Pelagius

 

From HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL DICTIONARY, 1697 by Pierre Bayle

.   .   one cannot make the Pelagians happier than by saying that the fear of false gods has been able to lead the pagans to give up some vice. For if the fear of drawing down the curses of heaven upon themselves had been able to make them abstain from evil, they could also be led to commit virtuous actions by the desire for spiritual rewards . . .     The two levers by which man is moved are fear of punishment and desire of reward. If he can be moved by the former, he can also be by the latter. One cannot simply admit one of these and reject the other.

Translated by R. H. Popkin (with Craig Brush).
Bobbs-Merrill 1965, p. 403.

 

From SOCINIANISM IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND, 1951 by John McLachlan

Sir Simonds D'Ewes (1602-50) classed Ochino, Lelius Socinus, Castellio, Servetus, and Erasmus of Rotterdam together, as revivers of the heresy of Pelagius.   (The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir S. D.'Ewes (1845), ii. 64-5.)

Oxford 1951, Note, p. 31.

 

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