now, for a word about next week, our writer-director, Wyllis Cooper.

COOPER: Thank you for listening to "Quiet, Please!" Next week, a man returns 
from the grave where I buried him. Mr. Charles W. Afternoon, the Man Who Knows 
Everything, knew more than I did -- and you'll hear from him again in 
"The Venetian Blind Man."

CHAPPELL: And so, until next week at this same time, I am quietly yours, 
Ernest Chappell.

(MUSIC ... THEME ... END)

ANNOUNCER: Now, a listening reminder. For a glimpse under the veil that hides 
the future, for a commentary that is incisive and based on fact, listen this 
evening to Drew Pearson. This is ABC, the American Broadcasting Company.

LOCAL ANNOUNCER: This is WJZ -- New York's First Station -- and WJZ-FM. 

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