T O N I   M O R R I S O N

"The language must be careful and
appear effortless. It must not
sweat. It must suggest and be
provocative at the same time. . . .
It is the thing that black people
love so much--the saying of words,
holding them on the tongue.


The language must be careful and
appear effortless. It must not
sweat. It must suggest and be
provocative at the same time. . . .
It is the thing that black people
love so much--the saying of words,
holding them on the tongue."  -Toni Morrison
   
Toni Morrison has indeed been recognized for the prowess of her literary skill, and subsequent success.  Her Nobel Laureate resume also includes the National Book Critics Circle Award, the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award, the Pulitzer Prize, and the Robert F. Kennedy Award. As well, since 1988 Morrison has held the Robert F. Goheen Professorship of the Humanities at Princeton University and currently is Chair of their Creative Writing Program.

    In 1993, Morrison was the first black woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. While giving a lecture at Princeton, Morrison was asked by a student "who she wrote for." She swiftly replied, "I want to write for people like me, which is to say black people, curious people, demanding people -- people who can't be faked, people who don't need to be patronized, people who have very, very high criteria." To this day, Toni Morrison continues to employ her "very, very high criteria" to challenge herself as both an educator and a writer.

                                                    
(Dalal,PiyaliNath. VOICES FROM THE GAP/ Women Writers of Color. University of Minnesota. Online.2000.<http://voices.cla.umn.edu/authors /MORRISONtoni.html>30June2003)
Ms. Morrison, in her Nobel acceptance address, relays a folktale topicing on a profound wisdom, wisdom appropriate throughout the ages. The story she tells is as old as time, and twice as wise. It is a story that reveals prismatic truths about the responsibilities of strength, power and the perceptions of both of these as seen through the eyes of others.  Even before the performances of the Oedipus trilogy Bards have been spinning tales that weave together the individual and shared intricacies of the human condition.  Then as well as now, the timeless relevance of these stories remind us of the futile, and destructive furies of being mortal.  
  
The Bluest Eye- A Critical Review
O U T S I D E   L I N K S
A comprehensive web site for all of Toni Morrison's books (Paradise, Beloved, Sula, Tar Baby, and others) as well as biographies, interviews, and web resources ...
Mail to: Breilloc@hotmail.com
Text taken from Toni Morrison's World of Fiction by Karen Carmean (1993)
Text of the Nobel Lecture copyright 1993 by The Nobel Foundation
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