Reflective lesson plan on editing summaries

Reflective lesson plan on editing summaries

 

Lesson Plan

 

Week 12 10:00-11:20 a.m.

Composition I  

Room 22

 

Objectives To:

i. recap use of present tense in summary writing

ii. offer general guidelines on summary writing

iii. encourage peer review

 

Procedures

1 Warm up (10:00-10:05):

   Quickly recap previous lesson. Tell today’s objectives.

 

2  Review verb tenses in summaries (10.05-10.15):

    Distribute H/O 1 (Tenses in summary/subject verb 

    agreement). Stds to do the H/O individually/pairs.

    Take holistic feedback (answer key on the reverse 

    side of tr’s H/O).

 

3  Student discussions (10.15-10.25):

   Return students the first drafts. Put them in groups.  

   Students discuss in groups and list important points to   

   be included in the summary from the passage. They  

   decide what should not be included in the summary.  

   Students make changes in their drafts.

 

4.  Group revision (10.25-10.45):

    Distribute H/O 2 (Summary writing skills). Ask 

    students to read and discuss in groups if their  

    summaries include the important points mentioned in     the H/O.

 

5.  Peer review (10.45-11.10)

    Shuffle and distribute stds’ drafts to the class. Give

    H/O 3 (peer review) is given to the stds. Stds review

    their peer’s work using the checklist. They may  

    discuss within groups to confirm their

    opinions/decisions. 

 

6. Homework:

    Students to work on drafts at home and email

    the drafts.

 

NOTE: 10 min cushion time.

 

Reflective notes and diary entries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

_____________________

Handout 1

 

VERB TENSES IN A SUMMARY AND SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT

 

Read the following plot summary of the American movie “Mona Lisa Smile” and underline the most appropriate verb tense from the verbs in brackets. Make sure that the verb tense is correct and that the verbs agree with the subject.

 

Katherine Watson (portrays/portrayed/portray) a single woman in the 1950s who, freshly (graduates/graduated) from school, (gets/got/get) a job working as an Art History professor in Massachusetts. Katherine (was/is) shocked when she (learns/learnt/learn) her students (had/have/has) already fulfilled the requirements in their syllabuses by the very first class, and (decided/decides/decide) to stray against the rules by showing the girls modern art and teaching them that they (have/had/has) a choice in life besides becoming a housewife and mother. Katherine (shares/shared/share) a special bond with her students, though a few students really stand out. Betty Warren (was/is) a "proper young lady" who quickly (gets/got/get) married because her family (wanted/wants) her to and soon (learns/learn/learnt) about marriage the hard way--she (become/became/becomes) rebellious towards Katherine's teachings in the meantime. Joan Brandwyn (was/is) a bright and intelligent girl who gets into Yale Law School but must (makes/make) a choice when she (fell/fall/falls) in love with a man. Then there (is/was) Giselle Levy who (was/is) kind of like Katherine herself, except Giselle (was/is) a "player" and (like/likes/liked) to fool around with guys...especially men who (were/are) a lot older than her. Through these students, Katherine (learnt/learns/learn) about herself and life as she (go/went/goes) against school board rules.

Text source: http://www.killermovies.com/dvd/do.php/3056.html

 

________________________________

Handout 2

SUMMARY WRITING SKILLS

 

Some pointers on writing summaries

 

Read with the Writer's Purpose in Mind

Read the text/passage carefully, making no notes or marks and looking only for what the writer is saying.

 

After you've finished reading, write down in one sentence the point that is made about the subject. Then look for the writer's thesis/main idea and underline it.

 

Does this thesis/main idea correspond with the sentence you wrote down? If not, adjust your sentence or reconsider the thesis/main idea you selected.

 

Underline with Summarizing in Mind

Once you clearly understand the writer's major point (or purpose) for writing, read the text/passage again. This time, underline the major points supporting the thesis; these should be words or phrases here and there rather than complete sentences.

 

In addition, underline key transitional elements which show how parts are connected. Omit specific details, examples, description, and unnecessary explanations.

 

Writing Your Summary

Now begin writing your summary. Start with a sentence naming the writer and article title and stating the essay's main idea. Then write your summary, omitting nothing important and striving for overall coherence through appropriate transitions.

 

Conclude with a final statement reflecting the significance of the article -- not from your own point of view but from the writer's. 

 

Throughout the summary, do not insert your own opinions or thoughts; instead summarize what the writer has to say about the subject.

 

Revising Your Summary

After you've completed a draft, read your summary and check for accuracy.

 

Does your summary make the same point as the article?

 

Have you omitted anything important?

 

Are specific statements combined to form general statements?

 

Are direct or reported speech changed into statements?

 

Does your summary read smoothly with all parts clearly related?

 

Keep in mind that a summary should generally be no more than one-fourth the length of the original. If your summary is too long, cut out words rather than ideas. Then look for non-essential information and delete it.

 

_______________________________

Handout 3

 

CHECKING YOUR PEER’S SUMMARY

 

Read the summary carefully and answer the following questions:

 

1.         What do you like best about your peer's summary? 

            _______________________________________________________________           

 

2.         Is it clear what is being summarized?

            Yes/No

 

3.         Do the first lines of the paragraph name the title and author, tell what kind of work it is, and 

           briefly state the theme?

            Yes/No

 

4.         Is the thesis/main idea of the original essay clear in the summary? (Write out what you think that  

            thesis is)

            _______________________________________________________________           

 

5.         Did your peer miss any key points from her summary? (If so, what are they?)

            _______________________________________________________________           

 

6.         Did your peer include any of his own opinions in his or her summary?

            Yes/No

           

7.         Did your peer include any unimportant details in his or her summary?

            Yes/No

             

8.         Are actions of the story presented in the present tense?

            Yes/No

 

9.         Where there any points where you were lost because some information seems to have been

            omitted?

            Yes/No

 

10.       Are events presented in general terms, not narrated in detail?

            Yes/No

 

11.       Are in text citations and bibliography given in APA style?

            Yes/No

 

 _________________________________________________

Handout 1 Answer Key

 

VERB TENSES IN A SUMMARY AND SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT

 

Read the following plot summary of the American movie “Mona Lisa Smile” and underline the most appropriate verb tense from the verbs in brackets. Make sure that the verb tense is correct and that the verbs agree with the subject.

 

 

Katherine Watson portrays a single woman in the 1950s who, freshly graduated from school, gets a job working as an Art History professor in Massachusetts. Katherine is shocked when she learns her students have already fulfilled the requirements in their syllabuses by the very first class, and decides to stray against the rules by showing the girls modern art and teaching them that they have a choice in life besides becoming a housewife and mother. Katherine shares a special bond with her students, though a few students really stand out. Betty Warren is a "proper young lady" who quickly gets married because her family wants her to and soon learns about marriage the hard way--she becomes rebellious towards Katherine's teachings in the meantime. Joan Brandwyn is a bright and intelligent girl who gets into Yale Law School but must make a choice when she falls in love with a man. Then there is Giselle Levy who is kind of like Katherine herself, except Giselle is a "player" and likes to fool around with guys...especially men who are a lot older than her. Through these students, Katherine learns about herself and life as she goes against school board rules.