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What Is A Pronoun?

        A pronoun can replace a noun or another pronoun. You use pronouns like "he," "which," "none," and "you" to make your sentences less cumbersome and less repetitive.

        Grammarians classify pronouns into several types, including the subject pronoun, object pronoun, possessive adjective, possessive pronoun, and reflexive pronoun.

Subjective Pronouns

        A subjective pronoun indicates that the pronoun is acting as the subject of the sentence. The subjective personal pronouns are "I," "you," "she," "he," "it," "we," "you," "they."

        In the following sentences, each of the highlighted words is a subjective personal pronoun and acts as the subject of the sentence:

I was glad to find the bus pass in the bottom of the green knapsack.
You are surely the strangest child I have ever met.
He stole the selkie's skin and forced her to live with him.
When she was a young woman, she earned her living as a coal miner.
After many years, they returned to their homeland.
We will meet at the library at 3:30 p.m.
It is on the counter.
Are you the delegates from Malagawatch?

Objective Pronouns

        An objective pronoun indicates that the pronoun is acting as an object of a verb, compound verb, preposition, or infinitive phrase. The objective personal pronouns are: "me," "you," "her," "him," "it," "us," "you," and "them."

        In the following sentences, each of the highlighted words is an objective personal pronoun:

Seamus stole the selkie's skin and forced her to live with him.

        The objective personal pronoun "her" is the direct object of the verb "forced" and the objective personal pronoun "him" is the object of the preposition "with."

After reading the pamphlet, Judy threw it into the garbage can.

        The pronoun "it" is the direct object of the verb "threw".

The agitated assistant stood up and faced the angry delegates and said, "Our leader will address you in five minutes."

        In this sentence, the pronoun "you" is the direct object of the verb "address."

Deborah and Roberta will meet us at the newest caf้ in the market.

        Here the objective personal pronoun "us" is the direct object of the compound verb "will meet."

Give the list to me.

        Here the objective personal pronoun "me" is the object of the preposition "to".

I'm not sure that my contact will talk to you.

        Similarly in this example, the objective personal pronoun "you" is the object of the preposition "to".

Christopher was surprised to see her at the drag races.

        Here the objective personal pronoun "her" is the object of the infinitive phrase "to see."

 

Possessive Pronouns

        A possessive pronoun indicates that the pronoun is acting as a marker of possession and defines who owns a particular object or person. The possessive personal pronouns are "mine," "yours," "hers," "his," "its," "ours," and "theirs." Note that possessive personal pronouns are very similar to possessive adjectives like "my," "her," and "their."

        In each of the following sentences, the highlighted word is a possessive personal pronoun:

The smallest gift is mine.

        Here the possessive pronoun "mine" functions as a subject complement.

This is yours.

        Here too the possessive pronoun "yours" functions as a subject complement.

His is on the kitchen counter.

        In this example, the possessive pronoun "his" acts as the subject of the sentence.

Theirs will be delivered tomorrow.

        In this sentence, the possessive pronoun "theirs" is the subject of the sentence.

Ours is the green one on the corner.

Here too the possessive pronoun "ours" function as the subject of the sentence.

 

Reflexive Pronouns

        You can use a reflexive pronoun to refer back to the subject of the clause or sentence.

        The reflexive pronouns are "myself," "yourself," "herself," "himself," "itself," "ourselves," "yourselves," and "themselves." Note each of these can also act as an intensive pronoun.

        Each of the highlighted words in the following sentences is a reflexive pronoun:

Diabetics give themselves insulin shots several times a day.
The Dean often does the photocopying herself so that the secretaries can do more important work.
After the party, I asked myself why I had faxed invitations to everyone in my office building.
Richard usually remembered to send a copy of his e-mail to himself.
Although the landlord promised to paint the apartment, we ended up doing it ourselves.
Citing :

http://grammar.englishclub.com/pronouns-personal.htm

http://grammar.englishclub.com/pronouns.htm

http://www.uottawa.ca/academic/arts/writcent/hypergrammar/pronouns.html

http://www.dailygrammar.com/021to025.html

http://www.dailygrammar.com/136to140.html

http://www.abcteach.com/grammar/pronouns.htm

http://www.dailygrammar.com/141to145.html
 

 
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