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Elboron

Éowyn and Faramir's only son Elboron isn't named anywhere in the text of The Lord of the Rings. You have to dig all the way through Christopher Tolkien's The History of Middle Earth (vol. XII, The Peoples of Middle-earth: "The Heirs of Elendil") to find the reference. However, it is stated in the prologue to The Fellowship of the Ring (Section IV: Note on the Shire Records) that they had a grandson named Barahir (see below), so we can only assume that Elboron was likely Barahir's father, as well as the second prince of Ithilien.

Etymology:

    el (star) + bor (faithful/enduring, likely after Boromir) + on (masculine form) ]


Barahir

Even if his name wasn't Elboron, Éowyn and Faramir still had a child, or this guy wouldn't have existed. As the prologue states in the beginning of The Lord of the Rings:

'[The Tale of Arwen and Aragorn] is stated to have been written by Barahir, grandson of the Steward Faramir, some time after the passing of the King.'

There are actually three Barahirs in The Lord of the Rings. The first was one of the heroic Edain (those men befriended by the Elves who came to live in Beleriand). He was the father of Beren (of Lúthien and Beren fame), and Aragorn wears his ring throughout the story.


The Ring of Barahir as it appears in
the film 'The Lord of the Rings.'

The second Barahir was the eighth Steward of Gondor, and also the father of Dior, who had no son of his own to claim the Stewardship. As a result, the Stewardship was passed to his nephew, Denethor I.

The third Barahir is the aforementioned author of The Tale of Arwen and Aragorn. He was Faramir and Éowyn's grandson and the third Prince of Ithilien.

Etymology:

    bara (eager, fiery) + hir (lord) ]



Images © Michael Whelan.



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