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Singapore News

2 in 10 S'poreans have thought of leaving: Survey

AMID the debate over stayers and quitters, a survey has found that two in 10 Singaporeans have considered leaving the country.

Half of those who explored such a move had their sights on Australia.

The survey of 1,000 people, conducted by ACNielsen Research last month, was done just before Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong made his National Day Rally speech on stayers and quitters on Aug 18.

But compared to an earlier survey in October last year, ...

 

  Singapore Business News

GLCs boost Singapore's honest name: Survey unit

LONDON - Singapore's government-linked companies (GLCs) were a major factor which helped it enjoy a treasured global reputation for being so corruption-free, according to Transparency International (TI).

Widely regarded as the world's leading independent anti-corruption organisation, TI issued research findings earlier this week which showed that Singapore was seen by international business leaders, politicians, academics and analysts as being the least corrupt country in Asia and the fifth most honest nation worldwide.

While graft in industry, ...

 

Business News

What Is "Corporate Responsibility"?

More companies are reporting on what they're doing for human rights and the environment. The only problem: No hard-and-fast standards In a year when a raft of scandals has further lowered the public's estimation of the ethics of Corporate America, some companies are trying to show they care. How? In addition to annual or semiannual reports, they're putting out so-called corporate responsibility reports chronicling data that show they're sensitive to social or environmental concerns. In 2001, 45% of the 250 largest global companies published such reports, up from 35% three years ago, according to a triennial study by KPMG. Says Eric Israel, a partner at the firm, which tracks such reporting: "It's a trend that's here to stay."

 That's the good news. The bad news is ...

 

  Information Technology

Glitches in anti-virus program confuse users

Customers who bought anti-virus software at a discounted price through a promotion by their banks may have received a defective version.

Early copies of McAfee VirusScan 6.0, which were offered by several banks to their customers at a special price of $12.36, shipped with a manufacturing glitch.

As a result of this, the software informed users that they had bought a "demo" version and that they qualified for anti-virus updates online for only four to five months, when the subscription to the update service should last a year.

Updates are necessary to protect users ...

Careers

Want a Raise? Don't Count Your Chickens

The experts see fatter employee paychecks in 2003, but those hikes are likely to be selective and based largely on merit Surely but slowly, employee compensation is likely to pull out of its tailspin in 2003. Fewer companies -- about 6% -- are planning to freeze pay next year, vs. the 17% that froze at least some salaries this year, according to a recent survey of 1,600 companies by Mercer Human Resource Consulting.

 Moreover, Mercer expects base salaries to rise 3.9% next year on average, ...

 

  Health

Duke scientists warn that caffeine adds to stress

Your morning cup of coffee may be doing more harm than previously thought, according to a new study by Duke University Medical Center researchers that shows caffeine consumed in the morning increases blood pressure and amplifies stress throughout the day.

The study, published in the July/August 2002 issue of Psychosomatic Medicine, is the first to demonstrate caffeine's lasting stress effects in a clinical setting.

"When regular coffee drinkers ingest caffeine, they are raising their blood pressure ...

 

Casual Reading

My country, but not my home?

'SINCE I was 14,' she says, 'I lived my life as a stray cat.

'Whoever gave me warmth became my instant family and my home. So I guess I don't have any attachment to one country where I can call my real home.'

'But,' my Japanese friend adds, 'there is one thing that has kept me rooted. It's the aesthetic sense and morals that were repeatedly taught at home and at schools.

'Now, no matter where I am, I cannot get rid of a certain sense of responsibility. I feel as if I were a representative of my country. It's a bit stressful, ...

 

 

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