netsKool 222 by William G. Hillman
Brandon, Manitoba, Canada
hillmans@westman.wave.ca

 http://home.westman.wave.ca/~hillmans/index.html

Back to Bill & Sue-On Hillman Eclectic Studio


PROLOGUE Over the last 30 years I have generated a gargantuan output of teaching assignments--eight 4-drawer file cabinets full.... Some of the work that I find most interesting, however, is not contained in these metal mausoleums...rather it is encrypted on a few tiny computer diskettes. Since the whole process of integrating computers into a "regular" modern classroom is in its infancy, it has occurred to me that some of this more recent output may be of some use to someone... somewhere. I post this conglomeration with this in mind ...but also with the hope that someone might have some ideas they would be willing to share with me.

These activities have been designed to be augmented with a variety of media...to be plugged into...or to be juxtaposed with all types of software ...and styles.

The first step in using or adapting any of these ideas is probably to assess the resources you have available. I have found it useful to build up a large personal collection print materials (books, mags, etc.) as well as video (over 4000 6-hour video tapes), audio, and computer programs. I soon learned, however, that such a collection is of little value if it is not catalogued and cross-referenced. The necessity of doing this brought about my first introduction to power of the computer. The lessons I learned while using the computer to organize my personal collections soon spilled over into my classroom activities.

I have tried to showcase mostly generic assignments which can be applied to a wide variety of situations. Although most have been pulled out of the air “in the heat of battle”...or while jogging...some have been borrowed and adapted from more traditional approaches.

I have also included a few complete examples but since I am trying to keep this first volume of classroom horrors to around 100 pages...well... ...130 pages...it's time to quit...for now....  


netsKool 222 - Volume I


CONTENTS PART 1: ENGLISH COMPUTER-BASED APPROACHES


1. Sample Advance Report / Course Outline
2. Word Pro Intro: My Summer Vacation
3. Word Pro Intro: A Paragraph is Like a Sandwich
4. Analysis/Report Template: Novel, Short Story, Movie, Play...
5. Role-Playing and/or Personal Journal
6. Lest We Forget - A Ceative Writing Role-Playing Activity
7. Novel Interpretation Procedure on a WP: Call of the Wild
8. Novel Interpretation Procedure on a WP: Science Fiction
9. Protagonist Diary
10. Novel-Associated, Themes-Generated Anthology
11. Character Analysis - Quotations Based
12. Journalism: DeskTop-Published, Novel-Related, Newspaper
13. Journalism: News Leads and Role Playing
14. Computer Poster
15. Quotations Interpretation in a Data Base
16. Video Short Story Analysis Template
17. Song/Poem Checklist and Analysis Guide
18. Student Anthology Digest
19. Cycles - Chase the Seasons with your Word Pro
20. Sample Short Word Games: Alphabet Sentences Anonymous Autobiography Word Bee Joint           Authorship Jumbled Paras Homonym Harvest
21. A Homophone Story with 140 pairs of homonyms
22. Chrono Log Creation...with a sample from Forrest Gump
23. Combining Sentences/Proofreading Activities The Right Stuff
24. Sample Imagination Para Topics
25. Response Journal
26. Twenty Poetry Word Pro Activities
27. Poetry Response Template
28. Computer Research - 8 Shakespeare Projects
29. U.S.S.R. Magazine Review...and Data Base Compilation
30. Video Trivia Quiz Template
31. Integrated Novel/Film Projects
32. Integrated Research Project on Twentieth Century Music
33. Rock Pile - Rock Poetry Multi Media Presentations


PART II: GEOGRAPHY SECTION

1. As It Happens Data Base - Research Assignment Part I
2. Bibliography - Research Assignment Part II
3. Journal Responses from Daily Clippings - Research Part III
4. World War II Role-Playing Scenarios
5. Periodical/Video/Film Review Template
6. Nagasaki Car Company
7. Local Study Pt. 1 - Preparation for Website
8. Local Study Pt. 2 - Town Data Base and Mapping - Website Prep
9. Local Study Pt. 3 - Final Website Prep and Creation
10. Local Study Pt. 4 - Strathclair Article/Chapter Activities
11. Geography Lab - Visual Pursuit - National Geographic Example
12. SimFarm Computer Simulation Game Log 13. Slide Tour Simulation


PART III: COMPUTER SECTION

1. Note Guides for Computer Program Tutorials
2. Introductory Research Portfolio and Scavenger Hunt Display
3. Student-Designed Computer Magazine
4. Student Computer Anthology - Internet Section - Computer Digest
5. 10 Introductory Word Processing Activities
6. Two People Create a Mystery Short Story in 12 Easy Steps
7. Word Processing Techniques Assignment
8. Bill Gates’ “The Road Ahead” Analysis
9. Article Analysis (National Geographic Ref)
10. Personal Web Page



1. A SAMPLE ADVANCE REPORT / COURSE OUTLINE

TEACHER: I DEBATED WHETHER OR NOT TO INCLUDE THIS BUT I FELT IT MAY GIVE SOME IDEA OF HOW I LAY OUT SOME OF THE COURSES.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS WILLIAM HILLMAN - INSTRUCTOR

COURSE CONTENT and ADVANCE REPORT

STUDENT SIGNATURE PARENTS' SIGNATURE(S) ____________________________________________________________

Language Arts - a double course - runs from August **** through June ****. It is offered in both terms one and two, with instruction taking place mainly in the computer labs and the English/Geography room but also incorporating the Library, Multi-Purpose Room, Gym Stage, and numerous other classrooms in ****School. Students have access to the Computer Labs throughout the day - including noon hours. To keep this privilege, all computer lab rules must be obeyed and time spent here must be productive time.

Much of the required reading in the course is issued to students early in Semester I for advance reading. Most movies associated with the course are on video tape and are available on a signout basis.

Students are expected to provide loose-leaf paper, a small ring binder used exclusively for this course, "duo-tangs," pens, markers, a good dictionary and thesaurus, and a long manila folder - as well as at least five 3 1/2" HD diskettes with a hard shell carrying case (for transport and storage of diskettes).

Many assignments will be presented to students via computer disks - a faster, cheaper, and a more versatile and efficient way of transferring and manipulating information. The student has the option, however, of doing most computer-based assignments with pen and paper.

The advantages of using a computer word processor are many. It is faster, easier to read (and proofread), and once stored on disk the assignments are much easier to revise, perfect, and to put on paper in many forms. It is also possible to make use of electronic spelling and grammar checkers, thesaurus, and desk top publishing programs.

As directed by the Department of Education, the curriculum has a major emphasis on Listening and Speaking as well as on the traditional areas of Reading & Writing and Literature & Language.

EVALUATION: A wide variety of tests, and written & computer printout assignments will be turned in for credit.

There will also be participation credit based on in-class performance, attendance, and promptness of turning in assignments.

FINAL EVALUATION is based on a total of 200 marks:

SEMESTER I: 25% - Term tests, daily assignments and participation. 25% - Midterm exam

SEMESTER II: 25% - Term tests, daily assignments and participation 25% - Final exam (this percentage emphasis may be lowered by choosing to complete optional assignments throughout the year). 


PROJECTED COURSE CONTENT SEMESTER I:
BLOCK 1: MAN & NATURE (6 weeks) -
-WORD PROCESSING: Introduction to the computer word processor - 'Hands on' experience with interactive introductory computer programs - Further exploration of the designated word processor through using written tutorial assignments - Preview of the revolutionary styles of writing encouraged by computer word processors.

-CALL OF THE WILD: by Jack London -- Compulsory core novel - 7 Chapter analysis paragraphs and 7 related imaginative paragraphs done on a word processor and/or handwritten in Writing Journal Folders. - In-class coverage of many theme-related novels, short stories, poems, videos and miscellaneous materials - Personal, peer, and teacher proofreading of student paragraphs followed by student revision

- CALL OF THE WILD instructional filmstrip - CALL OF THE WILD feature film with accompanying CHRONO-LOG assignment - Analysis notes, handouts, and overhead transparency presentation and discussions - Poetry readings: THE POEMS OF ROBERT SERVICE and related Man and Nature poems and music

- STUDENT WRITING JOURNAL FOLDERS: Introduction Part 1: Daily handwritten assignments - The importance of daily pre-writing and pre-reading is stressed. Part 2: Personal section - creative expression - student created stories, poems, songs, jokes, cartoons, illustrations, sketches journals...

- BOSS OF THE NAMKO DRIVE: Compulsory core novel - 15 Daily in-class chapter readings and observations - impressions are recorded in Writing Folders and/or on the word processor and presented to the class. - A daily journal written through the point of view of the Boss of the Namko Drive. - Readings and discussions on Native Canadian issues. - Introduction to writing character sketches with the optional use of the computer program Writing Character Sketches. - SHORT STORIES -NEW VOICES: Compulsory Anthology Text - Elements of the Short Story introduction - TRIKKI - A short story by James Herriot - Assorted short stories from Herriot's All Creatures Great & Small - ALL CREATURES GREAT & SMALL British TV debut episode with CHRONO-LOG assignment - JAKE & THE KID short stories by W.O. Mitchell with accompanying analyses on computer and in groups. - JAKE & THE KID TV shows from 50s & 90s CBC

- THE WRITER'S WORKSHOP: Textbook -An abundance of on-going writing projects & workshops

- ELEMENTS OF GRAMMAR: Various textbooks and related A/V materials - History of the English Language tie-in with James Herriot stories - STORY OF ENGLISH PBS video - HOW TO WRITE PARAGRAPHS filmstrips

- WRITING JOURNAL and/or WORD PRO PARAGRAPH assignments - Sandwich paragraphs - - Introduction to Combining Sentences 


BLOCK 2: WORLD GONE AMOK: (6 weeks)
SCIENCE FICTION & TECHNOLOGY THEMES

- THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS by John Wyndham -- Compulsory Core Novel -
Chapter analysis and imagination word pro paragraphs -
DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS - BBC radio drama -
DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS - BBC-TV Mini series -
DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS - Graphic Novel -
STAR TREK: TROUBLE WITH TRIBBLES - Script and CHRONO-LOG -
WAR OF THE WORLDS - Classic radio broadcast & script -
WAR OF THE WORLDS - Classics Illustrated & Marvel Magazines -
THE NIGHT THAT PANICKED AMERICA Feature Film - The making of the radio play War of           the Worlds -
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY Filmstrips & Scripts

SHORT STORIES - Selected Science Fiction short stories and group interpretation assignments - AMAZING STORIES TV short story episodes (Stephen Spielberg) - group discussions and
          analyses

- PARAGRAPH WRITING - Combining Sentences and related imaginative paragraph writing as word pro assignments (Sci-Fi based)

BLOCK 3: (6 Weeks)
POETRY - SPEECHES - IMPROVISATIONAL DRAMA

- POEMS: SECOND CENTURY POETRY Main reference text - Intro to the world of poetry - overhead transparencies & handout booklets with class discussions - Computer writing assignments for selected poems - Song poem analyses - Rock/Pop/Folk as poetry

- SPEECHES - a different type of speech by everyone every day for 10 days - possible topics include: 1. Sportscast or Newscast 11. Formal Speech 2. Impromptu speech - extemporaneous 12. Intros etc. 3. Demonstration 13. Poems/Songs 4. Editorial or Talk that persuades 14. Reviews 5. Sales Talk 15. Soap Box 6. Story Telling 16.Thought of day 7. Disk Jockey 17.StoryNarration 8. Picture is worth 1000 words 18. Panel discuss 9. Interview 19. Secretary 10. Joke telling or anecdote 20. Moderator/MC

- IMPROVISATIONAL DRAMA: - Warm ups and group activities - Zen - Individual pantomimes "in the round" - Improvisational movement & dialogue - conflict resolution - Improvised skit from 3 unrelated objects - Mime from a script - Major large cast mime

- CLASSIC DRAMA - Introduction - history - styles - director - lighting - actors - sets - props make-up - Instructional videos - Acting from scripts - classic movie scenes - Rock videos - Rock Operas - Colorsounds - Concept albums 


END OF TERM ONE - MID-TERM FINAL EXAM 
SEMESTER II BLOCK 4: (6 weeks)

NEWSPAPERS - JOURNALISM - DESKTOP PUBLISHING

- INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM - 5Ws - NEWSLAB II participation kit: 1. Exploring newspaper topics 2. World and Local News 3. Sports, Business, Business, Special Features 4. Editorial, Ad, & Propaganda 5. Comics: Social impact, Art form, Literary form - Journalism vs. Traditional Writing - Effective Journalism: 3 styles-news/feature/editorial - Proofreading - The writing of news leads & stories

- DESKTOP PUBLISHING - Intro to Wordperfect 6.0 and programs suitable for desktop publishing... and the rules of desk top publishing - Design a Front Page electronically - IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT by John Ball - Core novel - Prejudice themes & character study - Implement journalism skills in writing a news story for each chapter - Group project: Create a full Heat of the Night newspaper 


BLOCK 5: (6 weeks)
MEDIA STUDY

- MAGAZINE STUDY - USSR - Uninterrupted Sustained Silent Reading - Analysis of layout and design - Distribution - Publishing - Marketing - Group Project: Create a Students' Digest a la Readers Digest

- THE OUTSIDERS by S.E. Hinton Novel/Film - Analysis assignment and round table discussions - Daily USSR and entries into Observations and Reactions Journal - Adaptation of the novel to a radio drama

- RADIO DRAMA -
HISTORY of RADIO: Intro - Seniors' Questionnaire/Survey on Old Radio -
-Hillman slides/themes from CKX TV interview shows
- REMEMBER WHEN Show with Dick Cavett - Assignment - Script writing analyses: MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER: BEHIND THE LOCKED DOOR SUSPENSE: THE HOUSE IN CYPRESS CANYON -
Analyze & produce a play from an old script - Write and produce an all-original radio play

- TELEVISION: AN INSIDE VIEW Filmstrip set - TELEVISION: CRITICAL VIEWING Text - The role of TV in your life - Ingredients of a TV story - Who puts it together - Analysis of TV news and advertising

- FILM MAKING: Intro, questionnaires & group discussions - HOLLYWOOD: IN THE BEGINNING & STUNTMEN Videos - ELEMENTS OF FILM MAKING booklet - Film grammar - Video production with a Camcorder - Acting of famous movie scenes on stage & tape - Integration with Computer Awareness & Social Studies projects - RECORDED MUSIC: Using music for inspiration in writing - History of Rock 'n Roll/Concept Albums/"Rock Opera" - Songwriting - Rock Videos as poetry - Rock literature - HOW A RECORDING IS MADE Filmstrip set - Geneology of a song - First inspiration to 'hit'  


BLOCK 6: (6 weeks)
MATURING - TRANSITIONS - COMING OF AGE THEMES
The many novels, short stories and feature films covered here include: (NOTE: For most of these titles, the student has the choice of reading nd/or interpreting the video)

- TREASURE ISLAND by Robert L. Stevenson Core Novel/Film - Novel/Movie analysis - Computer study questions: paras, research, group and essay style questions - Classics Illustrated Graphic Novel - Interactive Novel Computer Program

- HUMAN COMEDY by William Saroyan Core Novel/Film - Chrono log assignment on the movie - Word Pro chapter paragraphs based on Overhead notes

- SHANE by Jack Shaefer - Core Novel/Film - Novel/Film analysis - Computer analysis: paragraphs, research, character study, quotations, group analysis, etc. - Student creation of Chrono Logs

- BRIDGES AT TOKO RI by James Michener - Novel/Film - Movie Chrono Log assignment - Progress paragraph writing

- SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES by Ray Bradbury - Novel/Film - Film and/or novel analysis - Movie chrono log

- FILMS: FORREST GUMP - MAN WITHOUT A FACE - THE GREAT SANTINI etc.

END OF TERM TWO - FINAL EXAMINATION  


2. WORD PRO INTRO: MY SUMMER VACATION

TEACHER: This is twist on the traditional first-day-back-at-school assignment - "What I did over summer holidays" - It is actually a step-by-step introduction to the very-different writing with that "magic, idea generator" - the word processor. The publishing can involve the collation of all the student paras into a xeroxed, class booklet which can be sent home to the parents.

WP01 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING AT THE WORD PROCESSOR........................... REF: WRITER’S WORKSHOP: INTRO: PP. 13-25, 313

MY SUMMER VACATION PROJECT: In about 125 words, write about something you experienced during your Summer Vacation.

DIRECTIONS:
SECTIONS 1 & 2 - Brainstorming Think back to your summer vacation experiences and in the two following sections - #1 Likes and #2 Dislikes - quickly jot down as many specific activities as you can remember.

#1 Likes

#2 Dislikes After about 10 minutes move your cursor down to Section #3

#3 Invisible Free Writing In the Invisible Free Writing space below, turn off your monitor and write invisibly on your topic - after about 10 minutes of invisible writing turn on your monitor and move to Section #4.

#4 Developing the Main Idea While referring to the brainstorming sections above, quickly develop these ideas into one or more rough "first draft" main idea paragraphs.

#5 Write the First Draft and Revise Choose the most interesting Main Idea from above and expand and revise it. Be sure to Choose: - an effective title - "grabber" opening sentences - appropriate words and sentences - a satisfying closing Check the mechanics of your draft for spelling, punctuation, and grammar. REVISE NOW use the COPY command to place a copy of this draft into Section #6 and invite your Peer Editor to analyze your work.

#6 Peer Editor Section Editor... please study the following draft and indicate all spelling and grammar flaws with ***** and insert suggestions in brackets using upper case letters. After you have done this turn to the Peer Editor Evaluation section.

#7 Peer Editor Evaluation - What was your first impression of this piece of writing? - What did you like most about it? ... least about it? Why? - How might this draft be improved? - Can you suggest how the ideas might be more clearly expressed? - Is there sufficient detail about the activity? ... too much? Suggestions... - Did the title grab your attention? ... the beginning? - What changes or improvements would you suggest? - Did you find the ending satisfying? ... If not, why not? - How could the ending be improved? - Coherence: Do the thoughts flow logically and smoothly from one to the next? (WW P. 313) Make suggestions... - Is there anything you do no understand? - Are there any problems with spelling, punctuation, capitalization, or sentence structure?

#8 FTEO Draft

#9 Final Draft

#10 Publish


3. WORD PRO INTRO: A PARAGRAPH IS LIKE A SANDWICH

TEACHER: Create some good topic (opening) and closing sentences for paragraphs. Present these to your students on a word pro. Their job is to finish off the paragraph by supplying an abundance of middle sentences... all related to the topic and conclusion. Let the students rotate to proof read each other's work. The role of the proof reader is to point out weaknesses by inserting ***** five stars and to make suggestions for improvement by inserting all comments IN EASILY RECOGNIZED UPPER CASE. I have found this to be a good, motivational, non-threatening approach to paragraph writing on a word pro. A few samples are included below:

"A PARAGRAPH IS LIKE A SANDWICH... The opening and closing sentences are like bread... ...the other sentences like the meat."

The "bread" sentences are supplied below. Supply the "meat."

The other day I realized how much my pet dog meant to me...
...I sighed with relief.

It reminds me of the time when I was staying at my grandmother's in Strathclair...
...I could taste the salty flavour of sweat as it dribbled down onto my lips.
ETC. ETC. ETC.


4. ANALYSIS/REPORT TEMPLATE: NOVEL - SHORT STORY - MOVIE - PLAY- DRAMA - SHORT STORY ANALYSIS

TEACHER: This is an all-purpose guide to encourage students to do optional reading. I believe it can provide needed structure for readers when they try to tackle reports. Students can use the following file as a template for a variety of analyses.

REVIEWER: REVIEW DATE: TITLE: AUTHOR: SOURCE: DATE: LENGTH:

SETTING: (Time, place, atmosphere or mood, weather...)

STORY TYPE: (Picaresque - sentimental - tragedy - comedy - farce - romantic - realistic - naturalistic - epic - psychological - autobiographical - satirical - historical - Sci.Fi. - gothic - factual - biographical - epistolary - mystery - western - fantasy - other...? Why? Discuss?)

IMPORTANCE OF LOCAL COLOUR:

P.O.V.: (Author (subjective or objective) - 3rd person - 1st person - omniscient) (Author intrusion):

CHARACTERS - MANNER REVEALED (Author - actions - thoughts - speech - appearance - words of others - influence of setting)

MAIN CHARACTERS DESCRIPTION: (Protagonist(s) and Antagonist(s):

MINOR CHARACTERS DESCRIPTION: (Indicate their significance)

To what extent are the characters flat, caricatures or stereotypes - which are well-rounded?

Mention one major decision the protagonist makes. What choices did he have? Why did he decide as he did? Can you tell if he was pleased or that he regretted his decision? How?

Note what changes, if any, the characters undergo in growth or deteriation in keeping with their personalities and temperaments.

ACTION - CONFLICT (with antagonist, nature, society, fate, self?), MOTIVATION and INFLUENCE OF SETTING:

PLOT - DEGREE OF COMPLEXITY (Use of subplots, flashbacks, summary, story within a story, suspense, interior monologue, foreshadowing, irony, importance of time (mood and atmosphere), other techniques.

STRUCTURE: Intro Inciting incident Rising action Climax Falling action Denouement

THEME: (What the author is trying to say - related to human values - implied by the action)

Examples of SYMBOLISM - MYTH - ALLEGORY - MOTIF - ALLUSIONS to other books, etc.

DIALOGUE: - (Amount and effect) - (Type of language used)

STYLE & TONE: (Optimism, pessimism, light, dramatic, depressing, comedy, flowery, factual, sparse)

Effectiveness of ENDING: (Satisfying, unsettling, tragic, surprise, shocking, ironical, pathos)

Significance of TITLE:

SYNOPSIS:

REFLECTION: What part of the work reviewed did you enjoy most? Why?

What are your criticisms of the work?

Other comments.

Compose at least 5 essay style questions based on this work and be prepared to answer them.

BIOGRAPHY of author, screenwriter, director, chief actor or some other appropriate person connected with this work. Include dates, home, education, influences, other works, accomplishments and awards, attitudes and values, his character, death, etc. 


5. ROLE-PLAYING AND/OR PERSONAL JOURNAL PROCEDURE
NOVEL INTERPRETATION ROLE PLAYING/JOURNAL ASSIGNMENT

TEACHER: I FIND THIS A USEFUL APPROACH TO ENCOURAGE YOUNG PEOPLE TO SIFT THROUGH THEIR OWN EMOTIONS AND VALUES AS WELL AS TO INTRODUCE THEM TO JOURNAL WRITING

Directions to students: As you read the novel each night jot down ideas from the story-line which would make good fodder for creating a make-believe first person journal. Put yourself into the protagonist's/antagonist's skin and write all your observations through his Point Of View (P.O.V.). Each day, with the assistance of your Word Processor, take yournightly rough notes and expand them into well-written journal entries. Do not print out and present your hard copy until you have proof-read, revised and edited many times.

FULL "A" CREDIT OPTION: Compile and include your own personal daily journal - juxtaposed with your role-playing effort. This might include your activities, hopes, frustrations, joys and so on, as you journey through this momentous year in home, school or elsewhere. Experiment with "dual personalities" or "two voices." Accompanying each entry made by the novel hero, create a personal diary entry based upon some similar experience you have lived. TEACHER NOTE: YOU MIGHT INCLUDE PROMPTING QUESTIONS/TOPICS FOR EACH CHAPTER TO GENERATE CREATION IDEAS. THIS APPROACH CAN BE APPLIED TO MOST NOVELS.


6. LEST WE FORGET - CREATIVE WRITING AND ROLE PLAYING

TEACHER: I have found this activity useful when preparing for November 11, Remembrance Day Services.

Choose one of the following scenarios and write... write....

Put down your thoughts in the form of: a diary, letter to the editor, letter to a loved one, or as a story you might tell to a small child.

Put yourself in another's shoes... role-play... pretend... become that person. Follow your heart and emotions.

Use the creative capabilities of your wordprocessor to the max.

The final step involves acting out your scenario. For this you will have to prepare an appropriate "war set"...complete with trenches, wire, devastation, etc. as well as a "period home front set." Plan to use sound effects, lighting, costumes, etc.

SCENERIOS: Your twin brother/sister (16 years) is overseas in a combat zone. You miss him/her. You may not see him/her again - ever!

Your son has been reported MIA (Missing In Action).

Your sweetheart/fiance has been killed in action.

You have returned from Remembrance Day service. Your son was killed 50 years ago. You are flooded with memories of his boyhood - his leaving for war - his letters - "the telegram" - the grief and loneliness. You have just seen his old classmates and chums (they are now retired and in their late 60s and 70s). Your thoughts are of what might have been had he lived - what if...? Try to convey your nostalgia and loneliness.

You are about to leave your home and loved ones - perhaps forever. You are being shipped overseas to fight for your country and way of life.

Your last thoughts.... Your fighter/bomber is in flames. You are trapped in your cockpit. Your life flashes before your eyes.


7. NOVEL INTERPRETATION PROCEDURE ON A WP: CALL OF THE WILD WORDPRO-BASED NOVEL INTERPRETATION

TEACHER: I USE THIS APPROACH WITH MANY OF MY CORE NOVELS. IT CAN BE ADAPTED TO MOST NOVELS...INCLUDED ARE A FEW SAMPLES FROM ADVENTURE AND SCIENCE FICTION NOVELS.

RELATED THEMES: TEACHER: Go through the novel and identify a list of related themes associated with the novel. This will be useful when you and your students are scrounging for related activities and resources to enrich research. ******LIST THE THEMES HERE*****

DIRECTIONS TO THE STUDENT: Chapter Paragraphs on the Word Processor

Read a chapter each night for homework. Before you start to read, look over this assignment sheet for that chapter and make rough notes as you read. Bring these notes to class next day so that you are prepared to key in a full and meaningful answer into your word processor. If you do not have access to a computer on a certain day, write your answer long hand (one paragraph/answer per sheet) and keep these records in your Writing Journal Folder Part I. (TEACHERS SEE THE WRITING FOLDER ACTIVITY) The first paragraph in each chapter is based upon your interpretation of the novel, while the second paragraph is an imaginative writing.

TEACHER: Create a good all-chapter-encompassing question for each chapter... and pair this with an activity which would inspire the student to draw upon his own imagination for the second para. Some typical "imagination" topics follow which were used in the Jack London novel, The Call of the Wild.

Jack London identified himself with wolves and dogs. He was delighted when his friends called him "wolf" or "shaggy wolf". He signed his letters "wolf" and had his book marks engraved with the picture of a wolf-dog's face. Choose an animal that represents your personality. Write a story about this animal.

Describe an incident where you, or people in general, are in conflict with nature or wildlife.

Describe your happiest - most embarrassing - most disappointing or most fearful moment.

Choose a picture of a person or animal which has some relevance to the themes in this novel.

Describe this person or animal, making a direct appeal to the senses and reflecting the mood of the picture.

You are the sled purchased by the southern greenhorns. Describe one of your typical days.

Recall a time when you were very aware of nature. Share the moment with us in a well-planned and developed descriptive paragraph.

Write an expository paragraph in which you explain one of the following: How to get a parent angry How to make enemies How to fail Language Arts How to write an interesting paragraph (Refer to observations you made from the filmstrips and videos)

CONCLUSION: Proofread (after you have proofread your own work, swap with another student and proofread each other's), revise, (you may wish to use the spellchecker), save again, print out and turn in your finished copy for credit.


8. NOVEL INTERPRETATION PROCEDURE ON A WP: SCIENCE FICTION

SCIENCE FICTION WORDPRO-BASED STUDY

TEACHER: THESE ARE A FEW SCIENCE FICTION IDEAS/THEMES WHICH CAN BE PLUGGED INTO THE A WORDPRO-BASED STUDY OF A NOVEL WHICH WAS INTRODUCED EARLIER.

DIRECTIONS for doing chapter paragraphs on the Word Processor:

* Read the assigned chapters each night for homework. * Before you start to read, look over this assignment sheet and make rough notes as you read. * Bring these notes to class next day so that you are prepared to key full and meaningful answers into your word processor. * The Chapter Analysis Notes must be keyed in and saved with WORKS Word Pro. * It is recommended that the Imagination Paragraphs also be done on computer but those for which you do not have sufficient computer time may be hand-written and collected in your Writing Journal Folder. * At least one chapter must be completed during every school day. * If you can not finish your work on a computer for a certain day, write your answer long hand (one paragraph/ answer per sheet) and keep these records in your Writing Journal Folder. * All daily assignments must be completed either by word processor or by hand. * The first paragraph in each chapter is based upon your interpretation of the novel, while the second paragraph is an imaginative writing. * You must also provide an alternate chapter title for each chapter. * All answers must be written in complete sentences and paragraphs. * All work must be revised by at least one fellow student who will indicate all spelling and grammatical errors with "******". * It is then the responsibility of the author to correct all indicated errors. * After all paragraphs have been written and re-written, revised and fully corrected, the entire assignment (Chapters 1 - 17) must be sent to the printer so that a hard copy may be turned in for evaluation. Hand-written versions must also be presented at this time - clearly notated, in the Writing Folder. * Students aiming for optional credits should consider working on APPROACHES II - IV or other optional assignments based on related theme materials.

TEACHER EVALUATION
25% Completeness - Effort
25% Content - Accuracy of Research - Quality
25% Mechanics - Proofreading/Revisions, Grammar, Spelling, Punctuation
25% The ability to create a variety of complete sentences AND to build well-crafted paragraphs from these sentences
_________________% Draft # Total Mark__________________________________________________% COMMENTS

RELATED ACTIVITIES AND REFERENCES FOR THIS INTEGRATED ENGLISH ASSIGNMENT NOVEL AND SHORT STORY READINGS - VIDEO - COMPUTER SOFTWARE - WORD PROCESSING - NOTEBOOK AND JOURNAL - GROUP DISCUSSION - GROUP AND TEACHER PRESENTATIONS - BULLETIN BOARD DISPLAYS - AUDIO-VISUAL PRESENTATIONS - ROLE PLAYING - INTEGRATION WITH RELATED THEMES THROUGH OTHER NOVELS, MOVIES, RADIO PLAYS, DOCUMENTARIES, JOURNALISM ASSIGNMENTS, COMBINING SENTENCES PARAGRAPHS, SPEECHES, SCRIPTS, SIMULATION GAMES, CD-ROM...

RELATED THEMES TEACHER: LIST 10-20 TO PROMOTE FUTURE DISCUSSION AND RESEARCH

IMAGINATION PARAGRAPHS FOR EACH CHAPTER:

* Write about a funny dream or a nightmare you have experienced. SUGGESTIONS: - Your story should have a beginning, middle and end. - Your beginning should capture your reader's interest. - Your middle should relate events in the order in which they happened - chronological order. Details in the description of the action should "bring the events to life" for your reader. - Your ending should satisfy the reader's expectations. S/he must not feel that your story has been a waste of time, or merely a trick. - Your story should contain, as close to the end as possible, a climax - the highest point of excitement, the decisive moment, and the turning point of the plot. You can create suspense by delaying the climax - and you can do this by using dialogue or description.

* Write about some memorable place or time in your childhood.

SUGGESTIONS: -Use your prewriting time for this assignment to concentrate on generating or inventing ideas - start by thinking about your childhood. -Try concentrating on places and times that were safe or frightening. -This should help you decide the topic for the assignment. -Then think about reasons for wanting to write about a particular place or time - through this you should discover your purpose for writing the assignment, and your main claim or thesis. -Next list as many details (supporting evidence) as you can about your topic, using all your senses to recall it: sight, sound, smell, taste, touch. -Do not be concerned about the order of your list - this prewriting is just for you. When you start your writing keep in mind who is going to read your assignment - you must know who your audience will be so that you may consider how you will recreate your experiences for your reader. You should also consider the format of this assignment. Because you are doing this assignment to familiarize yourself with the writing process, feel free to write a paragraph, essay, or letter. Start by stating your writing variables: TOPIC: AUDIENCE: PURPOSE: FORMAT:

* Write your autobiography.

SUGGESTIONS: Prewriting - Attempt to find a thread, an organizational tool, to keep your autobiography unified and concise. This "thread" may be a generalization about your life, or a quality or characteristic that you want to emphasize. In order to find the appropriate thread, you must do a bit of stocktaking of your life to date. Make a list of questions such as the following to discover a pattern in your life that might serve as a unifying device: (You may wish to work with one other person for this activity.) What are...your three best characteristics? ...your three worst? What people or events have been significant in your life? ...Why? Of what accomplishments are you proud? What are your goals and ambitions?

Now, for each of the above suggestions, list events that illustrate the generalization or characteristic that you want to emphasize...and under each of these events jot down details -- similarities and differences, pros and cons, etc.-- until you have built up a storehouse of information.

You must now decide how you are going to organize this material. What kind of organization shall you follow: CHRONOLOGICAL... CLIMACTIC... DECREASING IMPORTANCE... INCREASING IMPORTANCE ... SMALLER TO BIGGER... BAD TO GOOD... GOOD TO BAD... and so forth. You should also decide what tone and style you are going to adopt. There are many ways of saying the same thing - for example: STRAIGHTFORWARD. .. COLLOQUIAL... BREEZY... LECTURING... IRONIC... COMIC

* Describe similar disasters and/or punishments believed by other religions BUT present your work in typical newspaper format with headlines, leads, 5Ws, "inverted pyramid style," justified columns, etc.

* Pick a colourful ancestor from your family tree and describe his/her life and accomplishments in a biography.

SUGGESTIONS: Use the Prewriting suggestions in the Question 3 Autobiography to help you draft this assignment. If your ancestor is living, you may wish to interview your subject - but prepare your questions carefully. Here are some examples of questions you can ask: What do you think is...your best characteristic? ...your worst? What makes you... happiest?... most sad? ... proudest? Which countries have you visited? How many times have you moved? What would you do if you were elected for... PM... MP... Reeve, etc. What, do you feel, are your greatest ...accomplishments? ...setbacks? Find information on... dates... offspring... location in family tree... family history

* Write a letter to a pen pal describing your house, grounds and town. SUGGESTIONS: Your personal letter should have the following sections: SENDER'S ADDRESS DATE LINE SALUTATION (Dear...) BODY OF THE LETTER (Containing your descriptions) COMPLIMENTARY CLOSE (Yours sincerely, etc.) SIGNATURE

* Describe your birth day through the POV or eyes of another family member - mother, father, sibling, etc.... or through the eyes of a much younger you.... or... Create a dialogue using a variety of voices (doctor, nurses, visiting family members, other babies, etc.)

* What traditional beliefs held by our society, religion, government, culture, media, etc., do you question? Clearly express your views in an editorial or a soapbox speech. Be prepared to read your piece to the class.

* David's recurring dream is now starting to take on a symbolic meaning - it is becoming a symbol of paradise - a place far different from life in Waknuk. Describe one of your own recurring dreams which symbolizes hope or paradise or great pleasure for you. or * Create a journal entry in which you describe your most memorable day.

* As a representative of your telepathic group, write a formal business letter of complaint to the wayward Anne in which you present your concerns about her marriage to an outsider. Include suggestions as to how the situation might be rectified. Use a modified block style with mixed punctuation.

SUGGESTIONS: Good business letters should be planned carefully and revised during and after the composing process. As you write, keep asking yourself: Am I clear, correct and natural?... What facts are involved?... What message do I want to convey? You should not write business letters in a stilted, overly formal style - go directly to the point and explain facts in a natural way. Your writing should be direct, clear and grammatically correct. Be courteous in all your business letters. Even if you have been unjustly treated, you are more likely to solve the problem if you write pleasantly but firmly.

*Write a first- or third-person narrative essay describing a personal conflict (this struggle can be with another person, with nature, with society, or even with yourself).

SUGGESTIONS: Narratives are built on a series of chronological events: actual, imaginary, or a blend of both. PREWRITING - FIRST PERSON IDEAS: In what true-life situation have I really wanted something? What prevented me from having it? What was the nature of the conflict? Whom or what did it involve? How long did it take me to get what I desired?

PREWRITING - THIRD PERSON IDEAS: Whom do I know who always seems to be involved in some kind of conflict? Which conflict most intrigued me? Who was involved in the conflict? What was the nature of the conflict? How was it resolved? Was there anything that nearly prevented it from being resolved? How long did the conflict last? Who won?

Narratives are often improved by the use of dialogue, you are encouraged to include it in your work. The only rule about dialogue is to make sure it sounds real. Here is where slang, colloquialisms, and so on can be legitimately used in your writing. Be careful of strings of "he said," etc. and exaggerated expressions such as "she cooed" - once the speakers have been established and their style of speech made distinctive, it is possible to present their dialogue without speech tags. Use description and "word pictures" to help tell your story and to pull your reader into the story. Create vivid imagery through figurative comparisons, expressive verbs, and exact nouns. Long lists of descriptive words do not often help. Paragraph your narrative so that your audience will be able to read it easily. Ideally, paragraphs should develop a single idea fully and completely and end with another idea, suggestion, or hint of the next paragraph to entice the reader to push on. A new paragraph often requires some kind of transitional device to link it to the previous paragraph. When you use dialogue, include a new paragraph for each speaker. Sentences should not all be of a uniform length or structure. Try to create the same movement in your sentences that is in the action you are describing.

* In 200 to 400 words, write a set of instructions or directions on how to escape to your favourite vacation spot or "how to" any other activity you know how to do: ski, macrame, raise guppies, set up a computer or printer, etc.

SUGGESTIONS: Your format for this assignment can be a letter, report, memo, expository paragraph, or whatever you wish. Furthermore, you can use lists, maps and diagrams.

PREWRITING: List all the information that your reader will need. Do not be concerned about the order, simply list information as it occurs to you. What materials will be required? What terms will you have to define? What steps will your reader have to take to perform the activity? Number the steps in your list in the order you expect your reader to follow them - write your first draft following the order you have set up. If you need to define a term, try to work the definition into your devices. Check to ensure that your directions are complete and in the right order.

* Write a letter to yourself from a relative no longer living. Describe another time... another place.

* Write a letter to the editor of your local paper in which you: - present your views on a modern day controversial issue. SUGGESTIONS: Like a good persuasive essay, an effective letter to the editor should clearly state and support your opinion. Your purpose is to convince someone of your point of view; however, you will have to do so in very little space. You may want to summarize the argument briefly before refuting it. Have a strong opening. You must catch the editor's attention in order for your letter to be published. Make your points clearly and concisely. Have a strong ending. Leave your readers with the most important thought.

* Write a report on the CROSS and its significance to Christianity. Include a bibliography.

SUGGESTIONS: Reporting information is one of the most common tasks you will have in school or in business. While the research report requires a careful and diligent search for facts, the facts should be presented in your own style. The report should include a blend of your own prose and quotations from authorities. After you have selected a TOPIC ask yourself what you, or your readers, want to know about that topic. The journalistic 5 Ws serve as a useful checklist: WHO - WHAT - WHEN - WHY - WHERE and HOW? Gather information - check your sources: Encyclopedias, reference books, religious authorities, The Bible, documentaries. Read the material carefully and take notes. If your computer is not available at your source of information use index cards - they are easy to carry and to organize. Record your source, author, title, publisher, date, and page number. Organize your report by arranging your cards or computer data. Make a working outline consisting of topic, sub-topics and supporting facts. Fill out your outline into a finished report. List your references in a bibliography.

* Present your views, in the style of the Sealand lady, on any or all of the following issues: euthanasia - capital punishment - ethnic cleansing -genetic engineering - abortion - animal rights - "chrysalids" in our society...

* Write a short sequel to this chapter, tying together all loose ends. Use your best 'fictional-narrative-novel writing approach' in imitating the prose style of John Wyndham.

PUBLISH

Keep all your rough pre-writing notes on file until your final draft is approved.

Proofread all your work constantly!

Revise! Revise! Revise! Revise! Good writing is 90% revision.

FULL PARAGRAPHS ARE REQUIRED!!! - Be sure you have answered all questions fully. Your paragraphs s hould stand alone - should make sense to the reader - without having to read the question/directions. - This long-term assignment consists of 34 compulsory paragraphs. - Any paras not completed in the word processor printout MUST be hand written - one per numbered page - on Writing Folder sheets AND stapled to the printout. You must indicate that you have done this in the appropriate area in the printout - i.e. "See Writing Folder sheet #___."

A FULL PARAGRAPH MUST CONTAIN:

* An opening TOPIC sentence which introduces the theme of your para * Numerous DEVELOPING/SUPPORTING sentences exhibiting unity and coherence * A CONCLUDING sentence

Swap with colleagues and proofread each other's work - indicate all errors with ***** - do not revise their work - rather, point out all flaws and make suggestions in [UPPER CASE LETTERS IN BRACKETS].

REVISE...REVISE...REVISE!!! Craft your paragraphs to meet the evaluation requirements which have been presented at the beginning of this document.

Print out and turn in your "perfect copy" draft for evaluation on the DEADLINE DATE_________________. You may negotiate to re-work and re-submit your drafts until you achieve an "A" credit.

TEACHER: FOLLOWING ARE SOME SAMPLE IMAGINATION STYLE GENERATORS WHICH CAN BE PAIRED WITH CONTENT QUESTIONS FROM THE NOVEL (THESE WERE USED WITH JOHN WYNDHAM’S “DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS” AND “THE CHRYSALIDS”:

* Drawing upon personal experiences, relate a suspenseful event in your life.

* A common science fiction theme is that of the conflict between earthmen and some alien monster (B.E.M. - Bug Eyed Monster). Create your own science fiction story on this theme.

* Pretend you are blind for ten minutes and make mental observations of your new experiences in sound, smell, touch and taste. Describe your experience.

*Write a science fiction story in which you take some present or proposed invention and predict what the results of it might be in the future. Examples: time machines - "invisible" ray guns - mind readers - highly advanced computers or robots - devices to give men super powers - medical discoveries - life lengthening drugs or machines - transplants - weapons - space ships - communication devices etc.... Include an illustration of your "invention."

* Describe a memorable power outage which you have experienced.

* Pick a "cause" you feel very strongly about and present your views in an editorial in such a way that the reader will be won over to your point of view.

* Discuss how these same conflicting philosophies reveal themselves in our own present day society around such as issues as abortion, birth control, AIDS, euthanasia, poverty, famine, foreign aid, Medicare, etc.

* Describe a particularly frustrating and/or disastrous day at home or school.

* Describe how your views and tastes - likes and dislikes - have changed since you have entered puberty. Some of the things you might touch on include: lifestyle - food - entertainment - music - movies - recreation - reading - friends - adults - teachers - school - world issues etc.

* Write a science fiction short story in which you take some present characteristic or tendency of our society and predict what the results of it might be in the future. Examples: emphasis on money - credit - increasing dependence on machines - socialism - "big brother" governments - population boom - increased advertising - brainwashing - our tendency to be spectators rather than participators - our decreasing physical fitness - our dependence on drugs etc.

* Do some reading and research on the subject of UFO's. (Unidentified Flying Objects). Write a report on your findings as well as expressing your own personal opinions on the subject.

* Using your knowledge of UFO's picked up in the last chapter's research - write a piece of fiction centered on UFO's.

*Explain the statement: "...children have a different convention of the fearful until they have been taught the proper things to be shocked at." Illustrate the above statement with examples from your own experience.

* Research and describe the various inventions, diseases, catastrophes, and other events which have threatened the Earth and its civilizations throughout history. or Comment on the various theories surrounding the extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.

* Speculate on the various catastrophes which could possibly befall earth in the future - resulting in total or near extinction.

* Speculate on the pros and cons of leaving Strathclair to live in Winnipeg.

* Prophesy what life will be like on a western Manitoba farm 40 years from now.


9. PROTAGONIST DIARY - NOVEL OPTION

1. CHAPTER BY CHAPTER DAY BY DAY OBSERVATIONS

2. ILLUSTRATIONS/MURAL/STORYBOARD

3. INCLUDE MOMENTOS - MEMORABILIA -CLOTHING - WEAPONS - FOOD - ARTIFACTS - SOUVENIRS - ETC. FROM YOUR ADVENTURE. (ANY IMPORTANT ITEMS MENTIONED IN THE NOVEL WOULD BE APPROPRIATE)


10. NOVEL ASSOCIATED, THEMES-GENERATED ANTHOLOGY

1. APPROPRIATE SCIENCE FICTION STYLE COVER

2. REAR COVER 'BLURBS' AND REVIEW

3. CONTENTS PAGE

4. EXPLANATION AND ANALYSIS OF EACH CHAPTER TITLE

5. IMPORTANT QUOTES FROM EACH CHAPTER

6. APPROPRIATE RELATED ITEMS FOR EACH CHAPTER -CARTOONS -NEWS CLIPPINGS DEALING WITH THE THEMES -ARTICLES ON THE THEMES OR FUTURE -TV & MOVIE REVIEWS -MAPS OF ROUTES & PLACES MENTIONED -ANY POETRY RELATED TO THE THEMES COVERED -SHORT STORIES -SONGS & VIDEOS -RELEVANT TV SHOWS & MOVIES SYNOPSES -ILLUSTRATIONS -SHORT WRITE-UPS OF SCIENCE FICTION AUTHORS -SCIENCE FICTION BOOK REVIEWS -IMAGINATIVE IDEAS OF YOUR OWN


11. CHARACTER ANALYSIS - QUOTATIONS BASED

Dialogue is one of the most effective means or ways that an author has to reveal character. Find as many quotes as you can which effectively reveal the character of the protagonist and/or antagonist in the novel. Enter all your quotations into your WP so that you can expand upon them later. Discuss, fully, the personality trait revealed by each quotation. Some suggested traits are listed below - feel free to use these as well as any others you have found. Indicate the chapter number where each quote was found. Try to choose quotes which reveal very prominent characteristics and also ones which reveal changes in character. Decide on an effective way to present or display your finished work. TEACHER INSERTS SUGGESTED CHARACTERISTICS...


12. JOURNALISM: DESKTOP-PUBLISHED, NOVEL-RELATED NEWSPAPER NOVEL

TEACHER: ALMOST ANY NOVEL CAN BE PLUGGED INTO HERE. THIS IS A GOOD INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER DESKTOP PUBLISHING AND THE WORLD OF JOURNALISM... IT ALSO PROMOTES GOOD GROUP COOPERATION.

Based on the events in your featured novel, create a newspaper.

Use each of the chapters to create a different feature for your paper When you have completed all of the items, use your desk top publishing program to design a typical newspaper layout. When you are happy with the content and 'look' of your paper...print it...and display it.

1. FEATURE STORY (Setting) Write a feature story on the city/town**** - complete with pictures, diagrams, charts, maps etc. Give a full description of this area of the world, zeroing in on climate, history, topography, culture, etc.

Chapter 2. NEWS STORY Report on the main inciting incident...rising action...

Chapter 3. EDITORIAL Write an editorial on a major social/moral problem in the story, expressing a strong personal point of view.

Chapter 4. INTERVIEW Conduct an interview with the hero. Touch on his background, his qualifications, his opinions...

Chapter 5. LETTER Prepare an intercepted and published letter of reference concerning a character in the novel.

Chapter 6. EDITORIAL Write an angry editorial about an incident or on a controversial issue in the novel.

Chapter 7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR Write a 'letter to the editor' from novel character.

Chapter 8. A VARIETY OF SPECIAL FEATURES: i.e. horoscope - weather - crossword - comics - public opinion polls - display ads - sports columns - hobby columns...

Chapter 9. FEATURE STORY Write a feature story for your "On the Beat" column. Your feature involves a profile on a character in the novel.

Chapter 10. NEWS STORY Cover a major event ...novel climax, etc.

Chapter 11. ANN LANDERS Write a letters to the advice column followed by replies from the advice columnist. Letters could come from important characters in the novel.

Chapter 12. WOMEN'S SECTION FEATURE Compile a feature on female character in the novel...expressing a female point of view...background...trials & tribulations...grief... frustrations... loves...innermost thoughts...

Chapter 13. CLASSIFIED ADS Insert a number of classified ads ("For sale", Wanted, etc.) from a variety of key characters in the novel. Chapter 14. NEWS STORY Case Solved!!!!! Wind up the novel.

Design a Nameplate and a pleasing layout format for your front pages.

Sprinkle your paper with relevant cartoons, features, items and typical newspaper 'things'. Make it relevant to the novel and INTERESTING!!!!


13. JOURNALISM: NEWS LEADS

TEACHER: Role-play a newsworthy character...enter your class in character - with appropriate costuming and build-up - and hold a press conference. Have someone introduce you with just a hint of the main story you represent. Invite your class to ask probing questions and make notes. They must then write up a news lead and story - newspaper or radio/TV - with appropriate use of 5Ws and style.

TEACHER: In preparation for the above assignment you may want to try some prepared written releases, such as the one which follows - complete with errors.

Re-write the following news stories so that they are free from errors and follow the inverted pyramid/5Ws rules of journalism.

1. "The call come in at 7-30pm last night. I responded and was on the seen by 7:22. At the corner of 10th & Victoria I seen a man down - pined under a motorcycle and a 4-wheel drive jeep with the girll and a front fender caved in. I ascertained that the cyclest were Joe Brown , 41-22nd St. He was unconshious and as far as I know is still in a comma. The jeep was drove buy Harry Smith, 8 Cedar Bay. I smelled liquor on his breathe so I took him down to the station four a breath-alyzer. Sure enough he hit about .18. He admitted runing a red light. W'ell probly charge him latter today. We're kinda waiting too see what happens two Brown. If he dies, its criminal negligance." [Sgt. Peter Gunn, Brandon PD]


14. COMPUTER POSTER

TEACHER: Compile a collection of thoughtful poster slogans (a random few of the many hundreds I have hoarded are included below). One good source is a catalogue of commercial posters offered for sale to schools...the slogans are usually readable in the ads. Offer or assign appropriate "sayings" to students and have them create their own posters on a computer paint program.

ACHIEVING STARTS WITH BELIEVING **WITHOUT STRESS MY LIFE WOULD BE EMPTY **ALL THINGS ARE DIFFICULT BEFORE THEY ARE EASY **QUIET! FUTURE IN PROGRESS **WE'RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER **ARE YOUR EARS IN GEAR? **LEARN FROM THE PAST, LIVE IN THE PRESENT, AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE


15. QUOTATIONS INTERPRETATION IN A DATA BASE

TEACHER: Pick 25-100 quotations from a novel or play strong in quotations... i.e. Shakespeare. Then plan and set up a data base for the student to work on - possible field names:

#Quote: Quotation: (i.e."To be or not to be") Page: Who or About: Whom: When: Where: What: Why: How: 5Ss: (Five senses Sight, Sound, Smell, Touch, Taste) Significance:

Not every quotation will lend itself to full discussion in every field... but with a bit of a stretch this format works quite well. The student should soon become quite adept at switching between Form and List views, doing sorts, etc. This can be followed up with an "open data base" test to see how skilled the student is in using a reference data base... as well as driving home the relevance of the student-collated information.


16. VIDEO SHORT STORY ANALYSIS

TEACHER: A great number of famous short stories have been adapted to film/video. I have found Science Fiction-based episodes to be especially useful for this activity: Stephen Spielberg's Amazing Stories, Ray Bradbury Theatre, etc. Such short stories can be screen on a large screen television while the students view and record relevant information at their computer workstations. After the rough info has been keyed, the student then works at polishing his/her work into a finished report.

Procedure: Save this file as SHORT#YO.E91 View the video and key in notes, as you go, to add details to the following topics: (i.e. Identify/Discuss/Explain/Give Significance of:

PRODUCER/DIRECTOR/WRITER/SERIES, ETC.

TIE-IN WITH THE LITERATURE UNIT WE ARE STUDYING

STAR(S)

EPISODE TITLE

CHARACTERS PROTAGONIST ANTAGONIST SUPPORTING

SETTING: ATMOSPHERE/MOOD, TIME, PLACE, MUSIC, SOUND FX

PLOT: ACTION, CONFLICT

THEMES, SYMBOLS, METAPHORS, LITERARY REFERENCES & DEVICES:

ENDING:

EPISODE TITLE:

SYNOPSIS:


17. SONG/POEM CHECKLIST AND ANALYSIS GUIDE

TEACHER: This is a checklist that I have compiled a checklist for interpreters of songs on audio or video tape. Listeners plug their own impressions into the following topics headings on computer - they then expand, polish, print out and present to the class:

PRESENTER: DATE: ANALYSIS #

1. TITLE 2. SOURCE 3. SONGWRITER 4. PERFORMER 5. BIOGRAPHY: PERFORMER AND/OR SONGWRITER 6. MUSIC TYPE 7. TYPE OF VIDEO (IF AVAILABLE) 8. GUEST ARTIST(S) 9. ORIGINAL PERFORMER 10. COPYRIGHT YEAR OR APPROXIMATE YEAR ORIGINALLY PERFORMED 11. INFLUENCES 12. INSTRUMENTATION 13. AWARDS, IMPACT, ETC.

INTERPRETATION

14. THEME 15. TITLE SIGNIFICANCE 16. HOOK(S) (TITLE/LYRICS/SOUNDS/RIFFS) 17. LYRICS (VERSES AND CHORUS) 18. SUMMARY (INCLUDE YOUR INTERPRETATION) 19. MOOD-ATMOSPHERE 20. MESSAGES-RELEVANCE 21. SYMBOLISM-IMAGERY-WORD PICTURES 22. UNUSUAL USES OF LANGUAGE 23. CLICHES-PUNS-HUMOUR 24. RHYME (SCHEME/INTERNAL/TYPES/METRE/EFFECTIVENESS, ETC.) POETIC AND LITERARY DEVICES (i.e. similes, metaphors, alliteration, onomatopoeia, allusions, symbolism, repetition, personification, irony, hyperbole, spoonerisms, parody, sarcasm, satire, allegory, etc. 25. LITERARY/SOCIETAL/CULTURAL/GENERATION INFLUENCES 26. VIGNETTES ASSOCIATED WITH THIS SONG, ARTIST, VIDEO... 27. WEAKNESSES IN LYRICS, MUSIC, ARRANGEMENTS, PERFORMANCE, VIDEO INTERPRETATION... 28. WHAT I LIKE MOST ABOUT THIS 'SONG POEM'... 29. MY FAVOURITE LINES IN THE POEM... 30. OTHER SONGS OR POEMS WITH SIMILAR THEMES 31. OTHER SONGS BY THIS PERFORMER AND/OR SONGWRITER 32. EVALUATION (SELF, CLASS, AND INSTRUCTOR)


18. STUDENT ANTHOLOGY DIGEST

TEACHER: I usually use this in computer awareness classes but the idea and many of the topics can be incorporated into most subject areas:

Using Readers Digest and various current computer magazines as models, create your own "Computer Digest." Everything in this anthology must be computer and technology related. Information for your mag will be found in classroom lectures, discussions & materials, newspapers & newsmagazines, Internet searches, television broadcasts, computer & Net magazines, videos, CD-ROMs, etc. Your finished edition should include illustrations, journal writings, daily impressions, summaries, fiction, DTP-type layout and design, reviews, oddities, vignettes, etc. - with references where ever possible. A bibliography and accompanying data base of resources is recommended.

PART I- INTERNET SECTION Part one of your magazine should be an InterNet section with the following headings:

1. Log - a daily log of your classroom accomplishments while using the computer and the Internet.

2. Net Sites - keep a list of interesting sites. You should include site name, URL address, and a description of what you found interesting at 3. Up-to-date developments on the InterNet. Include information presented in class, as well as your own observations from outside research using the media.

4. Your personal homepage: Step 1: a paste-up layout of how you want your page to look...include a well-thought-out design with appropriate fonts, graphics, features, and information which reflects your interests.

Step 2: your ideas transferred to computer and programmed in html or with the help of a program such as NetScape 3 editor

Step 3: the final version of your homepage posted on the World Wide eb. Your page should also be registered with the most popular search services such as Yahoo, Web Crawler, Alta Vista, etc. The more dedicated student may wish to add audio clips, animation, counters, guest book, scanned photos, graphics, etc.

The number of steps you will be able to complete will depend upon your dedication to the project and the amount of time available on the Net.

PART II: COMPUTER DIGEST

Adapt magazine features and departments such as: - E-Mail correspondence with other schools - worldwide - illustrated cover page with logos - contents page listing all features with page numbers - editorial page - editor's notes - commentaries - news & notes - recent technology breakthroughs - what's new - feedback - letters - input/output - Q&A - tips & tools - hardware clinic - disk updates - workplace - business software - procedures - learning machine - educational software - multimedia section - telecomputing - internet - software guide - game reserve - reviews: software, hardware, videos, books, movies... - for the programmer - puzzles - mind games - behind the screens: people bios, events, news, trends - tek news stories of the week - funny bits - cartoons - humorous vignettes - word power - all in a day's work etc. etc. etc. make up your own departments create...create...create...create...create

Your finished product must be laid out in a neat, logical, informative, creative, and appealing fashion. This is a flexible, on-going, course-long project - it is important to start work on it early.

Feel free to colour your graphics.

All pages must be collated and bound appropriately.


19. CYCLES Creative Writing and Planning on a Word Processor

Choose a favourite holiday, celebration, or season and, in the THINK (BRAINSTORMING or PRE-WRITING) section below, quickly key in all the words you associate with that time period. Then use the 'down arrow' to go to the THUNK (WRITING) section and complete the sentence: "My favourite holiday/season/celebration time is..." Key in one more sentence and then move to the computer on your left and add a sentence to your classmate's composition on his computer. Make reference to the THINK section. Keep moving to your left each time you contribute a sentence, until you have worked on each computer in the room. When you return to your own computer, use the delete, insert, move, copy, spellcheck commands to place a proofread, revised copy in the THANKS Section. Share your hybrid masterpiece with the class. THINK (BRAINSTORMING PRE-WRITING) THUNK (WRITING SECTION)

THANK SECTION -Proofreading Revising Printing


20. SAMPLE SHORT WORD GAMES

TEACHER: IF YOU LOOK AROUND, YOU WILL PROBABLY FIND HUNDREDS OF SHORT ACTIVITIES WHICH CAN BE ADAPTED TO COMPUTER SITUATION - I COLLECT THESE I N A FILE I CALL WORD GAMES...THEY ARE USEFUL TO THROW AT A CLASS NEAR THE END OF A PERIOD - A FEW SAMPLES FOLLOW:

ALPHABET SENTENCE "A Britisher can do everything famously: greet hirsute Indians jovially, kill lions mutely, narrate odd parables quixotically, refuse sustenance tartly, upbraid vampires, wax xylophones, yoke zebra."

Work out your own alphabet sentence using the same alphabetically ordered structure. Use your dictionary and thesaurus!

ANONYMOUS AUTOBIOGRAPHY Write an autobiography. Do not use proper names for any of the relatives or friends which you include in your bio. Save to a class file along with all the bios of your classmates. Read and try to identify each of the anonymous autobiographies written by your classmates.

WORD BEE Your instructor will dictate words from one of your current subject units - i.e. computer technology, geography, English, Christmas words, music/movies, etc. Write out each word as it is dictated. If you get a word wrong, you must move down a level - to get back up a level you must get 5 words right, in succession.

Everyone starts in ............UPPER CASE (CAPS LOCK)
Next level down is indicated by writing in lower case Down to....................................
Bold Face C-B Down to....................................
Italics C-i Down to....................................
Underline

If you hit the lower level you will stay there until you get 5 words right, in a row.

The last person knocked out of the UPPER LEVEL is Supreme Winner. At the end of the game, the person with the most word placed in the UPPER LEVEL is the Ultimate Winner.

JOINT AUTHORSHIP Compose an outline for an original short story. Divide the outline into as many individual entries as there are students in the class.

Take turns going to other computers, choosing the part of the outline you like best, and writing a contributing para. Before you start writing you should read the whole outline and the paras that your classmates have done before and after your segment. Strive for continuity. Option: Choose the most interesting outline done in the class and draw lots to see which part each of the contributors will write. When everyone has completed a para, collate the material into one short story. JUMBLED PARAGRAPHS (PARA JIGSAW) The following paragraphs are out of sequence. Study them and assemble them in the most logical order possible, thus reconstituting the original excerpt. Use the copy/move procedure. 1. "Who are you -- the press?" inquired Josella. 2. She was quite right. It was that simplicity that seemed somehow to be the nucleus of the shock. From very familiarity one forgets all the forces which keep the balance, and thinks of security as normal. It is not. 3. Josella lay facing upward with a faraway look in her eyes. I thought perhaps I could guess something of what was passing in her mind, but I said nothing. She did not speak for a little while, then she said: 4. She nodded. "True enough. I've been in places where they are out of hand. Quite nasty. But in England -- well it's hard to imagine that here." 5. "Are you?" she asked. 6. "More or less," said the young woman. "At least, I'm the official record. Elspeth Cary." 7. "You know, one of the most shocking things about it is to realize how easily we have lost a world that seemed so safe and certain." 8. "So soon?" I remarked. "I trace the hand of our order-conscious Colonel." 9. "Well, I think they're troublesome enough to be taken seriously when they get out of hand," I told her. 10. "That'll be Ivan," said Miss Cary. "He thought he might manage to find one. I must go and get a picture of him landing. See you later." And she hurried off across the grass. 11. Her reply, if she had been about to make one, was forestalled by the sound of an engine overhead. We looked up and presently saw a helicopter come drifting across the roof of the British Museum. 12. "You're quite right," she agreed. She turned to look at Josella. "And you are Miss Playton. I've often wondered---" 13. "Um," said Miss Cary thoughtfully. "Uh-huh." She turned to another subject. "What's all this about triffids? she asked. 14. Josella lay down, clasped her hands behind her head, and gazed up into the depths of the sky. When the helicopter's engine ceased, things sounded very much quieter than before we had heard it. 15. "There'll not be a lot to stop them here now," I said. 16. "They think," added Josella, "that Bill here is either scary or scatty on the subject." 17. Miss Cary turned a straight look at me. Her face was interesting rather than good-looking, with a complexion browned by stronger suns than ours. Her eyes were steady, observant, and dark brown. 18. "Now look here," interrupted Josella. "Why should the one static thing in a collapsing world be my reputation? Can't we forget it?" 19. I don't think it had ever before occurred to me that man's supremacy is not primarily due to his brain, as most of the books would have one think. It is due to the brain's capacity to make use of the information conveyed to it by a narrow band of visible light rays. His civilization, all that he had achieved or might achieve, hung upon his ability to perceive that range of vibrations from red to violet. Without that, he was lost. 20. I saw for a moment the true tenuousness of his hold on his power, the miracles that he had wrought with such a fragile instrument....

HOMONYM HARVEST TEACHER: THIS IS A SIMPLE WARM UP TO THE LONGER GOOD KNIGHT, SUITE PRINTS ASSIGNMENT WHICH FOLLOWS.

Homonyms are words that have different meanings but are pronounced the same. Example: What does a female deer use for baking? Doe dough

How many twins-to-the-ear can you identify from the following clues?

1. What do you call a bucket that has seen a ghost?
2. What did the fancy flying machine call the undecorated one?
3. What is a group of musicians that isn't allowed to play?
4. What do you say in the evening to a soldier in shining armor?
5. How did the plate introduce the steak to the potatoes?
6. What is perfume that is mailed?
7. What is a reddish-purple vegetable that is all worn out?
8. If a big rock is brave, what do you call one that's even braver?
9. What is clam strength?
10. If a devil is completely sinful, what is an angel?
11. What are groups of sailors on an ocean pleasure trip?
12. What do you call a less expensive bird?
                 Now...try making up some of your own...


21. A HOMOPHONE STORY - FEATURING 140 PAIRS OF HOMONYMS

GOOD KNIGHT, SUITE PRINTS (with apologies to Walter Mitty)

Homophones sound alike but differ in spelling and meaning, like knight/night, suite/sweet, and prints/prince. How many of the 140 pairs can you find in this tale?

DIRECTIONS: When you discover a pair of homonyms do the following: beside the first occuring word of the pair, key in number of the pair (going by the order in which you have discovered them) AND rewrite, in CAPITAL LETTERS, the two words of the pair (i.e. at the word knight you would write: knight 1.KNIGHT/NIGHT ... suite 2.SUITE/SWEET ... prints 3.PRINTS/PRINCE, etc.

Create a GLOSSARY at the end of the story in which you will define, with the help of your dictionary, all the words on which you are not sure of the meaning. 


Russell Wood, a nearly bald man of modest mien, wore clothes of word serge and a tie with just the merest flecks of colour. Unless you focused on his tie, he almost disappeared: His hair matched his face, which matched his suit -- all grays. Alone at his teller's cage, idle and bored, Russell took a peek at the frieze along the bank's ceiling. There was a knight, a minstrel with a lute, an urn, a lyre. Russell swayed on his feet and the room began to reel as he daydreamed.

Sir Claude de Bois reined his horse and rode at a slower gait. As the castle bell tolled, he saw the lord of the manor wave his sword at an empty metal coffer. "You vile villein, to steal my gold!" The weak serf cowered as the baron sent the steel weapon toward his heart. Sir Claude bawled: "Stop, by the Holy Rood! I am de Bois! I mete out justice and bring aid and succor to all men. ***** base. Don't try my mettle or, rude coward, you'll be sealing your fate."

Suddenly through the grille of the cage came the hoarse bass voice of a constant cougher: "Freeze, sucker! Now, raise your hands. High." Russell looked but saw no one. "Didn't you hear me?" There was an edge of real pique verging on choler in the rough voice. "Do as I told you." "Do you mind, sir? I heard you but I can't see you," sighed Russell. "Never mind the sighs, liar. Look down here. Damn! I'm losing patience." The Teller ducked his head and saw a vain, wee man only four feet high who paced up and down, stopping at intervals to flex his impressive arm muscles. He wore a tee shirt, suede jacket, and blue jeans. Over his seamed forehead and ape-like brows perched a wig, apparently tacked on with flour paste. His nose went straight for a bit, then took a sharp turn to the side. Yet Harry "Peewee" Farplotz, the world's smallest and most inept bank robber, had style. As he paced, a veil seemed to fall over Peewee's eyes:

Dr. Malcolm Farquahar stepped out of the hansom cab and paid his fare. "Another wholly daring feat accomplished for The Cause,"he said as he flicked his ruff. None of his patients, indeed few in London, knew that the foppish medico was in fact a one-man-war-against-injustice in the guise of the Purple Pimpernel, master spy, who mined the terrorists of the French Revolution of their cache of francs.

During the instants that the pint-size hood mused, thoughts chased through Russell's mind. He was considering gambling on an act of derring-do when he saw Peewee's aide, a very broad broad, pointing a big black gun at him. Rose "Mean Queen" Farplotz was as outsize as her husband was undersame. Her beet-red hair was tied in a messy knot. She wore a wrap of mangy furs masquerading as minks and a four-carat rhinestone ring. "Not well-bred," thought Russell, "but oddly handsome." And then she too fell into a daze:

Chaste Rosalind, the shepherdess, rowed on the incoming sea tide. She began to wade in with her pail of mussels, as behind her on the strait, the surge of the surf moved to the barren shore. The rays of the morning sun glinted from a vein of silver ore in a boulder. A lone tern wheeled. As Rosalind headed for her secret vale, she could sense its peace. The dew had disappeared and the mist had vanished, quiet as a nun. She heard the caws of crows as the flocks soared over the copse of yews; a sole hare started to browse. Near the fields of hay and rows of ry, a deer family -- hart, doe, and half-grown fawn -- stopped to graze. A bee buzzed over the furze. Rosalind hugged her slim waist in delight as she inhaled the scent of phlox. She picked a flower and heard a rustle in the bushy brake as a herd of sheep appeared, a woolly lamb gamboling beside each ewe. She passed by the stile, went through the gate, and bathed her feet in the crystal water of the tiny duct that led from the dam. She hummed a hymn for this balm to her soul.

Rose's return to reality was abrupt. "This doll could waste you," Peewee snarled. "She knows how to use that gun. Last week she blew away four guys. And," he held up a vial of pale liquid, "this is a bomb. So let's have the bread, the loot, the dough." Russell stopped and weighed the situation as an uneasy silence reigned. Then he got out the cash box and threw it on the counter. "Take it. Be my guest, but the sum total is only eight hundred dollars and some cents." Russell's eyes were drawn, as though by a magnet, to Rose's big gun, which was now held loosely at her side. He knew that the tough facade had cracked and he felt bolder. With a wry smile, he said, "I'm only a simple teller." "Gimme a break," Peewee whined. "We didn't figure you for a real too. Well, hi! You're my idol, the gallant Pimpernel, the prince of spies. And," he made a bow to Rose, "this minx, this belle, this fair maid would be Rosalind." Russell stopped with a groan. "Oh, dear, I owe you an apology. I pushed the alarm, and the police will be here soon." "No need to fret, son, we'll beat the rap," said Peewee. "Not a penny has changed hands. Close the cash box and wipe off my prints. Then, just watch as Rosy eats her piece of hardware." Rose calmly ate the gun, a creation made of a carved carrot dyed black. "And now," said Peewee, "I'll just drink the liquid bomb and that ought to sew it up." He knocked back the tea that had posed as TNT. When the cops got there they found a disappointing paucity of perpetrators; no villain to collar, no one to grill. "It was a false alarm, in a manner of speaking," Russell told them with tact. The police made out their report while Rose started to coo at their fierce attack dogs, who wagged their tails, put their paws in her lap, gently clawed her furs, and licked her nose. For the three new-found friends, the nonheist had been a coup. One night a week they would meet for a "Days of Yore" fete when they ate well and wined well and told tales of the past.


22. CHRONO LOG CREATION...WITH A SAMPLE FROM “FORREST GUMP”

CHRONO LOG//VISUAL PURSUIT ASSIGNMENT ON_____________________________________

TEACHER: The idea behind this activity is to motivate video viewers CREATION INSTRUCTIONS: As you study the video, keep records/notes from which you may create questions which will test the powers of observation of 'future watchers' or rival team members. After you and your team have completed your viewing of the video, develop - through a group process - at least 100 questions. Keep these questions in chronological order and number them 1 thru 100+. Where possible, place in the margin beside each question the initials of the group member(s) who suggested the question. Provide a separate answer key. Swap assignments with a rival research group. Questions could touch on things such as:

RELEVANT FILM CREDITS SUCH AS: film company, date, major actors, writer, music, story source (novel, original, stage play, short story, etc.) author background awards

OTHER PURSUITS: Film locations Setting (time, place, atmosphere) Film techniques and effects stunts sound background music and/or songs sound effects special effects dialogue plot - events costumes acting styles unusual scenery Story line differences and/or similarities from novel characterization local colour imagery metaphors irony appropriateness of title foreshadowing flashbacks effectiveness of foley artists mattes lenses shots and camera angles etc. etc. etc

Q # Creator Question Answer 1. WH What movie company produced/distributed this film? Paramount 1 2. JFK Who was featured in the starring role? Lassie 2

TEACHER: A SAMPLING OF THE 250 QUESTIONS FROM “FORREST GUMP” ...A STRONG MUSIC EMPHASIS IN THIS CHRONO LOG - VCR PAUSE CONTROL FACILITATES DISCUSSION...ANSWERS ARE SHOWN ON OVERHEAD TRANSPARENCY REGULARLY: 14. Director: 15. Resting place of drifting feather: 16. Location of first person in front close-up shot: 17. Name of book in which feather is placed: 18. Year on bus: 19. Approximate time of day: 20. Name of man on park bench: 21. Probable occupation of woman who joins him: 22. Magazine woman is reading: 23. Number of chocolates FG can eat: 24. Who always said, "Life is like a box of chocolates...You never know what you're going to get." 25. What mamma thought always told a lot about a person: 26. Why FG has to wear braces: 27. Who FG was named after: 28. "Club" was started by FG's namesake: 29. Name of gas station in FG's town: 30. FG lived close to Highway: 31. ................. town & county: 32. ........in the state of: 33. Type of fence around Gump House: 34. How Mrs. Gump makes ends meet: 35. FG's I.Q.: 36. Person responsible for raising FG's I.Q. 5 points: 37. Where is Mr. Gump: 38. Name of the guitar playing boarder: 39. What FG teaches the guitar player: 40. Where FG next sees the guitar player: 41. 3 instruments in "King's" band: (option: players' names) 42. ..............................: 43. ..............................: 44. New type of music played by the "King": ETC...ETC...


23. COMBINING SENTENCES/PROOFREADING ACTIVITIES.............................. “THE RIGHT STUFF”

COMBINING SENTENCES - SANDWICH PARA - PROOFREADING

FROM THE RIGHT STUFF BY TOM WOLFE

TEACHERS: The purpose of this assignment is to help develop student skills in editing on the word processor...and to use these skills to correct typos AND to combine short choppy sentences into more complex efforts. A sample exercise follows:

Combine the following simple sentences clusters into 16 more complicated sentences. There are a multitude of "typos" and spelling mistakes -- correct all mistakes.

After you have complete your combining paragraph -- use your knowledge of sandwich para creation to write a sequel para.


1.1 Muroc wus up inthe high elevations. 1.2 The elvations where the Mojave Dessert.

2.1 It looked like sum fossil landscape. 2.2 The landscrape had long since bean left behind. 2.3 Terrestrial evolution have left it.

3.1 It was ful of lake beds. 3.2 The lake beds wer huje. 3.3 The lake beds were drie. 3.4 The bigest was Rogers Lake

4.1 The only vegtation was Joshua trees. 4.2 The vegetation was other than sagebrush? 4.3 They were freeks of the plant wirld. 4.4 The freaks were twisted. 4.5 They loooked lie a cross. 4.6 The crose were between cactus and Japanese bonsai.

5.1 They have a green colour. 5.2 The green was dark 5.3 The green was petrified? 5.4 They had branches. 5.5 The brunches were horrbly crippled.

6.1 At dusk the Joshua trees stood out. 6.2 They were in silhouett 6.3 They were on the fosseil waistland. 6.4 They were like some arthritic nitemare.

7.1 In the sommer the temprature went up to 110 digrees. 7.2 This was as a matter of coarse. 7.3 The dry lake beds were covered in sand. 7.4 Their wood be windstorms. 7.5 They're would be sandstorms. 7.6 These were write out of a Foreign Legion movie.

8.1 At night it would drop to neer freizing. 8.2 In december it would start reigning. 8.3 The dry lake's would filll up. 8.4 The lakes would have afew inches off water. 8.5 Some sort of shrimps would wirk there way up. 8.6 They were putrid. 8.7 They were prehysteric. 8.8 They would come from out of the ooze. 8.9 Sea gulls would come flying in. 8.10 They would come a hundred miles ore more. 8.11 They would come frum the ocean. 8.12 They would come over the mountans. 8.13 Tehy wood gobble up these throwbacks. 8.14 The throwbacks were squerming. 8.15 Tjhe throwbucks where littel.

9.1 A pwerson had to see it. 9.2 Seaing was in order to beleive it. 9.3 There were flocks of see gulls. 9.4 The gulls were wheeling around in the ayr. 9.5 The air was out in th emiddle of the high dessert. 9.6 The wheeling was in the ded of Winter" 9.7 The gulls wear grazzing on crustaceans. 9.8 The crustashuns were antediluvian. 9.9 the crustaceans were in teh ooze. 9.10 The ooze was primordial

10.1 The wind bloo the few inches of watter. 10.2 The blowing was bak and fourth. 10.3 The blowing was across the lake beds: 10.4 The lake beds became absolutely smoothe. 10.5 The lake beds become absolutly levell.

11.1 The water evapourated in the spring. 11.2 The sun bakked the ground hard. 11.3 The lake beds became the gratest landing feilds ever discovered. 11.4 The landing fields were naturale. 11.5 The landing fields were also the bigest. 11.6 The landing fields had miles of room four errer.

12.1 That was highly desirable. 12.2 The nature of the ernterprise at Muroc made it so.

13.1 Their was wind at Muroc. 13.2 There was sand at Muroc. 13.3 There was tumbleweed at Muroc. 13.4 There were Joshua trees. 13.5 There was nothing except too hangers. 13.6 The hangars were quonset-style. 13.7 The hangars were side buy side. 13.8 There was nothing exept a cupple of gasoline pumps. 13.9 There was nothing except a single concreat runaway. 13.10 There was nothing ecxept a few tarpapper shacks. 13.11 There was nothing except some tents.

14.1 The oficcers stayed in the shacks. 14.2 The shakes were marked "barracks.' 14.3 Lesser soles stayed in the tense. 14.4 They froze all night. 14.5 They fryed all day.

15.1 Every rode in to the propertay had a gardhouse. 15.2 The guardhouse was manned by soldieres.

16.1 The enterprize was the developement of plaines! 16.2 The army had undertakien the enterprise? 16.3 The enterprise was in the godforsaken place. 16.4 The planes were supersonic jetz. 16.5 The planes were powereed by rokkets.

SANDWICH PARAGRAPH CONTRASTING SEQUEL

In contrast, the Strathclair airport is on Southwestern Manitoba's grassy prairies...

...These are some of the reasons I prefer to live and work in Strathclair.


24. SAMPLE IMAGINATION PARA TOPICS

TEACHER: Below are more imagination para topics which you might consider juxtaposing with combining sentences:

* Describe, with vivid detail, the sights and sounds which confront you as you clean up your room or your house on a Saturday afternoon.

* Discuss a controversial issue about which you have strong convictions - feelings almost approaching dogmatism or fanaticism.

* Comment on the protective shells you must shed as you move from childhood to teen age and then as you move from your teens to young adulthood.

* Choose what you feel are the seven natural or man-made wonders of the modern world. Defend each of your choices. * You are Helen Keller -- Describe your friends and classroom (or school) as you "see" them. * Choose your five favourite TV shows, presenting reasons for your choices.

* Write a letter to Reader's Digest Magazine enclosing a personal family anecdote which you are trying to persuade them to publish in PERSONAL GLIMPSES, LIFE'S LIKE THAT, ALL IN A DAY'S WORK, LAUGHTER THE BEST MEDICINE or HUMOUR IN UNIFORM.

* You are a seagull! Tear out a page from your diary and share it with us.

* Describe, in graphic detail, a recurring dream or nightmare which you have experienced.

* Describe, in elaborate detail, your favourite rock video. Conclude your description with a critique.

* Analyze the above video through the eyes of an anthropologist.

* Video dating is alive and well in many big cites - and some smaller ones too. In follow-up writing, prepare a Member Profile on yourself.

* If the concept of video dating is distasteful to you, explain your reservations about this "scientific approach" to romance.

* Some people have speculated that black holes are "entry points" to other universes - or to places in our universe millions of years in the past or future. Approach the edge of the black hole and write about what happens.

* Imagine yourself back in some earlier or future time period during some disastrous new plague situation. Describe events around you as well as the hopes and fears you may have.

* Write about some "legacy" from the past. Under the themes of energy conservation and self-sufficiency, for example, you might discuss the return of one of the following: 1) wood stoves; 2) underground (or earth-sheltered homes; 3) bicycling to work....

* The year is 2010. What changes have occurred in attitudes toward death and funeral ceremonies and rituals. Discuss your own beliefs about death in a follow-up paragraph.

* Prepare a paragraph outlining the all the ways in which you and the people around you, add pollution to our environment in a typical day.


25. RESPONSE JOURNAL

The purpose of this reading journal is to help you make sense of what you are reading. Many of the entries will be in the form of notes and paragraphs, but you may also include jottings, doodling, drawings, news leads, outside references, and even poems. When completed, the journal will represent not only your ideas about your reading A detailed journal entry should be made for each chapter and it is to include responses to as many of the following questions as you can you are reading.

After you have finished each day's reading, you are expected to make a journal entry to summarize your final reflections.

Try to use your word processor creatively -- set aside a work space to jot down your prewriting ideas while reading the novel and before you tart your formal writing. While writing, make full use of the copy, move, insert, delete, etc. commands. All normal proofreading, revision, spellcheck and editing procedures apply.

IDEA GENERATORS

1. I PREDICT... - What sorts of things could happen in the short or long term? - How might the story develop? - How has what has happened transformed your interpretation of past events?

2. WHAT PUZZLES ME IS.... WHAT I DON'T UNDERSTAND IS.... WHAT I NOW UNDER STAND IS.... - What puzzles or problems are you formulating at various reading moments? - What specific questions are you asking of the text?

3. WHAT I NOTICED IS.... - What gaps are you filling in in the text? - What connections between events are you making? - What is the point of each event? - Why was a particular character included in the novel? - What connections are you making between events in your own experience and events in the novel? - Does the book remind you of any other books you have read?

4. I SPECULATE/HYPOTHESIZE.... - What mental images are you forming of people, places and events in the novel? - What impression is the book giving you of the kind of person who wrote it? - Do you find it difficult to sympathize with his/her view of the world. - What kind of reader do you think the author had in mind as his audience for this book? - Are you having any difficulty suspending your own values, prejudices, or world views sufficiently to enable the book to work on you?

5. WHAT IMPRESSED ME IN THIS SECTION WAS....

6. WHAT I DISLIKED IN THIS SECTION WAS....

7. I WONDER ABOUT....

8. AS A JOURNALIST THE EVENT WHICH MOST INTRIGUED ME TODAY WAS... - Write a news lead employing the 5 Ws.

9. MY SENSES HAVE BEEN STIMULATED BY.... - To what degree have your senses of sight, sound, smell, touch and taste been aroused?

10. THIS SECTION STIRRED ME POETICALLY.... - Comment on the use of poetic devices such as similes, metaphors, onomatopoeia, imagery, symbolism, allusions, etc.

11. I WAS IMPRESSED BY THE QUOTATION...BECAUSE....

12. MY RECOMMENDATION FOR AN ALTERNATE CHAPTER TITLE FOR THIS SECTION IS....BECAUSE....

13. I AM LOOKING FORWARD TO READING THE NEXT SECTION BECAUSE....

14. IF I HAD WRITTEN THIS I WOULD HAVE CHANGED....

15. I WAS MOVED EMOTIONALLY BY....

16. I HAVE LEARNED.... - From considering questions like 1-15, what are your learning about: i. yourself as a person? ii. your own strengths and weaknesses as a reader?... what are your productive reading strategies? ...for example, when you come to "boring" bits, think about what boredom means to you, and what you are learning about yourself from being bored.

PREWRITING WORK AREA

1. I predict... 2. What puzzles me... What I don't understand... What I now understand 3. What I noticed is... 4. I speculate/hypothesize... 5. What impressed me in this section was... 6. What I disliked in this section was... 7. I wonder about... 8. 5Ws news lead... 9. 5Ss stimulation... 10. Poetic devices... 11. I was impressed by the quote...because... 12. My recommendation for an alternate chapter title is...because... 13. I am looking forward to reading the next chapter because... 14. If I had written this I would have changed... 15. I was moved emotionally by... 16. I have learned...

CHAPTER-BY-CHAPTER REFLECTIONS BY:


26. TWENTY POETRY WORD PRO ASSIGNMENTS

TEACHER: I issue students the following poems keyed to disk. Before the text of each poem, prepare a series of activities involving poetic characteristics, devices, and interpretation...all computer-based (I HAVE PREPARED AN ABUNDANCE OF THESE WHICH I CAN PROVIDE UPON REQUEST). After the text of each poem the student does a related assignment on the wordpro. Those related assignments are summarized below:

NARRATIVE POETRY

1. JOHNIE ARMSTRONG ANONYMOUS

SUMMARIZE EACH STANZA IN ONE COMPLETE SENTENCE. THEN GO BACK AND INSERT NEW DESCRIPTIVE SENTENCES BETWEEN EACH OF THE ORIGINAL SEVENTEEN.

2. A RED, RED ROSE ROBERT BURNS

YOU ARE THE OBJECT OF THIS PERSON'S LOVE. THESE INTENSE FEELINGS OF LOVE ARE NOT MUTUAL. WRITE A DEAR JOHN/JOAN LETTER (PROSE OR POETRY) SPURNING THIS PERSON. OR ADD VERSES EXHIBITING ABUNDANT USE OF COLOURFUL SIMILES, METAPHORS AND HYPERBOLE.

3. THE DEATH OF THE HIRED MAN ROBERT FROST

GIVE THE FACTS OF SILAS' LIFE AND DEATH IN AN IMAGINARY LETTER TO A FRIEND BY MARY OR WARREN.

4. REYNARD THE FOX JOHN MASEFIELD

TURN THE RHYMING COUPLETS OF THIS POEM INTO RHYMING TRIPLETS OR PREPARE A MEDIA EDITORIAL STATING REASONS FOR...OR AGAINST SUCH HUNTS. OR YOU ARE A SPORTS ANNOUNCER COVERING THE HUNT. PREPARE A RUNNING COMMENTARY. OPTION: TRANSFER IT TO TAPE.

5. TO A MOUSE ROBERT BURNS

PARAPHRASE EACH STANZA WITH ONE WELL-THOUGHT-OUT SENTENCE. OR USE THE SAME RHYME SCHEME AND METRE TO WRITE A STANZA FROM THE WEE BEASTIE'S P.O.V.

6. LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI JOHN KEATS

REWRITE THE POEM AS A MODERN SUPERNATURAL 'HORROR' STORY. OR REWRITE THE POEM AS A FRONT PAGE NEWS STORY EMPLOYING ALL THE RULES OF JOURNALISM AND INCLUDING A HEADLINE, BYLINE AND THE 5Ws.

7. JANUARY MORNING ARCHIBALD LAMPMAN

WRITE TWO DESCRIPTIVE PARAGRAPHS IN WHICH YOU DESCRIBE A CONTEMPORARY LOCAL JANUARY MORNING IN THE STYLE OF THE POEM. REPLACE THE HORSES AND SLEIGHS WITH SIGHTS AND SOUNDS WITH WHICH YOU ARE MORE FAMILIAR.

8. THE LONELY LAND A. J. M. SMITH

USE YOUR WORD PRO TO GIVE THIS POEM ALTERNATE SHAPES. MAKE A COLLECTION OF POEMS WITH UNUSUAL SHAPES. OR FIND OTHER EXAMPLES, IN POETRY AND MUSIC, OF BEAUTY IN STRENGTH, DISSONANCE, RUGGEDNESS AND LONELINESS.

9. THE RAILWAY TRAIN - Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

CONSULT YOUR DICTIONARY FOR THE MEANING OF THE FOLLOWING: PRODIGIOUS SUPERCILIOUS PARE DOCILE OMNIPOTENT LAP

QUOTE FOUR EXAMPLES OF CONSONANCE - NEAR RHYMES IN WHICH CONSONANTS MATCH BUT VOWELS DO NOT.

GIVE YOUR IMPRESSIONS ON THE SERIES OF TRAIN SONGS PRESENTED BY THE TEACHER IN CLASS.

10. KUBLA KHAN SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

REVISE THIS POEM, GIVING IT AN ALTERNATE TITLE AND FIGURES OF SPEECH, ADJECTIVES, ADVERBS, NOUNS AND VERBS. OR WRITE A PARAGRAPH FULLY DESCRIBING THE SETTING AND LOCAL COLOUR.

11a. WHEN I WAS ONE-AND-TWENTY A. E. HOUSMAN

CHANGE THE TITLE TO 'WHEN I WAS ONE-OR-TWO' AND REWRITE THE POEM FROM THAT DIFFERENT AGE PERSPECTIVE.

11b. BREAK, BREAK, BREAK ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

COMPOSE A SUITABLE OBITUARY, EPITAPH, AND A LETTER OF CONDOLENCE TO LORD TENNYSON.

12. CLAY WINGATE STEPHEN VINCENT BENET

WRITE AN IMAGINATIVE PARAGRAPH DESCRIBING CLAY'S LAST HOURS AT ANY MAJOR CIVIL WAR BATTLE YOU WISH TO RESEARCH. USE AS MANY FACTS FROM THE POEM AS POSSIBLE AS WELL AS AMERICAN CIVIL WAR RESEARCH MATERIAL. OR WINGATE FINALLY DRIFTS OFF TO SLEEP. BASED ON WHAT YOU KNOW ABOUT HIM AND THE SOUTH, DESCRIBE HIS DREAM.

13. FOG CARL SANDBURG

WRITE TWO METAMORPHIC POEMS ABOUT OTHER CREATURES. USE THE STYLE EMPLOYED BY SANDBURG IN 'FOG.' OR PREPARE A NEWSPAPER STORY BASED ON THIS POEM. OBEY ALL RULES OF JOURNALISM AND INCLUDE A HEADLINE, BYLINE, AND THE 5Ws.

14. TO NIGHT PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY

WRITE A PARAGRAPH INDICATING WHY YOU PREFER NIGHT OVER DAY...OR VICE VERSA. OR WRITE A CHARACTER SKETCH ON NIGHT.

15. THE DESERTED VILLAGE OLIVER GOLDSMITH

IN THE STYLE EMPLOYED BY GOLDSMITH, WRITE A THIRD STANZA ABOUT ANOTHER PROMINENT INDIVIDUAL IN THE VILLAGE.

16. GOD'S WORLD EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY

CHOOSE A WONDERFULLY EXCITING EXPERIENCE WHICH HAS MOVED YOU PERSONALLY AND CREATE A POEM OR SONG SINGING ITS PRAISES. OR WRITE A THANKYOU NOTE TO THE 'CREATOR' THANKING HIM/HER FOR THE WONDERFUL WORLD UPON WHICH YOU LIVE.

17. THE BULLCALF IRVING LAYTON

REWRITE THE POEM USING AN ALTERNATE TITLE AND AS MANY CHANGED NOUNS, VERBS, ADJECTIVES AND ADVERBS AS POSSIBLE. OR ROUND OUT THE LOCAL COLOUR HINTED AT IN THIS POEM. EXPAND ON SPEECH, DRESS, CUSTOMS, OCCUPATIONS, MANNERS, HABITS OF THOUGHT, PECULIARITIES, NAMES, GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURES, ETC.

18. THE DANIEL JAZZ VACHEL LINDSAY

REWRITE THIS CHANT ALONG THE LINES OF A BEASTIE BOYS-RUN DMC MODERN RAP. FOLLOW THE ORIGINAL POEM BUT CHANGE THE TITLE, THEME AND APPROPRIATE NOUNS, VERBS, ADJECTIVES AND ADVERBS. OR PRESENT THIS POEM TO THE CLASS AS A RAP...COMPLETE WITH VISUAL AND SOUND EFFECTS. OR USING A DIFFERENT BIBLICAL STORY WRITE A MODERN STYLE RAP POEM.

19. THE FLIGHT OF THE GEESE SIR CHARLES G. D. ROBERTS

KEY THE POEM AND SCAN IT IN IAMBIC PENTAMETRE. OR WRITE A POEM OR PARAGRAPH DESCRIBING THIS SCENE THROUGH THE EYES OF A HUNTER.

20. GRASS CARL SANDBURG

WRITE SEQUEL STANZAS SHOWING HOW GRASS DOES ITS WORK IN OTHER SETTINGS... FARMERS' FIELDS...YOUR BACKYARD...CITY STREETS, ETC.


27. POETRY RESPONSE TEMPLATE

TEACHER: A template which may be used to respond to, and to review a variety of poems.

REVIEWER: REVIEW DATE:

TITLE OF POEM: AUTHOR:

LOCATION OF POEM (Book & page #): or PRESENT THE ACTUAL POEM HERE:

SUBJECT OR THEME OF THE POEM: (What is the poem about?) (What is the message?)...

Who is the person "speaking" in the poem - the poet or an imaginary character? (If the latter, explain who this character is)...

What does the poem do? (Respond to all which apply.) a. It tells a story (tell what happens in the story).

b. It expresses the poet's feelings about something. Explain the way the poet feels.

c. It plays with language or explores language in a new way. (Give examples of unusual or playful use of language in the poem.)

What is the poet's MOOD or ATTITUDE in the poem? (For each characteristic which applies copy at least one phrase from the poem that shows this mood. a. Serious/thoughtful:

b. Humorous/silly:

c. Ironic/satiric:

d. Happy/pleased:

e. Unhappy/depressed:

f. Gentle/calm:

g. Other:

List any words or phrases in the poem you did not understand very well:

Best line in the poem: Your reasons for liking this particular line.

List and give examples of poetic devices in the poem.

DISCUSS: Form - structure: Rhyme scheme: Imagery - Symbolism - etc.:

Your personal response to the poem - (Did you like it or dislike it? Why? Did you agree or disagree with the poet's ideas? Why?

List other poems or songs with similar themes.

List other works by this author.


28. COMPUTER RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT: 8 SHAKESPEARE PROJECTS

TEACHER: A collection of computer-based, research assignments I have created to explore the world of the Bard.

REFERENCES: PLAY SCRIPT - FEATURE MOVIES - OLIVIER - VIDEO DOCUMENTARIES - CBC - STRATFORD - CLASSICS ILLUSTRATED - SOUNDTRACKS - RADIO PLAYS

PROJECT 1: Empire of the Bard

You are William Shakespeare. Steven Spielberg is interested in doing a $50 Million dollar movie on your life. Since you have never written a movie script, Mr. Spielberg has requested that you prepare and submit a 'treatment' for his consideration.

Think back to the highlights of your life and career - - parents - Stratford - childhood experiences - schooling - occupations - marriage - children - career moves - breaking into "Show Biz" - your theatrical successes - conflicts and hard times - impact on English literature - old age - ...

Include only those events which would be appropriate for a Hollywood 'blockbuster.' You may also include a story board as well as suggestions for casting, shooting locales and cinematic techniques.

PROJECT 2: Globe Theatre Blue-prints

You are an architect trying to sell your scheme for a new Globe Theatre to Shakespeare's company. Using your Apple //b or not //b computer and Mousepaint software, create appropriate floor plans and side elevations.

Then, employing your best cartographic and drafting techniques, appropriately label all plans.

Include also, the speech and any other material you have prepared for your presentation to the Bard Company Finance and Planning Board.

PROJECT 3: Elizabethan Drama Critic

Shakespeare's company of players has presented seven of the Bard's best works - a different one each night - for the opening week of the all-new Globe Theatre.

You have been commissioned to review this event - commenting on: - the new facility - the audience (appearance and reactions) - the actors' costumes and performances - the overall mood of this gala event - reviews and synopses of all seven plays

PROJECT 4: A Day in the Life...

You are chief janitor at the Globe Theatre. You live on a typical Elizabethan London Street. Present a full description (first person) of all the events which transpire during a typical day from wake-up to turn-in: - morning sounds - dressing and toilet - meals - your house - your family - Royal Coach procession down your street - entertainment - the streets and their people - vendors - services - Globe site - Globe description - your unsuccessful attempts to become an actor - what is involved in being a Thespian - your impressions of Shakespeare and his work - the audiences - your maintenance duties - "catching a lift home" - "a night on the town" - London hazards - ...

Project 5: The London Globe-Times

References: Publish It! - Newsroom - Print Shop - Mousepaint - Newspapers - all available research materials on Shakespeare and Elizabethan times.

Prepare an imaginary theatrical newspaper similar to Variety dated June 3, 1599. All of your entries must be authentic and fully researched. Include the following features:

- news headlines of the day - theatre reviews from the Globe - angry letters to the editor concerning yesterday's unfavourable review of "As You Like It" - feature articles on the state of modern theatre and its stars - fashion page on the latest stage and street fashions - comics and cartoons - theatrical want ads - display ads - things to see and do around London (include map) - interview (Shakespeare or colleague)

Your paper must be carefully researched and laid out, including sketches, line drawings and other illustrations.

Project 6: On Stage

Perform "As You Like It" live on stage or on video tape. Your version will be a 30 minute condensed version and you may read from a previously prepared script. Well thought-out costumes, body movements, dialogue and props are encouraged. A narrator and actors should be used and only the highlights of each scene are to be featured. Lines may be taken verbatim or translated to "modern English."

Project 7: Reporter At Large

You are Court Reporter and have been assigned to cover the dispute between the rival Dukes. Prepare a series of front page stories, human interest features and editorials in chronological order. All techniques and rules of journalism must be obeyed. The use of Publish It! is highly recommended. Some of the following events may provide Fodder for your features: -The coup -Duke Senior's expulsion -Life in the new court -The plight of the loyal lords -The Will -Orlando's attack on Oliver -The wrestling match -The "kidnapping" -Escape of Oliver & Adam -Forest Life -Sale of the Sheep Ranch -Etc...................

PROJECT 8: PARAGRAPH ANALYSES (See html download file of entire play with teacher inserted discussion topics after each scene.)


29. U.S.S.R. MAGAZINE REVIEW...AND DATA BASE COMPILATION

TEACHER: This requires access to a wide variety of current magazines. Bring in a large selection and do a quick run-down on the characteristics of each. Display them and turn the class loose to gather the following info on each. The aim is to let students sample materials they might otherwise overlook.

TITLE: DATE: TYPE/GENRE: FEATURE STORY 1: I.Q.(INTEREST QUOTIENT 1-10) FEATURE STORY 2: I.Q. FEATURE STORY 3: I.Q. LIKES: DISLIKES:


30. VIDEO TRIVIA QUIZ TEMPLATE

TEACHERS: This can be used for rock/country videos, TV show bits, and famous movie scenes...live or animated. Compile a selection of 30-second clips and run them by the class to test their general knowledge of the entertainment media as well as their observational skills.

TOPIC:_________________________ CONTESTANT:___________________ TITLE ACTOR/CHARACTER/ARTIST DECADE

1. _________________ ________ ______________________________________________ 2. _________________ ____________________________ __________________________ 3. _________________ ____________________________ __________________________ 4. _________________ ____________________________ ___________________________ 5. _________________ ____________________________ ___________________________ 6. _________________ ____________________________ __________________________ 7. _________________ ____________________________ ___________________________ 8. _________________ ____________________________ __________________________ 9. _________________ ____________________________ _________________________ 10. _______________________ ____________________________ ___________________ ETC. ETC. NUMBER CORRECT:_______ NUMBER CORRECT:_____ CORRECT:____

SCORE:______/


31. INTEGRATED NOVEL/FILM PROJECTS

ACTIVITIES FOR A NOVEL WITH A RELATED MOVIE

TEACHER: MANY OF THE OTHER ACTIVTEACHER: MANY OF THE OTHER ACTIVITIES SUGGESTED EARLIER MAY BE APPLIED HERE.

1. Keep a response journal as you read the book. (See Response Section)

2. Write a detailed movie review and/or book review. (See Reviewing a Film and Novel/Film report.)

3. Write a "letter to the editor" based on a theme of the book. (See WW and Journalism Assignments)

4. Write a friendly letter from one character in the book to another.

5. Expand the character analysis section to include a full character sketch on the protagonist.

6. Expand your research on the author and director to include more extensive biographical information.

7. Expand the test creation section to include True/False and/or Multiple Choice questions. (Include a test key.)

NOTE: All the above are to be submitted in booklet form with a decorated front cover. Bonus marks will be awarded for a creative, colourful, and well-designed cover.

REVIEWING A FILM

1. State the theme clearly and concisely. What was the film about?

2. Name the principal characters in the story - - identify the actors - evaluate the acting and casting. Were the actors effectively cast? Was the acting - sincere or artificial? - natural or exaggerated? How well did the supporting cast perform? Cite examples to prove each opinion.

3. Outline the opening stages of the plot, but do not spoil a prospective viewer's pleasure by telling too much. Was the plot suspenseful or dull? - unusual or hackneyed? Where the incidents realistic, or did they stretch the imagination too far? Give concrete evidence to support each opinion.

4. Consider the dialogue. Did the characters speak like real people or did their speech seem stiff and unnatural? If accents were used, did they contribute to realism or were they merely a distraction?

5. Evaluate the contribution of such special effects as sound, lighting, and photography. Were sound effects continuous or broken? - realistic or exaggerated? What sounds were used to produce special effects? (for instance, were foghorns used to show gloom? Did background music harmonize with emotions? What did the close-up shots or the wide shots (landscapes, for example) contribute?

6. If the costumes, make-up, properties, or settings were outstanding in any way, discuss their contribution (For instance, were the costumes authentic properties appropriate settings natural?

7. Estimate the quality of the direction. Did all parts contribute to a central theme? Was the tone or mood the same throughout the film Was the pacing, or tempo, consistent or did some parts become monotonous? Did the director's interpretation of the plot or characters contribute to any unusual or dramatic effects?

8. Compare the film with another one of the same type, about the same subject, directed by the same person, or in which the same actor or actress appeared. If you have read the book on which the film was based, compare the two.

9. Conclude by giving your overall estimate of the film. Seek to be both sincere and fair.

A CAREFUL REVIEWER WILL SELECT ONLY THE TOPICS THAT ARE APPROPRIATE TO THE FILM AT HAND AND WILL PRESENT THEM IN WHATEVER ORDER HE THINKS BEST.


32. INTEGRATED RESEARCH PROJECT ON TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC

An analysis of musical forms which have influenced Canadian society - attitudes, morals, dress, speech, social life, etc. - throughout the 20th Century.

This is a long-term project involving class, small-group, and individual participation in research and writing. It is also meant to integrate the subject areas of Social Studies, English Language Arts, Computer Awareness and Music Appreciation.

It is expected that many of the research activities will spill out of the classroom and will involve home/community resources as well as to facilitate library usage.

The following 10 components are due on a weekly basis - to be turned on Monday morning for each of the 10 weeks.

Late or unfinished work will not be accepted and will result in a 0 grade for that particular week.

AGENDA

1 Week. (15 marks) Create a logo for your favourite recording artist. Use of a computer paint program is recommended.

2 Week. Movie Review (Choose a movie with a prominent theme related to music or with a strong musical soundtrack a. (30 marks) A critique (1 page) Refer to the WW Computer Assignment on writing Reviews b. (30 marks) A quiz on the movie - A chronolog format is recommended

3 Week. A Newspaper Article (30 marks) Review a concert or TV performance of a musician. (1 page) Refer to the WW Computer Assignment on writing reviews.

4 Week. Song Critique (25 marks) Many of today's artists express a certain social awareness through their music. Topics may include environment, poverty, civil rights, racism, peace, etc. Choose an artist(s) who focuses on one of these issues. Provide a copy of one of their songs that sends out such a message. Explain how the lyrics express the special concern. Refer to the Song/Poem analysis sheet.

5 Week. Great Music and Musicians (50 marks) OPTION A: Prepare a biography about the life of a musician. (2 pages) Refer to the WW Computer Assignment on writing Bios. You are urged to provide examples of the artist's work.

OPTION B: Music Style Report (2-3 pages) Write a detailed report on six various styles of music, e.g. classical, jazz, rock, heavy metal, punk, rap, blues, country, blue grass, folk, gospel, sacred, dance, swing, etc. In your report discuss its origin, founders, development, popularity, age appeal, etc. Each style should require at least one well-developed paragraph. You are urged to provide titles and audio/video examples.

6 Week. Create a Song OPTION A: Write the lyrics & melody of your song. Design a CD cover and liner notes for your hit. Perform your song live or on video/audio tape. OPTION B: Same as option A with the exception of performance. Instead of singing or performing the song, you may treat your lyrics as poetry and recite them to a musical background. OPTION C: Similar to Option B with the exception of a rap version instead of reciting your lyrics.

Lyrics........................30 marks CD Cover & Liner Notes........25 marks Performance...................25 marks

7 Week. Research Essay (50 marks) Does Heavy Metal music influence the actions and attitudes of today's youth? e.g. increased violence, suicidal behaviour, apathetic behaviour, etc. Collect articles from newspapers, TV and other sources to support your view. Discuss this topic in an essay format. Notes will be provided. Refer to the WW Computer Assignment on Short Research Papers. (3-5 pages)

8 Week. Music Survey (30 marks) Create your own Strathclair music survey. In your study determine what types of music are popular, what age groups they appeal to, and how much time is spent listening to music. Any other relevant information that you wish to survey may also be included. Present the results of your survey in graph form (Works Spreadsheet Program recommended). Include your questionnaire. All work is to be done using the Works Integrated Computer Program with the integration of a Word Processor, Data Base and Spreadsheet.

9 Week. Music Video Review (30 marks) View a collection of music videos (3 minimum). Discuss the factors necessary in the making of a successful video and/or the major factors of concern in the making of today's videos. (1 page) Do a Video/Song/Poem analysis on each video.

10 Week. Music Appreciation (30 marks) We will listen to and analyze various styles every day. Be prepared to keep an open mind to discuss your opinions and reactions or attitudes towards these musical styles. (10 selections)

PRESENTATION: You may be called upon to present or share any or all parts of your project with the class at any time (20 marks)

EVALUATION FORM

TOTAL VALUE: 400 MARKS STUDENT NAME_____________________

ALL WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS ARE TO BE ARRANGED IN A DUO TANG EACH ASSIGNMENT MUST BE PROPERLY NUMBERED AND LABELLED

1. LOGO _____/15

2.a. MOVIE CRITIQUE _____/30 b. MOVIE QUIZ _____/30

3. NEWSPAPER REVIEW OF PERFORMANCE _____/30

4. SONG CRITIQUE _____/25

5. MUSICIAN BIO or MUSIC STYLES _____/30

6. SONG CREATION/COVER/PERFORMANCE /SONG READING TO MUSIC /SONG AS RAP LYRICS..................._____/30 COVER & LINER NOTES......_____/25 PERFORMANCE.............._____/25

7. RESEARCH ESSAY "INFLUENCE OF HEAVY METAL" _____/50

8. MUSIC SURVEY - MS-WORKS COMPUTER INTEGRATION _____/30

9. MUSIC VIDEO REVIEWS _____/30

10. MUSIC APPRECIATION _____/30

FINAL PRESENTATION _____/20

SIGNATURE OF PARENT(S)___________________________________


33. ROCK POETRY SECTION -- Rock Pile -- MULTI MEDIA PRESENTATIONS

TEACHER: Students are encouraged to make full use of multimedia techniques in the compiling and presentation of these projects. Although everything is centered around the writing power offered by the word processor, it is expected that the student will also make full use of instruments, synthesizers, mixers, amps, lighting, graphics programs, Internet and CD-ROM resources, and a variety of music genres researched from current CDs, rock/country/jazz/folk literature, videos, live performances and AM/FM radio.

1. (a) Compile your own personal All Time Top 40 of Rock. (b) Complete a review sheet any 10 of these songs. (c) Research the careers of the performers of the songs.

2. Complete a Review Analysis Piece (RAP) on a representative song from each of the major categories of rock.

3. Complete a RAP on a representative song from each year from 1950 to present.

4. (a) Describe the instruments most commonly used on rock records. (b) Find songs where each of these instruments is emphasized. (c) Match each of these instruments with well-known musicians who play them.

5. Compile a report on established groups. (a) Describe how they started and how they have changed over the years. (b) Discuss the personalities of the performers and how they have influenced trends in music, fashion, persona, speech, etc.

6. Tape and transcribe interviews (real or simulated/mock) with rock performers.

7. (a) Compile a family tree of rock, illustrating music forms and artists. (b) Compare songs from the beginning of rock with those of today. Analyze their differences and similarities.

8. (a) Put together a display on other styles of music (jazz, classical, dance music, ethnic, etc.). Provide pictures, stories, taped examples, etc. (b) Compile a collage entitled Rock Today.

9. (a) Create an atmosphere for listening/dancing to Heavy Metal, Disco, Contemporary Country, Folk, etc. (posters lights, props, costumes, video screens, etc.). (b) Give a DJ/VJ presentation of the music style you have chosen using tapes and CDs which complement the visual milieu/atmosphere you have created.

10.(a) As you listen to your favourite songs, write down what you see/feel/hear as the song is playing. Describe the artist(s) as your mind sees him. (b) Read your creation (or some of your favourite lyrics) to an audience (live or on tape) with appropriate mood follow with a discussion of lyrics/music significance.



PART II: GEOGRAPHY SECTION



1. AS IT HAPPENS - DATABASE RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT

PART I Compile and maintain an on-going database of current events related to course topics: TOPIC CODE 1. Women in Canadian Society =WOM 2. Canada on the International Front =INT 3. Industry and Unions =IND 4. Rural Concerns =RUR 5. Multiculturalism - Minority Groups =CUL 6. Native Issues =NAT 7. Technology in Canada =TEK 8. Education =EDU 9. Northern Issues =NOR 10. Environmental Concerns =ENV

* You will be building a database of current events by summarizing newspaper stories, magazine articles, song/poetry lyrics, interviews, and audio/video/computer/CD-ROM documentaries.

* It is also recommended that you search School, Classroom and Hillman Libraries as well as volumes in your own collection/sphere and include a database of books relevant to the themes we are currently studying.

* This must be an on-going, daily activity.

* Concentrate on answering the 5Ws: WHO WHAT WHEN WHERE WHY HOW

Recommended Fields:

TITLE or HEADLINE (WHAT) Condensed - lead off with keywords - omit "The," "And," etc AUTHOR or SOURCE (name of paper, periodical, show, mag) PUBLISHER or SOURCE: LENGTH: (Pages, minutes, etc.) DATE: (WHEN) Date event occurred - OR date published TOPIC CODE: =TEK, =RUR, =EDU, =WOM, etc. PLACE: WHERE did event occur or CITY where published? KEY NAMES: (WHO) People, Places, Company, Organization EVENTS/TOPICS/THEMES: What happened? WHY? A short summary of article. EVENTS Continued if space needed - HOW? Who? What? When? Where? Why? COMMENTS: (Contents, relevance, quality, etc.)


2. BIBLIOGRAPHY RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT - PART II

REFERENCE BOOK AND PERIODICAL DATABASE/BIBLIOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENT Adapt the highlights of the material compiled in the Database Assignment Part I, into a bibliography.

Follow standard format prescribed in The Writer's Workshop.: Refer to pp. 406-409 and all of Chapter 35 pp. 392-409

Author, First Names. Book Title. City: Publisher, Date. (Add the topics code at the end of the entry (ex: =ENV)

NOTE: Your bibliography must be entered alphabetically by author


3. JOURNAL RESPONSES FROM DAILY CLIPPINGS - RESEARCH PART III

Compile a combined Journal/Scrapbook/Anthology on one of the following topics related to the CANADA IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Social Studies course:

1. Women in Canadian Society 2. Canada on the International Front 3. Industry and Unions 4. Rural Concerns 5. Multiculturalism - Minority Groups 6. Native Issues 7. Technology in Canada 8. Education 9. Northern Issues 10. Environmental Concerns 11. An area of your own interest - to be negotiated

Procedure:

Keep a personal daily journal of your observations of current events concerning your topic.

Document each page with clippings and illustrations from newspapers, magazines, etc. See the Jackdaw list for ideas.

A computer word processor, data base, paint or graphics program and desktop publisher is recommended.

Assigned: To be turned in for term and exam credit no later than:

Your main source of material should be the clippings, notes, sketches, music, audio/video clips and other information such as collated into your data base for Term Assignment Part I.

Paste the actual clippings or xeroxes into your Journal and make the observations part of the daily entries.

Another major ingredient could be the information gleaned from the Bibliography you have compiled in Term Assignment Part II.

Procedure:

* Keep a personal daily journal of your observations of current events concerning your topic.

* Document each page with clippings, illustrations, xeroxes, notes, songs/poetry, and AV clips from newspapers, magazines, periodicals, A/V, etc.

* You should include reviews of articles from both periodicals and video documentaries.

* Use of computer tools is recommended: word processor (WORKS, WORDPERFECT, etc.) data base (WORKS, APPLEWORKS, etc.) desktop publisher (WORDPERFECT 6, PUBLISH IT!, etc.) paint programs CD-ROM disks

* You might even consider presenting your information as a video newsmagazine or documentary.


4. WORLD WAR II ROLE-PLAYING SCENARIOS - (STUDENT PLAYS)

Each student is responsible for role playing at least two World War II overseas/battlefront or homefront scenarios.

The male members of the class are serving their country overseas - either waiting to go into battle in England or actually on the battle fields of Europe (ground, air or sea).

The female members of the class are serving their country on the homefront.

For each scenario, choose a persona, locale and event in which you can role play a monologue in front of an audience of your peers and the video camera.

Work with other members of the class in sharing props and sets as well as finding a way to segue the scenarios together into a cohesive unit...or play.

This will require considerable research on your part (refer to the list of references).

To make your role as authentic as possible you should plan to make use of as many of the following as possible: - your own IMAGINATION AND RESOURCEFULNESS - sound fx - spfx - hit songs of the day - lighting - props - scenery & backdrops - costumes - slang, colloquialisms and conventions of the time - references to then-current happenings and news events - accurately-researched and well-written role-playing scripts compiled on a word processor - interviews with real-life aquaintances who have lived these scenarios...or have experienced the war years - well-rehearsed acting and role-playing skill

Male Battlefront Scenarios: 1. In a Lancaster bomber briefing room before mission 1 2. Pilot in an aircraft cockpit (Spitfire, Lancaster, etc.) 3. On R & R in the Officers' Mess 4. Prairie kid in a London Pub shared by fighting men from all parts of the Commonwealth 5. Infantryman on a ship crossing the Channel to invade Normandy 6. Canadian grunt pinned down on the beaches of Dieppe 7. Seaman on a supply ship or corvette crossing the Atlantic 8. On a night bombing mission over Berlin 9. In a tank on the streets of Ortona 10. First Allied medic to reach Auschwitz 11. One of Intrepid's trainees parachuted behind enemy lines 12. Canadian caught in the Battle of Britain during leave from base 13. Personal true-life experiences of an acquaintance

Female Homefront Scenarios: 1. An entertainer on a Victory Bond fundraising drive 2. "Rosie, the Riveter" in an aircraft factory 3. Teacher encouraging students to start a Victory Garden and to collect materials for the war effort 4. Nurse in a military hospital 5. Truck driver shuttling goods and people to Japanese relocation camps 6. An instructor at Camp X 7. Pilot shuttling new aircraft across the Atlantic 8. Farm worker with three brothers and a fiancee overseas 9. A German Jew facing prejudice and the agony of having lost touch with your family in Germany 10. Newspaper writer reporting a balance of fact, propaganda and morale boosting news 11. A base canteen worker on V.E. Day 12. A CWAC about to be posted overseas 13. Personal true-life experiences of an acquaintance


5. PERIODICAL/VIDEO/FILM REVIEW TEMPLATE

TEACHER: A template which may be used in researching articles/documentaries. I find this especially useful for studying National Geographic magazines and video documentaries.

TITLE: COMPUTER REF. FILE NAME: (SOURCE/YEAR/MO./#/CHAP)=NG89.10NOR SECTION OF COURSE WITH WHICH ASSOCIATED: REVIEWER: REVIEW DATE:

SOURCE: WRITER/NARRATOR/PRODUCER/DIRECTOR: DATE OF ARTICLE/SHOW: PAGE OR LIBRARY # OR POSITION ON TAPE: LENGTH:

CONTENT (DEVELOP FULLY!!!) THEMES: GEOGRAPHIC REGION(S): GENERAL SUMMARY OR POINT FORM OUTLINE: INTRODUCTION: POINTS PRESENTED (1,2,3...ETC.): ARGUMENTS PRESENTED: CONCLUSIONS:

RELEVANCE TO COURSE OR DEGREE TO WHICH IT 'TIES IN': RESEARCH DEPTH & ACCURACY: INTEREST QUOTIENT: EASE OF READING: TOPICAL VALUE:

ILLUSTRATIONS: TYPES (CHARTS - GRAPHS - MAPS - PHOTOS - ETC.): EFFECTIVENESS OF:

SOUND (FOR VIDEOS & FILMS): FIDELITY: SFX: MUSIC: QUALITY OF NARRATION:

COMMENTS: IMPRESSIONS: OPINIONS: LIKES & CRITICISMS: RELATED ARTICLES - FILMS - VIDEOS RATING (1 - 10):


6. NAGASAKI CAR COMPANY - INDUSTRY LOCATIONAL FACTORS PROJECT

MEMO You are a group of Senior Executives for the Nagasaki Car Manufacturing Company.

PROBLEM ONE Your C.E.O. wants to locate your new Canadian factory in Strathclair Manitoba. You are OPPOSED! Your aim is to convince your boss that the most logical location is in Southern Ontario. Present - in a well-written speech - complete with extensive video aids - your carefully-thought-out argument.

Employ as many multimedia techniques as possible in your presentation: video audio computers & CDs links to the internet overheads posters maps display data printout/xerox handouts illustrations charts graphs guest speakers etc. etc. etc.

You must make full reference to text book information on the stages of manufacturing and industry, car assembly and locational factors.

PROBLEM TWO Your superiors have also decided that the future of the company should lie in the development of only utility trucks and bottom-of-the-line, low cost economy cars. You and your rebel band must convince your superiors that you can design a state-of-the-art, high performance car (or truck) that will appeal to a mass market. You will design such a car and prepare an advertising campaign to sell this this model to your superiors AND to the car buying markets around the world. Your presentation should make full use of computer CAD and graphics programs, A/V and print materials, and all the tricks used by other car companies to promote a new model of car.

PERSONNEL:

COORDINATOR OF MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATIONS (COMP) Correlates and supervises all activities

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY (CERT)

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF EXTERIOR DESIGN (CEED)

CHIEF RETAIL EXECUTIVE OF ADVERTISING & PRINT PROMOTION (CREAP)

CHIEF RETAIL EXECUTIVE OF ELECTRONIC MEDIA (CREEM)

You are up against 3 other company rebel groups who also feel very strongly about their respective designs. You must use all the research, razzmatazz and creativity you can muster to survive.


7. LOCAL STUDY PART I: PREPARATION FOR TOWN WEBSITE CREATION

TEACHER: This is phase one in the creation of a local town website on the Internet.

1.a. How did the name of your town originate? b. Account for the shape of the town. c. Does this shape seem to be related to the natural environment?...In what ways? d. What is the spatial relationship of the area to other features? (For instance, is it near a river or near land of differnt elevation (valley, uplands, etc.), or a major highway?)

2.a. Why was the town founded? b. Why is the town located here? c. How does the town's location influence its character and size? d. Why has it grown or declined? e. How is this town similar to and different from other towns? f. Who lives in this town...and why? g. How would you describe the general location to someone else? 3.a. Where were the earliest settlements in this area? b. Who were the erly and later settlers and where did they come from? 4.a. What was the natural environment like during these early times? b. How has it changed?

5. How did the form of the land (topography) come to be?

6.a. What type of vegetation is most common on steep slopes? ...on poorly drained areas? ...on fertile soils? b. Suggest reasons for these relationships.

7.a. What were some of the major community events of the early periods? b. When did these events happen...(season, occasion, time...)

8.a. Where is the community's areas of... greatest change ...relative stability? b. What and where are some of the community's strengths and problems?

9. What is the population of the town? ...the surrounding area?

10.a. Why are these people living in this community? b. Give a breakdown, with statistics if possible, of the occupations of the area. c. What is the average family income of the area? d. Give a percentage breakdown of the various salary levels - to the best of your ability. e. How do these incomes compare with those in the nearest urban area?

11. What can you say about the religious composition of your town? Are a variety of religions represented? Which?

12.a. What historical periods had the greatest influx of people from foreign countries? b. What areas did the people come from? c. List the area's common surnames and determine their ethnic origins. d. To what extent is your area dominated by a few families? In other words, does the town have many family names...or only a few? e. To what extent is your town linked by family ties with neighbouring towns? Map these kinship ties by connecting your town with surrounding ones. Use a line for each family name which the town have in common.

13.a. When were most of the buildings in the community built? b. Comment on the value of the buildings of the area. c. Are the buildings in good repair? d. How much does it cost to rent an average-sized apartment or house? e. What proportion of the townspeople live in multiple dwellings as apposed to single family houses? f. Comment on the architectural style of the buildings.

14.a. What kinds of building materials are available in the local area? b. Were building materials brought into the local area at considerable expense because some people who lived here preferred them to materials available locally? If so, give examples. c. Compare the structures of this area with those of other areas where different kinds of building materials are available.

15.a. What kinds of structures did the first settlers in the area need? b. To what degree was the builder's decision influenced by the times s/he lived in or by some other group s/he was a member of? c. Do local structures reflect that local workmen in times past have had different tools and skills and have worked with different building materials. d. Did various groups of people living in the area have different ideas about how the same kind of structures should look?

16. Compile a list of goods and services for your town using the following guide: - Building materials outlets - Hardware - Farm Equipment - General merchandise (general, dept., variety) - Food stores (meat, candy, bakery, etc.) - Automotive dealers (auto sales and service stations) - Apparel and accessory stores (clothing, shoes, etc.) - Furniture, appliances, home furnishings, etc. - Electronics, music, video, etc. - Eating and drinking places - Recreation (theatre, rink, arcade, etc.) - Other (hotel, drugs, fuel, liquor, etc.) Services: - Personal (barber, beauty, cleaners, photos, shoe repair, etc.) - Commercial (bank, insurance, lawyer, real estate, tax prep., etc. - Medical and associated (dentist, funeral, hospital, doctor, vet, etc. - Educational - General (churches, elevators, farm services, halls, libraries, newspapers, post office, trucking, bus, train, etc.) Manufacturing: - Food stuffs - Farm services - Other

17. Which activity points appear to be busier or more important than others?

18.a. Identify on the map, the main residential, commercial, recreational, educational, transportation, and worship areas. b. How are these areas of activity connected? c. Do some links appear more important than others? ...Which? d. What differences and similarities are there between different residential areas?

19.a. How do the goods and services which are offered here, differ from those offered in larger centres. b. Wh are some goods and services disappearing, wereas others are being introduced?

20.a. Prepare a graph of your town's population changes in the last 80 years. b. What were periods of growth in the local population? ...Account for these periods. c. What were periods of decline or little growth in the local population? ...Account for these...

21. Suggest reasons for the decline of such small towns since the '30s

22.a. What factors influence the farmer in making his decisions as to how to use his land and what kind of livestock to keep? b. Do most farmers in this area make the same general kinds of decisions?

23. What is the dominant type of farming in this area?

24.a. What kindsd of farmstead structures are required for this type of farming? b. Is there a distinctive complex of farm buildings that comprises a farmstead of this area? If so, of what is it made up? 25.a. Where, when, and how does the farmer dispose of his surplus? b. Is it processed locally or merely collected and shipped to a distant processing centre? c. Where does the farmer obtain the goods and services he needs?

26. What skills and equipment are necessary to be a successful farmer today?


8. LOCAL STUDY PART II: TOWN DATA BASE & MAPPING - WEBSITE PREP

TEACHER: THIS IS PHASE TWO IN THE GATHERING OF INFORMATION WHICH WILL ULTIMATELY BE USED IN THE CREATION OF A LOCAL TOWN WEBSITE FOR THE INTERNET. IF MONITORED CORRECTLY IT CAN BE A GOOD PR CONTACT BETWEEN YOUNG PEOPLE AND THE COMMUNITY. IT ALSO FOSTERS GOOD RESEARCH, COMPUTER, DATA BASE AND MAPPING SKILLS. THE FINAL RESULTS CAN BE SCANNED IN PREPARATION FOR DISPLAY ON THE WEBSITE.

References: Clipboard & data-gathering template form Sketch pad & PPREPP Town maps Town aerial photos A computer data base program i.e. MS-Works A large BB map sheet for collated group data MTS Telephone book

PART I: MAPS: INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP WALL DISPLAY Your group is responsible for collecting town information with the goal of creating a large wall map of your sector. Refer to air photos, desk maps, town history books, phone books, topos and any other relevant resources you can find at the Municipal Office, libraries, family documents, etc. Develop a legend with appropriate cartographic symbols to display your information. Your map should include accurate representations of: - residences - businesses - streets, lanes, alleys, approaches, etc. - utilities, services, public buildings, etc. - railroad tracks and related services - outstanding woodlots, water bodies & topographic features It is of the utmost importance to choose an appropriate and accurate scale. All map-making conventions must be obeyed (border, legend, direction, title, scale, symbols, horizontal block print, proper pencilling and inking, colours, etc.

PART II: DATA BASE During your field trip sessions through your assigned town sector, collect relevant information and compile it into a suitably coded data base. (Your data-gathering template has been laid out with suggested coding numbers - 1, 2, 3, 4) This data base is to be a companion to your wall map and the information it contains should supplement the map.

DATA-GATHERING TEMPLATE TO GENERATE DB INFORMATION 1 2 3 4 (5) MAP # OR CODE: FAMILY OR ESTABLISHMENT NAME: LOCATION-NO.-STREET: TELEPHONE: ----------------------------------------------------------------- GREENERY & LANDSCAPING:EXCELLENT AVERAGE FAIR NONE CONDITION: EXCELLENT AVERAGE FAIR ABANDONED USE: RES RES (MULTIPLE) RES/BUS BUS UTL/P STYLE: RANCH 2-STOREY 3 OR SPLIT MOBILE... MATERIAL: FRAME BRICK METAL OTHER(ston GARAGE: 0 1 CAR 2 CAR 3 CAR ADD 4 attch AGE: 80-NEW WWII-80 PRE-WWII HERITAGE SIZE: LARGE MEDIUM SMALL COMPLEX NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS:01 2 3 OR MORE MULTI-FAM COMMUNICATIONS: TV ANT RADIO ANT DISH OTHER ---------------------------------------------------------------- SUPPLEMENTARY NON-DB INFORMATION: KEEP FOR FUTURE REFERENCE OCCUPANTS' NAMES: OCCUPATION(S) OR BUSINESS TYPE: COLOURS: ROOF MAIN TRIM FOUNDATION COMMENTS:

DB setup example:

YO##: WH12 (Your initials followed by the record number) NAME: SCSchool ADDRESS: 16 Main St. PHON: 2468 1: 2 2: 2 3: 5 4: 5 5: 2 6: 0 7: 2 8: 4 9: 5 10: 3 COMMENTS: 180 Students & Staff/Education/1 storey red/white trim Parking, Play & Sports Grounds

TOWN MAPPING & DATA BASE PROJECT EVALUATION

Compile a report based upon the work you did with your group on the Town Mapping & Data Base project.

Start your report by declaring the mark you expect on the project and use most of the rest of the report to defend this mark.

Compile a list of signatures of other group members who agree with the mark you have given yourself. They may also include comments.

All the raw data you have collected must also be turned in i.e. info on buildings, streets, etc. and sketches.

Topics and areas to touch upon:

My individual mark expected on this project___________% (Include leader & peer verification below) SIGNATURES: 1____________________OK?___NO?___SUGGESTED MARK 2____________________OK?___NO?___SUGGESTED MARK 3____________________OK?___NO?___SUGGESTED MARK 4____________________OK?___NO?___SUGGESTED MARK 5____________________OK?___NO?___SUGGESTED MARK

Our overall group mark: MAP____ and DATA BASE____ Area of town mapped:________________________ Group members:_________________________________________

1. Effort I put into the gathering of data 2. Effort I put into the compiling and collating of data 3. What I accomplished on the data base collection 4. What I accomplished on the wall map design and creation 5. What I did that I feel was "beyond the call of duty" 6. What I learned about Strathclair Village 7. Degree to which I participated and worked cooperatively with other group members 8. Things I wish I had done differently 9. My overall impressions on the total experience of participating in such a major project 10. Overall, general summation as to why I deserve the mark I am requesting


9. LOCAL STUDY PART III: FINAL HOMETOWN WEBSITE PREP & CREATION

Do a final collation of material on your hometown in preparation for programming a Home Page. The main theme of this Home Page will be to Surf the Internet for ideas on layout. Try a mock up on paper and then refer to the html tutorial for procedure directions and/or use one of our click and drag editors for your creation. Gather a collection of suitable links to include on your page. Refer to the Create Your Own Homepage Assignment for more ideas.

Summary Checklist: Town Name - origins of name - presented in an unusual way - complete with logo or - appropriate photos Location and Site - Where is it? - How far away are major centres? - size (area) of town - Maps. Transportation - public transportation - connecting highways - airways - railways - rivers, etc. History - origins - legends - heritage... Geography - climate - soils - vegetation - landforms - water bodies Population - numbers - ethnic backgrounds - demographics Local Authority - type of government - tax structure - laws, rules, zoning, etc. Utilities - phone - electricity - cable - water supply & treatment - sewage treatment system - waste disposal - cable Security - law enforcement - fire fighting - crime statistics Job Market - Major Employers - Industrial Markets - Economic Development Ideas Education - public school courses offered - private - adult - extension - distance ed... Religion - Church Services Recreation - organized sports - outdoors: hunting, fishing, trapping, skiing, hiking, canoeing, swimming, etc. - organizations, clubs, etc. Service Clubs - Fraternities - Culture Potential Existing Businesses and Professional Services (compile a list with appropriate interviews and descriptions)

The People Speak - Bouquets “What I like about Strathclair.” (Compile a collection of quotes - identify the speakers)


10. LOCAL STUDY PT IV: STRATHCLAIR EXCERPT ANALYSIS

The following document is a chapter from the University geography text book on Manitoba - A Geography of Manitoba

1. Read the chapter carefully and use the accompanying maps to locate the 30 places which have been italicized and numbered. Use all the resources at your disposal to make your map as accurate as possible. Be sure to follow all the conventions of acceptable cartography.

2. Compile a fully defined glossary from all 65 underlined words in the text. Where appropriate, include analyses/descriptions of any physiographic origins of landforms. Make full use of your word processor here...Copy... Move...Split Screen...etc.

3. In the style of the first seven paragraphs, give a geographical description of your home site. Include such things as surrounding flora and fauna, hydrology, topography, climate, transportation, buildings, ancestry, etc.

4. Read para 8 and through a description of a typical Saturday night in Strathclair as you know it, show how the '90s compare and contrast to the '50s remembered by the author.

5. After reading paras 9-11, present your own ideas on how you think Strathclair should meet the challenge of the fast-approaching 21st Century.

EVOLUTION OF THE STRATHCLAIR DISTRICT William G. Hillman, B.Sc.(Hons), B.Ed., M.Ed.

1. Early activity in the area, that would eventually evolve into the 1.Strathclair district, was centred on the 2.Little Saskatchewan River and its valley about midway between 3.Riding Mountain and the 4.Assiniboine River (Figure 1). The Little Saskatchewan, a tightly-meandering tributary of the Assiniboine, flows south out of 5.Lake Audy and 6.Clear Lake in what is now Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP) and then follows a generally southeastward course through a fertile, deeply-entrenched, heavily-treed valley. Members of at least two early exploratory expeditions, those led by Dickinson and Hind, recognized this valley as one of the best in the northwest in terms of beauty and settlement potential.1 Along with the deep fertile alluvial soils, the valley contained an abundance of good water, wood, pasture and gravel deposits, as well as offering a relatively easy transportation route for water cargo. It is where the river turns southeast at 36-17-22 that the first settlement took form. The location also gave the settlement its name -- 7.The Bend (Figure 1).

2. The area north of The Bend was dotted with sloughs and lakes interspersed with stands of poplar, spruce and birch. It eventually became the Riding Mountain Timber Reserve (and then RMNP) and the 8.Keeseekoowenin Indian Reserve No. 61. The excellent hunting, trapping and fishing here was the raison d'être for the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) Trading Post upstream near the present site of 9.Elphinstone.

3. The rolling hills and open grassland south of The Bend presented stark contrast to the northern woodland. The unobstructed prevailing westerlies fanned prairie fires in the summer and whipped up blizzards in the winter. Indian tribes had long encouraged fire to enhance grassland for buffalo grazing and, indeed, an early settler, Lord Elphinstone, found that these grazing grounds lent themselves to successful ranching enterprises.2 Wood for fuel and buildings had to be hauled from the river valley or from farther north, but as soon as the land was broken, bluffs of poplars took root and spread out from the low-lying potholes or sloughs.

4. Several settlements sprang up before the arrival of the railway. About 10 miles south of The Bend and just east of the southern tip of 10.Salt Lake was 11.Old Marney (2-16-22) which, at one time, boasted a store and post office, a blacksmith shop, a brickyard and the Do-Drop-Inn Hotel. Farther east was the 12.Forks (33-15-21), a junction at which the Carlton Trail (known also as the Hudson Bay Trail or Ellice Trail) continued on its westerly route to Fort Ellice on the upper Assiniboine while a branch broke off northward to The Bend. From there it followed the river to Lake Audy and continued north to Gilbert Plains, Fort Dauphin and the Swan River Valley. Many 5.

So, the nuclei and the pattern for farm settlement were determined before the railway arrived -- The Bend, Riding Mountain HBC Post, Old Marney and The Forks were connected by the river, cart routes and Indian trails. By the mid-seventies the area had been surveyed by Duncan Sinclair and a section-township-range grid was in place for future homesteaders and settlement. Wagon loads of adventurous Scots from the east began to arrive having travelled by rail to Winnipeg. Scottish place names soon appeared; for example, 14.Menzie and 15.Glenforsa. Even The Bend was renamed Strathclair, a combination of the Scottish word "strath" for valley and "clair" from the surveyor, Sinclair's, name. Then came the 16.Manitoba and North Western Railway (now a branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway), which traversed the area midway between The Bend (Old Strathclair) and Old Marney (Figure 1). Before the end of the century the original four settlements -- The Bend (Old Strathclair), Old Marney, The Forks, and The Riding Mountain HBC Post -- had shrivelled and most activity had moved to the upstart Strathclair Station located in 35-16-22.

6. This event had a profound effect on the development of the area. Besides the obvious adjustments to the technological and cultural changes brought by the railway, pioneers had to erect a town from scratch on a barren prairie. Furthermore, because the railway company held rights to the land along the line, the town's business strip stretched along only the northeast side of the main street, which ran parallel to the tracks in a northwest-southeast direction, a situation characteristic of many prairie towns (Figure 2).

7. Pioneers such as James Campbell who had settled some distance from 'civilization' 17.(NW 24-16-22) now found themselves on the fringes of a booming settlement with full rail services.3 The railway and land companies carried on extensive advertising campaigns to lure new settlers, resulting in a flood of newcomers, and infusion into the area of a much more diverse ethnic mixture. By 1888, even the Premier of Manitoba, the 18.Honourable John Norquay, had a summer home on the north east corner of Salt Lake -- a lake which was fast becoming a popular picnic and resort spot. He had plans to erect a sanitorium there, as analysis of the waters had shown them to be beneficial to sufferers of rheumatism.4 Unfortunately, these plans never materialized as he died suddenly. Nevertheless, by the turn of the century, Strathclair had grown into a robust and thriving farm community.

8. The glory years of Strathclair and many other similar prairie communities reached their zenith in mid-twentieth century -- the '50s decade. The excitement and spirit generated by these towns was perhaps best epitomized by the Saturday Night "event." Following the Saturday evening supper hour, families would prepare to "go to town." The first cars to arrive would get the best seats. This meant finding a diagonal parking spot along the north side of main street 1a.(North Railway Street) in the well-lit, high-traffic area extending from the 2a.pool room(Johnny Dmytar's) at 3a.Minnedosa Street to the modern 4a.'self-serve' department store(Louis Molgat's) at 5a.Campbell Street Figure 3). Between these termini, people of all ages walked a jostling gauntlet along a strip of thriving businesses. Three favourite spots were the 6a.drugstore(G. V. Henderson's) with its soda fountain and magazine rack, the 7a.Chinese café(Sam Choy, Henry Choy, Lee's) with its booths for socializing, and a rival eatery which featured a jukebox, pinball machine and lunch counter with stools. Many of the men gathered in one of the two male bastions -- the 8a.beer parlour(Hotel) and the pool room; while a favourite routine for the women was to peruse the line of parked Fords, Chevies and Dodges -- each vehicle demanding a nod, wave or a detour off the sidewalk for a chat. When the week's discussion lagged out on the street, there seemed to be no end of open doors to shops to provide diversion: 9a.bakery, grocery, dry goods store, newspaper office, garages, butcher shop, hardware store, restroom, shoemaker, and tinsmith. In the winter there was always skating, curling and hockey at the 10.aRink. he routine for some was to go to the 7 o'clock movie at the 11a.Bend Theatre, delaying the sidewalk promenade for later. From a thirty-five cent allowance, kids could eke out a full night's entertainment which included a movie (complete with newsreel, Three Stooges short, cartoon, serial, previews, and draws for prizes), popcorn, "coke" or popsicle, double bubble gum, jawbreakers, and a fifty-two page comic book. Later in the decade, many people gathered outside the 12a.electric shop which provided an outdoor speaker connected to the twenty-one inch television in the window, few realizing that this box with its flickering black and white pictures was a harbinger of drastic change to this weekly social phenonemon that everyone took for granted.5 9. Just as the inception and growth of Strathclair were typical of many Manitoba towns, so too were the changes the town and surrounding district experienced throughout the twentieth century. While agricultural service centres have waned, the surrounding farms have become larger without a corresponding increase in total area farmed, resulting in fewer farms and decreased population. Increased capitalization, mechanization and the use of chemicals have resulted in farming becoming more of a competitive industry than a way of life. Money which once went to the maintenance of a labour force and working animals now is diverted to high tech machines, devices and chemicals. The fields are larger with different things in them -- less summer fallow, more trash cover, and a greater variety of crops. To facilitate the use of large machines many of the sloughs have been filled in; stone piles9. Just as the inception and growth of Strathclair were typical of many Manitoba towns, so too were the changes the town and surrounding district experienced throughout the twentieth century. While agricultural service centres have waned, the surrounding farms have become larger without a corresponding increase in total area farmed, resulting in fewer farms and decreased population. Increased capitalization, mechanization and the use of chemicals have resulted in farming becoming more of a competitive industry than a way of life. Money which once went to the maintenance of a labour force and working animals now is diverted to high tech machines, devices and chemicals. The fields are larger with different things in them -- less summer fallow, more trash cover, and a greater variety of crops. To facilitate the use of large machines many of the sloughs have been filled in; stone piles buried; road allowances and section lines worked; traditional early twentieth century-style barns, outhouses and granaries torn down; and bluffs and old farmsteads bulldozed. Some of the items removed have been replaced by windward-located, Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration-supplied shelter belts, utilitarian steel structures, and mobile homes or ranch-style bungalows. The transportation grid serving these re-organized farms consists of wider, higher roads designed to handle the winter snow pile up, spring runoff water, and larger, heavier machines and vehicles.

10. Most farm service towns have experienced a steady decline over the last half of this century and Strathclair is no exception. Despite some lack of foresight, occasional political blundering, and the fluctuating economic, social and geographic climate, pragmatic changes in role emphasis have brought about some degree of success in the ongoing fight for survival. In addition, as districts such as Strathclair enter the Computer/Communication Age it becomes increasingly obvious that they will survive only if they can adapt to the challenge of the new technologies and integrate them with the agricultural base.

11. Throughout their history and evolution, the successes and character of communities such as Strathclair have come largely from their ability to draw lifeblood from communication links -- foot and horse trails, fur trade and supply routes, river travel, oxcart trails, rail lines and later, highways with their bus routes and transport lines. Even the road grid laid out on the section-township-range survey system seemed to exist to channel farm trade into the local towns.6 Now, with most of these traditional lifelines either gone or rerouted to bypass the local settlements, many towns seem to have lost the ability to communicate with the outside. Today's links to the world have changed: fibre optics and cable lines, cellular telephones, computer networks, faxes, satellite communications, and high-speed land and air travel are now the norm. Highway traffic can be lured by roadside way stations but such traffic has little inclination or incentive to drive through every little town en route. Those towns and agribusinesses unwilling to embrace the new technologies which facilitate access to modern-day communications, will most certainly be passed by. Strathclair, progeny of the interplay of traditional trails of the past, now faces the complex task of tapping the ucharted myriad trails leading to the strange new frontier of the twenty-first century.7

End Notes

1 H. Y. Hind, Report of the Assiniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition (Toronto: John Lovell, by Order of the Legislative Assembly, 1859)

2 Lord Elphinstone, "Visit to Western Canada 1979" The Edmonton Courant, 13 January 1880.

3 K. Campbell, The Journals of Katherine Campbell: 1933-1971 (Strathclair: Maple Grove Publishing, 1991)

4 Strathclair Centennial History Committee, Our Story to 1984 (Strathclair: Rural Municipality of Strathclair, 1984)

5 W. Hillman, Bill & Sue-On Hillman: A Prairie Saga in 24 Original Songs (Strathclair: Maple Grove Records, Compact Disc Album, vol 10, 1993)

6 J. L. Tyman, By Section Township Range (Brandon: Assiniboine Historical Society, 1972)

7 W. Hillman, "The Integration of Microcomputers with the High School Language Arts Programme" (M.Ed. Thesis, Brandon University, 1991)


11. GEOGRAPHY LAB -- VISUAL PURSUIT NATIONAL - GEOGRAPHIC EXAMPLE

TEACHER: Issue each student a copy of a relevant National Geographic. The student then reads clues which the teacher has prepared in a computer file and records the answers (with page #) in the appropriate place in the file. The student will then draw from these answers--and and information remembered from the reading search--to compile a report on the magazine article. Full use of the powers of a word processor is expected in execution of this assignment. Sample visual pursuit questions follow:

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC JUNE 1992 NO CLUE ANSWER PAGE

1. Human remains found on excavated 1864 medicine bottles of Union Army's 32 US Colored Infantry...
2. Special maps used in Washington DC Metro...
3. 345 million-year-old geologic feature found while blasting Maryland's Sideling Hill...
4. Mountain range formed from colliding N.A. & African continental plates...
5. Cod food...
6. Source of heat in the 'natural kitchen' which cooks the Sao Miguel dish called Cozido...
7. A medical benefits of moderate alcohol consumption...
8. How most of the world perceives Jewish Aliyah and settlement to the West Bank and Gaza...
9. Harmful result of increasing the white-tailed deer pop...
10. Early Newfoundland Grand Banks fishermen and longtime market for Newfy fish...

THE WORLD'S GREAT LAKE
11. Country containing world's largest, oldest, deepest lake...
12. Baikal's two nicknames...
13. Main polluter of lake...
14. Country 100 km to south...
15. Mtn Range on NW shore...
16. Famous railway along south shore...
17. Classic geologic landform upon which this lake sits...
18. Cultural feature which caused erosion of north shore...
19. Famous river to the north which flows thru Siberia to the Arctic Ocean...
20. Approximate number of degrees latitude between Chivyrkuyskiy and the equator...
21. Approximate number of degrees between Greenwich, Eng. and Baikal-Lena Nature Reserve...
22. A type of fish netted in Baikal...
23. Favourite winter pass time in lake towns...
24. Source of threatening acid rain...
25. Instant 30,000 pop city built to support BAM...
26. Vodka-drinking Shamanist god of Baikal...
27. Major hazard to seal hunters in April...
28. A reason to catch the freshwater Nerpa...
29. Leader who purged and repressed local religions from '30s...
30. Leader whose reforms restored religious & social freedoms '90s...
31. Main product of the rainshadow and dry westerlies-beaten areas...
32. Main reason to plunge into Baikal's ice cold waters...
33. Main tourist attraction on eastern shore...
34. Important local vegetable crop...
35. Approximate age of the lake...
36. Reason for lake's longevity...
37. 1990 submarine discovery...
38. Reason for abundance of life at all depths...

SUNSET BOULEVARD
39. The most famous "strip" on Sunset Boulevard...
40. Major LA ethnic group...
41. Main skyline vegetation...
42. Target of Hispanic groups in Silver Lake...
43. Type of building at end of Sunset 200 years ago...
44. Ethnic settlement located in triangle formed by LA River Highway 110 and Sunset...
45. Home of 1958 "immigrants" from Brooklyn...
46. Hollywood's most famous intersection at the Walk of Fame...
47. Hollywood landmarks...
48. Reason for winding route west of Hollywood...
49. Famous Beverly Hills shopping street south of Sunset...
50. What the initials UCLA stand for...
51. Park named after famous American humorist...
52. Name by which most people know Highway #1...
53. Document a tourist can buy on almost any Hollywood street corner...
54. Famous 100-year-old Bel Air resident...

NUCLEAR GRAVEYARD
55. What happened at Bikini...
56. What type of island/ocean feature, is Bikini...
57. How Bikini is attached to sister islands...
58. Why the Bikinians can not return to their home...

THE PALESTINIANS
59. The 2 groups which lay claim to the West Bank...
60. Reason for bulldozed homes and cisterns...
61. Scene of military patrols, concrete-filled barrels, barbed wire and curfews...
62. Common holy site for Arabs and Jews...
63. Importance of UN decision in 1947...
64. Holy City for western religions...
65. Home to most Palestinians...
66. Only passport for most Palestinians...
67. Body of water bordering Gaza Strip...
68. Palestinian tactic used in "shaking off" confrontations...
69. Political group representing Palestinians...
70. Grandmothers' role in many Palestinian marriages...
71. Those brought together at Interns for Peace Summer Camps...

CUTTYHUNK SEASONS
72. What/Where is Cuttyhunk...
73. Ideal conditions for finding striped bass...
74. Cuttyhunk's physiographic origins...
75. Main vegetation...
76. Type of 100 mph storm in 1991...
77. Student/teacher ratio at the school until 1991...
78. Most common exterior finishing materials on island buildings...

EXTRO
79. What makes this issue's cover a landmark event...
80. Pollutant which gold seekers add to the Amazon..


12. SIMFARM COMPUTER SIMULATION GAME LOG

TEACHER: Go through the SimFarm tutorial with the class...you might want to issue notes or create overhead transparencies to facilitate student skills. Then assign each student the task of monitoring his/her progress... the following instructions may help. The same approach can be adapted for SimCity, SimEarth, SimTower, etc.

OPENING INFORMATION WHICH MUST BE RECORDED AT THE TOP OF EACH DAY'S JOURNAL ENTRY: Date, weather, finances, instructor's signature Below the menu bar is a row of buttons that let you open each of SimFarm's windows. To the right of the buttons are three icons and text that show:
1. Today's weather, and the weather for the next two days
2. The current date (week, month and year)
3. Your stash of cash - your available funds

YOUR JOURNAL MUST INCLUDE A FULL DESCRIPTION OF YOUR SITE & LOCATION - TERRAIN, TOPOGRAPHY, HYDROLOGY, VEGETATION, AND ALL ORIGINAL & FUTURE MAN-MADE FEATURES AND CHANGES. RECORD ALL STEPS TAKEN DURING THE SESSION. GIVE THE RATIONALE BEHIND EVERY MAJOR DECISION YOU MAKE.


13. SLIDE TOUR SIMULATIONS:

TEACHER: If you have access to large slide collections of the areas you are studying, I have found the following approach to be useful. (If you can incorporate videos, music, sound effects, CD-ROMs and Internet sites, so much the better. Simulate a tour over many days...give students a list of important geographical locations to map for each day...as well as topics to incorporate outside research (before and/or after each days leg of the journey). You might have questions prepared on a computer file which students can fill in before, during and/or after your travelogue spiel. Every aspect of geography - historical, geomorphology, physical, vegetation, hydrology, cultural, wildlife, ecological, climatology, economic, ethnic, urban, rural, agricultural, transportation, industrial, political...--the possibilities are endless -- restricted only by your slide choice and how far you want to take your students in this. Extended use of multi-media and role-playing here can be an asset.




PART III: COMPUTER AWARENESS SECTION:

1. NOTEGUIDES FOR COMPUTER PROGRAM TUTORIALS

TO ACCOMPANY TUTORIALS WHICH ACCOMPANY VARIOUS WORDPRO, DATABASE, SPREADSHEET, DOS, BASIC, ETC. PROGRAMS

TEACHER: Many computer programs come with computer-based tutorials. Sometimes it is useful to go through this on-monitor, instructional material and create questions-sheets on which students can record their responses. This usually sharpens their concentration as they think about the answers required...and after they have finished the tutorial, they are left with a set of notes which they may file away for future reference.


2. INTRODUCTORY RESEARCH PORTFOLIO AND SCAVENGER HUNT DISPLAY

TEACHER: This introductory computer awareness project was designed for a Middle Years class. Many different components can be plugged into it.

INSTRUCTIONS Prepare a portfolio and display presenting the twenty sections listed below. This project will be presented in front of the class.

The aim of this term project is to reinforce concepts and skills learned in class, as well as to encourage reading, viewing, and thinking outside of the classroom environment.

All work should be done on loose sheets which allows them to be revised, updated and easily collated into the finished layout at the end of term.

The finished Scavenger Collection is due in January and late or incomplete work will not be accepted for credit!!!

Evaluation is based on completeness, neatness, inventiveness, and overall quality and quantity of research and written work.

Each item should be carefully and properly identified and displayed. Items should appear in the order they are named below and page numbering should begin with the appropriate number prefixes...ie... Cartoons = pages 2.1, 2.2, 2.3,... Computer Glossary = pages 4.1, 4.2,

PART I: TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

1. Current newspaper and magazine articles about computers (as many as you can find with main points underlined or highlighted). Sources and dates are required.
2. Cartoons about computers (as many as you can find or create yourself).
3. List of computer inventors and their inventions. Include illustrations.
4. Computer glossary from A to Z with illustrations.
5. List of input/output devices with accompanying illustrations.
6. Story summaries (from novels, TV shows, movies, etc.) AND/OR video reviews
on documentaries about computers.
7. A listing of Internet Web Site addresses. Each address must contain a short description of what a "surfer" may find at the site.
8. A listing of E-Mail addresses. For each address, identify the owner of the address and the significance of the address to you.
9. List of computer devices currently available for personal and home use ie. watches, appliances, entertainment, etc. Include illustrations.
10. List of occupations which make use of computers. Indicate how computers are used in these occupations. Search newpaper want ads, articles, videos, etc. You may illustrate your list with clippings.


PART II: THE SCAVENGER HUNT DISPLAY

11. Computer printed grocery tapes. (Slips from old fashioned tills are not acceptable.)
12. Samples of Universal Product Codes (UPCs). In each case indicate the product with which they were associated.
13. Ads for a microcomputers... as many different brands and models as possible.
14. Ads for a calculators, 'pocket planners', electronic dictionaries, and any other miniature  computers.
15. Computer-related job advertisements.
16. Computer-generated utility bills (hydro, telephone, etc.).
17. Ads for computer toys ie. robots, Nintendo, pocket video, talking toys, etc.
18. Cancelled bank cheques with MICR numbers.
19. Computer-generated 'junkmail'.
20. Magnetic tape...ie. reel to reel 1/4", audio and/or video cassette, diskette material, etc.


3. STUDENT-DESIGNED COMPUTER MAGAZINE

TEACHER: This was designed to be a follow up to the previous RESEARCH PORTFOLIO AND SCAVENGER HUNT

REFERENCE: - MS-WORKS Word Processor - Various computer paint, drawing & graphics programs - Desktop Publishing Programs - Bits & Bytes Text Booklets 1-10 - MS-DOS Reference Books - Computer Magazines - Byte, Compute, Home Computing - Various Home and School Library videos and TV shows - Current newsmagazines, daily newspapers, etc. - Latest software for IBM systems - Windows - DOS - Wordperfect 6 techniques - CD-ROM programs - Internet

PROCEDURE: The aim of this term project is to reinforce concepts and skills learned in class, as well as to encourage reading, viewing, and thinking outside of the classroom environment.

All work should be done on loose sheets which allows them to constantly revised and easily collated into the finished layout at the end of term. The end result should be presented in magazine format.

The finished magazine is due in January and late or incomplete work will not be accepted for credit!!!

Evaluation is based on completeness, neatness, inventiveness, and overall quality and quantity of research and written work.

CONTENTS

1. COVER PAGE(S): Must include title logo, illustrations, date, price, etc. Illustrations must be done with a computer paint program such as Paint Brush.

2. CONTENTS: Contents of the magazine must be itemized here. Page numbers must include the prefix number of each particular section ie. COMPUTER CARTOON pages should be numbered as follows: 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, etc. A word processor must be used and the margins should be decorated with related illustrations, either student-drawn or clipped and pasted from another source.

3. NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS: Actual newspaper clippings on up-to-date developments in the world of computers are to be pasted in your pages here.. NEATLY. Source and date must be indicated on each clipping. Important points must be highlighted and commented upon.

4. NEWS MAGAZINE SYNOPSES: Relevant computer articles from magazines such as Time, Macleans, Compute, etc. should be condensed/summarized and presented with a word processor here. You are encouraged to include your own thoughts and observations about the articles. Sources and dates must be included.

5. COMPUTER CARTOONS: Either student created or clipped and pasted from another source.

6. REVIEWS OR SYNOPSES OF COMPUTER RELEVANT FILMS, VIDEOS, TV SHOWS ETC.: The student is strongly encouraged to produce these items on a word processor program and printer. Since your work here must be done in newspaper style columns, use of a Desktop Publishing program is recommended. Art decoration is optional.

7. ADVERTISEMENTS - DISPLAY AND WANT AD STYLES: These may be clipped and/or student generated but they must be relevant.

8. A "HELPS" SECTION: A collection of everyday or special commands, helps and hints, and shortcuts in the use of Microcomputers, CD-ROMS, Internet, programming, file organization, and technology in general. Use of a Word Processor is recommended.

9. FUTURAMA: A section devoted to "state-of-the-art" developments in 10. INTERNET LOG: Present the log you were assigned to keep while on assignment on the Internet.

11. POTPOURRI SECTION: A section devoted to artwork, writings, programs, and anything which shows off the student's creativity and awareness. Much of this section may be culled from our everyday lab work.


4. STUDENT COMPUTER ANTHOLOGY DIGEST - TERM RESEARCH PROJECT

Using Readers Digest and various current computer magazines as models, create your own "Computer Digest." Everything in this anthology must be computer and technology related. Information for your mag will be found in classroom lectures, discussions & materials, newspapers & newsmagazines, Internet searches, television broadcasts, computer & Net magazines, videos, CD-ROMs, etc. Your finished edition should include illustrations, journal writings, daily impressions, summaries, fiction, DTP-type layout and design, reviews, oddities, vignettes, etc. - with references where ever possible. A bibliography and accompanying data base of resources is recommended.

PART I- INTERNET SECTION Part one of your magazine should be an InterNet section with the following headings:

1. Log - a daily log of your classroom accomplishments while using the computer and the Internet.

2. Net Sites - keep a list of interesting sites. You should include site name, URL address, and a description of what you found interesting at that site.

3. Up-to-date developments on the InterNet. Include information presented in class, as well as your own observations from outside research using the media.

4. Your personal homepage: Step 1: a paste-up layout of how you want your page to look...include a well-thought-out design with appropriate fonts, graphics, features, and information which reflects your interests.

Step 2: your ideas transferred to computer and programmed in html or with the help of a program such as NetScape 3 editor

Step 3: the final version of your homepage posted on the World Wide Web. Your page should also be registered with the most popular search services such as Yahoo, Web Crawler, Alta Vista, etc. The more dedicated student may wish to add audio clips, animation, counters, guest book, scanned photos, graphics, etc.

The number of steps you will be able to complete will depend upon your dedication to the project and the amount of time available on the Net.

PART II: COMPUTER DIGEST

Adapt magazine features and departments such as: - E-Mail correspondence with other schools - worldwide - illustrated cover page with logos - contents page listing all features with page numbers - editorial page - editor's notes - commentaries - news & notes - recent technology breakthroughs - what's new - feedback - letters - input/output - Q&A - tips & tools - hardware clinic - disk updates - workplace - business software - procedures - learning machine - educational software - multimedia section - telecomputing - internet - software guide - game reserve - reviews: software, hardware, videos, books, movies... - for the programmer - puzzles - mind games - behind the screens: people bios, events, news, trends - tek news stories of the week - funny bits - cartoons - humorous vignettes - word power - all in a day's work etc. etc. etc. make up your own departments create...create...create...create...create

Your finished product must be laid out in a neat, logical, informative, creative, and appealing fashion. This is a flexible, on-going, course-long project - it is important to start work on it early.

Feel free to colour your graphics.

All pages must be collated and bound appropriately.


4. TEN INTRODUCTORY WORD PROCESSING ACTIVITIES

TEACHER: These 10 assignments were designed to introduce English students to the power of the word processor (MS-WORKS-DOS) and how it can bring about different approaches to writing.


WORD PROCESSING LAB #1 - MINUS ONE PLUS TWO

OBJECTIVE: To build sentences from a three word starter sentence.

WORD PROCESSING FEATURES USED: delete insert underline Delete & Insert........Backspace, Delete & Insert Keys Underline..............ALT-formaT/Underline or CTRL-U Select text............Alt-Select/tExt...or...F8 Delete hilited text....Delete Key Save...................ALT-File/Save

ASSIGNMENT: - Choose any six of the 12 three-word-starter sentences in the reference section below. - By using a minus one plus two process, substitute interesting adjectives, nouns, adverbs, and verbs until your sentences are expanded into sentences of 10 or more words. - Your 6 sentences must be of the following types: 1. funny 2. exciting 3. happy 4. sad 5. scary 6. impossibly exaggerated

- UNDERLINE ALL THE NOUNS IN YOUR SENTENCES - Proofread your new sentences for errors - Swap computers with a neighbour - Proofread - Revise your work - Select or Block all directions - Delete directions - Save your work

REFERENCE: Choices for starter sentences The dog ran The wind blew The creature walked The cat clawed The shark attacked The boy yelled The doctor cut The rain fell The bike wobbled The mouse nibbled The monster moved

WORK SPACE...

DATE NAME

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS:


WORD PROCESSING LAB # 2 - DIAMANTES ARE FOREVER

OBJECTIVE: To write a seven-line diamante poem

WORD PROCESSING FEATURES USED: Delete/Insert Centre...............ALT-formaT/Centre...or...CTRL-C Choose Normal Para...ALT-formaT/Normal...or...CTRL-X Underline............ALT-formaT/Underline...or...CTRL-U Boldface.............ALT-formaT/Bold...or...CTRL-B Select text..........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Delete selected text...Delete Key Save.................ALT-File/Save

REFERENCE: EXAMPLE AND RULES

Winter Cold, Dark Skating, Skiing, Shoveling Frost, Snow/Sun, Rain Picknicking, Swimming, Biking Hot, Bright Summer

- The first line of this poem is the subject of the poem. - The subject is a person, place or thing. - The second line of the poem contains two adjectives which describe the subject - The third line contains three verbs which tell us more about the subject. These verbs end in 'ing' or 'ed'. - The middle line contains two sets of nouns. - Two of the nouns relate to the top subject and two to the bottom subject. - The next two lines are similar to the second and third line except that they describe the end noun. - The last line of the poem is also a person, place, or thing but the opposite of the first line. ex. spring/autumn - earth/sky - whale/minnow - light/dark - sun/moon - car/tricycle

ASSIGNMENT - Using the above rules, compose your own diamante poem (insert and delete words or phrases as you write and revise your poem) - Using the Works centering commands, centre the entire poem in diamante form - Underline descriptive words (adjectives, adverbs) - Use bold command to emphasize the first and last words in the poem - Proofread - Swap - Proofread - Revise - Select/Block directions and Delete - Save

WORK SPACE...

DATE NAME

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS


WORD PROCESSING LAB #3 - HAIKU POETRY

OBJECTIVE: To write a haiku poem

WORD PROCESSING FEATURES USED: Insert and Delete functions Underline..........ALT-formaT/Underline..or...CTRL-U Italics............ALT-formaT/Italic.....or...CTRL-I Select text........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Save...............ALT-File/Save

REFERENCE: The dewdrops glistened into jewels on soft green summer sun burning

Snowflakes fall softly covering the earth. Inside everything sparkles

Haiku is ancient Japanese style, three line, nature poetry. Line one has five syllables Line two has seven syllables Line three has five syllables

ASSIGNMENT - Write an original Haiku poem (use thesaurus & dictionary)

- Delete or Insert words as necessary - Edit your poem for: FORM - ie the correct number of syllables DESCRIPTION - ie plenty of fresh descriptive words CONTENT - ie smooth-flowing interesting lines - Underline descriptive words - Select/block your poem - Change the print of your poem to ITALICS - Proofread - Swap - Proofread - Revise - Select directions text - Delete directions - Save

WORK SPACE

DATE NAME

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS____________________________


WORD PROCESSING LAB #4 - CINQUAIN MEANS FIVE

OBJECTIVE: To write a cinquain poem

WORD PROCESSING FEATURES USED: Delete/Insert procedures Select text........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Double Spacing.....ALT-formaT/Double space..or..CTRL-2 Centre.............ALT-formaT/Centre...or...CTRL-C Boldface...........ALT-formaT/Bold...or...CTRL-B Save...............Alt-File/Save

REFERENCE: A typical cinquain poem Corvette Black, sleek Engine Humming, roaring Loved for its beauty Car

ASSIGNMENT: Write two cinquain poems PROCEDURE:

LINE 1 - Think of something you would like to own. Name it in just one word. Write that word on the first line of your poem.

LINE 2 - Think of two words that describe this object. Write these two words on the next line under the first word.

LINE 3 - Use three words to describe some action you could perform with the object. Write these words on the third line.

LINE 4 - Now write four words to describe how you feel about the object. Put these words on line four.

LINE 5 - Finally, on the fifth line, write one word that is a synonym for the thing you would like to own.

REMEMBER: This is a cinquain poem. Each of the five lines has a special purpose.

WORDPRO FOLLOW-UP FORMATTING ASSIGNMENT: - Centre your poem - Bold face the poem's subject and its synonym - Double space (vertical spacing) the lines in the poem - Delete - Insert - Proofread - Revise - Delete directions - Save - Print

WORK SPACE... DATE NAME MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS___________________________


WORD PROCESSING LAB #5 - BOOK REPORT

OBJECTIVE: To compose a novel/short story/movie report

WORD PROCESSING FEATURES USED:

REFERENCE: The main parts of a novel/ss/movie report are:

1. Title significance: What connection does the title have with the events which take place in the novel/ss/movie

2. Author: - Biography or analysis of creator's style

3. Setting: Time - Place - Atmosphere

4. Theme: The main lessons or themes presented

5. Character: Discussion of characteristics, motivation, good points, bad points, etc of main characters

6. Conflict: with people, nature, self, society, etc. 7. Climax: The main turning point in the story - usually near the end and the most exciting event

8. Plot summary: The main story line simplified - the main events of the story retold

9. Opinion: - Pros & Cons - What did you like and dislike - Your recommendations...

10. Other: Anything else you noticed about the work... anything not covered in the above topics... awards...actors... illustrations...look of the book/film...etc...

ASSIGNMENT:

- Brainstorm a rough draft of a novel/short story/movie you have read/viewed recently - Wordpro your ideas into your computer - Insert/delete copy/move information as needed - As you write, use the Works Thesaurus to find more colorful synonyms to use in your composition - Underline the title - Indent each of the 10 paragraph headings 5 Tab spaces - Boldface the headings for the 10 main parts of your report - When finished, Justify the entire report - Double space the report - Study the Automatic Page Breaks and insert Manual Page Breaks in more appropriate spots - Use your Spellchecker to check for spelling errors - Edit: check capitalization, punctuation, grammar.... - As your report becomes longer, practice Scrolling through the file with the fast scrolling keys - Trade workstations with a friend for further proofreading - Revise! Revise! Revise! - Select the directions text and Delete - Save

WORK SPACE...

DATE NAME

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS ________________________


WORD PROCESSING LAB #6 - STEM PARAGRAPH EXPANSION

OBJECTIVE: To complete a story when given only a first, middle and last sentence.

WORD PROCESSOR FEATURES USED: Delete/Insert procedures Thesaurus..........ALT-Options/Thesaurus Select text........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Copy...............ALT-Edit/Copy.....or...F3-SHIFT Centre.............ALT-formaT/Centre.or...CTRL-C Underline..........ALT-formaT/Underline...or...CTRL-U Double Spacing.....ALT-formaT/Double space..or..CTRL-2 Justification......Alt-formaT/Justified...or...CTRL-J Boldface...........ALT-formaT/Bold...or...CTRL-B Tab Indents........TAB Spellchecker.......ALT-Options/check Spelling Scrolling..........PgUp, PgDn, CTRL-Home/End/Arrows Mouse Scrolling....Scroll bars & boxes - right & bottom Save...............Alt-File/Save

ASSIGNMENT: - Choose one of the Beginning Stems from the reference section. COPY it to the work space and expand it into a beginning paragraph for a story. Be sure to introduce the story, character, setting and action.

- Now choose a Middle Stem and COPY it to the work space. Expand it into a middle section para for your story.

- Finally, choose a Last Stem and COPY it to the work space. Expand it into a concluding paragraph for your story.

REMEMBER: A good paragraph must have: A strong opening...... Topic Sentence -- followed by related... Supporting Sentences -- and summarized or closed with a strong ............ Concluding Sentence --

WORDPRO FORMATTING ASSIGNMENT:

- Use the Works Thesaurus while you work to add more expressive words to your composition - Boldface, Centre and Underline an appropriate title - Justify your paragraphs - Double Space your paragraphs - Indent the first line of each of your three paras - Spellcheck your document

- Proofread, looking for continuity of the entire story, spelling errors, capitals, punctuation, sentence construction, and suitability of story title. - Revise your story, checking for clarity and good descriptive words. - Select and Delete directions - Save  



 REFERENCE
BEGINNING STEMS: - I opened the door and looked outside. There, in my front yard, stood the most unusual animal I had ever seen. - Of all the people in the world who could__________. ______________________________ was the best. - It was a nightmare and it wouldn't quit. - Deep inside the school, the morning bell sounded. - Everyone was gathered around the small playing field. - It was certainly a day for just lounging around. - You'd have thought the world was coming to an end, the way everyone looked. - I felt very nervous about this trip. - We were all alone in that dark blue sky with glittering stars around us.

MIDDLE STEMS: - Behind them, there was a scratching sound, as a key turned in the lock of the door. - Glass exploded from the store, over the steady blast of the fire alarm. - She stumbled after him, farther and farther into the darkness. - One footstep could give us away. We started to look around. - I didn't know what to answer. It might be sort of exciting. - Be careful. We don't want to frighten it. - The shouting and barking grew softer and softer. - I looked straight at the television camera and took a big breath. - "No," said the strange creature with surprise. - I decided not to worry. Somehow we would stay together.

LAST STEMS: - The future looked pretty good for us now. - Then everyone piled out of the van and headed for home. - All the way home, my family kept asking me questions. - The excitement died down pretty fast. And now it's just as if I'd never been away at all. - I'm not going to do anything. I just want to keep it. - They took a quick backward look. They were safe. - Now I was all alone. I breathed a sigh of relief. - I finally stopped shivering. It was going to take me awhile to warm up. - I sat there for awhile, remembering how it had been.

WORK SPACE... DATE NAME MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS


WORD PROCESSING LAB #7 - THE BUSINESS OF LETTER WRITING

OBJECTIVE: To understand and use the format of a business letter in the creation of TWO business letters.

WORD PROCESSING FEATURES USED: Delete/Insert procedures Thesaurus..........ALT-Options/Thesaurus Select text........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Copy...............ALT-Edit/Copy.....or...F3-SHIFT Centre.............ALT-formaT/Centre.or...CTRL-C Underline..........ALT-formaT/Underline...or...CTRL-U Double Spacing.....ALT-formaT/Double space..or..CTRL-2 Justification......Alt-formaT/Justified...or...CTRL-J Boldface...........ALT-formaT/Bold...or...CTRL-B Tab Indents........TAB Spellchecker.......ALT-Options/check Spelling Scrolling..........PgUp, PgDn, CTRL-Home/End/Arrows Mouse Scrolling....Scroll bars & boxes - right & bottom Save...............Alt-File/Save

REFERENCE: Sample Letter

William Boxcar 17 Track St. Ipswich, MB ROJ 2CO

June 30, 1999

ACE Pencil Company 1932 Pine Avenue New York, NY 10017

Dear ACE Pencil Company:

Please send me the following items from your summer catalogue:

#682 - 10 red pencils with my name engraved on them #805 - 5 black pens with blue ink #201 - 11 spitballs

I have enclosed payment of $10.50. Thank you.

Yours truly,

William Boxcar

ASSIGNMENT:

- Look at the above sample letter or other styles of business letters. Select the one which appeals to you, make up an address and write a business letter in which you order 10 of your favourite audio tapes, CDs, or movies. - Centre your letter head - i.e. Name & Return Address - Justify margins for a business look. - Experiment with the creation of columns, using TAB stops - Double space the body of the letter and use the underline and boldface commands wherever they may enhance your letter. - Correct format, punctuation, capitalization, spelling... - Copy the body of your letter to a new workspace and send this second one to a different company - Select and Delete directions - Save

WORK SPACE....

DATE_________________NAME________________________________

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS___________________________


WORD PROCESSING LAB #8 - BE A LEXICOGRAPHER

OBJECTIVE: To collect, define, and alphabetize words associated with music using a dictionary format.

WORD PROCESSOR FEATURES USED: Delete/Insert procedures Thesaurus..........ALT-Options/Thesaurus Select text........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Copy...............ALT-Edit/Copy.....or...F3-SHIFT Centre.............ALT-formaT/Centre.or...CTRL-C Underline..........ALT-formaT/Underline...or...CTRL-U Double Spacing.....ALT-formaT/Double space..or..CTRL-2 Justification......Alt-formaT/Justified...or...CTRL-J Boldface...........ALT-formaT/Bold...or...CTRL-B Tab Indents........TAB Spellchecker.......ALT-Options/check Spelling Scrolling..........PgUp, PgDn, CTRL-Home/End/Arrows Mouse Scrolling....Scroll bars & boxes - right & bottom Save...............Alt-File/Save

ASSIGNMENT: - Find a music-related word for each letter of the alphabet. - each word must be defined - insert the words in alphabetical order - Boldface and Underline entry words - set Justification to both sides so the document will look like a dictionary - proofread, revise - Select and Delete directions - Save

WORK SPACE....

DATE_____________NAME____________________________________

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS____________________________


WORD PROCESSING LAB #9 - MAKE IT DIFFERENT

OBJECTIVE: To write a descriptive paragraph. To use the encyclopaedia and dictionary to find information.

WORD PROCESSING FUNCTIONS USED: Delete/Insert procedures Thesaurus..........ALT-Options/Thesaurus Select text........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Copy...............ALT-Edit/Copy...or...F3-SHIFT Centre.............ALT-formaT/Centre...or...CTRL-C Italics............ALT-formaT/Italics...or...CTRL-I Underline..........ALT-formaT/Underline...or...CTRL-U Replace............ALT-Select/Replace Double Spacing.....ALT-formaT/Double space...or..CTRL-2 Justification......Alt-formaT/Justified...or...CTRL-J Boldface...........ALT-formaT/Bold...or...CTRL-B Tab Indents........TAB Margins adjust.....ALT-Print/page setup & Margins Spellchecker.......ALT-Options/check Spelling Scrolling..........PgUp, PgDn, CTRL-Home/End/Arrows Mouse Scrolling....Scroll bars & boxes - right & bottom Save...............Alt-File/Save

ASSIGNMENT: - Choose two famous people (computers, music, literature, movies, current news, etc.) and write a descriptive paragraph of at least seven sentences about each. - Use a variety of sources for your research. Concentrate on using good descriptive words. - Using the Replace commands replace the person's name with your own name each time it appears. - Full Justify the paragraphs - Centre and Italicize the title - Insert additions and corrections - Change the margins to Left 2" and Right 1.5" - Proofread - Revise - Select and Delete directions - Save

WORK SPACE.....

DATE_______________NAME__________________________________

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS____________________________


WORD PROCESSING LAB #10 - WRITE ABOUT IT

OBJECTIVE: To develop an outline for a report. To write a report from an outline.

WORD PROCESSING FUNCTIONS USED: Delete/Insert procedures Thesaurus..........ALT-Options/Thesaurus Select text........ALT-Select/tExt...or...F8 Copy...............ALT-Edit/Copy...or...F3-SHIFT Centre.............ALT-formaT/Centre...or...CTRL-C Italics............ALT-formaT/Italics...or...CTRL-I Underline..........ALT-formaT/Underline...or...CTRL-U Replace............ALT-Select/Replace Double Spacing.....ALT-formaT/Double space...or..CTRL-2 Justification......Alt-formaT/Justified...or...CTRL-J Boldface...........ALT-formaT/Bold...or...CTRL-B Tab Indents........TAB Margins adjust.....ALT-Print/page setup & Margins Spellchecker.......ALT-Options/check Spelling Scrolling..........PgUp, PgDn, CTRL-Home/End/Arrows Mouse Scrolling....Scroll bars & boxes - right & bottom Save...............Alt-File/Save

PROCEDURE:

- A good outline provides a framework for a report. It is a tool to help us write a report that is interesting and accurate. If you have written a complete outline it is easier to write the paragraphs in the report. SAMPLE OUTLINE:

COMPUTER GENERATIONS

I. First Generation (1950-1959) II. Second Generation (1960-1965) III. Third Generation (1965-1975) a. Solid state i.c. Design 1. 2. 3. b. Nanosecond Speeds c. Cooler with less energy consumption d. Change in storage technology e. Improved Languages f. On-Line systems IV. Fourth Generation V. Fifth Generation (Future)

ASSIGNMENT:

- Look at the form of an outline. Notice where words are indented and where Roman Numeral letters and numbers are used. For example, for the Third Generation you could write five paragraphs: A,B,C,D & E.

- Choose a relevant topic (If you pursue a computer theme you could choose topics such as the following: Evolution - AI - Banking - Business - Communication - Crime - Computer Literacy - Creative Arts - Education - Engineering - Future Trends - Games - Government - Home - Jobs and Productivity - Law - Library - Medicine - Merchandising - Military - Multi-Media - Privacy - Robotics and Bionics - Recreation - Software - Space - Transportation - Virtual Reality - etc.)

- Do research on your topic - take notes and make an outline. Next, expand your outline into a report. - Centre the title - Tab for an outline format - Boldface outline topics and important words in the report. - Double space the outline - Justify the finished report - Adjust the margins: Left 1.5, Right 1.5, Top 2, Bottom 2 - Proofread - Revise - Select and Delete directions - Save

WORK SPACE....

DATE_________________NAME__________________________________

MARK OR INSTRUCTOR'S INITIALS_____________________________


6. TWO PEOPLE CREATE A MYSTERY STORY IN TWELVE EASY STEPS

This activity can be used for a number of purposes: 1. a discovery approach to word processing 2. as a structure and coherence writing experience 3. as a mini-mystery writing experience.

TWO WRITING PARTNERS AT THE COMPUTER, USING THE WORKS WORD PROCESSOR PROGRAM, ARE TO PROCEED THROUGH THIS ACTIVITY COMPLETING EACH STEP IN TURN.

1. After viewing the ambiguous, frightening, confusing, picture presented by the instructor, each pair of partners should collaborate and begin typing a story using their word processor. The "keyboarder" should type in THREE complete sentences which have been inspired by the picture, while the recorder writes them down on paper in case some material is inadvertently erased.

2. Partner positions should be reversed and the new "keyboarder" should add THREE more sentences to the previously word processed material while the new "recorder" continues to make duplicate notes on paper.

3. Partners should again trade places, and a new paragraph consisting of THREE more sentences should be typed into the computer. During the typing of these three sentences the keyboarder should experiment using all the Works function and scrolling keys we have studied so far. Both partners must demonstrate that they know their way around the Wordpro.

4. Now change places and let the "keyboarder" type in THREE final sentences to complete the story while the partner takes notes.

5. Swap positions again and insert ONE additional sentence between the second and third sentences.

6. Swap positions and insert ONE additional sentence immediately preceding the last one in your story.

7. Each partner must now insert the following material: At THREE different locations in the story, insert descriptive adjectives or phrases.

8. Each partner must now change FOUR different verbs throughout your story to more descriptive, exciting or colourful ones.

9. Each partner must take a turn at proof-reading and revision. Concentrate on correcting typographical, grammatical, punctuation, and spelling errors as well as trying to make your story "flow". Make use of the Spellchecker here.

10. Double Space and for a weird effect - Right Align the text.

11. Once you have completed your story, insert an Upper Case (capital letter), Centered, Boldfaced, title of your choice at the top of the story. Under this title also centre the names of the creators.

12. You are now ready to final Save your creation and to read it to the class.

WORK SPACE:


7. WORD PROCESSING TECHNIQUES ASSIGNMENT PART 1

Show that you know your way around a word processor by revising approximately 50 spelling and grammatical errors in the opening paragraph of the following letter to Ottawa. You may double check your revisions with the SPELLCHECKER.

PART 2 After you have revised these errors show off your skill with the MS-Works Word Processor by making the following changes to the letter:

1. Key your return name and address information just above the capitalized directions (i.e. YOUR NAME, etc.) then HIGHLIGHT capitalized three lines of direction and DELETE them.
2. CENTRE your return name and address
3. Put in the name of the Prime Minister where indicated and BOLD FACE his name
4. DOUBLE SPACE the opening para
5. UNDERLINE the name Neil Enns in the second para
6. FULL JUSTIFY the entire reprinted story on Neil Enns (six paras), which starts with the second para of the letter
7. Put the entire Neil Enns story (six paras) into ITALICS
8. Insert a MANUAL PAGE BREAK between these directions and the beginning of the letter
9. MOVE the second last paragraph so that it appears as the last para - just before the Winnipeg Free Press reference
10. Change both the LEFT & RIGHT MARGINS of the page to .5"
11. Place the Winnipeg Free Press credit 5 TAB spaces from the left margin
12. LEFT INDENT only the second para 1"
13. Place a DOUBLE OUTLINE BORDER around the Winnipeg Free Press and date credit
14. Create a P.S. after your signature and name. Use the DESK DICTIONARY which you have been directed to keep at your workstation at all times to define the words CRYPTOGRAPHY and COMPUTER.
15. Save your work to the hard drive EVERY 10 MINUTES

AFTER YOUR FINAL REVISION...MAKE YOUR FINAL SAVE TO YOUR WORKS LAB DISK ... TURN IT IN

THE LETTER

YOUR NAME YOUR ADDRESS YOUR TOWN, PROVINCE, POSTAL CODE

DATE

PRIME MINISTER OF CANADA 123 Gritty Drive Ottawa, Ontario H0H 0H0

Dear Sir:

i feele thet tenagers ar nevre givn enuf recoagnition fer there acheivements. the newpapers ownly seam too prints storeys abuot the bad ones & niver prayse the gud thins we dew Four theese raisons I thunk thet yur guvernment shud gave an patt on the back to the Branden Manitobah tenager i red abowt recintly. I amm enkclosing the storie I red:

Neil Enns is a high school dropout who packed it in after Grade 9. But the teen didn't spend his time hanging around malls or scootin' on a skateboard. No, Enns went off to college. And today - two days after his 17th birthday - the computer whiz will become the youngest person ever to graduate from Brandon University. "It's very exciting," said Enns. "I've been walking around with a big grin on my face for weeks."

But a degree in computer science isn't the only cause for celebration. Next week, Enns will mark the one-year anniversary of his consulting firm, NetSurf Technologies. With the help of NetSurf, school teachers in Flin Flon and federal workers in Ottawa have been introduced to the information highway. And when the world curling championships came to Brandon this year, Enns put up pages on the World Wide Web on the internet. He estimates 25,000 people - from places as far away as Sweden and Switzerland - picked them up. "I had the most current scores and standings," says Enns proudly, "I was ahead of TV and radio."

"He's the next Bill Gates," a university official says half-jokingly in reference to the Microsoft wunderkind. Neil's father Robin is an education professor at Brandon University. His mother Carol works as a librarian for the federal government.

At age four, with dad at his side, Neil was already showing his pre-school classmates and their parents the wonders of computer technology. By the time he reached Grade 3, the techno-tyke had already written his first computer program. "He's really low key about all of this and that's what we're really proud of," said Carol.

When he's not tinkering with one of the family's five computers, Enns likes to dive into mystery novels and play softball. His plans for the summer: A course in Cryptography and continued work on his forest fire simulation software program. "It's one of the most advanced in the world and hopefully I'll get a paper published out of it."

Enns will spend next year in the computer science honours program at the Brandon campus before heading off to grad school, possibly at the University of Victoria. Beyond that? "I'd like to get into research and development in communications," said Enns. "I like the way computers can bring people together."

Winnipeg Free Press - May 27, 1995

Yours truly,

YOUR NAME  


8. BILL GATES’ “THE ROAD AHEAD” ANALYSIS

CD-ROM/HARDCOVER TEXT REVIEW LOG OF BILL GATES' THE ROAD AHEAD TEACHER: The following is a guide that students can use to record observations as they explore the Bill Gates Book/CD-ROM --THE ROAD AHEAD. The CD-ROM contains a hypertexted version of the accompanying hardcover book...as well as numerous videos -- a tour through his futuristic mansion, an interview, and the future of technology in the home, business, and education. Numerous research activities are included.

THE ROAD AHEAD AUTHOR(S): DATE: PUBLISHER:

MENU CHOICES: (6) PICTURES CORRESPONDING WITH MENU CHOICES:

I. FUTURE View the CD-ROM videos and address the following headings:

1. HOME i. Information Appliances ii. Home Control Console iii. Asynchronous TV iv. Interactive TV v. Electronic Marketplace vi. General Description
2. GATES HOUSE VR TOUR i. Location and Site ii. Construction Materials iii. Examples of Advanced Technology iv. The ID Pin
3. BUSINESS Indicate the benefits of : i. Electronic Commerce ii. Wallet PC iii. Mobile Communication iv. Video Conferencing v. Voice recognition
4. EDUCATION Indicate the advantages to education of: i. Networks ii. The classroom environment of the future iii. Digital White Board iv. Multimedia

II. ASK BILL GATES INTERVIEW Summarize Gates' responses:

1. When will the Information Highway be here?
2. Why did you decide to write the book now?
3. Is the Internet the Information Highway?
4. How will the Information Highway effect social interaction?
5. Will there be equal access tto the Information Highway?
6. What changes in education can be expected?
7. How will students be effected [sic] by the new technologies?
8. How will the new technologies effect [sic] the home?
9. Will people have control over the information available in their homes?
10. What has been your key to success?
11. What's ahead for Bill Gates?

III. THE ROAD AHEAD

ASSIGNMENT:
1. Present a summary for each of the following chapters.
2. Choose which you feel were the most interesting hypertext links for each chapter. (A listing of key links is provided below.)
3. Indicate reasons for the choosing of each of your hypertext links and work this information into your summary. (Include fascinating bits of info you which you did not know previously.)
4. Describe the most intriguing/interesting/informative illustrations in each chapter and incorporate these descriptions into your summary.

SUGGESTED HYPERLINKS TO RESEARCH FOR YOUR SUMMARIES

Foreward PC Personal Computer MacIntosh Computer Internet Electronic Mail Computer Games Information Highway Software Developers

1. A Revolution Begins Seattle Computer Terminal BASIC Computer Chips Facsimile Machines Microsoft "Information at Your Fingertips" Telephone Printing Press Bible Laser Printer Mainframe Teletype Digital Equipment Corporation Minicomputer PD P-8 Intel Micropressor Chip Intel 8008 Traf-O-Data Harvard University Honeywell Inc. IBM Popular Mechanics Magazine Altair 8800

2. The Beginning of the Information Age Information Age CD-ROMs Computer Databases Scan Abacus Pascaline (Mechanical Calculator) Stepped Reasoner Analytical Engine Binary System Analog Bit Byte Vacuum Tubes Transistors Bell Labs Integrated Circuit Fibre Optics Moore's Law PC/XT Hard Disk Megabytes Gigabytes Terabyte

3. Lessons from the Computer Industry Apple Compaq Lotus Oracle Sun Wang Wordstar WordPerfect System/360 Computer VAX Control Data Hitachi Itel Commodore Radio Shack TRS-80 & Model 100 Heathkit JVC & VHS Sony Lotus 1-2-3 Apple II Xerox Texas Instruments Hewlett Packard Graphical User Interface GUI Character Based Interface Mouse Windows Microsoft Word Microsoft Excel PC/AT Intel 800286 microprocessor IBM PC IBM PS/2 AT & T Cellular Telephones Dolby Internet

4. Applications and Appliances Synchronous Asynchronous Video On Demand Servers Information Appliance General Electric Set-Top Box HDTV VGA Flat Panel Display Digital White Board Mobile Society Wallet PC Global Positioning GPS Scanners Smart Cards Pen-Based Computing Spatial Navigation Hyperlinks Software Agent Cyberspace Microsoft Bob Virtual Reality

5. Paths to the Highway Protocols Baud Electronic Bulletin Boards BBS Download Usenet Newsgroups Web Browsing Word Wide Web Home Page TCP/IP Virus & Worm Coaxial Cable Compuserve America Online AOL Modem Video Conferencing Direct Broadcast Satellites Direct TV Pagers Cryptography RSA Public Key Cryptosystem

6. The Content Revolution Boeing Microsoft Encarta Broderbund & Myst 7th Guest Microsoft Flight Simulator Vitascope Cinematographe

7. Implications for Business Luddite Social User Interface Emoticon MCI MAil Video Phone Telecommuting

8. Friction-Free Capitalism Netiquette Levi Strauss & Co. Compact Disc Electronic Book Smart Card NEC "Information At Your Fingertips"

9. Education: The Best Investment Education Authoring Tools Interactivity Pacific Bell Viacom TCI "Just Grandma and Me" Academic Systems Lightspan Partnership SimLife/SimCity Maxis Software GLOBE Project

10. Plugged In at Home Video-On-Demand System Gates Residence Interactivity Pacific Bell Viacom TCI Silicon San Simeon Hearst Castle Guest Cottage (Gates) Seattle Weyerhaeuser Forest Products Home Control Console Corbis Digital Art Codex da Vinci Notebook

11. Race for the Gold British Telecom Pentium Processor Minitel Deutsche Telekon Toshiba NTT Telephony Direct Broadcast Satellite Hughes Electronics DIRECTV, Inc. Teledisc UNIX

12. Critical Issues Artificial Intelligence Information Age Cryptography

Afterword

IV. CONNECT What service does this section provide?

V. INDEX

TEK GALLERY HALL OF FAME From the 60 famous persons listed below, choose 20 or more whom you feel have been most important in the development of computer technologies. Present your investigative results in such a way that you include the 5Ws in your answer.

Bill Gates Paul Allen Blaise Pascal Gottfried von Leibniz Peter Rinearson Nathan Myhrvold Adam Smith Dwight D. Eisenhower Al Gore Alexander Graham Bell Antonio de Saint Exupery Johann Gutenberg James Burke Alan Turing Claude Shannon John von Newmann J. Presper Eckert John Mauchly Bob Noyce Gordon Moore Lee Iacocca Ken Olson Thomas J. Watson Eugene Amdahl Kay Nishi Tim Paterson Bill Lowe Don Estridge Steve Jobs Thomas Edison Thomas Jefferson Charles Babbage Whitfield Diffie Martin Hellman Ron Rivest Adi Shamir Leonard Adelman Chester Carlson Stephen W. Hawking Georges Melies William Gibson D.W. Griffith Sergei Eisenstein Steven Pinker Reed Hundt James D. Watson Richard Feynman Warren Buffett Le Corbusier William Randolph Hearst Melinda Gates Leonardo da Vinci Lee Kkuan Yew Wu Jichuan Craig McCaw Henry Ford Alan Turing H.G. Wells Bill McKibben George Orwell

VI. EXIT

News Release: Winnipeg Free Press - February 1996

Gates a best-seller in China

BEIJING (AP) - Big time capitalist Bill Gates is a it in Communist China. A translation of his book, The Road Ahead, has become popular among young people and computer experts in China, the official Xinhua news agency reported yesterday. About 200,000 copies have been sold since it was published in China in January, Xinhau said. Gates is listed by Forbes magazine as the world's richest man. The Beijing University Press predicted sales might top 600,000 copies. The book went on sale in the United States in October.

CHAPTER TITLES Foreward 1. A Revolution Begins 2. The Beginning of the Information Age 3. Lessons from the Computer Industry 4. Applications and Appliances 5. Paths to the Highway 6. The Content Revolution 7. Implications for Business 8. Friction-Free Capitalism 9. Education: The Best Investment 10. Plugged In at Home 11. Race for the Gold 12. Critical Issues Afterword


9. ARTICLE ANALYSIS - INFORMATION REVOLUTION

TEACHER: This type of research approach can applied to a variety of information sources. To make it a little more generic...and shorter... the topics and note headings have been removed:

TEK FILE ANALYSIS 100 marks SOURCE: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 1995 "INFORMATION REVOLUTION" by Joel L. Swerdlow Analyze this article by answering each of the following 4 sections: PART I: PERSONALITIES 10 marks Discuss the importance of each of the following persons to the Information Revolution:

PART II: QUOTATIONS 15 marks Discuss Each of the Following Quotations from the Article Indicating: SOURCE & SIGNIFICANCE/IMPORTANCE (i.e. WHO WHAT WHERE WHY WHEN HOW???)

PART III: DEFINITIONS 30 marks Define each of the following terms and discuss its importance as it applies to the "Information Revolution."

PART IV: SUMMARY OF CONCEPTS AND ARTICLE CONTENT: 45 marks Use the power and all the features of the revolutionary Word Processor to summarize and analyze the main ideas presented in "The Information Revolution." Incorporate the following topics into your work.

NOTE: You have already supplied many descriptions, quotes and ideas which could be expanded in this section.

You are expected, then, to use your WP's hilite and copy commands in your writing - and any other techniques and shortcuts synonymous with modern electronic writing. Edit, proofread, revise and format your work.


10. YOUR PERSONAL HOME PAGE

Prepare a mock up of a Web Page on yourself which would present material of interest to Web Browsers around the world. Layout your design ideas on sheets of paper. You might consider the following in your format:

Your URL address (http\\www...) Your e-mail address An appealing background colour and texture A variety of fonts, borders, designs and layouts which express your personality Photos which could be scanned and imported into your page A well-written description of : your hometown your date and place of birth a short bio interests - hobbies - activities - sports your family your favourites (music, sports players/teams/events, books, entertainment...) some of your best artistic creations (stories, poems, sketches, etc.) A list of links to favourite Internet sites FAQ Credits


SCS Network Use - Bill Hillman - February 19, 1997

Daily procedure for my English, Social Studies, Geography, Computer Awareness and Software Applications courses: 


 Each student starts the period by loading a Windows-based Word Processor -- i.e. Works -- WordPerfect -- Write

THEN... OPEN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS...ONE UPON THE OTHER ON DESKTOP 


 Access, via the wordprocessor, the day’s assignment placed earlier on the: a. Network Server, in a folder dedicated to the course (a quick efficient way to disseminate current, on-going information and assignments) b. student’s personal “whole year” assignment floppy given out at the start of the course c. the stand-alone hard drive on the student’s personal workstation 
 Access CD-ROMs from Network stack -- World Book, Encarta, Canadian, Comptons, Corel Graphics... 
Load Netscape 3 Gold to access the InterNet 
 Search the Net for relevant information to complete the day’s assignment using search engines such as Alta Vista, Yahoo, WebCrawler, etc. AND/OR Go to the SCS WebPage or the links file on the main server to get relevant URLs to complement the day’s research. AND/OR Import Web sites searched out, saved and brought in by the teacher from his home computer. 
 

Open the NetScape Editor (File...New Document...Blank) which will allow the student to collate information into a WebPage later.


The student keys information into the wordpro from the above sources -- CD-ROM, files saved on the intra-network or workstation hard drive, and InterNet sites -- as well as from ongoing information gathered from text books and AV material presented by the instructor (video, chalk board, overhead, filmstrips, audio, handouts, lecture, group interaction, books, mags, etc.).


COPY PROCEDURE: All information found via computer may be imported verbatim by using the following procedure: - highlight the desired material with the mouse via click and drag technique or by using the Control-A command - press Control-C to copy or Control-X to Cut (this puts the desired material in desktop memory - Press Alt-Tab to skip across to any of the above programs you have already opened into Windows...usually to the wordpro - When you reach the wordpro...Arrow to where you want to import the selected material - Press Control-V (view) to paste the selected material to the new location in your word pro

This technique will allow you to copy print and even graphics material from most of the reference sources you have opened into your Windows arena.

The above will even allow you to copy text from any Internet page. To copy backgrounds, graphics, buttons, lines -- and even midi sound features -- follow the following procedure: - Put your mouse pointer on the graphics element you wish to copy - Click the RIGHT button of your mouse - In the box which appears on screen choose “save image as” - Save to a folder of choice on C or A drive ... you can then import the graphic into your Netscape editor. 


WEBPAGE ADVANTAGES When you have a good collection of material -- self-created or copied and revised...you might consider moving it into your Netscape Editor to create a WebPage. There are many advantages in doing this. In addition to looking much more appealing than a standard wordpro document, your web page can eventually be published on the Internet for other students everywhere to see. This is a great motivational tool since it is breaking new ground...very few students and schools have done it yet. The whole procedure promotes good research skills and helps the student become quite adept at Multi-Tasking -- AND really seems to develop self worth. It also gives your school’s new intranet system a good workout. 
STUDENT WEBPAGE SIMULATIONS

The possibilities for integrating WebPage creation into classes as a learning tool are endless.

To begin with, most students are interested in creating personal homepages. I usually give them a guideline like the one below (taken from netsKool 222 on the Strathclair CyberSchool Website at  http://www.oocities.com/Hollywood/7992/netskool222.html


STUDENT BIO HOMEPAGES Prepare a mock up of a Web Page on yourself which would present material of interest to Web Browsers around the world. Layout your design ideas on sheets of paper. You might consider the following in your format:

Your URL address (http\\www...) Your e-mail address An appealing background colour and texture A variety of fonts, borders, designs and layouts which express your personality Photos which could be scanned and imported into your page A well-written description of : your hometown your date and place of birth a short bio interests - hobbies - activities - sports your family your favourites (music, sports players/teams/events, books, entertainment...) some of your best artistic creations (stories, poems, sketches, etc.) A list of links to favourite Internet sites FAQ Credits 


 WEBPAGE SIMULATIONS or VIRTUAL POV PAGES

From there we go on to integrating research material into Virtual POV pages. I made up the following assignment on the morning of February 18, 1997 while the class was doing research on the InterNet about the Roaring ‘20s and Dirty ‘30s...I then posted it on the school network and the students immediately downloaded the file and chose the scenario which most interested them. 


 BOOM AND BUST WEBSITE SCENARIOS

Use the following scenarios for inspiration in creating a '20s/'30s WebSite. Refer to your text, ref. books, CD-ROMs, and the InterNet to research events, people, activities, etc. associated with your scenario.

SPORTS COLUMNIST You are Olympic-award-winner Bobbie Rosenfeld. You are now a '30s sports columnist. Your job is to prepare daily newspaper columns about sports highlights, past and present.

ELECTRIC COMPANY ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE You are the advertising exec of the Sparks Electric Company. Prepare a WebSite touting the advantages of the relatively new phenomenon -- ELECTRICITY -- and all the related new gizmos which are being invented to take advantage of it.

ENTERTAINMENT MOGUL You are the owner of the Bijou Vaudeville and Motion Picture Theatre. You also manage a "slightly illegal" speakeasy in the basement of your entertainment complex. The success of your business depends upon your knowledge and promotion of all the entertainment happenings of the day -- movies, stars, entertainers, music, prohibition laws, etc.

LABOUR LEADER You are the leader of the OBU and your job is to make public the plight of the common worker. You are very involved in rallies, overthrowing big business and government policies, and anything to give the worker more power and better work conditions.

RADIO STATION MANAGER You are the station manager of the radio station WENN (Remember WENN). Your WebSite should include program schedules, current news releases, drama/comedy/variety scripts, bios on stars, program logs, etc.

PRAIRIE JOURNALIST Your job as a journalist is to cover the effects of the drought and depression on the prairie farmers living in the dust bowl. Include features on the causes of this calamity and the effects -- lost farms, hunger, poverty, welfare, out-migration, fortitude, small pleasures, acts of heroism, etc.  



STAY TUNED FOR netsKool 333 - Which will have more of an Internet-use emphasis
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