Palmer List of Merchant Vessels


 

Hamburg ship GELLERT [1856] - See: RIO GRANDE (1846)


GENERAL MORGAN (1847)

According to the New York Evening Post, 23 February 1849, p. 1g, "N. Falkenburgh", of New Jersey, was second mate of the schooner GEN[ERAL] MORGAN, [Charles] Falkenburgh, of New Jersey, master, which cleared New York for San Francisco on 20 February 1849, and sailed on 22 February, carrying members of the Connecticut Mining and Trading Company. According to the San Francisco newspaper Alta California, 9 August 1849, the American schooner GEN[ERAL] MORGAN, "Falkinbird", master, arrived at San Francisco on 6 August 1849, 161 days from New York, with 25 passengers. The Wilmington, North Carolina, Commercial of 28 December 1848, had announced that the GENERAL MORGAN would stop at Wilmington en route to California "if a suitable amount of freight and passengers should offer", but her owners apparently did not receive enough offers, and she did not call at Wilmington [James P. Delgado, To California By Sea; A Maritime History of the California Gold Rush (Columbus, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 1990), p. 21.

New York newspapers of the time published lists of many of the mining "associations" that sailed to San Francisco, and I have located the following two for this voyage of the GENERAL MORGAN:

New York Daily Tribune, 24 February 1849, p. 4b:
Henry Kellogg, President ................. Hartford, Ct.
Dennis Sage, Secretary ................... Middletown, Ct.
Wm. H. Crowell ........................... Hartford
Albert Lyman ............................. Hartford
Geo. L. Pease ............................ Hartford
Albert Kellogg, MD ....................... Hartford
Jason Barr ............................... Hartford
Henry Casey .............................. Hartford
H. W. Tracey ............................. Hartford
Geo. W. Hayden ........................... Hartford
E. W. Crowell ............................ Hartford
Thos. S. Parker .......................... Hartford
Justin Francis ........................... Hartford
Lawrence Robbins ......................... Hartford
Wm. H. Eakins ............................ Philadelphia, Pa.
Monroe Stannard .......................... New Britain, Ct.
Almond Davis ............................. New Britain
Ira Stanley, 3d .......................... New Britain
Waldo Corbin ............................. New Britain
Seth W. Bishop ........................... New Britain
Edwin Pond ............................... Wallingford, Ct.
Wm. Rogers ............................... New Jersey
Stephen Arents ........................... New Jersey
Com. Edwin R. Hawks ...................... New Jersey
Capt. Charles Falkenburg ................. New Jersey
Dr. Demarest, passenger .................. New York
New York Evening Post, 23 February 1849, p. 1g:
Com. F. R. Hanks ......................... New Jersey
Capt. C. Falkenburgh ..................... New Jersey
N. Falkenburgh, 2d mate .................. New Jersey
H. Kellogg, president .................... Hartford
D. Sage, secretary ....................... Middletown
W. H. Crowell ............................ Hartford
A. Dyman ................................. Hartford
G. L. Pease .............................. Hartford
Dr. A. Kellogg ........................... Hartford
J. Burr .................................. Hartford
W. H. Cary ............................... Hartford
Mr. Tracy ................................ Hartford
G. W. Hayden ............................. Hartford
E. Crowell ............................... Hartford
T. S. Parker ............................. Hartford
J. Francis ............................... Hartford
Mr. Robbins .............................. Hartford
W. H. Eakins ............................. Philadelphia
M. Stannard .............................. New Britain
H. Davis ................................. New Britain
I. Stanley, 3d ........................... New Britain
W. Corbin ................................ New Britain
S. W. Bishop ............................. New Britain
E. L. Pond ............................... Wallingford
W. Rogers ................................ New Jersey
S. Rogers ................................ New Jersey

The New York Herald almost certainly also published a list of the passengers, but I have been unable to check this, as my university library does not have a microfilm copy of this newspaper for 1849.

The vessel in question is the schooner GENERAL MORGAN, 138 tons, built at Washington, New Jersey, in 1847, and enrolled at the port of New York on 13 December 1847 [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 270]. I know nothing of the vessel's subsequent history, but in view of her relatively small size and the fact that she arrived at the height of gold fever it is unlikely that she returned to New York, but was most probably abandoned in the harbor by her crew and became one of the "forest of masts" in the famous panoramic photograph of 1850/51 (see Delgado, op. cit., between pp. 128 and 129, and opposite p. 129). It is interesting to note, however, that a Charles A. Falkenberg was master of the schooner A. R. PHARO, which in 1854 advertised as sailing in the Merchant's Line of coastal packets between New York and Mobile [Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), p. 491], and on 6 September 1854, the "half-clipper" bark FALKENBERG, Charles A. Falkenberg, master, sailed from Boston, arriving at San Francisco on 2 February 1855, after a voyage of 118 days [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), V.3823].

[20 Apr 1999]


GENERAL WERDER (1874)
MIDNIGHT SUN [1893, 1901]
PRINCESS OF WALES [1899]

Photograph of the MIDNIGHT SUN ex GENERAL WERDER, taken in the 1890's. Source: Arnold Kludas, Die Seeschiffe des Norddeutschen Lloyd, Bd. 1: 1857 bis 1919 (Herford: Koehler, c1991), p. 27. To request a larger copy of this scan, click on the picture.

The steamship GENERAL WERDER was built for Norddeutscher Lloyd by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland (ship #178), and was launched on 4 March 1874. 3020 tons; 107,49 x 12,01 meters (length x breadth); straight stem, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 144 passengers in 1st class, 68 in 2nd class, 502 in steerage; crew of 88 to 100.

16 September 1874, maiden voyage, Bremen - Southampton - Baltimore - Bremen; laid up. 7 July 1877-11 September 1886, Bremen - Southampton - New York (40 roundtrip voyages). 1886, rebuilt in Bremerhaven for the Far East feeder route Hong Kong-Japan; painted white, 12.75 knots. 1887-July 1891, Hong Kong-Japan service. 4 November 1892, traded in to Armstrong, Mitchell & Co, in partial payment for the steamship H. H. MEIER, 1893, sold to the Albion Steamship Co; triple-expansion engine, renamed MIDNIGHT SUN, for Norwegian cruises. 1899, chartered by an American women's group and donated to Britain for use as a hospital ship during the Boer War, under the name PRINCESS OF WALES. 1901, again cruising as MIDNIGHT SUN. 1912, scrapped on the River Tyne.

Sources: Arnold Kludas, Die Seeschiffe des Norddeutschen Lloyd, Bd. 1: 1857 bis 1919 (Herford: Koehler, c1991), pp. 26-27 (photograph); Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), pp. 72-73, no. 46 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 550-551.

Voyages

  1. Norddeutscher Lloyd steamship GENERAL WERDER, Capt. Christoffers, arrived at New York on 5 July 1879, from Bremen 22 June, via Southampton 24 June.
  2. Norddeutscher Lloyd steamship GENERAL WERDER, Capt. Sander, arrived at the Bar of New York Harbor at 3 AM on 22 August 1885, from Bremen 9 September and Southampton 11 August.

[20 Mar 1998]


GENESSEE (1841)

The U.S. ship GENESSEE, 459 tons, was built at Bath, Maine, in 1841, by Clark & Sewall, and registered at New York on 16 November 1844.

Sources: William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), V.3195 and 3261; Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag merchant vessels that received certificates of enrollment or registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record groups 41 and 36), United States National Archives and Records Service, Publication no. 68-10, Special list no. 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968). p. 272.

[30 Sep 1997]


GENESSEE (1841)

The U.S. ship GENESEE, 377 tons, was built at Freeport, Maine, in 1841, and registered at New York on 24 September 1843

Source: Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag merchant vessels that received certificates of enrollment or registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record groups 41 and 36), United States National Archives and Records Service, Publication no. 68-10, Special list no. 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968). p. 272.

[30 Sep 1997]


GENESSEE (1854)

The U.S. bark GENESEE, 673 tons, was built at Freeport, Maine, in 1854, and registered at New York on 3 November 1855. I know little of her history, beyond the fact that in 1855, J. Merryman, master, she made a passage from Hamburg to New York (the passenger manifest is abstracted in Germans to America, vol. 9, pp. 368-370). The damages sustained by going ashore at Little Egg Harbor did not prove fatal to her career, and from 1857 until at least 1860 she was advertised among the vessels sailing for the Orleans Line of packets between New York and New Orleans.

Sources: Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 272; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 522-523.

[09 Jan 1998]


GEORGE CANNING (1852)

Oil painting [detail], by L. Petersen, 1855, of vessels commanded by Capt. Paul Nickels Paulsen (1812-1882). 140 x 93 cm. 1968 in the possession of Frau Christina Martens, Nieblum/Fähr. Source: Ernst Hieke, Rob. M. Sloman Jr., errichtet 1793, Veröffentlichungen der Wirtschaftsgeschichtlichen Forschungsstelle e.V., Hamburg, Band 30 (Hamburg: Verlag Hanseatischer Merkur, 1968), between pp. 64 and 65.

The Hamburg ship GEORGE CANNING was built at Lübeck by Hans Jacob Albrecht Meyer, for the account of Robert Miles Sloman of Hamburg, in 1852 [Bielbrief (certificate of registry) 11 May 1852]. 296 Commerzlasten / 857 tons, 146.6 x 32.6 x 22.6 Hamburg Fuß (1 Hamburg Fuß = .28657 meter), length x beam x depth of hold.

Masters:
     1852-1853 - Paul Nickels Paulsen
     1853-1855 - J. H. Jacobs

The GEORGE CANNING sailed exclusively between Hamburg and New York. She was lost on 1 January 1855 on Groß Vogelsand, at the mouth of the Elbe River.

Source: Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum für Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum für Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), Bd. 3, S 210.

Voyages:

  1. Hamburg ship GEORGE CANNING, Paul Nickels Paulsen, master, arrived at New York in the forenoon of 24 November 1852, from Hamburg and Cuxhaven 19 October, with merchandise and passengers to Schmidt & Balchen.

[08 Nov 1997]


GEORGE HURLBUT (1850)

The U.S. ship GEORGE HURLBUT, 1047 tons, was built at Essex, Connecticut in 1850, and registered at New York on 23 December 1850. She sailed originally in the Hurlbut Line of sailing packets between New York and Havre, with the winter crossing (between December and March) from Havre to New Orleans, until mid-1854, when she was transferred to Hurlbut's New York- Antwerp service. In 1856, Ezra D. Post, master, she was advertized as sailing in Tapscott's Line of New York-Liverpool packets, and in 1859, Thomas S. (or L.) Masson, master, as sailing in the Post Line of New York-Mobile packets and in the Stanton & Thompson Line of New York-New Orleans packets.

Sources: Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 276; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 388 396, 397, 497, and 521.

[21 Mar 1998]


GEORGE WASHINGTON (1822)

Bremen records and the Bureau Veritas state that the Bremen sailing ship, later bark, GEORGE WASHINGTON was 450 tons, built at New York in 1822. However, Holdcamper indicates that no ship of this name, tonnage, place and year of build was ever registered at New York, which indicates either that she was built for out of state owners or, more probably, that she is the ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, 317 tons, built at Killingsworth, Connecticut, in 1822, and registered at New York on 4 May 1822. If this is indeed the case, the change from 317 to 450 tons may well represent a rebuild. From 1839 to 1849 the Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON belonged to the Bremen firm of C. L. Brauer & Sohn, and from 1849 to 1855 to the Bremen firm of F. Möller Söhne. I have no record of her later history.

Sources: Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 719; Otto Höver, Von der Galiot zum Fünfmaster; Unsere Segelschiffe in der Weltschiffahrt 1780-1930 (Bremen: Angelsachsen-Verlag, c1934), p. 182; R. T. Sexton, Shipping Arrivals and Departures, South Australia, 1627-1850; Guide for Genealogists and Maritime Historians, Roebuck Society Publication No. 42 (Ridgehaven, SA: Gould Books/Aranda, ACT: Roebuck Society, 1990), pp. 98, 115, and 158. The Focke-Museum in Bremen contains a model of the GEORGE WASHINGTON.

Voyages:

  1. Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, Matthew (Mathias) Probst, master, arrived Port Adelaide, South Australia, 12 September 1844, from Hamburg 23 May, and Bremerhaven 27/29 May, with 3 cabin passengers and 181 German emigrants; there had been 6 deaths and 8 births among the passengers. 3 October 1844, sailed for Batavia, with a crew of 20.
  2. Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, Matthew (Mathias) Probst, master, arrived Port Adelaide 22/23 January 1846, from Bremen 11 Oct 1845, with 17 cabin and 208 steerage passengers. 19 February 1846, sailed for Manilla, with a crew of 29.
  3. Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, [Mathias] Probst, master, arrived Baltimore 8 June 1847, from Bremen 22 April, with 185 passengers.
  4. Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, [Mathias Probst, master,] arrived New Orleans 30 December 1847, from Bremen 28 October, with 174 passengers.
  5. Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, [Mathias] Probst, master, arrived New New York 12 June 1848, from Bremen 2 May, with 186 passengers.
  6. Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, Matthew (Mathias) Probst, master, arrived Port Adelaide 2 March 1849, from Bremen 24 October 1848, with merchandise and 210 passengers (sailed from Bremen with 213). 4 April 1849, cleared for Batavia.
  7. Bremen ship GEORGE WASHINGTON, [Mathias] Probst, master, arrived San Francisco 1 November 1850 with 29 passengers, from Bremen 6 May 1850 with 30 passengers, and 55 days from Valparaiso. Bremen bark GEORGE WASHINGTON, Probst, master, sailed from San Francisco 3 February 1851 for Callao.

[08 Apr 2000; 21 Mar 2002]


GERMANIA (1816)

The Bremen brig GERMANIA was built at Vegesack/Grohn by Johann Lange, for the Bremen firm of Oelrichs Gebrüder & Eitzen, and was launched on 12 March 1816. 69 Commerzlasten, 23,4 x 6,7 x 3,2 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). The first master of the GERMANIA was Jürgen Havighorst. In 1820, ownership of the vessel was divided in five equal portions between Joh. Fr. Schlingemann, Daniel Meinertshagen, the firm of Barkhausen & Garlichs, Anton Loebelein, and Hinrich Plump. Havighorst was succeeded as master by D. J. Eggers (1820-1822) and Johann Hinrich Gätjen and Joh. H. Homann, who alternated between 1823 and 1826. (Gätjen was master of the GERMANIA on her first recorded voyage to New York in 1825.) In 1830, Reinke Siedenburg and Captain Diedrich Kimme each purchased a half interest in the GERMANIA, Kimme also taking over command. The GERMANIA received her last sea pass on 2 May 1833, and appears to have been lost in 1834. Capt. Kimme shortly afterwards took command of the bark JUPITER, but lost his life in December of the following year when the vessel stranded on the coast of Denmark.

Source: Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 159-160, no. 44.

Voyages:

  1. Bremen brig GERMANIA, [Diedrich] Kimme, master, arrived at New York from Bremen most probably on or shortly before 10 October 1834 (the New York newspapers for this month to which I have access are incomplete for early early October 1834, and consequently I am not able to determine precisely when the vessel arrived, and the date she sailed from Bremen). Microfilm copy of the passenger manifest for the voyage, dated 10 October 1834, on National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 18, list #749 for 1834.

[06 Mar 1999]


GERMANIA (1850)

The U.S. ship GERMANIA was built at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1850. 996/1215 tons (old/new measurement); 170 ft 8 in x 35 ft 6 in x 17 ft 8 in (length x beam x depth of hold); 3 decks; draft, 20 feet. She sailed in William Whitlock's line (later part of the Union Line) of New York-Havre packets from 1850 until the end of the Line in 1863, after which she continued as a transient for Whitlock. During her 13 years with the Line, her westbound passages from Havre to New York averaged 38 days (a relatively slow time), her fastest passage being 26 days, her longest 52 days. Like many New York-Havre packets, she often sailed a triangular route, carrying emigrants from Havre to New York, then sailing in ballast or with general merchandise to New Orleans, where she loaded a cargo of cotton for Havre. She was advertized as sailing in the Ladd Line of New York-New Orleans packets in 1852, and in the Brigham Line of New York-New Orleans packets in 1854.

Sources: Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 286-287 and 299; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 521 and 524.

[....]


 

GERMANIA (1863)

[Right] The GERMANIA. Source: Hans Jürgen Witthöft, HAPAG; Hamburg-Amerika Linie (3., überarbeitete Auflage; Hamburg: Koehler, 1997), p. 17. To request a larger copy of this scan, click on the picture.
[Left] The GERMANIA. Source: Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 26. To request a larger copy of this scan, click on the picture.
[Right] The GERMANIA ashore on Cape Race, 1869. Source: Arnold Kludas, Die Geschichte der Deutschen Passagierschiffahrt, Bd. 1: Die Pionierjahre von 1850 bis 1890, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, 22 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1986), p. 43. To request a larger copy of this scan, click on the picture.

The steamship GERMANIA was built for the Hamburg-America Line by Caird & Co, Greenock, and was launched on 6 April 1863. 2,123 tons; 337.4 x 41.2 x 28.3 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold); straight stem, 1 funnel, 3 masts (barkentine rig); iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 10 knots; accommodation for 80 passengers in 1st class, 120 passengers in 2nd class, and 525 in steerage; crew of 80.

1 August 1863, delivered to HAPAG. 22 August 1863, maiden voyage, Hamburg - Southampton - New York (intermediate stop later changed from Southampton to Havre). 16 April 1868, collided with and sank the Dutch bark PAULINE CONSTANCE ELEONORE. 7 August 1869, wrecked in fog near Cape Race, Newfoundland, on a return passage from New York to Hamburg; no loss of life.

Captains:
     1863-1866       - H. Ehlers
     1864, 1867-1869 - H. F. Schwensen
     1867-1869       - H. E. Kier

Voyages:
     1863      - New York (3 x)
     1864      - New York (4 x)
     1865      - New York (6 x)
     1866      - New York (6 x)
     1867      - New York (6 x)
     1867      - Grimsby
     1867      - Leith
     1868      - New York (8 x)
     1869      - New York (3 x)
     1869      - Leith ...
Sources: Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum für Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum für Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 190; Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 26; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 389.

Voyages:

  1. Hamburg-America Line steamship GERMANIA, Capt. Ehlers, arrived at New York on 6 September 1863 (passenger manifest 7 September 1863), from Hamburg 23 August, and Southampton 26 August, with merchandise and 633 passengers, to Kunhardt & Co. "Passed the needles [August] 28th, 9 PM."
  2. Hamburg-America Line steamship GERMANIA, Capt. Schwensen, arrived at New York on 26 May 1867, from Hamburg 12 May, via Southampton 15 May, at 3 PM, with merchandise and 769 passengers, to Kunhardt & Co. "Had westerly winds during the passage .... From lat 46 37, lon 51, to lat 45 40, lon 53, passed a great many large icebergs."
  3. Hamburg-America Line steamship GERMANIA, Capt. Franzen, arrived at New York on 17 March 1869, from Hamburg 3 March, via Havre 6 March, with merchandise and 537 passengers, having experienced fine weather and variable wind during the passage.
  4. Hamburg-America Line steamship GERMANIA, Capt. [H. E.] Kier, arrived at New York on 29 April 1869, from Hamburg 14 April, via Havre 17 April, with merchandise and passengers, to Kunhardt & Co. "Had strong westerly winds and heavy sea during the passage"

[15 Jul 1999]


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