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Mathematics

Grade 8: Measurement

Planning: Term #

Tracking: Ach. Level

Overall Expectations

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• research, describe, and report on applications of volume and capacity measurement;

 

 

 

 

• determine the relationships among units and measurable attributes, including the area of a circle and the volume of a cylinder.

 

 

 

 

Specific Expectations

 

 

 

 

Attributes, Units and Measurement Sense

 

 

 

 

– research, describe, and report on applications of volume and capacity measurement (e.g., cooking, closet space, aquarium size) (Sample problem: Describe situations where volume and capacity are used in your home.).

 

 

 

 

Measurement Relationships

 

 

 

 

– solve problems that require conversions involving metric units of area, volume, and capacity (i.e., square centimetres and square metres; cubic centimetres and cubic metres; millilitres and cubic centimetres) (Sample problem: What is the capacity of a cylindrical beaker with a

radius of 5 cm and a height of 15 cm?);

 

 

 

 

– measure the circumference, radius, and diameter of circular objects, using concrete materials (Sample Problem: Use string to measure the circumferences of different circular objects.);

 

 

 

 

– determine, through investigation using a variety of tools (e.g., cans and string, dynamic geometry software) and strategies, the relationships for calculating the circumference and the area of a circle, and generalize to develop the formulas (Sample problem: Use string to measure the circumferences and the diameters of a variety of cylindrical cans, and investigate the ratio of the circumference to the diameter.);

 

 

 

 

– solve problems involving the estimation and calculation of the circumference and the area of a circle;

 

 

 

 

– determine, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies (e.g., generalizing from the volume relationship for right prisms, and verifying using the capacity of thin-walled cylindrical containers), the relationship between the area of the base and height and the volume of a cylinder, and generalize to develop the formula (i.e., Volume = area of base x height);

 

 

 

 

– determine, through investigation using concrete materials, the surface area of a cylinder (Sample problem: Use the label and the plastic lid from a cylindrical container to help determine its surface area.);

 

 

 

 

– solve problems involving the surface area and the volume of cylinders, using a variety of strategies (Sample problem: Compare the volumes of the two cylinders that can be created by taping the top and bottom, or the other two sides, of a standard sheet of paper.).

 

 

 

 

Student Name:

 

 

 

 

 Expectations: Copyright The Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2005.  Format: Copyright B.Phillips, 1998.