Propylene Glycol
PROPYLENE GLYCOL

Propylene Glycol is a colorless, viscous, hygroscopic liquid CH3CHOHCH2OH, used in anti-freeze solutions, in hydraulic fluids, and as a solvent. Also called "propanediol". American Herritage Encyclopedia Dictionary

PROPYLENE GLYCOL: Implicated in contact dermititis, kidney damage. and liver adnormalities; can inhibit skin cell growth in human tests and can damage cell membranes causes rashes, dry skin and surface damage.
ACUTE EFFECTS: May be harmful by inhalation, indgestion or skin absorption. May cause eye irritation, skin irritation. Exposure can cause gastro-intestinal disturbances, nausea, headache and vomiting, central nervous system depression.
Material Saftey Data Sheets (MSDS)

A published clinical review showed propylene glycol causes a significant number of reactions and was a primary irritant to the skin even in low levels of concentrations.
The American Academy of Dermatologists, Inc.; Jan. 1991

Propylene Glycol is used in:
Anti-freeze
Brake and Hydraulic Fluid
De-icer
Paints and Coatings
Floor Wax
Laundry Detergents
Pet Food
Tobacco
Cosmetics
Toothpastes
Shampoos
Deodorants
Lotions
Processed Foods
and many more personal care items.

Propylene Glycol also serves as a humectant - a substance that help retain moisture content, or simply - it prevents things from drying out. That's why some pet foods are soft and chewy. This, of course, is a good reason it's in cosmetics and other personal care items. It makes the skin feel moist and soft. And, the products don't dry out. Propylene Glycol is also found in baby wipes and even some processed foods! Go ahead, check your labels!

In 1938, the FDA grandfathered the use of several ingredients as safe for personal care items, with restrictions of course. Based on what?

Like DEA, Propylene Glycol may be absorbed through the skin. Studies have shown systemic retention (residue throughout).

DO YOU REALLY NEED TO WAIT FOR A STUDY?

Back To Main Page