Comments of the Vestry:

Mrs. Atkinson was asked to act as organist during the illness of Prof. Artes. Mr. Artes went to Evansville on Oct. 17, 1886. He died there on Nov. 20, and was buried in Fernwood on Nov. 22. The Vestry placed a wreath of flowers upon his grave, and Mr. Barrett recorded in the parish register - "Caspar F. Artes, for twenty six years the faithful and efficient organist of St. Paul's Church - a chivalrous gentleman - an upright man - an unobtrusive Christian - a surpassing artist - a constant friend"; all of which was the substance of the Vestry's minute of sorrow and condolence.

Mr. Barrett, in a memorial sermon on Prof. Artes, said:

"Few men, I think, knew Prof. Artes well. Of course everybody was familiar with his genial smile, his cordial salutation, his never-failing politeness, which characterized him as a true gentleman. But few, I think, realized his unusual intelligence, his wide reading, and his thorough appreciation of all that pertains to the spirit of our times and the good of man and our country...

"To tell the truth, Mr. Artes' true language was music. ... He knew well the great masters and loved to commune with them. But he was himself a master among the masters."

He had come to Henderson on Mar. 4, 1852. He was born at Melkers, Saxe. Meiningen, Germany Mar. 29, 1886.

The Vestry requested the Rector to look in to designs for a stained glass window in memory of Prof. Artes.

"The Vestry of St. Paul's Church, at a meeting, Nov. 23rd 1886, passed the following minute and ordered that it be entered upon the Vestry Record Book; also that it be published in our city papers, and a copy of it be sent to the family of the late Professor Caspar F. Artes:

"As Vestrymen of St. Paul's Church we desire to express our sincere sorrow at the death of our friend and brother, Professor C. F. Artes, who has for the past twenty-six years been our most faithful and efficient organist.

"We desire to record our deep appreciation of him as a chivalrous gentleman, an upright man, an unobtrusive Christian, a surpassing artist and a constant friend. With all the scenes of our personal history has he been long and intimately associated. In the Sunday School, at Confirmation, at the marriage ceremony, at funeral obsequies, at the Sunday service and the week-day lectures, amidst Christmas festivities and Lenten solemnities, and Easter joys, he has been a prominent and an appreciative participant.

"We shall long hold in loving memory his exceptional fidelity and his genius; and we indulge the hope that we shall meet him again and join with him in the praises of Eternity.

"To his sorrowing family we extend our sincere sympathy, and assure them of our good wishes in whatever state it may please God to call them."

 

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