Painted Face Ceremonies

Painted Face Ceremonies

History:

These ceremonies were adapted from Cub Scout Pack 3804's website. The ceremonies originally came from Pack 6 in the Mt. Baker Area council. Pack 19 of the same council added to the original text. I revised the ceremonies to meet the needs of Pack 157 in 1997.

Variation:

Our pack had 11 Tigers, 10 Wolves, 8 Bears and 10 Webelos to paint at our Blue and Gold dinner. The original text included a wolf paw print and a bear face to be painted on the boys faces. I thought this was a bit complicated for my parent helpers so I decided to use a war paint theme. Each color stripe on the boys face signifies their achievement along Scoutings upward trail. As I read the color and description one parent would begin to paint that particular color and proceed down the line of boys. This method made the ceremonies run smoothly and quickly. The boys loved the paint and were proud to wear it. We had a teepee on the stage and two drummers softly beating tom-toms while the boys marched up to the stage. This ceremony was a winner!!!

Materials:

We used soap-based paint sticks found at a costume shop. They look like a tongue depressor dipped in paint. They cost about $2.00, we bought red, blue, yellow and black. To apply you dip a cotton swab (Q-tip) in water and rub it on the paint, then streak the boys cheek. This method was clean and fast. The paint washes off easily, doesn't crack and the lady said she was sure they would wash out of clothing...well, maybe not the red. We didn't have any problems.

Ceremonies :

Painted Tiger Ceremony

Painted Wolf Ceremony

Painted Bear Ceremony

Painted Webelo Ceremony




Painted Tiger Ceremony

Materials: Black, Yellow and Red Paint, Tiger Paws

Indian Drummer begins soft, slow rhythmic beat.

Cubmaster: Would the Tiger Cubs and their partner please come forward.

Cubmaster: For the past few months, you and your family have explored new and exciting things and places. You have taken each part of the Tiger Cub Motto: Search, Discover, Share and used it in your home, school, and neighborhood.

You and your partner have searched out new activities which have shown you how people work and have fun together

Cubmaster: Do you want to wear the sign of the Tiger? If you do, please say "yes".

Tigers: Yes

Cubmaster: We will give you the sign of the Tiger which will start you on your journey along the Scouting Trail. You will need lots of support from your family as you try to attain Cub Scoutings' highest honor, the Arrow of Light.

The black on your cheeks is for happiness along the Tiger Trail.
(Paint two horizontal stripes on each cheek)

The yellow on your chin is for sunlight along the Wolf Trail.
(Paint two vertical stripes on chin)

The red on your forehead is for bravery when you attempt the Bear Trail.
(Paint two vertical stripes on forehead)

Tiger Cubs, remember the meaning of your Tiger paint. It shows that you are ready to move along the upward trail of Scouting.

I will now present your paws. Thank you and enjoy the rest of the evening.

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Painted Wolf Ceremony

Materials: Black, Red and Yellow Paint, Wolf Badges, Safety Pins

Indian Drummer begins soft, slow rhythmic beat.

Cubmaster: When a boy joins a Cub Scout Pack, he earns the badge of the Bobcat and starts on an upward trail. This trail will lead him through the footsteps of the wolf, the bear and the Webelos brave, and on his way to the highest honor of Cub Scouting, the Arrow of Light. Tonight, we honor those Scouts who have made a significant advancement along this journey.
Would the following Scouts and their parent please come forward.

Read Scouts names.

Cubmaster: Please recite with me the Cub Scout Promise:

Cubmaster & Cubs: I ______ promise to do my best,
to do my duty to God and my country,
to help other people and to obey the Law of the Pack.

Cubmaster: Do you want to wear the sign of the Wolf? If you do, please say "yes".
Cubs: Yes

Cubmaster: You have worked hard with your Den and your parents to fulfill the Wolf requirements. You are now ready to wear the sign of the Wolf.

The black on your chin stands for happiness from your days as a Tiger Cub.
(Paint two vertical black stripes on chin)

The red on your forehead is for bravery when you become a Bear.
(Paint two vertical stripes on forehead)

The yellow across your nose is for sunlight along the Wolf trail.
(Paint a yellow ramp across the nose from ear to ear with a stripe under the ramp on each cheek)

Wolf Cubs, remember the meaning of your Wolf paint. It shows that you are ready to move along the upward trail of Scouting.

I will present your badge to your parent who will pin it to your uniform when you go back to your seat.

Congratulations to you and your family on completing this part of the Cub Scout Trail.

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Painted Bear Ceremony

Materials: Blue, Yellow, and Red Paint, Bear Badges, Safety Pins

Indian Drummer begins soft, slow rhythmic beat.

Cubmaster: Tonight we are honoring some Cub Scouts who have reached a new rank. They have worked hard to earn the sign of the bear.

Would the following Scouts and their parent please come forward.

Read Scouts names.

Cubmaster: Do you want to wear the sign of the Bear? If you do, please say "yes".

Cubs: Yes

Cubmaster: You are well on your way along the Cub Scout Trail to reach the honor of the Arrow of Light, and eventually start the Boy Scout trail to seek the sign of the Eagle.

To help you along your journey, we will give you the sign of the Bear.

The yellow on your chin stands for Sunlight from the Wolf Trail.
(Draw two vertical yellow stripes on chin)

The blue on your forehead is for loyalty when you become a Webelo.
(Draw two vertical blue stripes on forehead)

The red on your cheeks is for courage and the hard work you and your parent did to achieve the Bear Rank.

(Draw two upward slanting lines on each cheek)

Bear Cubs, remember the meaning of your Bear paint. It shows that you are ready to move along the upward trail of Scouting.

I will present your badge to your parent who will pin it to your uniform when you go back to your seat.

Congratulations to you and your family on completing this part of the Cub Scout Trail.

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Painted Webelos Ceremony

Materials: Blue, Yellow and Red Paint, Webelos Badges, Safety Pins

Indian Drummer begins soft, slow rhythmic beat.

Cubmaster: Webelos stands for "We'll Be Loyal Scouts."

Would the following Scouts and their parent please come forward.

Read Scouts names.

Cubmaster: The sign of the Webelos Scout signifies a major step on the Cub Scout Trail. Just as Indian boys became warriors and were painted in the colors of their tribe, we will paint you with the colors of Scouting.

Do you want to wear the sign of the Webelos, please say "yes".

Cubs: Yes

Cubmaster: You are well on your way along the Cub Scout Trail to reach the honor of the Arrow of Light, and eventually start the Boy Scout trail to seek the sign of the Eagle.

To help you along your journey, we will give you the sign of the Webelos.

The blue W across your nose is for strength as you work on the Arrow of Light.
(Paint a large W From ear to ear across the bridge of nose)

The yellow on your chin and forehead is the color of sunlight and will light your way along the Scouting Trail.
(Paint a yellow triangle on chin pointing down and on forehead pointing up)

The red stands for fire so that you have a burning desire to explore new areas.
(Paint red stripes on each side of the chin and forehead triangles and under the W on each cheek)

All of these colors together form the Webelos symbol. You should be very proud to wear it.

I will present your badge to your parent who will pin it to your uniform when you go back to your seat.

Congratulations to you and your family on completing this part of the Cub Scout Trail.

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