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Mathematics

Grade 4: Data Management and Probability

Planning: Term #

Tracking: Ach. Level

Overall Expectations

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• collect and organize discrete primary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs;

 

 

 

 

• read, describe, and interpret primary data and secondary data presented in charts and graphs,including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs;

 

 

 

 

• predict the results of a simple probability experiment, then conduct the experiment and compare the prediction to the results.

 

 

 

 

Specific Expectations

 

 

 

 

Collection and Organization of Data

 

 

 

 

– collect data by conducting a survey (e.g., “Choose your favourite meal from the following list: breakfast, lunch, dinner, other.”) or an experiment to do with themselves, their environment, issues in their school or the community, or content from another subject, and record observations or measurements;

 

 

 

 

– collect and organize discrete primary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels (e.g., appropriate units marked on the axes), and scales (e.g., with appropriate increments) that suit the range and distribution of the data, using a variety of tools (e.g., graph paper, simple spreadsheets, dynamic statistical software).

 

 

 

 

Data Relationships

 

 

 

 

– read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data (e.g., survey results, measurements, observations) and from secondary data (e.g., temperature data in the newspaper, data from the Internet about endangered species), presented in charts, tables, and graphs (including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs);

 

 

 

 

– demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of median (e.g.,“ The median is the value in the middle of the data. If there are two middle values, you have to calculate the middle of those two values.”), and determine the median of a set of data (e.g., “I used a stem-and-leaf plot to help me find the median.”);

 

 

 

 

– describe the shape of a set of data across its range of values, using charts, tables, and graphs (e.g. “The data values are spread out evenly.”; “The set of data bunches up around the median.”);

 

 

 

 

– compare similarities and differences between two related sets of data, using a variety of strategies (e.g., by representing the data using tally charts, stem-and-leaf plots, or double bar graphs; by determining the mode or the median; by describing the shape of a data set across its range of values).

 

 

 

 

Probability

 

 

 

 

– predict the frequency of an outcome in a simple probability experiment, explaining their reasoning; conduct the experiment; and compare the result with the prediction (Sample problem: If you toss a pair of number cubes 20 times and calculate the sum for each toss, how many times would you expect to get 12? 7? 1? Explain your thinking. Then conduct the experiment and compare the results with your predictions.);

 

 

 

 

– determine, through investigation, how the  umber of repetitions of a probability experiment can affect the conclusions drawn (Sample problem: Each student in the class tosses a coin 10 times and records how many times tails comes up. Combine the individual student results to determine a class result, and then compare the individual student results and the class result.).

 

 

 

 

Student Name:

 

 

 

 

 Expectations: Copyright The Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2005.  Format: Copyright B.Phillips, 1998.