Untitled

Mathematics

Grade 4: Measurement

Planning: Term #

Tracking: Ach. Level

Overall Expectations

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• estimate, measure, and record length, perimeter, area, mass, capacity, volume, and elapsed time, using a variety of strategies;

 

 

 

 

• determine the relationships among units and measurable attributes, including the area and perimeter of rectangles.

 

 

 

 

Specific Expectations

 

 

 

 

Attributes, Units and Measurement Sense

 

 

 

 

– estimate, measure, and record length, height, and distance, using standard units (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, metre, kilometre) (e.g., a pencil that is 75 mm long);

 

 

 

 

– draw items using a ruler, given specific lengths in millimetres or centimetres (Sample problem: Use estimation to draw a line that is 115 mm long. Beside it, use a ruler to draw a line that is 115 mm long. Compare the lengths of the lines.);

 

 

 

 

– estimate, measure (i.e., using an analogue clock), and represent time intervals to the nearest minute;

 

 

 

 

– estimate and determine elapsed time, with and without using a time line, given the durations of events expressed in five-minute intervals, hours, days,weeks, months, or years (Sample problem: If you wake up at 7:30 a.m., and it takes you 10 minutes to eat your breakfast, 5 minutes to brush your teeth, 25 minutes to wash and get dressed, 5 minutes to get your backpack ready, and 20 minutes to get to school, will you be at school by 9:00 a.m.?);

 

 

 

 

– estimate, measure using a variety of tools(e.g., centimetre grid paper, geoboard) and strategies, and record the perimeter and area of polygons;

 

 

 

 

– estimate, measure, and record the mass of objects (e.g., apple, baseball, book), using the standard units of the kilogram and the gram;

 

 

 

 

– estimate, measure, and record the capacity of containers (e.g., a drinking glass, a juice box), using the standard units of the litre and the millilitre;

 

 

 

 

– estimate, measure using concrete materials, and record volume, and relate volume to the space taken up by an object (e.g., use centimetre cubes to demonstrate how much space a rectangular prism takes up) (Sample problem: Build a rectangular prism using connecting cubes. Describe the volume of the prism using the number of connecting cubes.).

 

 

 

 

Measurement Relationships

 

 

 

 

– describe, through investigation, the relationship between various units of length (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, kilometre);

 

 

 

 

– select and justify the most appropriate  standard unit (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, kilometre) to measure the side lengths and perimeters of various polygons;

 

 

 

 

– determine, through investigation, the relationship between the side lengths of a rectangle and its perimeter and area (Sample problem: Create a variety of rectangles on a geoboard. Record the length, width, area, and perimeter of each rectangle on a chart. Identify relationships.);

 

 

 

 

– pose and solve meaningful problems that require the ability to distinguish perimeter and area (e.g.,“I need to know about area when I cover a bulletin board with construction paper. I need to know about perimeter when I make the border.”);

 

 

 

 

– compare and order a collection of objects, using standard units of mass (i.e., gram, kilogram) and/or capacity (i.e., millilitre, litre);

 

 

 

 

– determine, through investigation, the relationship between grams and kilograms (Sample problem: Use centimetre cubes with a mass of one gram, or other objects of known mass, to balance a one-kilogram mass.);

 

 

 

 

– determine, through investigation, the relationship between millilitres and litres (Sample problem: Use small containers of different known capacities to fill a one litre container.);

 

 

 

 

– select and justify the most appropriate standard unit to measure mass (i.e., milligram, gram, kilogram) and the most appropriate standard unit to measure the capacity of a container (i.e., millilitre, litre);

 

 

 

 

– solve problems involving the relationship between years and decades, and between decades and centuries (Sample problem: How many decades old is Canada?);

 

 

 

 

– compare, using a variety of tools (e.g., geoboard, patterns blocks, dot paper), two-dimensional shapes that have the same perimeter or the same area (Sample problem: Draw, using grid paper, as many different rectangles with a perimeter of 10 units as you can make on a geoboard.).

 

 

 

 

Student Name:

 

 

 

 

 Expectations: Copyright The Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2005.  Format: Copyright B.Phillips, 1998.