Abbott John, pianos, 135 Laurens
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Abott John, pianomkr, r 249 Spring, h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Abbott John, piano forte, 85 Varick
Allen William H. piano tuner, 170 Montague (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Altenburg, Frederick E. pianomkr,
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Altenburg Frederick O. pianos, 59 First, h 47 Av. A
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ambler Samuel M. pianos, 358 Bowery,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Ambler Samuel M. pianos, 49 Mercer,
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Ambler Samuel M. pianos, 151 Wooster & 42 Thompson, h W. 69th n Tenth av.
Ambler & Co. pianos, 151 Wooster & r 42 Thompson
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ambler & Co. piano fortes, 151 Wooster and 42 Thompson
(New York State Directory, 1870)

A

MERICAN UNION COMPANY'S NEW

and superior Piano, No. 407 Broome-st., corner of
Greene-st.
(New York Times, Sep. 25, 1865)

AMERICAN UNION COMPANY'S

New and IMPROVED PIANO, No. 407 Broome-st.,
Corner of Greene-st.
(New York Times, Oct. 23, 1865)

Anderson Andrew, pianos, 204 Cottage pl.
Anderson Andrew, 204 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Anderson Andrew, pianos, 204 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Anderson Andrew, pianos, 204 Bleecker, h refused
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Anderson Andrew, piano fortes, 208 Bleeker
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Arion Piano Forte, Manner's patent, warerooms at Covell & Co. 544 B'way
(New York State Directory, 1869)
Arion Piano Forte Co. S E. 14th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Arion [patent] 554 Broadway
(Brooklyn Eagle, 1870.11.30)

THE ARION

Has the Patent Reversed Wooden Agraffe Bridge,
Patent Full Iron Frame and Patent Diagonal Sustaining
Bar.
  The Patent Arion Piano remains in tune longer and
has the best quality of tone of any Piano in the market.
  It was awarded the premium over Steinway, Chicker-
ing adn others, at the Fair of the American Institute in
New York, after a blindfold trial.
  The Patent Arion Pianos are ALL SEVEN AND
ONE-THIRD OCTAVES, Price LOWER THAN ANY
OTHER FIRST CLASS INSTRUMENT, and WAR-
RANTED for a LIFE TIME.

...
Churches, Ministers and Teachers Liberally
Dealt with.
EVERY INSTRUMENT WARRANTED.
Agents wanted in every County. Send for Circular.
A. J. VIELE,
General Western Agent,
  At the Music Store of J. L. PETERS & CO.,
212 N. Fifth St., ST. LOUIS, MO.
  In ordering, state in what paper you saw the adver-
tisement.
(St. Louis Christian Advocate, Aug. 24, 1870)

A

SPLENDID SQUARE GRAND PIANOFORTE, 7 1/3
octaves, richly carved, with all modern improve-
ments, cost $850 nine months ago ; will be sold at a bar-
gain, at No. 5 East Fourteenth street, warerooms of the
Arion Pianoforte Company
(New York Herald, May 16, 1872)

THE ARION

The Most Powerful !

Is the Purest in Tone !

THE MOST ELEGANTLY FINISHED,
THE MOST DURABLE, AND WILL
STAND IN TUNE LONGER THAN ANY
OTHER.

ALL 7 1-3 OCTAVES

Also the ESTEY COTTAGE ORGAN,

$60 TO $750.

Is the best made. Buy no other The
Arion can be seen at the Fancy Store of
Rice, [] & Co, Ohio Street, [
] Block.
  All Tuning and Repairing done in the
best style. All orders left at the Ohio
Street Store will receive prompt attention.
WM. H. FOSTER.
  Agent for Viele & Mills, of St. Louis,
General Western Agents. []
(Sedalia Daily Democrat [Missouri], Aug. 2, 1872)

ARION

PIANO-FORTES

Excel all others in Tone and Du-

rability, and in Elegance of Fin-

ish they are Unsurpassed.

  These instruments contain in their construc-
tion four valuable patented improvements, viz:

The Patent Reversed Wooden Agraffe,

  The Patent Compound Wrest Plank,

    The Patent Full Iron Frame,

      The Patent Sustaining Iron Bar

REASONS

WHY THE ARION PIANO-FORTE IS SU-

PERIOR TO ALL OTHERS.

  The Arion Piano-Forte has greater power than
any other piano-forte manufactured.
  It will stand in tune longer, and in its mechan-
ical construction it is more perfect, and, there-
fore, more durable, than any instrument con-
structed in the usual modern style.
  The arrangement of the Agraffe, the manner
of stringing, the peculiar form and arrangement
of the iron frame supercedes all others.
  The use of a bar (which is part of the iron
frame) on a line with the heavy steel stringing,
gives great strength where most needed, and in
this respect all other pianos fail.
  The construction of the Wrest Plank, into
which the tuning pins are inserted, is such that
it is impossible for the pins to become loosened
or the Wrest Plank itself to split, as is too often
the case in other piano-fortes.
  The extraordinary evenness throughout the
scale, the excellent singing quality, the length
and purity of vibration, all go to prove what we
claim, viz : - That the Arion Piano is the best
instrument manufactured.

  The Patent Arion Piano-Fortes are used ex-
clusively in the New York Conservatory of Mu-
sic.
  It is acknowledged that the most severe test
a piano can receive is constant use in a conser-
vatory. The New York conservatory of music
is the oldes and most extensive institution of
the kind in America, they have constantly in
use from twenty-five to thirty Arion Pianos, and
we respectfully refer to this conservatory as to
the durability and excellent qualities of our in-
struments.
  The Arion Piano-Forte company is incorpor-
ated by the State of New York.

CAUTION.

  As some firms are advertising a reduction of
price, it behooves the public to examine care-
fully what they buy. There has been no reduc-
tion in the price of labor and materials ; but
there has been introduced a cheaper class of
pianos made of refuse material and these are
sold cheap, the better class of goods remaining
the same. We allow no firm to undersell us in
the same grade of goods.
  The reason of "The Arion" having obtained
so high a reputation is that we satisfy our cus-
tomers. Our Pianos continually improve by
use ; other makes are never so good as when
new.

NOTICE.

  Agencies for the sale of the Patent Arion
Pianos, will be found in nearly all the large
cities in the United States and South and Cen-
tral America, and it is desirable that purchases
should be made through them, thereby saving
trouble and expense to purchasers.
  These instruments are the largest square
Pianos that are manufactured in America ; they
are thoroughly made, and only the very best
materials are used in their contruction. We
do not put them in the market to compete with
other makes of a lower price and grade ; but
we claim superiority over all others, and that
"The Arion" is as perfect a Piano as can be
made

H. H. HAMILTON & CO., Agents,

DENVER, COLORADO.

H. A. E. PICKARD, Agent, Pueblo.

(Colorado Weekly Chieftan [Pueblo, CO], Jan. 2, 1873)

THE PATENT

ARION PIANO-FORTES

ARE

Unsurpassed in Elegance of Finish,

AND

EXCEL ALL OTHERS IN TONE AND DURABILITY.


Arion Piano-Forte Factory.

The Patent Arion Piano-Fortes are now used exclusively in the New York Conservatory of Music.
   It is acknowledged that the most severe test a Piano can undergo is constant use in a Conservatory.
The New York Conservatory of Music is the oldest and most extensive institudion of the kind in
America. It has constantly in use from TWENTY-FIVE TO THIRTY ARION PIANOS, and we re-
spectfully refer to this Conservatory as to the durability and excellent qualities of our instruments.
Our Pianos are also used by the leading Seminaries and Colleges throughout the United States, and
by many of the principal Opera Troupes.

At every Fair at which it has been exhibited during the past four years, the Arion Piano has received the

FIRST PREMIUM.

without a single exception - a fact unparalleled in the manufacture of Pianos. It received the First Premium
at the Fair of the American Institute, held in New York in 1867, in competition with the best makes of Pianos.

Every Instrument Warranted for Five Years.

ILLUSTRATED CIRCULARS MAILED FREE.

The Arion Piano-Forte Co.

(Incorporated by the State of New York.)

WAREROOMS, No. 5 EAST FOURTEENTH ST.

Manufactory, - - - Mott Haven, Westchester County, N. Y.


CHAS. H. COVELL, Pres't

J. B. SIMPSON, Jr., Sec'y and Treas.

GEO. C. MANNER, Sup't

(Brittan's Journal, 1874)

ELEGANCE AND EXCELLENCE, RICHNESS
of tone and durability, reduced prices
and Fair dealings are all to be had at
McDonald's old established Arion Piano
Warerooms, 143 Fourth Street near
South Third Street, sign of the

GOLDEN PIANO.

Instalments or a heavy discount for cash, also se-
cond hand Pianos for sale or to rent.
BROOKLYN, E.D.N.Y.
(Brooklyn Life, Walzes, 1880)

Ashforth James, piano forte maker, E. 16th. c. Av. 3
Ashforth Thomas A. piano forte maker, 175 Av. 3
Ashforth William, pianomaker, 139 Av. 3
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Atherton Charles E. 409 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bacon Francis, pianos, 135 Grand & 149 Baxter,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bacon Francis, pianos, 135 Grand,
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bacon Francis, pianos, 646 B'way, h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1869)

Francis Bacon, Manufacturer of the Bacon Pianos, Nos. 204 to 206 East 43d Street, near Grand Central Depot. -- The name of Bacon has been honorably and successfully identified with the manufacture of pianos from a very early date. In this historical review of the trade, it will be of special interest to refer to the earliest commencement of the trade in New York. This we are enabled to do through the courtesy of Mr. Francis Bacon, who is in the direct line of successor to John Jacob Astor, who, as will be seen by the following advertisement, was the founder of the business in New York. On January 10, 1789, he advertised : "J. Jacob Astor, No. 81 Queen Street, has for sale an assortment of pianofortes, made by the best makers in London, which he will sell on reasonable terms." In 1802 Astor retired from the piano business and was succeeded by John and Michael Paff, at No. 127 Broadway. In 1815 William Dubois succeeded them and imported pianos at no. 125 Broadway. In 1836 the firm becam Dubois & Bacon, and was succeeded by the firm of Bacon & Raven in 1841. In 1856, by the death of the senior Mr. Bacon, the firm became Raven & Bacon. In 1871 the firm became Bacon & Karr, and was succeeded in 1880 by the present proprietor, Mr. Francis Bacon. Intending purchasers of pianos will notice that his house has been connected with the manufacture and sale of pianos longer than any other in the trade. Mr. Bacon, personally, has now been closely identified with the manufacture of pianos for the last thirty years, and possesses the best of practical skill coupled with a wide range of experience. His factory is centrally located at Nos 204 and 206 East 43d Street, near Grand Central Depot, where he is possessed of every facility for manufacturing the justly celebrated Bacon pianos. All valuable improvements are introduced into these instruments and none but strictly first-class pianos are allowed to leave the premises. Among the latest improvements is Mr. Bacon's patented mode of inserting the tuning pins. It is found only in his pianos, and by means of it tuners are enabled to give greater satisfaction from the solidity of their tuning and by the pianos remaining longer in tune. Mr. Bacon manufactures every class of grand, square, and upright pianos, in ebony and rosewood cases, and in the latest styles. He makes pianos to order to suit any style of furniture : all instruments are fully warranted, those sold in the city or immediate vicinity being kept in tune for one year free of charge. The Bacon pianos received the highest medal and diploma at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition, which were awarded after the closes examination and in direct competition with over one hundred instruemnts of the bwest makers in the world. The judges decided that the Bacon pianos was entitled to the highest medal and diploma and was specially notable for strength and evenness of tone, pleasant touch, and smooth finish. Mr. Bacon refers with pleasure to hundreds of New York's most prominent citizens who are his patrons, and who can testify as to the superior merits of his pianos. Mr. Bacon is a native of this city, a life-long resident, and one of our most respected and popular manufacturers.

(New York's Great Industries, 1884)

Bacon George music 285 Broadway
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Bacon George 59 piano forte maker, Connecticut
(Federal Census, 1850)
Bacon George, piano manufacturer, 162 Centre
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Bacon & Karr, piano forte manufacturers, 255 Greene
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Bacon & Raven, pianofortes, 162 Centre
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Bacon & Raven, Centre Street
Reception of Gov. Louis Kossuth, 1852)
Baker Smuel, 112 Macdougal
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Ball, S. V. & Co., 15 E. Fourteenth st.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Barberie & Bloomfield, 28 White
(New York City Directory, 1859)

B

ARBERIE & BLOOMFIELD'S PIANO-

FORTES were awarded 1st premium at the late Fair
of American Institute, 1860. Manufactory and Wareroom
184 Grand-st., entrance in Baxter. Warranted for 5 years.
(New York Times, Nov. 24, 1860)

O

NLY $210 FOR A HANDSOME 7-OCTAVE

piano-forte, with carved legs, nearly new ; has all
modern improvements ; warranted for five years. Can be
seen at BARBERIE & BLOOMFIELD'S, Nos. 123 and
125 Grand-st., entrance on Baxter. Also, an assortment
of instruments of their own manufacture.
(New York Times, July 25, 1863)

Barlow Warren S. Middleton's National oil portraits, 486 Pearl
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Barlow Warren Sumner, pianos, 694 B'way, h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Barlow & Mathushek, pianos, 694 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Barmore Garret, pianos, 348 Bleecker & 276 W. 13th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Barmore Garrett, pianos, 348 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Barmore Garrett, pianos, 348 Bleecker, h 65 Perry
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Barmore R. V. pianos, 348 Bleecker & 276 W. 13th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Barmore Harvey, pianos, 348 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Barmore Harvey, pianos, 348 Bleecker, h 308 W. 14th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Barmore Henry, pianomkr,
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Barmore G. & H. pianos, 348 Bleecker & 276 W. 13th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Barmore G. & H. pianos, 348 Bleecker & 87 Charles
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Barmore G. & H. pianos, 348 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Barmore G. & H. piano fortes, 368 Bleecker
(New York State Directory, 1870)

G

OLD MEDAL PIANOS. - G. & H. BANNORE,

manufactory and wareroom No. 348 Bleecker-st.,
offer a large assortment of the best Pianos, with all the
latest improvements, pronounced unrivaled by the best
judges, at great bargains. Two fine second-hand Pianos
at $140 and $170.
(New York Times, 28.09.1859)

A

GREAT REDUCTION IN PIANOS. -

G. & H. BARMORE, warerooms no. 348 Bleecker-st. :
splendid assortment ; 17 prize medals ; warranted 5 years ;
elegant 7 octaves, been used, good as new, $270.
(New York Times, Sept 1, 1865)

A

GREAT TRIUMPH - BARMORE CELE-
brated improved Agraff premium pianos, splendid
assortment, warranted five years. Warerooms No. 348
Bleecker-st. 17 prize medals; without exception best
piano made. Fine second-hand, $100
(New York Times, Dec. 13, 1865)

G. & H. BARMORE,

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURERS,

Warerooms, 348 Bleecker Street,
Warranted 5 years. Testimonials from the most distinguished Artists.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Barnes John C. books, 111 William
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Barnes John C. pianos, 137 Eighth & 117 Third av. h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1869)

A.

"BARNES'" PIANOFORTES ARE SUPERIOR IN
tone, finer in finish and more durable than any other
manufactured, for which they were awarded the prize medal
at the American Institute Fair, 1869, and are offered extreme-
ly low for cash or instalments. Warerooms 137 Eighth
street, near Broadway.
(New York Herald, March 15, 1870)

Batterson Abraham L. 678 Sixth av.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bauer John R. pianos, 650 B'way
Bauer J. & Co. Wholesale dealers in pianos & musical merchandise, 650 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bauer Julius, pianos, 650 B'way, h Ill.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Baumgartner Jacob, pianomker
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Baumgartner Jacob, pianos, h 849 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Beames James F. pianos, 499 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Beames James F. pianos, 117 W. 11th, h 265 W. 38th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Beames William E. pianos, 399 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Beames, Bent & Co. pianos. 117 W. 11th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Becht Christian, pianos, 245 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)

BECHT,
(Late Walker & Becht,)
NO. 227 FULTON STREET,
Large assortment of
UPRIGHT AND SQUARE PIANOS
For sale and to rent at low prices.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 20.12.1879)

Behning & Klix. pianos, 99 Bleecker, 424 Broome & 196 W. Houston
Beck Matthias, pianos
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Beck Matthias, pianos, h 884 Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Becker Paul, pianos, 820 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bedell Joseph L. pianos, 324 Spring,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bedell Joseph L. pianos, 324 Spring,
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bedell Joseph L. pianos, 324 Spring, h 37 Vandam
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bedell Joseph L. piano fortes, 324 Spring
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Behning Henry, pianos, 196 W. Houston & 21 Minetta ln.
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Behning H'y, pianos, 99 Bleecker, h 43 Macdougal
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Behning & Klix, pianos, 196 W. Houston & 21 Minetta ln.
(New York City Directory, 1867)
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Behning & Klix, piano fortes, 445 W. 42d
(New York State Directory, 1870)

BEHNING & KLIX,

Piano Case Manufacturers,

196 W. HOUSTON STREET,

NEW YORK.

THE TRADE SUPPLIED.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

BEHNING & KLIX,

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURERS,

No. 196 West Houston St., and 21 Minetta Lane,

NEW YORK.
We call the attention of the Public, Teachers of Music and Dealers, to our Pianos.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Behr & Peck, Manuf'r of Piano Cases and Tops, 292 to 298 Eleventh ave.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)
Behrman Fanny, pianos, h 41 Canal
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Benjamin L. A. 288 Bowery
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Benjamin John L. music, 435 Fourth av.
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Benjamin John L. pianos, 458 Fourth av. h 21 W. 44th
Bent Richard M. pianos, 117 W. 11th, h 57 E. 9th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bent & Co. piano fortes, 117 W. 11th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

PIANO FORT EMPORIUM

361

BROADWAY, NEW YORK. The most exten-

sive and varied assortment of ROSEWOOD PIANO
FORTES, plain and ornamental, elegant patterns, elabo-
rately carved, and highly finished with Pearl keys, all of
our own manufacture, and warranted in every particular,
can be found at our Warerooms, 361 BROADWAY, NEW
YORK.
BENNTT & CO.
(Essex County Republican, 20.10.1852)

R. M. Bent & Co. Manufacturers of Square and Upright Pianos, No. 453 West 36th Street. - The great advancement made of late years in musical culture has rendered the task of the piano manufacturer one demanding no ordinary skill and enterprise. As in every other branch of industry competition in this has grown to be of the keenest, and the growth of capable players and critics has advanced with the appearance of superior instruments. As a consequence many piano manufacturers of reputable standing for some years have been pushed out of existence, through inability to meet the exacting requirements of the times. There is no risk, therefore, in hazarding the opinion, that any firm that has stood the strain of the last fifteen years' marvellous improvement in musical culture, and the construction of musical instruments and whose merits are still unchallenged has every reason to be proud of the ordeal through which it passed, and to be highly sanguine of its career in the future. Such has been the fortunate lot of Messrs. R. M. Bent & Co., whose pianos are to-day in the full light of advanced musical intelligence, rated as highly as they were fifteen years ago, and regarded in many respects of unrivalled excellence. They are the manufacturers of the celebrated three stringed, treble full agraffe pianos, and among the points of superiority are their great strength, durability in every climate, and beauty of proportion and finish, coupled with a peculiar musical quality and richness entirely their own. Besides square pianos they also make the cabinet, grand upright, parlor uprights, and a small pony upright, which for beauty and originality of design, superiority of workmanship, delicacy of action and volume of tone, are unexcelled. They unite every advantage of the best pianos produced. The business was established in 1870, under the firm name of Beames & Bent, both practical workmen of long experience. In 1880 Mr. Bent bought out the original firm and about the same time purchased the entire stock and premises of the late firm of Bloomfield & Otis, and since which time the business has prospered and increased beyond the most sanguine expectations. The firm removed to their present six-story building, 25x100, about three years ago. It is equipped with all the most improved machinery and appliances, and gives employment to a large force of skilled workmen. The business is so large, that negotiations are now being engaged in for the adjoining building of the same dimensions, as that at present occupied, which will double their present production. This is done to meet the requirements of the trade, which is annually increasing. The house carries a large stock of pianos, and maintains agencies all over the United States, Canada, and West Indies, their sales being of such proportions as to stamp this one of our leading, representative manufacturing enterprises. Mr. Bent, the senior member of the firm, was born in this city and regularly brought up to the piano forte manufacturing business, since his fourteenth year. He has always taken an active interest in every movement that had for its object the welfare and advancement of his fellow citizens, and adornment of his native city. He is well known in trade circles and is esteemed as an honorable, enterprising and conscientious business man.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Berge Louis & Co., grand, square and upright piano-fortes, organs, and melodeons, 97 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Berge Louis, pianos, 342 Second av, h 342 E 17th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Berge Louis, piano fortes, 97 Bleecker and 175 Lewis
(New York State Directory, 1870)

B

ERGE'S PIANOS - THESE MOST SUPERB AND ELE-
gant instruments for sale on favorable terms by instal-
ments. Several second hand Pianos, very cheap. Manufac-
tory and warerooms 340 and 342 Second avenue.
(New York Herald, May 18, 1869)

"P

IANOS" - GREATEST BARGAINS FOR CASH OR
instalments at BERGE'S Pianoforte Manufactory,
Second avenue, corner Twentieth street. These Pianos are
superior for power, finish adn durability. Pianos to rent.
(New York Herald, March 15, 1870)

Bergin Rudolph, pianos, 409 W. 51st
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bergen Rudolph A. piano tuner, 409 W. 51st
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Bergqvist G. 44 W. 15th
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bergqvist Gustav, pianos, 484 Sixth av.
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bergqvist Gustavus, pianos, 486 Sixth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Berry Thomas S. pianos, 447 and 333 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Berry Thomas S. pianos, 458 B'way,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Berry Thomas S. pianos, 593 B'way & 136 Mercer
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Berry Thomas S. pianos, 789 B'way, h 115 W. 44th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Berry T. S. & Co. piano fortes, 789 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)

T. S. BERRY,

DEALER IN

PIANOS

AND

CHORAL ORGANS,

No. 593 BROADWAY.

Hallet, Davis & Co.'s Pianos.
(New York City Directory, 1867)

B

EST NEW PIANOS AND ORGANS AT GREAT
sacrifice for case, or on small monthly payments;
some nearly new Pianos at great bargains ; Pianos to
rent, and rent applied if purchased.
T. S. BERRY & CO., 789<1--?--> Broadway.
(New York Herald, May 16, 1872)

Betts Charles J. pianos, 4 Leroy pl.
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Betts Charles J. pianos, 4 Leroy pl. h S. I.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Betts Chas. J. pianofortes, 94 Bleecker
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Biddle John, music,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Biddle John, teacher, 18 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Biddle John, piano fortes, 18 Amity
(New York State Directory, 1870)

B

IDDLE'S PIANOS, 557 FULTON ST.

are pre-eminently superior to other instruments in
use and give universal satisfaction, but are sold and rented
at remarkably low prices. They are just the thing for a
holiday present. We also have organs and secondhand
pianos from $35 upward ; excellently finished. Please call
and examine them at our warerooms.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 20.12.1879)

Billings & Wheelock, "Burdett Organ," 14 E. Fourteenth st.
(New York as It Was, 1876)

Billings & Richmond, Manufacturers of the Billings Piano. Factory. No. 124 and 126 West 25th Street ; Warerooms, No. 21 East 14th Street. - A representative member of the piano manufacturing trade of New York is the firm of Billings & Richmond, manufacturers of the justly celebrated Billings piano. Their record is to every respect a most enviable one. Strict honor and rigid integrity have ever characterized their transactions with the public, while, as is well knwon, they have from the start produced strictly first-class instruments at nominally low prices. From the commencement of their manufacturing carrer, they determined to conduct their business in a straightforward, legitimate manner. To them, their own reputation and the good-will of their patrons has ever been of far more value and importance than would be the temporary profit gained by glaring imposition. They have now been established in business for thirteen years, and have effectually filled the wide field opened to pianos of superior excellence at figures within the reach of all. Every piano they sell combines the best workmanship bost inside and out, at a very moderate price. While it is the rule for so-called manufacturers to buy their casess and action from irresponsible makers, and simply put together the various parts, the firm of Billings & Richmond, in common with the best, make every part of their pianos in their own factory. They personally select and contract for the very best of the various kinds of woods entering into the manufacture of the cases, as also all the other materials which enter into the composition of a pianoforte. Their ripe judgment and practical experience superintend every detail of the manufactory, so that they construct instruments embodying only the very best of everything, and which accounts for the high reputation of the Billings' piano, both in Europe and America. While they do not indulge in high-sounding announcements that their pianos are superior to all others, yet they do unhesitatingly and justly challenge the world to produce for the price a superior instrument, and they claim unresevedly for the Billings piano the following points of excellence :
1. Smoothness and evenness of tone ;
2. Purity of tone ;
3. Symmetry of construction, and
4. Lowness of price.
The members of the firm of Billings & Richmond are gentlemen of cast practical experience, who have had a life-long connection with all branches of the piano making business, and who are minutely conversant with every detail. Thus qualified, they embarked in the manufacture of a class of instruments which have ever reflected lasting credit upon them, and afforded permanent satisfaction to the thousands of their customers. Their factory, which is conveniently located in West 25th Street, is of large dimensions, and fitted up in modern style, with every possible appliance for the production of perfect instruments. Each piano embodies all the latest improvements, besides several valuable patents, exclusively owned by the firm, and to be found in their instruments only, while experienced designers are kept constantly at work to try and devise something new, pleasing and substantial. They employ about one hundred skilled hands, and their annual outfit is of great and steadily growing magnitude. The firm's office and warerooms are at No. 21 East 14th Street, an absolutely central location, and where they have occupied magnificent premises for the last eight years. Here can be seen a complete stock of their pianos, which, as regards finish and elegance, make an unusually fine display, while a trial is sufficient to vouch for beauty and volume of tone and perfection of mechanism. They make every style of grand, square and upright pianos. Their new upright has several attractive features, not found in those of other makers. The success that has attended their efforts to produce a perfect upright has been most flatttering, and their uprights in their beautiful new style cases, with all the improvements made, are adapted to the wants of every class of purchaser, and will afford permanent satisfaction to the possessor by reason of their superior musical qualities. Their grand and square pianos also possess distinguishing characteristics of excellence, and it is only proper to add that with every piano manufacturer, the firm gives a guarantee that it is a perfect instrument in every respect (made of the best seasoned material), and hold themselves responsible for any radical defect in the same for the term of six years from date of purchase. In fact they give a written and signed guarantee, thus ensuring perfect security in purchasing of their house. Messrs. Billings & Richmond have in their possession thousands of the most flattering testimonials from purchasers of their instruments in all parts of the United States and Canada, and which unanimously tend to show the universal popularity of the Billings' piano. We have room for but one, which goes to prove that it stands in the front rank of all makers as regards tone and quality. It reads as follows :
"The two pianos on trial vs. yours were the 'Rogers upright of Boston, list eight hundred and fifty dollars,' and the 'Steinway & Sons, N. Y., list six hundred and fifty dollars.' A gentleman who is an enthusiast for the Steinway played the 'Steinway' and 'Billings' blindfolded, and pronounced decidedly in favor of the Billings piano - 'the action was so nice, the tone was so clear and open' - but he certainly thought he was speaking this of the Steinway - we told him one was a Steinway before he played.
"AYRES, MITHOFF, DANN & CO.,
"Columbus, Ohio."
The co-partners, Mr. J. N. Billings and Mr. M. O. Richmond, give close personal attention to every detail of their large business, and have built up a permanent and constantly growing wholesale and retail trade. They are both natives of New York, responsible and popular citizens, and their instruments will in all cases be found to be strictly first-class, as represented, while sold at a medium price, and no one that consults their own interests should fail to call upon Messrs. Billings & Richmond, or write them, before buying a piano of any other make.

(New York's Leading Industries, 1884)

Blath Jacques, piano matls. 127 Third av. h Third av. n E. 105th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bloomfield Edward, pianokeys, 88 White,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bloomfield Edward, pianos, 29 King
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bloomfield Edward, pianos, 199 Wooster, h 223 Ewen, B'klyn
(New York City Directory, 1869)

E.

BLOOMFIELD'S PIANO-FORTES

are the cheapest first-class instruments in the mar-
ket. Call and see them at his manufactory, Nos. 29 and
31 King-st., Between Macdougal and Varick sts.
(New York Times, Nov. 10, 1865)

E.

BLOOMFIELD'S PIANOS ARE NOT

surpassed for power, quality or durability. Prices
low. Warranted for five years. Manufactory and ware-
rooms, Nos. 29 and 31 King-st., between Varvelt and Mac-
dougal sts.
(New York Times, Dec. 28, 1865)

EDWARD BLOOMFIELD,

(Late Barberie & Bloomfield,)

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURERS,

29 KING STREET, NEW YORK.

First Premium Awarded by American Institute, in 1859
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Bloomfield George, piano tuner, 301 Humboldt, E. D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Bloomfield & Otis, pianos, 199 Wooster
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bloomfield & Otis, piano fortes, 209 E. 19th near 3rd ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)

BLOOMFIELD & OTIS

Manufacturers of

PIANO-FORTES

Warerooms No. 475 Broadway.
Every Instrument is warranted for seven years.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1866)

Blume Frederick, pianos, melodeons, sheet music, music insts. 208 Bowery
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Blume Frederick, pianos 27 Union Square
(New York State Directory, 1870)

$140

- ROSEWOOD PIANO, SECOND-

hand, with iron plate, &c., &c.; rosewood piano,
with pearl keys, pearl name-board, extra moulding and
serpentine case, for sale at a bargain. Second-hand pi-
anos taken in exchange for new.
FREDERICK BLUME, No. 203 Bowery.
(New York Times, Sep. 25, 1863)

N

EW SCALE ROSEWOOD PIANOS - $225,

with all improvements, iron fram, full round cor-
ners, overstrings, etc. Second-hand pianos, best City
makers, $100, $125, $135, $260. Melodeons, Prince's cele-
brated make, $58, $68 to $350.
FREDERICK BLUME, No. 234 Broadway
(New York Times, Nov. 10, 1863)

N

EW SCALE ROSEWOOD PIANOS -

Full round corners, 7-octave, iron frame, pearl name-
board, etc., $250. Second-hand 6-octave piano, $150;
one for $75 ; one for $45, in good order.
FREDERICK BLUME, No. 203 Bowery
(New York Times, Oct. 26, 1864)

N

EW SCALE ROSEWOOD PIANOS -

With full iron frame, overstrings, carved legs and
lyre, &c., $300 to 600.
MELODEONS,
Rosewood case, with divided swell, price $67 to $300.
Second-hand Pianos, $75 to $250.
FREDERICK BLUME, No. 203 Bowery.
(New York Times, May 30, 1866)

Boardman, Gray & Co. 487 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Boardman & Gray, pianos, 748 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1867)

PIANO FORTES!

T

HE Subscribers would respectfully invite attention to their
stock of Piano Fortes, among them may be found the best
assortment of Boardman & Gray's with and without the celebra-
ted Dolce Compania attachement, (not AEolioan) ever offered west
of Albany. The superiority of these Pianos is universally ac-
knowledged, and they have received ten first class premiums
within the past five years, in all places where placed in competi-
tion with all the makes generally known in this vicinity. The
eight hundred dollar Piano sold by us last month to a gentleman
in Philadelphia was pronounced the finest ever exhibited in this
city. Every instrument is warranted to give perfect satisfaction
and the new attachment is now so much in use that a Piano is
not considered perfect without it. We shall be happy to show
to all who call on us, and pledge ourselves to deliver in this city
any Piano Forte made by them at precisely the same price charg-
ed at the manufactory without adding transportation, &c.
  Buffalo, Dec. 18 1852J. SAGE & SONS
(The Erie Observer, Mar. 12, 1853)

B

OARDMAN, GRAY & CO. HAVE AT

their warerooms, No. 487 Broadway, new and elegant
piano-fortes for $180.
  Call and see them.
(New York Times, May 13, 1860)

B

OARDMAN, GRAY & CO. WILL SELL UN-

til February 1, their stock of new and second-hand
Pianos very cheap for cash. Their Automatic Melodeon
is also on exhibition at their warerooms, 487 Broadway.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1861)

B

OARDMAN, GRAY & CO., No. 487 BROAD-

way. - We are selling our Pianos very cheap to accom-
modate holiday purchasers. A new scale 7 1/4 octave piano
is much admired.
(New York Times, Jan. 4, 1862)
BOARDMAN, GRAY & CO. HAVE RE-
MOVED to No.728 Broadway. They call attention
to their pianos, with all their valuable improvements.
Second-hand pianos of their own manufacture for sale
and to rent.
(New York Times, May 22, 1862)

B

OARDMAN, GRAY & CO., BROADWAY

opposite the New-York Hotel. An assortment of their
unrivalled PIANOS on hand. Cottage and school pianos
for $125 and $150
(New York Times, Sept. 20, 1862)
BOARDMAN, GRAY & CO.'S NEW STYLE
Piano Fortes for two hundred and ten dollars, for
sale at No. 726 Broadway. Warranted perfect in every
particular.
(New York Times, Jan. 5, 1863)

B

OARDMAN, GRAY & CO.'S UNEQUALED

Piano-fortes, for sale at the Agency, No. 726 Broad-
way. A new supply just received. 6 1/2, 7 and 7 1/2 octave.
(New York Times, Apr. 25, 1863)

B

OARDMAN, GRAY & CO.'S PIANO-

Forte, with their sole Patent Iron Rim and Plate,
warranted perfect in every particular. For sale at the
depot, No. 748 Broadway.
(New York Times, June 25, 1864)

The BOARDMAN, GRAY & Co.

PIANO-FORTES,

WHOLESALE AGENCY.

  The subscriber, late a member of this well-
known firm, has established a

Wholesale Agency,

748 Broadway,

New York City

where he will be pleased to receive the orders of
his friends and the public, and especially to
hear from those who have so liberally bestowed
their patronage on the firm heretofore. He will
supply these superior instruments to the trade

Wholesale and Retail

At the Very Lowest Prices.

Made with the Insulated Iron Rim and Frame
(cast in one solid plate.) They excel all others
in durability, superiority of tone, and elegance
of external appearance.

Patent Insulated Iron Rim.

  The iron frame and rim (forming the upper
part of the case) is cast in one pieces - bringing
the strength where the strain is, giving a larger
music scale in the same size case, which is also
more ornamental in appearance. The strain of
the strings, being entirely on the Iron Rim, re-
lieves the sounding board and vibrating parts, as
the Iron Rim is insulated from contact with
them and they then give a perfect vibration.
The case is also made thin (similar to the sides
of a guitar or violin,) to which the sounding
board is fastened ; and the tone gushes forth
with a sweetness and melody peculiar to those
instruments, and with greater depth, power and
volume.
  These instruments are the only Pianos made
where the Iron Frame is entirely detached and
insulated from contact with the sounding board
and vibrating parts.

Especially Adapted to Warm or

Cold Climates,

As the extremes of heat or cold do not affect it
to its injury, or to put it out of tune. The
Strings, Iron Rim and Frame all being metalic,
they expand and contract alike, by heat and
cold, and as the strain of strings is so securely
held by the iron, they do not give way and come
to pieces in hot climates, as those made in the old way.
  Their great superiority is shown in comparing
them to the old way - made with wooden rims.
necessarily thick and held by large wooden
bracings and thick bottoms ; to retain the im-
mense strain of the strings, causing not only a
clumsy appearance but very heavy to handle.
And the case being of wood, and the strings of
metal are differently effected by changes in
temperature, &c.
  All these PIANOS have overstrung scales,
giving in connection with the patent Iron Rim
and Frame Full Round, Powerful, and Sweet
Mellow Tone. The cases are elegant in appear-
ance, and easily and safely handled.

Warranted to Prove Satisfactory, or the

Money Refunded.

Adress all orders to

SIBERIA OTT,

748 Broadway, N. Y.
(Rocky Mountain News [CO], Mar. 13, 1866)

BOARDMAN & GRAY,

PIANOFORTES,

748 BROADWAY.

(New York City Directory, 1867)

Bodstedt Henry F. piano fortes, 41st ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Boedicker John D. pianos,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Boedicker John D. pianos, r 84 E. 28th
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Boedicker John D. pianos, r 407 E. 24th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Boedecker John D. piano fortes, 407 E. 24th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

JOHN DANIEL BOEDICKER.

MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS OF OVERSTRUNG

PIANO-FORTES,

Rear 84 EAST TWENTY-EIGHTH STREET, near Lexington Avenue, New York.
Every Instrument warranted for five years.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Boilermann C. piano tuner, 904 3d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Bonneau Francis, pianos, 176 Centre,
Bonneau Francis jr. pianos 176 Centre,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bonneau Francis jr. actions, 176 Centre
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bonneau F. jr. & Bro. piano action makers, 176 Center
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Bornemann William F. pianos, 87 E. 22d
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bornemann William, pianos, 51 Crosby, h 4 First
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bothner Chales, pianos
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bothner George, pianomaker,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bothner Geo. pianos, 146 Elizabeth
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bothner George, piano action maker, 144 Elizabeth
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Bothner Gustav, pianomkr
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Botzenhardt Jacob, pianos, h 515 E. 11th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bowden, W. H., manu.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Bradbury Edward G., music, 413 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Bradbury, Edward G. pianos, 421 Broome,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bradbury, William B. Music, 16 E. 18th
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Bradbury William B. pianos, 421 Broome & 122 Wooster,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Bradbury W. I., 244 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Bradbury William B. pianos, 427 Broome, & 65 & 116 Elizabeth
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Bradbury, pianos, 427 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)

WM. B. BRADBURY'S

NEW PIANO-FORTE WAREROOMS,

  No. 427 Broome-st., corner of Crosby-st., New-York,
  The subscriber, having withdrawn his interest, stock
and materials from the late firm of LIGHTE & BRAD-
BURYS, (which firm was dissolved on the 24th of Janu-
ary,) and having purchased the entire stock of Piano-
Fortes and Piano-forte material owned by his brother
EDWARD G. BRADBURY, in the said firm, is now pre-
pared to supply the increased demand for his celebrated
Piano-Fortes.
  Employing the most skillful and experienced workmen,
and having a large stock of the best and most thoroughly
seasoned material, he is enabled to manufacture Piano-
Fortes of unequaled tone and durability.
  A fine assortment of elegant instruments now on hand
and for sale at No. 427 Broome-st., corner of Crosby-st.,
one block east of Broadway.
WM. B. BRADBURY.
(New York Times, Feb. 10, 1863)

WM. B. BRADBURY'S

FIRST-CLASS PIANO-FORTES.

427 Broome-st., corner of Crosby-st. -437.
  In withdrawing from the late partnership of Lighte
& Bradburys, and by the purchase of the interest of
one of the former partners, the subscriber has been en-
abled to secure a
SPLENDID STOCK
of elegant piano-fortes, of the most thorough workman-
ship, beautiful tone, elastic touch, and perfect finish in
all respects. These instruments he is now enabled to offer
to cash customers at a trifling advantage upon old trades, not-
withstanding every kind of piano-forte material has ad-
vance from 30 to 60 per cent. The profession and the
public are invited to examine. Every instrument FULLY
WARRANTED.WM. B. BRADBURY,
No. 427 Broome-st., corner of Crosby-st.,
one block east of Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, Feb. 25, 1863)
A CARD
WM. B. BRADBURY'S
PIANO-FORTE ESTABLISHMENT.

No. 527 Broome-st., corner Crosby-st., New York.
  The undersigned hereby announces to his patrons that,
with all his increased facilities, he has been unable fully
to meet the present unexpectedly large demand for his
Piano-fortes. He is now enlarging his factory to twice
its former size, and otherwise greatly increasing his man-
ufacturing facilities, by means of which he will soon be
in a position to meet promply all orders for his instru-
ments. Meanwhile, he begs his customers to be patient,
assuring them that their orders shall be filled with the
utmost possible dispatch, consistent with thorough and
perfect workmanship.
  Samples of his different styles may be seen, and the
TONE, for which they have become so celebrated,
heard, at hsi warerooms, No. 427 Broome-st., corner of
Crosby-st., one block east of Broadway. Professors,
amateurs, and all lovers of a good piano are cordially in-
vited to call and try them, with or without reference to
purchasing.WM. B. BRADBURY.
(New York Times, May 11, 1863)

BRADBURY'S NEW SCALE.

THE SUPERIORITY
of WM. B. BRADBURY'S NEW SCALE PIANO-
FORTES, everywhere acknowledged, has created a de-
mand for them unprecedented. To meet this demand he
has doubled his manufacturing facilities. Every depart-
ment of the business is under Mr. BRADBURY'S person-
al supervision. Every instrument fully warranted. Call
or send for a circular at No. 427 Broome-st., corner of
Crosby, one block east of Broadway, N. Y.
WM. B. BRADBURY
(New York Times, July 25, 1863)

B

RADBURY'S NEW SCALE PIANO-

FORTES. - Gottschalk, the renowned pianist and
composer, after a careful and thorough examination of
these instruments, says :
  "I have examined with great care Mr. Wm. B. Brad-
bury's new scale Piano-fortes, and it is my opinion that
they are very superior instruments. I have especially
remarked their thorough workmanship, and the power,
purity, richness and equality of their tone.
  NEW-YORK, July 12, 1863.L. M. GOTTSCHALK.
  Every instrument fully warranted.
WM. B. BRADBURY,
No. 437 Broome-st., corner of Crosby, New-York.
(New York Times, Sep. 25, 1863)

BRADBURY'S NEW SCALE PIANO-

FORTES!

  After thorough and repeated tests by Gottschalk, Ma-
son, Mills, Sanderson, Morgan, Heller, Timm, Patterson
and may others of the most competent judges, are pro-
nounced "superior in power, purity, richness and
quality of tone and thoroughness of workmanship." See
their letter in my last Circular.
  Seven first premiums, including two gold medals, were
received by Mr. Bradbury within four weeks, at the State
fairs, and at the American Institute of 1863 "For the best
piano-forte a gold medal!"
  Warerooms No. 437 Broome-st., one block east of Broad-
way.WM. B. BRADBURY.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1863)

WM. B. BRADBURY, No. 427 BROOME-ST.,

NEW SCALE PIANO-FORTES.
SEVEN FIRST PREMIUMS IN FOUR WEEKS!
(New York Times, Feb. 25, 1864)

WILLIAM B. BRADBURY'S

GOLD MEDAL

PIANO-FORTES.

Seven first premiums, including
TWO GOLD MEDALS, AND ONE SILVER MEDAL,
were awarded to Wm. B. Bradbury for the "BEST
PIANO-FORTE." The only GOLD MEDAL of the
American Institute of 1863 was awarded to WM. B.
BRADBURY, for the "BEST PIANO-FORTE."
  An assortment of these magnificent instrument at No.
427 Broome-st., one block east of Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1864)

B

RADBURY'S SUPERIOR PIANOS
"THE BEST," - Pronounced "the best" by the most
renowned artistes. Superior in tone, touch, power, du-
rability and elegance of finish. Warerooms Nos. 427 and
428 Broome-st., corner of Crosby. Call or send for cir-
cular.WM. B. BRADBURY.
(New York Times, Oct. 10, 1865)

SAXTON'S

ST. LOUIS PIANO WAREROOMS


WM. B. BRADBURY'S

New-Scale Piano-Fortes!

From $550 to $1000.


MASON & HAMLIN'S

CABINET ORGANS!

From $100 to $600


THE BEAUTIFUL

BOUDOIR PIANO!

MADE BY

JAMES W. VOSE,

From $375 to $500.


CHAMBERS & GABLER'S

Full Iron Frame, New-Scale, Over-Strung,

PIANO-FORTES!

From $400 to $800.


PIANOS!

MADE BY

NEW YORK PIANO-FORTE COMPANY,

From $490 to $700.



Every Instrument Warranted for FIVE YEARS.

NO CHARGE FOR BOXING AND SHIPPING.

SOLD AT FACTORY PRICES

BY

M. H. Saxton & Company

(Under Southern Hotel),

COR. FIFTH AND WALNUT STREETS,

SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI
(St. Louis Christian Advocate, Jan. 25, 1866)

THE BRADBURY

PIANO-FORTE

is now pronounced "THE BEST" by our first Artists, by
the American Institute of New-York, and by
many State Fairs.
  Besides these, THIRTY of the most eminent musicians
and pianists of the country have testified to the same.
The points of excellence cover the ENTIRE REQUIRE-
MENTS of a perfect Piano.
  Call or send for circulars with illustrations to.
WM. B. BRADBURY,
No. 427 Broome-st., N. Y.
(New York Times, June 16, 1866)

BRADBURY PIANOS.


Rev. BRADFORD K. PIERCE says : "We have had for more than three years in our home one of the 'Bradbury Pianos,' advertised in our paper by Mr. Freeborn Garretson Smith, its manufacturer. Its tone and touch are admirable, the former being full and sweet, and the latter grateful to the performer. It preserves its pitch and tune in a remarkable manner, and altogether is one of the best instruments that we have seen. It has more than fulfilled the promise of Mr. Smith when he sold it to use, at his office in New York. We heartily commend his announcements to such of our readers as are proposing to purchase a piano."
Dr. T. DEWITT TALMAGE : "Friend Smith is a Methodist, but his pianos are all orthodox : you ought to hear mine talk and sing. It is adapted to morning prayers of the gayest parties."
BISHOP AMES says : "My Bradbury Piano is found, after sever test and trial, to be equal to all you promised, and is in all respects, in richness of tone and singing qualities, everything that could be desired. Yours truly,

Baltimore, Md., Jan., 1874.E. R. AMES.

Dr. E. O. HAVEN says : "My Bradbury Piano continues to grow better every day, and myself and family more and more in love with it. It is the pet of our Household."
BISHOP SIMPSON says : "After a trial in his family for years, for beauty of finish and workmanship and for splendid quality of tone, our Bradbury Piano cannot be equaled."
The best manufactured ; warranted for six years. Pianos to let, and rent applied if purchased ; monthly installments received for the same. Old pianos taken in exchange : cash paid for the same. Second-hand pianos at great bargains, from $50 to $200. Pianos tuned and repaired.
Organs and Melodeons to Clergymen, Sabbath-schools and Churches, supplied at a liberal discount. Send for illustrated price list. When we will say something to please you.

FREEBORN GARRETSON SMITH

Late Supt. for and successor to WM. B. BRADBURY, No. 14 E. 14th Street, bet. Broadway and 5th Avenue, N.Y. Factory, corner Raymond and Willoughby Sts., Brooklyn.

(Our South American Cousins, 1878)

Brainard James, pianos, 69 E. 22d & ft. E. 24th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Brainard James, pianos, 143 E. 23d
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Brainard James, pianos, 219 E. 23d, h 336 Fourth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Brainard James, piano fortes, 219 E. 23d
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Brainard & Ogden, pianos, ft E. 24th
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Brainard & Ogden, 71, 73 and 75 East Twenty Second st. near Lexington avenue
(The Canada Directory, 1859)

BRAINARD'S

PIANO-FORTES.

Manufactory and Warerooms,

No. 143 EAST TWENTY-THIRD ST.,

Near Third Avenue,New York.
Every Instrument warranted for three years.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Brainard & Wing, pianos, 219 E. 23d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Brautigam Adam, pianos, 47 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Brautigam Adam, pianos, h 21 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Brautigam A. piano-fortes, 701 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)

A. Brautigam, Manufacturer and Dealer in Upright, Square and Grand Pianofortes, No. 8 East 17th Street. - The metropolis has always been the centre of the piano trade, and prominent among the leading establishments in this line is that of Mr. A. Brautigam, who for the past twenty years has carried on the manufacturing of pianofortes. "The Brautigam" is an instrument that has found its way into popular favor, and possesses many fine qualities which are lacking in other pianos. It is unrivalled for purity of tone, singing quality and rich, clear, resonant sound, and has found favor in the homes of our wealthiest families and a choice collection of these splendid instruments, in uprights, square and grands, are constantly on exhibition at the warerooms, No. 8 East 17th Street. Mr. Brautigam makes a specialty of renting pianos to responsible parties, and the business done is constantly increasing. Mr. Brautigam is a genial gentleman whose friends are legion. As a business man he is energetic, liberal and honorable in everything, and is a man with whom it is a pleasure to deal. He is highly esteemed in trade circles for the straightforward and well-balanced methods by which his business is conducted.

(New York's Great Industries, 1884)

A BRAUTIGAM, Manufacturer of and Dealer in Upright. Square, and Grand Piano Fortes. No. 8 East Seventeenth Street. The great advancement made of late years in musical culture has rendered the task of the piano manufacturer and dealer one demanding superior skill and enterprise. Prominent among the successful representatives of the piano trade in the metropolis is Mr. A Brautigam, who established this business in its present location thirty years ago, and from the very start has obtained a liberal and influential patronage. His upright, grand, and square pianos are unsurpassed for elegance of finish, beauty of design, purity of tone, evenness of action, and delicacy of touch, combined with great power and general excellence. Every possible improvement has been introduced into these instruments, which have no superiors in this country or Europe, while the prices quoted for them are extremely reasonable. These pianos are sold either for cash or on the instalment plan, or are rented to patrons at low rates Mr. Brautigam makes pianos to suit any style of furniture; all instruments are fully warranted, and those sold in the city or vicinity are kept in tune one year free of charge. Special attention is paid to repairing and tuning. Mr. Brautigam was born in Germany, but has resided in New York for the last forty years. Mr. Brautigam's upright, square, and grand pianos are sold at prices as low as can be named for first-class instruments.

(Illustrated New York, 1888)

A.

BRAUTIGAN, 701 BROADWAY, NEAR FOURTH
street, offers his first class square and upright Piano-
fortes at extremely low prices ; second hand Pianos, great
bargains, for cash. Pianos to let.
(New York Herald Dec. 29, 1869)

Brenner Joseph, pianos, h 783 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)

C. BREUSING.

DEPOT OF
ERARD'S GRAND PIANOS,
701 Broadway,
NEW YORK.
(New York City Directory, 1857)

Brock & Miller, 127 Worth [piano leg makers]
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Brown Henry A. pianos, 76 E. 9th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Brown Henry A. pianos, 420 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Brown Joseph, pianos, 13 Second
(New York City Directory, 1852)

J. Burns Brown, Successor to Charles J. Betts, Manufacturer of Piano-Fortes, No. 8 Union Square, Fourth Avenue. - The manufacture of pianos is one of the great industries of the United States, a leading representative in Fourth Avenue being Mr. J. Burns Brown. This house woriginally established in 1797, by Mr. Geib, at No. 11 Maiden Lane, and after various changes of location was eventually removed to its present eligible position. In 1860, Mr. Betts succeeded to the business, and in January, 1385, was succeeded by the present proprietor. The house enjoys a liberal and influential patronage, in consequence of the superiority of the instruments. Mr. Brown is a gentleman having a thorough knowledge of this branch of business in every department, and is well known for the general excellence of his square and upright pianos, which combine a sweetness and brilliancy of tone, with easy action. The premises occupied are commodious, and are stocked with an excellent assortment of Steinway's, Weber's, Chickering's, etc., in addition to pianos of his own manufacture. These instruments are made from well seasoned materials, and are always warranted. Pianos and organs are sold on the installment principle, or let, according to the wishes of customers. Mr. Brown also attends to tuning and repairing. He is a native of New York, and was formerly in partnership with Brambach, on East Seventeenth street. Mr. Brown learned the piano mansturing business in this house entering into its employ when a boy of fifteen years of age, and now, after eighteen years, he is sole proprietor. The popularity of the concern since Mr. Brown's assuming the entire control has steadily increased, the orders showing sensible addition ; and we may reason. ably assume that the trade will in the future largely expand under his judicious, and energetic management.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Brown & Perkins, pianos, 420 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Brown & Perkins, pianos. 76 E. 9th
(New York City Directory, 1869)

BROWN & PERKINS.

NO. 420 BROOME-ST., NEW-YORK.

&nbps; We invite those who are about purchasing to call and
examine our new scale pianos. We sell on monthly pay-
ments on liberal terms, so as to enable all to purchase.
A few fine second-hand pianos for sale.
(New York Times, June 9, 1866)

Browning Benjamin, builder, 124 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Browning Benjamin J. pianos, 124 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Browning John, builder, 124 Amity
Browning John G. pianos, 124 Amity
Browning B. & J. buildiers, 124 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Browning B. & J. pianos, 124 Amity
Brymer William, pianos, h 389 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Bunce Chas. pianos and music, 56 Court
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Bunce Chas..Publisher of Music and Dealer in Pianos, Melodeons, Cabinet Organs and Musical Merchandise of all kinds, 56 Court, St
(Brooklyn City Bus. Dir., 1873)

R

EMOVAL NOTICE. - THE SUBSCRIBER

having removed his stock of PIANO-FORTES from the
old stand, 94 Fulton st. to 27 Court st, would call the attention of
purchasers to his large assortment of new and second-hand pi-
ano-fortes, which will be sold at reasonable prices.
All second-hand Pianos sold will be put in perfect order be
fore delivery.
  Piano-Fortes and Melodeons to rent by the month.
  Tuning and repairing promptly attended to.
CHAS. BUNCE, Piano-Forte Manufacturer
Ware Rooms, 27 Court-st., Marble Building
(Brooklyn Eagle, 20.08.1857)

THE PIANO CASE. - The case of Mr. J. B. Wheaton, a music teacher, who was arrested last week on a complaint of Charles Bunce, who charged him with having stolen a piano worth $150, was called up before Justice Boerum yesterday afternoon, when the complaintant failed to appear, and the accused was discharged.

(Police Courts, Brooklyn Eagle, 21.06.1862)

Burkard Philip, pianos, h 873 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Burnett & Co. manu. 361 Broadway.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Busch Peter G. pianos, h 118 W. 17th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Buttikofer John, pianomaker, 102 Elm,
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Buttikofer John, pianos, 444 Broome,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Buttikofer John, pianos, 52 E. 13th, h Vt.
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Buttikofer John, pianos, 52 E. 13th, h West Farms
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Buttikofer John, piano fortes, 52 E. 13th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J. BUTTIKOFER,

Manufacturer of

Grand, Upright, Oblique and Square Pianos,

(The Grands with the "Erard Action,")

52 EAST 13th STREET, BET. BROADWAY & UNIVERSITY PLACE, N. Y.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Cable Robert, piano fortes, 470 8th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)

T

HE CALENBERG & CO.

  OVERSTRUNG GRAND AND SQUARE PIANOS.

Are now considered as the best manufactured, and highly
recommended by the most celebrated artists and judges in
this country, warranted for five years.
  The public are respectfully invited to call and examine
these truly Wonderful Instruments. They cannot fail to
please and astonish all who consider themselves judges of
Piano Fortes.

SAWYER & THOMPSON,

SOLE AGENTS FOR LONG ISLAND,

Warerooms No. 59 Fulton avenue, cor. Jay.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 22.05.1862)

Calenberg Henry S. pianos, 333 W. 36th, h New Rochelle
Calenberg, Vaupel & Co. pianos, 333 W. 36th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Calenberg & Vaupel, sales, $57,387
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Calenberg & Vaupel, pianos, 333 and 335 W. 36th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Calenberg, Vaupel & Co., Manuf'rs of Piano Fortes, &c., 333, 335 W. 36th st.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)

C

ALENBERG & VAUPEL'S

NEWLY IMPROVED
Overstrung Grand and Square PIANOS, are now con-
sidered by the best judges as superior to any other made
in this country. Warranted for five years.
  Warerooms No. 101 Bleecker-st., corner of Greene-st.,
second block west of Broadway.
(New York Times, July 10, 1863)

CALENBERG & VAUPEL,

  Manufacturers of OVERSTRUNG GRAND AND
SQUARE PIANO-FORTES. The very best and cheapest
now in the market. Warranted in writing for five years.
Please send for a circular.
Warerooms Nos. 99 and 101 Bleecker-st.,
Seocnd block west of Broadway.
(New York Times, Apr. 11, 1864)

THE CALENBERG & VAUPEL PIANOS.

  "They are unsurpassed for volume and sweetness of
tone, elasticity of touch and durability ; they are perfect
and superior to any others made in this country, &c.,
&c." - Testimonial of the most celebrated artists. War-
ranted for six years. Warerooms Nos. 99 and 101 Bleeck-
er-st., two blocks west of Broadway.
(New York Times, June 25, 1864)

HOLIDAY PRESENTS ! !

THE CALENBERG & VAUPEL NEW SCALE

PIANOFORTES,

Unsurpassed for volume and quality of tone, as well as

EXTERIOR FINISH.

  We are new prepared to meet all orders for Holiday
Presents in this line, from the all plain, yet 7-octave
Piano up to those of the richest finish. Prices moderate
and unlimited warrantee given for six years.
Warerooms, Nos. 99 and 101 Bleecker-st.,
Corner Greene-st.
(New York Times, Jan. 2, 1865)

CALENBERG & VAUPEL,

MANUFACTURERS OF

GRAND AND SQUARE

AGRAFFE

PIANO-FORTES,

Recommended by all the LEADING

ARTISTS IN THE COUNTRY.

Warerooms,

101 BLEECKER STREET,

  2D BLOCK WEST OF BROADWAY.
WARRANTED FULLY FOR SIX YEARS.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Calenberg & Vaupel, Sole Manufacturers of the Bijou and Separable Upright Pianos, Manufactory and Warerooms, Nos. 333 and 335 West 36th Street. The firm of Calenberg & Vaupel has been closely identified with the manufacture and sale of the best class of grand, square and upright pianos known to the trade, since their establishment in 1858. They manufacture their pianos in their own beautiful 4-story building, 38x100 feet in area,the lot being 75x100, with dry basement and cellar, which gives them abundance of light on all four sides of their factory, and also perfect ventilation. In the cellar is situated the dry room, in which the lumber used in the manufacture of the pianos, is placed, and by that means always have well seasoned material on hand for use. On the first, or street floor, are the commodious warerooms, office and shipping room. The second floor is devoted to the finishing and regulating of tone and action, the fly finishing, etc. ; the third floor as casemaking department, and the fourth floor for varnishing and polishing cases. The manufacturing department is under the able management of the senior partner, who is ably assisted by Mr. Vaupel in the office and salesrooms, and also a number of foremen of acknowledged ability and integrity, being subordinates in their respective departments. Special rates are offered by the firm to the clergy, professionals, teachers, and parties forming a club of three or more. Among the prominent persons who unite in recommending their pianos, we notice the names of Prof. Justin Juch, Miss Emma Juch, Prof. I. G. Widmann, Prof. Doehring, Prof. W. Kaepplinger, Prof. Braun, Profs. Kanski, Huehue and Becker ; also Carl Aushutz, Antonio Barilli, T. D. Sullivan, New York Catholic Protectory, Prof. Elie Charlier, "Charlier Institute," and various others. Mr. H. S. Calenberg is a native of Germany, who came to this country some 35 years ago, and is a resident of New Rochelle, N.Y. - Mr. A. Vaupel was also born in Germany, and resides in New York City.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Callaway Thomas C. tuner pianos, 59 Av. 3
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Callaway Thomas C. 51 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Calm & Blath, piano matls, 127 Third av.
Campbell John, pianos, h 600 E. 11th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Campton Richard, pianos, 127 Java, E. D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Candidus Wm. pianos, 46 Bleecker, h 213 E. 52d
(New York City Directory, 1869)

W. CANDIDUS,

PIANO-FORTE WAREROOMS,

No. 46 Bleecker Street, New York.

NEW AND SECOND-HAND PIANOS FOR SALE AND TO LET.
Pianos Tuned and Repaired.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Carr Charles, pianomaker, r. 148 Wooster
(New York City Directory, 1852)

PIANOS FOR SALE. - At the lowest manufacturing

prices ; for brilliancy of tone and finish unsurpassed,
and warranted in every respect. Purchasers would do well
to call and examine, at the Factory, No. 148 Wooster st.,
near Houston.CHAS CARR.
(New York Daily Times, Dec. 15, 1852)

Central Piano Forte Co. 51 Crosby
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Central Piano Company, sales, $44,000
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Central Piano Forte Co. 51 Crosby
(New York State Directory, 1870)

Central Piano-Forte Co.,

Manufacturers of FIRST CLASS

PIANO-FORTES,

Manufactory and Warerooms,

87 East 22d Street,

Between Lexington and Third Aves., NEW YORK
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Chambers Maynard M. pianos, 99 Fourth av. & 219 Sixth, h 151 E. 18th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Chambers Maynard M. pianos, 221 6th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Chambers Samuel J. pianos, h 151 E. 18th
(New York City Directory, 1869)

P

IANOS! PIANOS! PIANOS! - A VERY

fine stock at very low prices. Call and examine,
S. J. CHAMBERS, No. 739 Bowery, opposite Astor-
Place.
(New York Times, Dec. 11, 1864)

C

OTTAGE SQUARE PIANOS. - A FINE AS-

sortment of our unrivaled pianos, warranted in all
respects, without regard to time, at lower prices than any
other first-class house. S. J CHAMBERS, 739 B'way
(New York Times, Jan. 12, 1865)

P

IANOS. - FIRST-CLASS PIANOS SELLING AT

$300, $350 and $375, which I guarantee cannot be
bought less than $400 or $500 elsewhere. Guarantees un-
limited. Old ones taken in exchange. S. J. CHAM-
BERS, No. 739 Broadway
(New York Times, Mar. 11, 1865)
S. J. CHAMBERS' FIRST-CLASS PIANOS
- Warranted in every respect.
No. 739 Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, Aug. 20, 1865)

Chambers Thomas H. music 285 Broadway
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Chambers Thos. H. pianos, 385 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Chambers T. H. 8 Bible b.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Chambers Thomas 50, piano forte m. N. Y.
(Federal Census, 1860)
Chambers Thomas H. & Son, pianos, 99 Fourth av. & 219 Sixth, h 151 E. 18th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Chambers Thomas H. pianos, 8 Bible,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Chambers Thomas H. & Son, pianos, 101 4th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Chambers Thos. 60 Piano Forte Manf. New York
(Federal Census, 1870)
Chambers' Piano Factory, 306 Fourth av.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Chambers Thomas H. 72, pianoforte manufacturer, New York
(Federal Census, 1880)

THOMAS H. CHAMBERS.

(Formerly Conductor to Dubois & Stodart,)

PIANO FORTE MANUFACTURER,

No. 385 BROADWAY, NEW-YORK.

N.B. - All Piano Fortes sold at this Establishment are warranted to stand the
action of any climate.
(New York Past, Present and Future, 1849)

T.

H. CHAMBERS, (FORMERLY DUBOIS &
Stodart and Dubois, Bacon & Chambers, Piano
Manufacturer, Bible House, corner of 8th-st and 4th-
av., opposite the Cooper Institute.
(New York Times, Feb. 18, 1860)
IMPROVED OVERSTRUNG, IRON FRAME, PIANOS.
  An elegant overstrung, iron frame, 7-octave, carved
Piano $185.
  One elegant overstrung, iron frame, double round
Piano $300.
  Second-hand Pianos, in good repair, at $75, $85, $95,
$100, $110, $125, $135, 150 and $175.
  Pianos hired. Allowances on hire if purchased.
(New York Times, Apr. 3, 1860)

1828

T. H. CHAMBERS' PIANOS.

1860

  Justly celebrated for their intrinsic merits and ex-
cellence.
WAREROOMS IN THE BIBLE HOUSE,
Corner of 8th-st., and 4th-av.
  N. B. - Send for a circular with description of styles,
prices, and list of references.
(New York Times, May 1, 1860)

THOMAS H. CHAMBERS,

PIANOS AND MELODEONS FROM $40 TO $400.
Corner of 8th-st. and 4th-av., in the Bible House.
PIANOS TO RENT.
(New York Times, Nov. 24, 1860)

P

IANOS AT WAR PRICES. - SQUARE PI-

anos. $60, $75, $85, $130, $150, $200, &c. Upright
boudoir or cottage pianos for sale or to rent, by T. H.
CHAMBERS, in the Bible House, 8th-st., corner of 4th-av.
(New York Times, Mar. 8, 1862)

C

HAMBERS' COTTAGE PIANOS, SQUARES

and uprights, at lower prices than any other first-
class house. Manufactory, East 28th-st., warerooms in
the Bible House, 8th-st., corner of 4th-av.
(New York Times, Apr. 10, 1863)

P

IANOS FOR THE HOLIDAYS. - SQUARES

and upright pianos, the best instruments, with all
the recent improvements, at lower prices than any first-
class manufacturer, by T. H. CHAMBERS, Bible-house,
8th-st., corner 4th-av.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1863)

C

HAMBERS' COTTAGE OR CABINET

Pianos and new scale square pianos, excellent in
tone and quality ; moderate in price ; lower than any
other first-class house. 8th-st., corner 4th-av., in the
Bible House.T. H. CHAMBERS.
(New York Times, June 25, 1864)

H

OLIDAY GIFT PIANOS ELEGANTLY

finished in superb rosewood cases, for sale at
moderate prices, by
T. H. CHAMBERS, 8th-st.,
Corner of 4th-av., in the Bible House.
(New York Times, Dec. 10, 1865)

A

T CHAMBERS' 8TH ST., CORNER 4TH-AV.

- Elegant upright "Boudoir" Pianos in fine rose-
wood cases at moderate prices. Also a variety of su-
perbly finished square pianos at lower prices than any
other first class house.
T. H. CHAMBERS, Bible House, New-York
(New York Times, Dec. 28, 1865)

T

HOS. H. CHAMBERS' UPRIGHT AND

square pianos, wholesale and retail, and to rent,
with the privilege to buy. 5th-st., corner of 4th-av., in
the Bible House. Send for a circular.
(New York Times, Mar. 16, 1866)

B

ARGAINS - PIANO PURCHASERS ARE IN-

vited to call at our FACTORY, No. 14 6th-st, near
the Bowery, or at our warerooms in the Bible-House, 8th-st., corner of 4th-av.
THOMAS H. CHAMBERS & SON, No. 14, 6th-st.
(New York Times, July 5, 1866)

C

HAMBERS & SON'S "ECLECTIC PIANOS"

combine every improvement of intrinsic value, are
excellent in quality, moderate in price. Factory, No. 14
6th-st. Warerooms 6th st. corner of 4th av.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1866)

T. H. CHAMBERS & SON INVITE

Piano dealers and professos to examine their
IMPROVED NEW-SCALE PIANOS just finished
which combine all the essential attributes of a perfect
Piano, constituting the "CHAMBERS" PIANO the
best now manufactured. Factory No. 14 6th-st. ; Ware-
rooms 8th-st., corner of 4th-av.
(New York Times, Jan. 4, 1868)

"C

HAMBERS'" PIANOS - PRICES REDUCED THIS
week. - CHAMBERS & SON (formerly Dubois, Bacon
& Chambers - Seven octaves $200, $225, $250, $275, $300
$325, $350; A $900 Piano at $450 ; an Organ Piano $200, No.
99 Fourth avenue
(New York Herald Dec. 29, 1869)

SPECIAL PIANO BARGAINS :
OFFERED BY
CHAMBERS & SON, 101 4TH AV.

Some excellent square and upright pianos in from
hire as good as new, and all the better for use, at $200,
$225, $250, $275, $300, &c. A superb $1,000 upright
grand for $850. Some rose-wood squares made by
Bradbury, Stodart, Worcester, Bacon & Raven, &c.
$200, $175, $125, $100. A rose-wood seven-octave, carved
with stool, for sale at a special low figure, on account
of owner leaving the City. A French rose-wood up-
right $175
(New York Times, July 10, 1872)

CHAMBERS & GABLER'S

Piano-fortes at lower prices than any other first-class
manufacturer.
CHAMBERS & GABLER,
Bible House, 8th-st., corner of 4th av.
(New York Times, Aug. 24, 1863)

M

ONITOR PIANOS - IN SIZE, CONVENIENT ;

in tone, powerful and melodious. Piano buyers are
invited to call and examine Chambers & Gabler's Pianos -
the best and cheapest made. Warerooms 8th-st., corner
4th-av., in the Bible House.
(New York Times, Feb. 25, 1864)

C

HAMBERS & GABLER'S COTTAGE

squares and grand squares, also cottage upright pi-
anos, equal in tone and quality to any other first-class
pianos, are sold at more moderate prices. Warerooms
8th-st., corner of 4th-av., in the Bible House.
(New York Times, June 24, 1864)

G

RAND SQUARE AND COTTAGE SQUARE

Pianos, and Upright or Cabinet Pianos, excellent in
quality, moderate in price, by CHAMBERS & GABLER,
8th-st., corner of 4th.-av., in the Bible House. Please
send for a circular.
(New York Times, Oct. 26, 1864)

C

ARD. - TO PIANO DEALERS AND PURCHA-

SERS - You are invited to call on or adress CHAM-
BERS & GABLER, who have removed to their new
Piano Factory, No. 14 6th-st., New-York.
(New York Times, Mar. 11, 1865)

TO PIANO DEALERS AND PURCHAS-

ERS.

Superior instruments and advantages are offered by
CHAMBERS & GABLER, No. 14 6th-st.
(New York Times, Oct. 10, 1865)

C

HAMBERS & GABLER, NO. 14 6TH.

ST., are manufacturing a NEW UPRIGHT PIANO ;
also Square Pianos, to which they invite the special at-
tention of DEALERS. Send for a circular.
(New York Times, Mar. 15, 1866)

CHAMBERS & GABLER,

Manufacturers of

Full Iron Frame, New-Scale, Overstrung,

Piano-Fortes,

No. 14 SIXTH STREET, NEW YORK.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Chandler & Brothers, pianos, 170 Montague (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Chandler Bros., Chickering & Son's Pianos, Grand, Square and Upright, 172 Montague St
(Brooklyn City Bus. Dir., 1873)
Chesnut Benjamin, pianoforte, 25 Forsyth
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Chickering & Sons, pianos, 694 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Chickering Charles F. 30, piano forte maker, 10,000, 5,000 Massachusetts
(Federal Census, 1860)
Chickering Charles F. pianos, 11 E. 14th, h 47 W. 14th
Chickering George H. pianos, 11 E. 14th, h Mass.
Chickering Thomas E. pianos, 11 E. 14th, h Mass.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Chickering & Sons, Boston, real est 4,000
(Boyd's New York City Tax Book, 1857)
Chickering & Sons, pianos, 11 E. l4th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Chickering & Sons, 11 East Fourteenth street
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Chickering & Sons, 11 E. Fourteenth st.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Choplain A. 175 Prince
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Clark Cornelius E. pianos, 171 E. 24th
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Clark John piano-m 137 Broadw.
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Clark John, pianos, 257 Broadway,
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Clark Robert W. 56, piano mftr, England
(Federal Census, 1880)
Collins Wm, "Oct 31st 1856|No. 2173|NY
(Wm. Hall & Sons 2173)
Compton William, 103 E. 40th
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Condit William, 169 Centre [piano forte hardware]
Conover James, pianos, 219 E. 23d,
(New York City Directory, 1869)
COOK, Sebastian, piano forte maker, 3 Prospect
(Brooklyn Directory, 1840)

RECEIVER'S SALE OF PIANO-FORTES.

BY ORDER OF HON. JUDGE LEONARD, OF THE
SUPREME COURT.
  A large assortment of 7-octave pianos, in plain and
carved cases, single and double round corners, carved
and octagon legs, pearl and ivory keys, plain, carved,
and serpentine mouldings, pearl inlaid with landscapes,
fruits, &c. These pianos are of the first-class, in tone
and finish are second to none, and will be sold at an im-
mense sacrifice for the benefit of the creditors of the late
firm of Cooper & Atherton. Can be seen at the Piano-forte
warerooms of McDonald & Co., No. 384 Bowery, near
4th-st. Terms cash.JOHN McDONALD, Receiver.
New-York, Aug. 20, 1860.

NOTICE.
  All persons having claims against the late firm of
Cooper & Atherton, piano-forte manufacturers of this
City, are hereby notified to present them to the under-
signed at no. 386 Bowery.
JOHN McDONALD, Receiver,
New-York, Aug. 20, 1860.
(New York Times, Aug. 23, 1860)

Costello John, pianos,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Costello John, piano strings, n. 207 E. 22d
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Covell & Co. gas fixtures, French china and cut glass, clocks, bronzes and fancy goods, warerooms of the patent Arion Piano Forte, 554 B'way & 92 Crosby
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Cox John F. agent Lighte & Co.'s Pianos, 985 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)

BOSTON PIANO FORTES. -

Just received from Boston, some new
and splendid Piano Fortes, from Wil-
kins & Newhall, Hallet, Davis & Co., Parkhurst
& Co., Lord & Cumston, and all the princial ma-
nufactories in the city. The instruments from Wil-
kins & Newhall are of the same class of those for
which they received the Gold Medal at the recent
Fair in Boston, and are superior instruments, both
in tone and finish. The subscriber would also call
the attention of the public to the new patent Harp
attached to Hallet, Davis & Co.'s Pianos. Persons
desirous of purchasing, are invited to call and exa-
mine, between the hours of 4 and 6 P. M., at the
Classical Hall, (opp. the Lyceum,) Washington st.
J. L. CUMMINGS.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 18.09.1844)

Cummings & Canfield, 637 B'way & 156 E. 21st
(New York City Directory, 1859)

PIANOS. PIANOS. PIANOS.
CHEAP. CHEAP. CHEAP.
CUMMINGS & CANFIELD, manufacturers of the
American Improved Piano Forte, have on hand a fine as-
sortment of their pianos, for sale wholesale and retail, at
prices cheaper than ever for chas, at their Broadway
manufactory, No. 637, near Bleecker st., and also at
their warerooms, No. 419 Broadway. CHAS. E. ATH-
ERTON, Agent. If you want a piano, call at either of
the above places, and you are sure to purchase.
(New York Times, Sep. 11, 1858)

CUMMINGS & JENNYS,

PIANO FORTE MANUFACTURERS.
Nos. 156 and 158 East 21st-st., New-York.
(New York Times, Oct. 26, 1864)

CUMMINGS & JENNY'S,

MANUFACTURERS

OF

GRAND AND SQUARE

PIANO-FORTES.

No. 726 Broadway, New-York.
  In these instruments are to be found the embodiments
of those great qualities, volume, richness, purity and
sonority of tone, which have so often met with the high-
est commendations of the leading artists throughout the
country, and yet, they are offered to the public at prices,
from 20 to 30 per cent. lower than any other of equal quality.
  Every instrument warranted for five years.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1864)

CUMMINGS & JENNYS,

manufacturers of Grand and Square Piano-fortes, No.
726 Broadway, New-York. These superior instruments
are now offered to the public at greatly reduced prices.
Each instrument warranted for five years. Four sec-
ond hand pianos for sale at bargains.
(New York Times, Mar. 11, 1865)

C

UMMINGS & JENNYS, PIANO-FORTE

MANUFACTURERS, NO. 726 BROADWAY, NEW-
YORK. - These manufacturers are now offering their el-
egant instruments to the public, in every variety, at
greatly reduced prices. Each instrument fully warranted
for five years.
(New York Times, May 27, 1865)
CUMMINGS & JENNYS, NO. 726 BROAD-
WAY, New-York, are now offering their instruments
at largely reduced prices. A superior seven-octave sec-
ond hand piano for sale at a bargin
(New York Times, Aug. 20, 1865)

P

IANO-FORTES AT GREAT BARGAINS,

by CUMMINGS & JENNYS, No. 726 Broadway, New-
York. An elegant second-hand piano for sale cheap.
(New York Times, Nov. 10, 1865)

P

IANO-FORTES FOR HOLIDAY GIFTS,

elegantly finished in every style, at prices from $100
to $150 lower than any other in the city - possessing
equal merit. A superior seven-octave second-hand piano
for sale low ; has every improvement. CUMMINGS &
JENNYS, No. 726 Broadway
(New York Times, Dec. 13, 1865)

P

IANO-FORTES OF EVERY STYLE.

great reduction in prices; examine four yourselves
[our?] instrument warranted for five years. 3 second-
hand pianos.CUMMINGS & JENNYS,
No. [] Broadway
(New York Times, Jan. 10, 1866)

P

IANOS - AT LARGELY REDUCED PRICES -

warranted five years ; for tone, elegance of finish and
durability, are unsurpassed. Several second-hand pianos
at bargains.CUMMINGS & JENNYS, No. 726 Broad-
way
(New York Times, Mar. 15, 1866)

Cummings Lawrence P. pianos, 8 Union pl. h 306 E. 21st
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Curtiss Nathan P. B. pianofortes, 423 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Curtiss Nathan P. B. pianos, 487 B'way,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Curtiss Nathan P. B. pianos, 747 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Curtiss N. P. B. piano fortes, 743 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)

N. P. B. CURTISS,

PIANO-FORTE WAREROOMS,

No. 743 Broadway.

  Sole agent for ERNEST GABLER'S Piano-
fortes. Pianos and Melodeons to Let, Tuned,
etc.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Cushing Jas. W. pianos, 423 Broome, h 42 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Davies J. G. 6 Astor pl.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Davies Julian G. & Co. pianos, 95 Prince, h 271 W. 11th.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Davis Jesse J. pianoactionmaker, Fifth c. Lewis
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Davis Jesse J. pianos, 212 Sixth,
Davis Jesse J. 21 Sixth [piano action makers]
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Davis Jesse J. piano action maker, 703 6th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Decker David, pianos, 330 W. 35th, h 304 W. 14th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Decker Edington B. pianotuner, W. 30th c. Av. 9
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Decker Edington B. pianos, 62 Bleecker
Decker Horace B. pianos, 62 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Decker John J. pianos, 135 Grand & 149 Baxter,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Decker John J. pianos, 330 W. 35th, h 240 Spring
Decker Marcus A. pianos, 62 Bleecker
Decker Myron A. pianos, 127 Third av. 310 E. 14th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Decker Brothers, 256 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Decker Brothers, pianos, 33 Union pl. & 322 W. 35th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Decker Brothers, sales, $118,000
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Decker Brothers, pianos, 33 Union Square
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Decker Brothers, 33 Union square
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Decker Brothers, 33 Union sq.
(New York as it was, 1876)

D

ECKER BROTHERS,

PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS,

No. 91 Bleecker-st., (marble building, one block West of
Broadway,) invite attention to their new
PATENT PLATE PIANOFORTES,
of which the New-York Tribune, April 23, 1864, said :
"One of the simplest and most truly valuable improve-
ments yet made in the pianoforte is that invented and
patented by Decker Brothers."
WARRANTED FOR SEVEN YEARS.
(New York Times, Jan 1, 1865)
  Pronounced by our most eminent musicians the BEST
PIANO MADE. Call and examine

DECKER & CO.

NEW SCALE IVORY AGRAFFE BAR

PIANO FORTES.

NO. 419 BROOME-ST.,

  The above piano we warrant for the term of seven
years.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1866)

DECKER BROTHERS,

PIANO-FORTES,


Wareroom and Factory,

One Block West of Broadway,

NEW YORK.

  IMPROVEMENT IN PIANO-FORTES. - One of the simplest and most truly valuable improvements yet
made in the Piano-Forte is that invented and patented by Decker Brothers, No. 91 Bleecker Street. -
New York Tribune, April 23, 1864.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)


DECKER BROS' PIANO MANUFACTORY [Seneca Falls]

(State of New York, 1882)

Decker & Brother, pianos, 62 Bleecker
(New York City Directory, 1869)

A

FINE ASSORTMENT OF PIANOS AT BARGAINS,
for cash, at 82 Bleecker street, one block east of Broad-
way. Call and be satisfied.DECKER & BROTHER.
(New York Herald, March 15, 1870)

Decker & Barns, pianos, 129 3d ave
Degray James, pianos, 37 Union Square
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Dehoog Peter, pianomanufacturer and tuner of pianos with the aeolian, 90 Thompson, h. 92 Thompson
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Dehoog Peter, 697 1/2 Sixth av.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Dekuhn Anthony, pianos, 10 Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Dekuhn A. pianos, 10 2d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)

F. Denninger, Piano Forte Case Factory, Nos. 653 and 6 East 156th Street. - At Nos. 653 and 655 East street, will be found the manufactory of Mr. Deninger, an establishment built and conducted for the purpose of manufacturing piano cases. The proprietor, is a native of Germany, who came to the United States in 1867, and commenced his present venture in 1878. He employs about thirty men steadily, has a capital of $12,000 invested, and his aggregate trade amounts to $30,000 per annum. His building has a capacity of 36x100 feet, the motive power for driving machinery being an engine of forty-five horse-power.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Descombes L. J. importer, 156 Broadway
Descombes Louis I. 766 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)

Chas. B. Dickinson & Co., Manufacturers of the "American Piano," No. 48 University Place. - The impetus given to musical taste throughout Europe and America is unquestionably due to the pianoforte, the manufacture of which has been happily facilitated in a wonderful degree by the application of steam power. For the present generation the piano has become an absolute necessity, a costant source of pleasure, a powerful means for the development and acquisition of the musical art. Our children are now taught their letters and notes simultaneously, and for a young man or girl of the present day to be found deficient in the rudiments of music is thought to be almost as reprehensible as an ignorance of the common rules of arithmetic. A prominent house engages in the manufacture of grand, square and upright pianos is that of Messrs. Dickinson & Co., No. 48 University Place, which was originally established in 1859. After several changes, on the death of Mr. S. T. Dickinson the present proprietor, Mr. Chas. B. Dickinson, succeeded to the business, and has associated with him a special partner. Ever since the foundation of the house the firm of Dickinson & Co. have derived the greatest satisfacton from the reputation voluntarily accorded them by the professional and amateur world, of manufacturing all their pianofortes of equal merit and excellence, and maintaining the highest standard in the production of these famous instruments. The specialty of this house is the "American Piano," which for quality of tone, lightness of touch and beauty of finish is unsurpassed by any similar instrument of any contemporary concerm, and by careful attention to details and the employment of skilful artisans, combined with proprly seasoned materials, Dickinson & Co. are enabled confidently to warrant every instrument leaving the factory for a term of six years. The firm is unable to compete with the cheap trash with which the market is flooded, and which are dear at half the price they sell at. Many a purchaser of these "cheap John" pianos has found when keys begin to rattle, key-board to give and asthmatic tones to proceed from his instrument, that it would have been much better and cheaper to thave paid a little more and obtained a substantial and lifetime pianoforte. Music is the universal language of the human race, the one tongue that was not confused in the confusion of tongues at the Tower of Babel, and is nature's own vocabulary of passion, joy, sorrow, hope and love. There is no economy in placing in the parlor for the education of the family an instrument that is false in its interpretation of music, and which in the end must subvert and destroy the taste for harmony which it was intended to elevate and establish. The pianos of Dickinson & Co. are known and admired in musical circles all over this vast country, from Canada to Texas, and from Maine to California, and also in some of the fashionable and brilliant saloons of Paris and London. We can conscientiously commend Dickinson & Co.'s pianos to those interested, being assured that they are equal if not superior to any in the market. In power and quality of tone, delicacy of touch, perfection of mechanism, durability and general excellence, these instruments are not excelled, if rarely equalled, and they combine all these rare and grand qualities which constitute a really fine piano. The firm offer specially liberal terms to purchasers, and those having dealings with this house will derive both satisfaction and profit.

(New York's Leading Industries, 1884)

DICKSON,John, piano forte maker, High n Jay
(Brooklyn Directory, 1840)
Diehl Gustav, pianos, 243 E. 23d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Dielman & Funck, piano cases, 517 W. 19th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

DIETRICH & STAIB,

Manufacturers of

PIANO-FORTE ACTION,

112 & 114 WOOSTER STREET,

NEW YORK
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

DIETRICHSEN, LUDEWIG & STROTHOFF,

Manufacturers of

FIRST-CLASS PIANO-FORTES,

33 WEST 13th STREET,

N. B. Piano-Fortes of our manufacture are warranted for five years.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Dingle John W. pianos, 6 Marion, h 183 Grand
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Dingle John W. & Co. pianos, 218 Thompson
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J. W. DINGLE,

Manufacturer of

IMPROVED PIANO-FORTES,

Corner Christopher and Fourth Sts.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Dippel Christian, pianos, 94 Clinton, h 225 E. 46th
Dippel, Wihler & Schmidt, pianos, 94 Clinton
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Dippel, Wihler & Schmidt, piano actions, 94 Clinton
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Doane Richard, pianos, 423 Broome, h 230 Henry
Doane, Cushing & Smith, pianos, 423 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Doane, Wing & Bushing, pianos, 423 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Dodd M. W. [publisher and bookseller] 506 Broadway
(American Congregational Year-Book, 1858)
Doellner, John F. piano actions and hammers, 14 Amity pl. h 232 E. 9th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Doeliner John F. piano actions, 232 E. 9th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J. F. DOELLNER,

Manufacturer of

Piano-Forte Hammers,

And Importer of
FELT, CLOTH, BUCKSKIN ; ALSO PIANO-
FORTE HARDWARE,
No. 203 NINTH STREET,
Bet. 2d & 3d Aves.NEW YORK
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Dolge Alfred, piano forte materials, 16 Amity
(New York State Directory, 1870)

ALFRED DOLGE, manufacturer, one of the most remarkable men for whom America is indebted to the mother land of Germany, was born in Chemnitz in that country, Dec. 22, 1848. His father, August, was one of the leaders of the Revolution of 1848-49, and the honor of being twice tried by court martial was accorded to him. Twice he was sentenced to death, but the penalty of his courageous efforts for liberty was afterward changed to imprisonment for fifteen years.
Alfred attended the public schools of Leipzig during his boyhood, and then learned the trade of piano making in his father's factory, an art requiring the highest mechanical skill. Attracted to America by the greater liberty and more promising opportunities of the new world, he landed at Castle Garden on the 9th of September in 1866. A strongly built, capable and practical youth, he accepted the first employment which offered, and found work on a farm in Wisconsin for one season. Returning then to the East, he spent two and a half years at his trade of piano making. With $500, which he had earned by diligent labor at the bench and saved by careful economy, Mr. Dolge began, in July, 1869, the importation of piano materials from Europe. The felts employed by piano makers in this country were at that time purchased abroad, but Mr. Dolge believed that they could be, and should be, made in America. To believe is, with a nature as energetic as his, to act. In 1871, therefore, Mr. Dolge began the manufacture of piano felts, in Brooklyn, and thus became the actual pioneer of this valuable industry in the United States. In 1874, he moved the works to Dolgeville, in Herkimer county, N.Y. In this beautiful town, a large factory has gradually come into existence through his persistent energy; and at these works Mr. Dolge has also developed the most highly approved felt machinery known to the whole industry. Departments for making the different parts of pianos have been added to the factory, one after another, until Mr. Dolge is now the proprietor of the most complete, the largest and most highly developed piano material manufactory in the world. Employment is given to a large force of skillful operatives; and probably no where in the United States can there be found a finer group of working people than those to whom Mr. Dolge has been both an employer and benefactor. His enterprise has finally put an end to the importation of piano materials from Europe, and rendered America entirely independent of every other land for its supply of these articles. If it be added that the performance of public services of great utility has brought Mr. Dolge a fortune, it must be said on the other hand that he has bestowed far greater benefits than he has received.
But to say that he is a successful manufacturer, by no means sums up the remarkable career of Alfred Dolge. The village of Dolgeville, founded by him, has become the model industrial town of American origin, both in its social and economic aspects. It has all the advantages of modern ideas and city methods, without the disadvantage of the paternalism usually associated with so called ideal towns. A free public school and an academy of the highest order, fully equipped with scientific apparatus and with all the modern appointments, have been built by Mr. Dolge and given to the town. Houses containing from six to nine rooms have been built, many of them wholly or in part by Mr. Dolge, and now belong to the workmen themselves. Mr. Dolge has also converted the woodlands surrounding the town into parks, which will always remain a permanent and beautiful feature of the place. In all which pertains to making Dolgeville a model town in its sanitary, educational and picturesque aspects, Mr. Dolge has shown a practical good sense, amounting to real greatness. He is the leader of his people, not their patron.
The most significant of the new ideas introduced at Dolgeville, and the one whose influence will be the most permanent and far reaching, is Mr. Dolge's contribution to the solution of the labor problem. One of the most depressing features of the present industrial system, apparently the one most difficult of treatment, is the discharge of workmen, when they reach the stage of "diminishing returns," or declining efficiency. It is a complaint against modern capital, that it takes labor when it is young and vigorous, exploits its vitality, and ruthlessly throws it aside, when it has passed the prime of life or approaches old age, The workmen are then too old to learn a new trade. Except in rare cases, they are liable to become recipients of charity or entirely dependent for support upon the younger members of their families.
It is thus held, and not without force, that a hopeless old age is all the average working man can hope for, unless he dies in the harness. This is made the basis of much of the Socialistic attack upon modern capital.
For this complaint, Mr. Dolge has, by experiments continued through twenty years, developed a successful remedy, based upon economic and scientific principles, which enables every workman to retire at the age of sixty with a competence for the remainder of his life. It is a system of industrial insurance, which is to labor what a depreciation fund is to capital. It provides for the retirement of workmen when they reach the age of declining efficiency, in the same way that a depreciation fund provides for replacing old machinery with new. This system entirely eliminates the inhumanity hitherto involved in the discharge of old and often faithful workmen. By providing for them a permanent income for the remainder of their lives, the hopelessness of old age is entirely overcome.
In an article in The Social Economist for June, 1892, presenting the leading features of his system, Mr. Dolge says: "In order, therefore, to obtain the best results from laborers, they must not only live under good conditions while working, but they must be placed beyond the fear of want in their old age. To secure this, a labor depreciation or insurance fund should be made an established part of the cost of production, just the same as depreciation for machinery is provided for now. From these, two important advantages are obtained: (1.) Laborers can be retired without becoming paupers, when they cease to be profitable factors in production, or when they reach what economists call the stage of 'diminishing returns.' (2.) Their future being assured, laborers would feel safe in keeping their wives at home, sending their children to school, and otherwise living up to the full extent of their income. Thus, instead of constantly trying to restrict their standard of living to provide for old age, they would have every inducement for extending it, which would tend to increase their intelligence, social character and individuality, and develop not only more efficient laborers, but a higher manhood and superior citizenship among our people."
Mr. Dolge's plan is entirely free from the slightest taint of paternalism, being based upon strictly economic and thoroughly practical business principles and verified by a test of twenty years. It is susceptible of universal application. If this were made a national policy, as it easily might be, it would tend to eliminate pauperism from this country, might do it altogether, and would certainly do much to destroy the acrimonious spirit which is creating a social antagonism against present methods of production. In this, Mr. Dolge has proved himself a social philosopher as well as a successful manufacturer, qualities rarely found together. To grow rich, and at the same time to become more democratic towards the masses, is a quality of greatness.
Mr. Dolge is now the head of the great firm of Alfred Dolge & Son; a partner in C. F. Zimmerman & Co., manufacturers of autoharps; and Daniel Green & Co., second vice president of The Little Falls & Dolgeville Railroad, and in New York city, trustee of The German Savings Bank, and member of the Republican and Liederkranz clubs.
By his marriage, Dec. 22, 1868, to Anna Auguste Horn, he has five children, Rudolf, William, Ernst, Henry and Fritz Dolge. His home is now in New York city, where he has become widely known and greatly respected. He is an interesting speaker and has frequently been heard with profit before public assemblages in explanation of economic questions.

(America's Successful Men of Affairs, 1895.

THE DRIGGS PATENT PIANO-FORTES.

  Having purchased the manufacturing interest of
DRIGGS, PARMELEE & Co., in the above Piano-Fortes,
together with their extensive stock of materials, we
are now prepared with greatly increassed facilities to
supply these instruments.
  They are constructed on purely scientific principles ;
having upper and lower sounding-boards, (with an en-
tire iron frame for sustaining the strain of the strings,)
the case forms a complete vibrating shell, and ap-
proaches nearer to the violin in perfection than any
other instrument of its class.
  The public are respectfully invited to call and see
them at the Warerooms of this Company, No. 256 Canal-
st.THE DRIGGS PIANO COMPANY
Sole Manufacturers and Vendors,
  LEWIS C. PARMELEE, Secretary.
(New York Times, 28.09.1859)

DRIGGS PATENT PIANO FORTES.

Sole Agents - WM. HALL & SON,
No. 543 Broadway, one block above the St. Nicholas.
(New York Times, 28.09.1859)

THE OVAL PIANO-FORTE

(With the over-strung bass,)
The most graceful in form, and the best-toned horizon-
tal piano in the world.
  The Driggs Piano Company, by greatly extending
their facilities of manufacture and improvement in their
machinery, are prepared to receive advance orders for
these graceful and elegant instruments. The demand
has heretofore been far beyond our ability to supply,
and for most of the time during the last year we have
not had an instrument of this peculiar style to exhibit.
This is the original shape of the Driggs patent, or violin
piano, and it closely approximates, not only in the prin-
ciples of its construction, but in its shape, to the violin,
- "the most perfect becaue the most responsive instru-
ment in the world." The case is a vibratory shell, free
from all strain of the strings, and the oval shape retains
more perfectly the vibratory circles, sustaining the
tones with wonderful purity, and making the instru-
ment more responsive and perfect. Warerooms No. 548
Broadway, between Spring and Prince sts.
S. B. DRIGGS, Inventor and Patentee.
(New York Times, 02.02.1860)

T

HE DRIGGS PATENT PIANO-FORTES,

or the Violin Piano, for sale at the music-store of
WM. HALL & SON, no. 548 Broadway, between Princes
and Spring sts.
(New York Times, May 12, 1860)

P IANOS RENDERED DURABLE AS VIO LINS
("Cremona - The most esteemed violin now in use, made by family of Amadeus, of Cremona, Italy, 100 years ago." - CYCLOPAEDIA.)
  1. Worn our Pianos permanently and perfectly re stored.
  2. New Pianos assured against decay.
  3. Cost for this, only from $30 to $60.
  4. Pianos, with this patent improvement, for sale.
DRIGGS' STRING CLAMP PIANOS. Warerooms, MASON BUILDING, BROADWAY, AND 4TH- ST. ENTRANCE NO. 390 4TH-ST., NEXT DOOR EAST OF CON ESS.
  1. The Piano-forte is at once the most expensive and perishable article of household furniture. The outlay ought to secure an instrument to last for genera tions, and, like the violin, even improve with age ; but, as the pockets of husbands and fathers testify, it does not. $300 to $1,000 spent for a piano become in a few years a dead loss, for the instrument is them musically worn out and useless. This individual, and, we may add, public and national loss - considering that pianos are as plenty as three-story houses, and are counted by hundreds of thousands - is now finally corrected and reformed by a sim ple invention of Mr. S. B. DRIGGS - simple, because all great inventions are but the adoption of Nature's obvious laws.
  II. If economical reasons regarding this costly and frail instrument, as at present made, be forcible in the time of peace, with the National Government espenses at 2,000, 000 a month, the same arguments now, when these outlays are officially rated at $2,000,000 a day, become of immens urably greater force. It is even respectable for persons to say they need money, and have to save. Economy cer tainly, then, may begin with the luxury of the piano. That such economy is alone practicable by Driggs' Im provement shall be shown.
  III. This patent accurately described below by our leading musicians and eminent journals, can be applied equally to PIANOS, OLD, WORN-OUT, OR NEW.
  The private holder, or the manufacturer, of a new piano who desires it guarded against decay, (like the violin,) or the possessor of a worn-out piano, long since consigned as lumber to the garret, can, at an expense of from THIRTY to SIXTY DOLLARS, obtain this security to its perma nent life to the one case, and ensuring renovation in the other. The subscribers honorably pledge themselves to take a piano, an utter wreck as regards tone, and make it as good as ever for this sum. This will include new cover ing for the hammers, and new strings throughout, secured by the clamp.
  IV. The Subscribers keep on hand new pianos made by the best manufacturers, with this Patent String-Clamp added.
  V. The subscribers leave descriptive explanations to the following authorities. The approval, absolute and un qualified, of Mr. Morgan and Mr. Berge, the great organ ists, who have not their superiors in Europe ; of Mr. Bristow, whose reputation as a composer has crossed the Atlantic ; of Mr. Fradel, whose piano compositions are known in all the capitals of Europe and America, etc., etc., etc. ; besides the scientific dicta of the leading musi cal, and the metropolitan daily journals subjoined, estab lish the artistic and economical value of the invention to the entire musical world.
OPINIONS OF EMINENT MUSICIANS.
  The undersigned, after a thorough and critical examina tion of Mr. S. B. Driggs' newly-patented method for string ing Piano-Fortes, cheerfully bear testimony to the great superiority over the ordinary mode now in use. It re leives the bridge and sounding-board from all strain or pressure in any direction, thereby eminently increasing the tone and vibratory power of the instrument. It is exceedingly simple in construction, and cannot really go our of order. It is likewise of great utility by reason of its ready application to all pianos, old as well as new. The ef fect of this improvement is an increase of tone to a great de gree, at the same time rendering it perfectly pure, distinct, and musical. We have examined old pianos restrung after this method, each exhibiting in a marked manner all the peculiarities above stated. We have reason to believe that pianos strung in this way will improve, and not deteriorate in tone by age, and take great pleasure in recommending to all manufacturers and the public generally, so important and useful an improvement as this, known as "DRIGGS' PATENT STRING-CLAMP."
GEO. W. MORGAN, WM. BERGE, GEO. F. BRISTOW, CHAS. FRADEL, H. W. A. BEALE, etc., etc., etc.
OPINIONS OF THE NEW-YORK PRESS.
From the New-York Herarld, Oct. 28, 1861
  INTERESTING IMPROVEMENT IN ACOUSTICS. - A very inter esting exhibition of an improvement in the acoustic prop erties of the pianoforte took place before a large number of musical gentlemen, professional and amateur, on Thursday evening, at the room No. 350 4th-st. It was the application of a new string-clamp, invented by Spencer B. Driggs, the inventor of the Wallace "Violin Piano" the object being to avoid the oblique position of the strings on the bridge, and thus not only to prevent the instru ment from jarring, but to increase its tone immensely and preserve its tone for a great length of time. By this sim ple invention the strings are kept in perfect line, and all strain upon the bridge, screw and sounding-board obvi ated. The experiment worked to perfection, and received the warmest approbation of the professional gentlemen present.
From the New-York Express, Oct. 28, 1861.
  IMPROVING THE PIANO. - A new invention, which is now attracting the attention of musicians and musical ama teurs, is that called the "Driggs Patent String-Clamp" for pianos. By a simple clamp of metal screwed to the bridge of the instrument, and through wich the strings pass, the bridge and the sounding-board are relieved from all side compression. It increases the tone nearly double, on account of the freedon in the vibration, and the instru ment cannot really get out of tune. It can be applied to all old pianos, thus restoring such as have grown "tin- pan-ny," as it is usually termed. The invention is to be examined by the curious, in 4th-st., corner of Lafayette place.
From the Musical Review and World, Nov. 9, 1861.
  A NEW IMPROVEMENT IN PIANO-FORTES. - It is well known that the ordinary mode of attaching or connecting the strings of a piano-forte with the sounding-board is by placing each string under oblique pins, (behind and in front,) and about one inch apart, on top of the bridg, giv ing the strings a zigzag form, which is necessary, to pre vent jarring upon the flat surface of the bridge, where they rest. But, even with such precaution, it does not re quire the most powerful playing to overpower the instru ent sufficiently to cause a jar.
  The patent string-clamp of Mr. Driggs is the most simple and practical remedy for that defect that can possibly be conceived of.
  The most noticeable features that first strike the player upon trying this improvement are the free, open tone - the absence of unpleasant harmonics, in testing the "singing" qualities - the proper pitch sound remaining, the normal sound to the last vanishing - an individuality and distinction fo tone in each note, and a grandeur and power of tone that cannot be overcome by the most pow erful playing.
  It can be applied to any piano, old or new, at a small expense. Instruments containing this improvement can be seen at No. 350 4th-st.
From the New-York Times, Nov. 11, 1861.
  The piano-forte occupies so important a position in the world of music, that any genuine improvement in its mode of manufacture, by which new results are obtained, can scarcely be valued too highly. A step in this forward di rection seems to have been made lately by Mr. S. B. Driggs, a gentleman who has spent over ten years of his life and a comfortable fortune in endeavoring to improve the instrument. Every one knows how a piano is strung, but few know of the fact that the twisting strain of the strings on the plan is from 6,000 to 7,000 pounds, causing, as a matter of course, the bridge and sounding-board to be held so tightly that freedom of vibration is seriously ob structed. This fact tends to a gradual deterioration of power after a few years' time, as the strings become im bedded, and draws into straight line. A sweet but wiry tone is all that remains of the former grandeur of the in strument. Mr. Driggs claims that this result is attribu table solely to the present erroneous way of stringing, and to obviate it he has invented a contrivance called a "string-clamp," by which the board and bridge are com pletely relieved from strain. It would hardly interest our readers to describe this clamp, but the musically-inclined will find it worth their while to pay a visit to No. 350 4th- st., where pianos in which it has been introduced can be seen. The tone is unquestionably improved, and the in strument cannot apparently be overpowered by heavy playing, the volume of sound being in proportion to the strength of the blow, and all jarring of the strings being out of the question. Mr. Driggs has certainly proved that that a piano strung with his patent clamp is most sensi tive to vibration, and gives a freer and more sympathetic response than one that has been strung on the old plan but whether, as he claims, the piano thus constructed will absolutely improve with age, like the violin, remains to be demonstrated. It is certainly a great and popular recom mendation of the clamp that it can be applied to the old est instrument, and restore it from a state of chronic wheeziness to one of renewed vigor, at a very trifling and insignificant cost.
From the New-York Tribune, Nov. 26, 1861.
  A new improvement by the ingenious and liberal Mr. Driggs, on the mode of stringing pianos, so as to save the strain on the wood, and to be applied to the renovation of worn-out instruments - worn out as regards tone - is exciting much attention amog the eminent professors and manufacturers.
  Few persons are aware of the immense amount of [] and capital involved in the production of American Pianos, and the enormous amount, to many millions of dollars, annually sold. When we reflect that they are nearly as common as curtains and mirrors, we may arrive at the fact that the value of the number manufactured each year would present noble figures compared with national sta ples, even such as King Cotton.
  An invention, therefore, which aims to improve the tone, strengthen the works, diminish the necessity for frequent tuning, and prolong the vitality of the instru ment, is a matter of importance, both as it regards the taste and the pocket. There is on exhibition in the Mason Buildings, in 4th-st., next to Broadway, a piano, which claims to possess such improvement. It is by Mr. Driggs. It has already been extensively praised by the Press - the daily and musical as well - has [ably ?] undergone the in vestigation of many leading manufacturers, and received the approval of some of our highest porfessors of music. The invention consists of the mode of fastening the strings. The strain on the wood from the combined action of the strings is several thousand pounds. This causes the deterioration of pianos, which, unlike violins, grow worse with age.
  The ordinary way of attaching or connecting the strings of a piano to the bridge is by placing each string under oblique pins, behind and in front, on top of the bridge, and about one inch apart, giving the strings a zig-zag form, which is necessary to prevent jarring upon the flat surface of the bridge, where they rest ; but with the open pedal, it does not require the most powerful playing to cause a jar sufficient to destroy the purity of tone, when the instrument is overpowered. The twisting strain upon the bridge and board, caused by placing and holding the strings so out of line, is immense - not less than 6,000 pounds on an ordinary piano, tuned to concert pitch. The string clamp of Mr. Driggs is a simple and practical rem edy for this. The clamp is formed with two straight pa rallel jaws, and a right angles with the strings, and the screw that causes the jaws to bite and hold the strings also secures the clamp firmly to the bridge or bear ing-point, and with positive certainty secure every vibration which the strings can make, beyond the possi bility of a jar ; and whether the strings may - as they not infrequently do, from the peculiar spring of the hammer, shank or key - assume a lateral, or longitudinal, a perpen dicular or a circulatory vibration, they are all equally secured in every direction by the clamp, and there is no possi bility of change by time and use, as ordinarily construct ed. Every string is kept in perfect line, from the hitch- pin to the tuning block, and there is no strain or weight whatever on the screw, bridge or sounding-board, leaving these free to develop tone in its purity. By this simple arrangement it is claimed the piano will remain much longer in tune ; and, as a plain and philosophical fact, where the board is not overpowered by strain, improve by age and use, and be absolutely more valuable after twenty- five years' proper use than when new. It is capable of being easily and inexpensively applied to worn-out and condemned instruments, giving them a new lease of tuneful life.
From the New-York World, Jan. 8, 1862.
  SOMETHING NEW IN PIANO-FORTES. - Americans have a laudable passion for perfecting the piano-forte. The Pat ent Office people generally have under consideration something like a baker's dozen of novel expedients for adding to the value of the favorite instrument. The re sult is that we are constantly achieving new triumphs of mechanical skill in its manufacture, adn are distancing all foreign competitors. The past Fall has witnessed the introduction of a feature in the mode of stringing pianos that certainly deserves general attention from all lovers of music. The improvement in question is the invention of Mr. S. B. Driggs, a gentleman already widely known as the originator of some useful patents in this line.
  Mr. Driggs claims, and justly, that the prevalent method of stringing is faulty, and in place of it he has applied a fastening termed a "string-clamp," which ef fectually relieves the board and bridge from strain. Here tofore the twisting strain upon the bridge and board caused by placing and holding the strings out of line, has been rated at 6,000 or 7,000 pounds on all ordinary pianos, tuned to concert pitch. The clamp obviates the undesira ble results of this enormous pressure, and therefore adds to the sweetness, brilliance, and power of the tone. Fur thermore, it is claimed that the instrument must improve by use and age, like other vibrating instruments, where the board is not overstrained, so that a piano, with clamped strings, will be actually more valuable when twenty years old than when fresh from the factory.
  There are minor effects, equally desirable, resulting from this simple contrivance. Old pianos, of any make, can be refitted at a trifling cost on this principle, so as to regain, or rather to surpass, their pristine qualities of tone. Practical illustrations of the truth of our remarks can be obtained by all who are curious in the matter by visiting the warerooms, No. 350 4th-st.
  PIANOS, OLD AND NEW, containing this improve ment, can be seen at our Warerooms. THE TIME RE QUIRED to [make?] the alteration and apply the STRING CLAMP to pianos will not ordinarily exceed ONE WEEK.
DRIGGS & TOOKER. No. 350 4th-st., New-York.

(New York Times, Feb. 20, 1862)

MUSICAL. - Mr. SPENCER B. DRIGGS, whose ingenious inventions and bold thories in connection with the piano-forte have resulted in many important improvements in that instrument, has recently completed a grand piano-forte which, by its power, quality and duration of tone, deserves to rank as an advance on anything yet accomplished. It may be seen at No. 744 Broadway, and is well worth a visit from parties interestd in this truly domestic orchestra ; this real condenser of polyphony ; this solitary muse of the parlor - the piano-forte. The day is not far distant when America will supply Europe with pianos - the day already being past when Europe could supply America. The writing on the wall was seen distinctly in 1862, when an American house (STEINWAY & SONS) bore off the prize at the great London International Exhibition. It was curious then to notice how timidly the great bulk of makers clung to the oldest devices of their craft, and how positively those who had only stepped a little forward found themselves in advance of their contemporaries. In America there has been a steady effort during the past ten years to go ahead of the time ; to leave the old beaten path and strike out boldly into new regions of sound. Hence, the superiority which, in 1862 was regarded as astonishing, but which was, nevertheless, cordially and generously acknowledged. Mr. DRIGGS stands alone in his department, as a pioneer. He has literally hewn a way for himself. From the commencement, the prospects were new and delightful, but it is only now that he has, as it were, settled upon his theories and cultivated them to the point of absolute productiveness. The grand piano, to which we have referred, is an achievement of which he may well feel satisfied. We cannot enter into an explanation of the technical peculiarities of its construction. They are striking to the general perception, and philosophical to the informed mind. The results are a beautiful and extraordinary quality of tone ; a power and roundness of sound that we have not heard equalled. When the instrument has been supplied with a better action than the one which it now possesses, it will, we are sure, command the attention of the musical world. We learn with satisfaction that a large and wealty corporation has taken the patents in hand, and they intend manufacturing pianos on Mr. DRIGGS' principles. Anything that adds to the charm of home is a benefit to the community, and a good piano is one of the happiest means to this end. Mr. DRIGGS has spent a fortune in maturing his plans, we hope he may amass a larger one in their consummation!

(New York Times, Feb. 28 1864)

CARD
  The following private correspondence has been pro cured, with permission for its publication, and we pub lish it for the benefit of those who may feel an interest in the subject.
  Prof. Fradel is one of our most learned and eminent men, in all that relates to the science of music.
THE DRIGGS PATENT PIANO CO.
    Sole Proprietors and manufacturers,
        No. 3 Union-square, New-York.
  MR. S. B. DRIGGS - Dear Sir ; Since I was in the ware rooms of your Company, a few days ago, anad tried your many pianos, I have been ill, and confined to my room, and as many of my professional acquaintances, during their friendly visits, have, in speaking of your pianos, asked my opinion and criticism, I would like to know some thing more of them. That the tone is more full in body, and more free in the singing qualities than can be found in other pianos, any musician can readily perceive, and I would like to known how you obtain such freedom through out the entire scale. I have heretofore been unable to per ceive any marked differences of tone in the various pianos of our best makers. They have each their good points, but I have heard it remarked (and my own observation confirms it) that there is fully as much difference in tone between the several instruments of any one maker, in his own warerooms, as there is between his collectively and those of his neighbor.
  But your instruments, I find, are quite different. They seem to have a clear voice in every note, and a satisfying finish of tone, that I have never heard in the piano-forte before. Will you gratify me so much as to give me a de scription, or rather a scientific analysis of this tone, em bracing your own views on the subject, and I shall be greatly obliged. Respectfully yours,
CHARLES FRADEL,   NEW-YORK, Aug. 28, 1864.
AUGUST 29, 1864.
  PROF. C. FRADEL - My Dear Sir : I hasten to reply to your friendly and excellent letter of yesterday's date, and in doing so, I will at once express my thanks for the opportunity it affords me of answering the important queries you put, and of explaining certain other cogent points suggested thereby. The task, however, of giving an intelligent criticism on an instrument of such dignity, real grandeur and importance, is by no means an easy one, but instigated by your letter, I set myself to it with pleasure ; and let me at once admit that there is much more study applied to the manufacture of the piano now- a-days than formerly. This is shown in the superior in struments manufactured by intelligent makers. It is beginning to be seen that some knowledge of science, some slight familiarity with the inflexible laws that gov ern vibration and sound, is necessary. From such cir cumstances, it is not unreasonable to predict that the next generation will possess a perfect piano. We must not expect too much now, for, study in the right direc tion, has but just commneced, and a trade which has, for a century, has been conducted on a basis of pure tradition, cannot be expected to throw off its prejudices, either willingly or rapidly. A piano maker dies harder than his piano.
  As to my patented improvements, they are plain and simple. A few words of explanation will be all that you will require. Vibration, you are aware, is the first and last condition of sound. Every part of a piano-forte vi brates before the desired note is produced, even to the very hinges and casters. Now, the only portion of the instrument that can be properly used to gather up and magnify this sound, is the outside shell, and it follows, of course, that whatever is added in thickness of timbers, or wood of any kind, becomes a sort of excresence that absorbs and obstructs the free dom, as well as deforms and destroys the purity of tone which the instrument would naturally have, if it were not clogged up by such incumbrances. Necessity has of course to provide the requisite strength for resisting the pull of the strings, (nearly equal to twenty thousand pounds) and experience has demonstrated that wood alone is not adequate to this test. Hence the introduc tion of an iron frame, which all good makers now use. But in my mind, the application of the iron frame, even by the best makers, as they now use it, is almost as un philosophical as it would be to make the instru ment without it. Their mode of manufacture is to construct a thick and heavy case of wood, - braced very strongly - to which they attach an iron frame, and screwing it firmly to the entire case and sounding-board. In this way it is capable of resisting the strains fo the strings, but it does so under conditions that are fatal to its durability. When the in strument is put in a parlor for use, the same temperature and heat that shrinks the thick wood to its smallest pos sible capacity, expands the iron, and so through every change of temperature there is an antagonistic action, t he wood pulliing one way, the iron another. There can be no wonder why the piano-forte (contrary to the well- known fact that all other musical instruments improve by vibration, age and use,) gradually deteriorates in tone until its original grandeur is worn out and nothing but gingling and untunable wreck is left behind.   My pianos are constructed on the general principle of the violin, with but a thin case of wood sufficiently strong to carry an iron frame, action, &c., in their proper posi tions. The iron frame is so braced within itself that it takes the entire pull of the strings.
  The result is, that the tone producing parts of the in strument - namely, the case and sounding board, are wholly free to perform their vibratory functions. Not a single pound of strain is imposed upon them. You can see at a glance, that this is a new feature in the construc tion of the piano, and one which will cause the instru ment to improve with age and long use. At least, its construction and grandeur of tone cannot but remain unimpaired, sufficiently long to wear our a dozen sets of keys and actions. As to the voice-like quality of tone to which you refer, it is the highest compliment you could pay the instrument. That kind of subdued, or [uealed] tone, which seems of late to have become some what of a standard for the piano, caused wholly by an absence of free vibration. I must confess, it is not my aim nor my wish to imitate. It is impossible to obtain a free and open tone by any system of manufacture, (I speak here from experience,) that connects a solid cast iron frame, firmly to, and with the case and sounding board, and there can be no doubt that the tone of my pianos give a much better, richer and more colorable representation of the human voice, than can be obtained from any piano of the ordinary construction. At a short distance from the instrument, or in an adjoining room, it does not require much imagination to believe, that the tones evolved, come from well trained voices. Again, the parts are so well balanced (i. e., the voice in each register, or as you describe it, "a clear voice in every note," is so distinct, that polyphonic playing is compara tively easy and well defined.
  And in this respect I may add, that it is almost impos sible to properly perform the better class of musical com positions on an ordinary made piano. The base is so ap parently ponderous, yet superficial, and so much more FREE in vibration than the tenor and treble, that in changing a singing melody from one part of the scale to the other, it gives the impression to the critical listener, as well as to the performer, that some other instrument has suddenly been called into the performance. The suave and graceful effect of the cantabile is consequently lost. You will in a critical examination of my pianos perceive, that the notes preserve their exact vibratory balance to the end, and therefore do no deflect from the absolute standard of intonation - a matter of vital importance, not only in a melodic sense, but in every consideration that attaches to the sci ence of music. On all other pianos that I have ever heard, the vibrations are so cramped and enslaved, that they only perform a part of their work, and generally disappear in whirring harmonics, long before the value of the note has been obtained. I am aware, of course, that these harmonics are natural to all musical vibration, but they ought not to become the most prominent sounds, and their presence in fact is always a defect. It is be cause certain wind instruments are free from this blem ish, that they excercise their remarkable charm over the senses. The clarionette is acknowledged to be the in strument, that most nearly approaches the human voice, and it will not take long for any one to decide that my pianos have even stronger affinites to nature, than the instrument I have named. Sincerely yours,
S. B. DRIGGS.

(New York Times, Oct 10, 1864)

THE DRIGGS PATENT PIANO COM-

PANY,

OFFICE NO. 4 BROAD-ST., ROOM NO. 16.
  The Trustees of the above company have directed the
Treasurer to pay the stockholders of record of this
date One Per Cent, on the per value of their stock, payable
May 10, 1866. The tranfer books are closed till May
11, 1866.WM. F. SHIRLEY, Treasurer.
(New York Times, May 3, 1866)

Drucker Sigismund, pianos, 79 4th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)

S. DRUCKER & CO.,

Manufacturers of

Piano-Fortes,

340 & 342 SECOND AVENUE,

Corner of 20th Street,NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Dubois [] 20 piano forte maker, New York
(Federal Census, 1850)
Dubois, William, 33 White Street. [1813-1814]
Dubois, William, 55 Hudson Street. [1815-1816]
Dubois, William, music store, 127 Broadway. [1817]
Dubois, William, music store, 126 Broadway. [1818-1821]
Dubois & Stodart, music store, 126 Broadway. [1822-1826]
Dubois & Stodart, music store, 149 Broadway. [1827]
Dubois & Stodart, music store, 167 Broadway. [1828-1834]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Dubois Wiliam, music store 167 Broadway
Dubois & Stodart, music store, 167 Broadway
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Dubois & Bacon, music store, 285 Broadway. [1835-1837]
Dubois, William, music store, 285 Broadway. [1839-1842]
Dubois, William, pianos, 285 Broadway. [1843]
Dubois, William, pianos, 315 Broadway. [1844-1849]
Dubois & Warriner, pianos and music, 315 Broadway. [1850]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Dubois William 60 piano forte maker West Indies
(Federal Census, 1850)
Dubois & Warriner, pianos, 300 Broadway and 13 Crosby Street. [1851-1852]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Dubois William, pianos, 300 B'way
Dubois & Warriner, pianos, 300 Broadway & 13 Crosby
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Dubois, William, pianos, 300 Broadway. [1853]
Dubois, William, late, 90 East 26th Street [1854]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Dumsday Michael, teacher of music, 190 Grand
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Dumsday Michael, pianos, 200 Grand
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Dumsday Eliza V. pianos, 124 W. Houston
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Dunham David H. pianos, 831 B'way
Dunham Edgar A. pianos, 831 B'way, h Melrose
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Dunham John B. pianomaker
(New York Reg. & Directory, 1835)
Dunham John B. pianom. 361 Broadway
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Dunham John B.
(1846; Gen.l Soc. of Mech's and Tradesmen of NYC)
Dunham John B. 38, piano maker, N. York
(Federal Census, 1850)
Dunham, John B. pianomaker, 79 E. 18th,
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Dunham, John B., manu.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Dunham, John B., A piano maker. Commenced poor, served his time as a cabinet maker, and worked his way into a competence by industry and close application. $150,000
(The Wealth and Biography of the Wealthy Citizens of the City of New York, 1855)
Dunham John B. & Co. pianos, 79 E. 13th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Dunham, John B., & Co., 73, 77, 79, 81, 83, 85 East Thirteenth st. near Broadway
(The Canada Directory, 1859)
Dunham Jno. B. 53 Manfs Pianos 15000 5000 NY
(Federal Census, 1860)
Dunham John B. pianos, 831 B'way, h Eastchester
Dunham & Sons, pianos, 831 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Dunham John 59 Piano Manufacturer 2000 1000 New York
(Federal Census, 1870)
Dunham & Sons, pianos 17 Union Square
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Dunham & Sons, factory at 155th Street between Morris and Park Avenues
(1873; Bronx Piano Factories, 2006)
Dunham John B. 32, piano manufacturer, New York
(Federal Census, 1880)

JOHN B. DUNHAM & CO.,

PIANO FORTES.
Manufactory and Warerooms,
75, 77, 79, 81, 83, 85, EAST THIRTEENTH ST.
(Near Broadway,)
J. B. Dunham,
J. K. Philips,
} New York. {A. Mixsell,
H. S. Mecke.
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Card from John B. Dunham,

THE OVER-STRUNG GRAND PIANO CONTRO-

VERSY.

  An advertisement has appeared in the daily papers
forbidding manufacturers of piano-fortes using the
bass over-strings in their instruments.
  This card is to inform the public and the manufactu-
rers that the improvement of the over-strings in grand
pianos is open to all, and that all the prolonged discussion
of their merits as an American invention amount to no-
thing, as there is at the present time
AN OVER-STRUNG GRAND PIANO,
MADE IN RUSSIA SEVERAL YEARS AGO,
in possession of a gentleman of this City, in whose house
it has been for
OVER TWO YEARS.
  Parties desiring further information upon the subject
can gain it by applying to the undersigned.
  The subscriber will continue to furnish the over-
strung grand Pianos to all who may desire them.
JOHN B. DUNHAM.
Nos. 76 to 86 East 13th st.,
Near Broadway, New-York
(New York Times, Feb. 6, 1860)
JOHN B. DUNHAM,
ESTABLISHED IN 1834.
Manufacturer of
THE OVER-STRUNG
GRAND AND SQUARE PIANO FORTES,
Manufactory and Warerooms
Nos. 76 to 86 East 13th-st.,
Near Broadway, New-York.
Purchasers may rely upon these instruments. They
are warranted for five years, and the prices are moderate.
(New York Times, Feb. 18, 1860)

D

UNHAM PIANOS. - THE UNDER-

signed having been appointed Agents for the sale and
renting of Dunham's Pianos and Carhard & Needham's cele-
brated Melodions and Harmonicams, in the manufacturer
of which no expense is spared, would respectfully inform
the citizens of Brooklyn that they have opened the large
store
NO. 352 FULTON STREET, Halsey Building,
Opposite the City Hall.
For the sale of Musical Instruments, Sheet Music, &c., &c.
  G. & A. feel assured that it is no longer necessary to go to
New York, as they will cheerfully furnish every article de-
sired in their line.
GRUBB & ADLER.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 19.06.1860)

John B. Dunham.

Overstrung Grand
Square and
Upright Pianos.

Established in 1834.
   Are pronounced to be the best Pianos
manufactured. Each Instrument warranted
5 years. Send for Circular. Warerooms and
Manufactory, 75 to 85 East 13th Street, near
Broadway, N.Y.
(Harper's Weekly, 1861)
ESTABLISHED IN 1834.

JOHN B. DUNHAM,

MANUFACTURER OF
GRAND, SQUARE AND UPRIGHT PIANO-FORTES,
WAREROOMS AND MANUFACTORY,
NOS. 75 TO 85 EAST 13TH-ST.,
NEW YORK.
(New York Times, Dec. 10, 1864)

T

HREE SECOND-HAND DUNHAM

pianofortes for sale - One grand and two square, all
in good order ; also, two square pianos to rent. Apply to
JOHN B. DUNHAM, Nos. 111 to 121 East 13th-st.
(New York Times, Mar. 15, 1866)

A

CARD. - JOHN B. DUNHAM INFORMS HIS

friends and the public that about May 1 he will re-
move to his new Piano-forte Manufactory, now being
built, of much larger dimensions than the one so long
occupied by him in 13th-st. This card is deemed proper
to revent any misapprehension as to my retiring from
business.
(New York Times, Apr. 16, 1866)

SOLE AGENCY FOR THE

DUNHAM & SON'S

PIANO-FORTES

NEW YORK.

  This celebrated Factory was established
in 1843, and has been in sucessful opera-
tion until this time. It is now universally
acknowledged on of the most reliable in
our country. I have secured the sole
agency for this city.

The Merits of the

"DUNHAM" PIANO-FORTE.

It is the most durable Piano in the World.
It improves by use.
It never deteriorates.
In workmanship it excels.
Its tone is unequalled.
Its touch is perfect.
It can be warranted for the longest period of time
It can be sold after years of use for nearly the original
          cost.
As an investment it is the safest and best.
It has more points of perfection than any other Piano-
          Forte.
Clergymen and Schools dealt with most liberally. Cata-
          logues and Illustrations sent on request.
Sold on Monthly Payments, or Rented and Rent
applied to purchase, if bought within a specified time.

JOHN F. ELLIS,

306 Penn. Ave., near 10th St., Washington, D. C.
SOLE AGENT.
(Guide to Washington and Vicinity, 1868)

UNHAM

PIANOS

Dunham & Sons, Manufacturers,
Warerooms, 18 East 14th St.,
[Established 1834.]
NEW YORK.
Prices Reasonable.Terms Easy.
(Georgetown Courier [CO] June 13, 1878)

DUNN & LANDENBERGER,

Manufacturers of

PIANO-FORTE ACTION,

91 ELIZABETH STREET,

NEW YORK.
  Everything in the business furnished at the
shortest notice.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Dupuy Guitan Bertrand, Case No. 2173 December 17th 1856 ... 16 White Street, New York
(Wm. Hall & Sons 2173)
Dupuy Guitan B. pianos, 12 Carroll pl. & 238 Sullivan, h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Eckhart F. & Co. 14 Amity pl. [piano key makers]
Edney James M. 147 Chambers
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Ellison Edward L. pianos, 37 Union Square
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Ely George, pianos, 108 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ely George, pianomaker,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Ely George, pianos, 108 3d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)

PIANOS ! PIANOS !! PIANOS !!!

A

TTENTION of purchasers in respectfully called
to a new and gigantic invention in Pianofortes
now fully perfected and before the public, known as
HALL'S CELESTIAL TRIPLE STRINGED PI-
ANO The peculiarity of the Celestial Piano con-
sists in its capacity for octave playing with the single
finger, an attainment hitherto unknown to the Pi-
anoforte.
  The most ordinary performer is enabled by the aid
of this improvement to produce effects in octave
playing that would confound a Thalberg or a Listz.
One of its chief excellencies is its capacity to be used
at will as an ordinary Piano of the sweetest quality
of tone, and is instantly changed by the use of a
common pedal to a combination so thrilling and ma-
jestic, as to captivate and charm the heart. These
instruments are superior in power to two ordinary 7
octave Pianos, while for sweetness, purity, breadth,
and richness of tone, they challenge the competition
of the world.
  This is the united testimony of Professors and
Amateurs who have tested the Celestial Piano. Or-
dinary Pianos of all sizes, new and second hand for
sale and reduced prices.
  ELY & MUNGER, 321 Broadway, New York.
  Manufacturers and Dealers, Wholesale and re-
tail.
(Quincy Daily Whig [IL], Oct. 21, 1854)

P

IANOS! PIANOS! - EMPIRE CITY PIANO

forte Company's Manufactory and Warerooms, No.
276 Prince-st.
(New York Times, Dec. 10, 1865)

EMPIRE CITY

PIANO-FORTE COMPANY,

MANUFACTORY AND WAREROOMS,

178 PRINCE STREET, five blocks West of Broadway, New York.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Endicott, George, lithographer, pianofortes, music, 359 Broadway. [1839]
Endicott George, lithographer [and seller of pianos: trade card] 152 Fulton St. [1840]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Endicott Sarah L. widow of George, 10 Charles
(New York City Directory, 1852)

ESTEY

SAVE MONEY
by purchasing the best Piano. Do not
decide what make to get until you have in-
vestigated the claims that are made for the
Estey Piano. The patent repeating action used
in these pianos makes them superior to all
others, but besides this there are many other
improvements that are not found in other
makes. The immense business now being
done in these pianos all over the world, and
the surprising increase in the demand for them
proves that there is something in their con-
struction that is worthy of investigation. Write
for catalogue, and mention this paper.
Correspondence solicited. Address
SIMPSON & PRODDOW,
No. 5 East 14th Street,
New York.

PIANO

(The Cranbury Press [NJ], Aug. 17, 1888)

Fenner Frederick W. pianos, 233 W. 39th, h 353 Ninth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Finley James, 25 Hamersley
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Firth, John, musical instruments, 8 Warren Street [1815-1816]
Firth, John, musical instruments. 9 Frankfort Street. [1817-1819]
Firth John, musical instruments, house Hester near Rhyndus Street.
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Firth John mus. inst. maker 1 Franklin-sq.
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Firth John, Music, 1 Franklin sq.
Firth Thaddeus, music, 1 Franklin sq.
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Firth, John, music, 547 B'way
Firth Thaddeus, musical instrs. 700 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Firth, Thaddeus, music, 563 Broadway [1866]
Firth & Hall, music store, 362 Pearl Street [1821-1822]
Firth & Hall, music store, 358 Pearl Street. [1823-1826]
Firth & Hall, music store, 360 and 358 Pearl Street [1827-1828]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Firth & Hall, music store, 358 Pearl
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Firth & Hall, music store, 356 Pearl Street [1829-1831]
Firth & Hall, music store, 1 Franklin Square [1832]
Firth & Hall, music store, 1 Franklin Square [1834-1842]
Firth & Hall, not in directory but see, Firth, Hall & Pond, below [1843]
Firth & Hall, music Store, 239 Broadway and 1 Franklin Square. [1844-1845]
Firth & Hall, music store, 1 Franklin Square [1846-1847]
Firth, Hall & Pond, (see also 1843), music store, 1 Franklin Square [1833]
Firth, Hall & Pond, music warehouse, 1 Franklin Square [1843-1845]
Firth, Hall & Pond, music warehouse, 239 Broadway [1846-1847]
Firth, Pond & Co. (See alsoHall, William & Son), music store, 1 Franklin Square [1848-1853]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Firth, Pond & Co. music, 1 Franklin sq.
Firth, Pond & Co., manu.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Firth, Pond & Co. music store, 1 Franklin Square and 407 Broadway [1854-1855]
Firth, Pond & Co. music store, 547 Broadway [1856-1860]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Firth, Pond & Co. music, 547 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Firth, Pond & Co. pianos, 547 Broadway [1861-1862]
Firth, Son & Co (See also, Pond, William & Co.), music, 563 Broadway [1863-1865]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

PREMIUM IRON PIANO-FORTES. - These

instruments have a tone equal to those made of wood,
and are 25 per cent. cheaper for the same pattern. They
will stand in any climate. FIRTH, POND & CO.,
Sole Manufacturers, No. 1. Franklin-square.
(New York Daily Times, Apr. 14, 1853)

PIANO-FORTES. - The undersigned would call

the attention of purchasers to their IRON PIANO-
FORTES, which are 25 per cent lower in price (where
the pattern is the same) than those made off wood We
continue to manufacturer our celebrated Grand and other
Piano-fortes, in roserood cases, all of which are made
in the most thorough manner. Our instruments are war-
ranted to give satisfaction in every particular, and
purchasers may rely upon getting a really good Piano-forte
directly from the manufacturers, at the very lowest prices.
Second hand Pianos for sale or to rent. Our catalogue
of SHEET MUSIC is the largest in the country. Schools
supplied on the most favorable terms.
FIRTH, POND & CO.
No. 1 Franklin square, New-York.
(New York Daily Times, June 4, 1853)

ESTABLISHED 35 YEARS.

  We don't make the Patent (!) Pianos, or Pianos with
the Attachment !!
  But we do make good substantial and warranted
Piano-fortes of excellent tone and action.
  Our instruments RECOMMEND THEMSELVES IN PRICE as
well as in other particulars.
Call and see them. New and second-hand PIANOS TO
RENT.FIRTH, POND & CO.,
No. 547 Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, 28.09.1859)

100

NEW PIANO-FORTES OF OUR OWN

make to hire, and the rent applied to the purchase.
FIRTH, POND & CO., No. 547 Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1861)

Fischer Charles, pianos, 176 G'wich
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Fischer Charles S. pianos, 325 B'way & 245 W. 28th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Fischer Edward, pianos, 82 B. 9th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Fischer John, pianomaker, 176 Greenwich
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Fischer John U. pianos, 325 B'way & 247 W. 28th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Fischer Jno. U. pianos, 425 W. 28th, h 262 W. 36th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Fischer J. & C. pianos, 176 Greenwich
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Fischer J & C, pianos, 325 B'way & 245 W. 28th
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Fischer J. & C. Pianos, 425 W. 28th, Manuf. of Improved Pianos Which Are Acknowledged The Best And Most Reliable
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Fischer J. & C. sales, $69,308
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Fischer J. & C. pianos, 425 W. 28th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J. & C. FISCHER, (late NUNNS & FISCHER,) Man-

ufactory and Warerooms, No. 170 Greenwich st. corner
of Dey-st. PIANO-FORTES, warranted, with reverse
bridge and patent tube, well calculated for keeping in tune.
Piano-Fortes tuned, repaired and exchanged.
N. B. - Also AEolian Piano-Fortes for sale.
(New York Daily Times, Dec. 15, 1852)

J. & C. FISCHER, (late NUNNS & FISCHER,)

Manufactory and Wareroom, No. 170 Greenwich-st.,
corner of Dey-st. PIANO-FORTES, warranted, with re-
verse bridge and patent tubes, well calculated for keeping
in tune. Piano-fortes tuned, repaired and exchanged.
N. B. - Also AEolian Piano-Fortes for sale.
(New York Daily Times, Apr. 14, 1853)

J.

& C. FISCHER, NO. 856 BROADWAY,

near 14th-st., offer at a great bargain a selected as-
sortment of iron frame overstrung pianos, warranted :
also, a large round corner piano, little used, $165 ; one
6 1/2 piano, $10 ; one melodeon, piano style, $85.
(New York Times, July 22, 1860)

G

REAT BARGAINS FOR CASH AT NO.

536 Broadway, near 14th-st. A fine assortment of
those celebrated Fischer's Pianos - acknowledged the best
Pianos in the world - with overstrung scale, patent dam-
per, and fully warranted.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1861)

G

REAT BARGAIN IN PIANOS AT NO. []

Broadway, near 14th-st. A fine assortment of the
celebrated Fischer's Pianos, with the best modern im-
provements, full iron frames, overstrung patent damper,
and fully warranted.
(New York Times, Feb. 8, 1862)

P

IANOS. - THE BEST ARE THE CHEAPEST. -

The FISCHER PIANOS, the strongest and best pi-
anos made ; overstrung, iron frame, and all modern im-
provements. Wholesale and retail at reasonable prices
at no. 365 West 28th-st., near 9th -av.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1863)

T

HE CELEBRATED PIANOS OF J. &

C. FISCHER, the best and most reliable pianos
made ; overstrung, agraffe and all improvements. Whole-
sale and retail at Nos. 211, 213, 215, 217, 219 28th-st., near
9th-av.
(New York Times, Feb. 16, 1866)

Fischer Willhelm, piano tuner, 196 Allen
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Folks Richard, piano forte maker, Ford avenue, b'n 5th and 6th sts.
(Henry's Dir. of Morrisania, 1853-4)
Fullam A. J. pianos, 650 B'way, h 648 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Fullam A. I. pianos, 645 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Fullam James M. pianos, 650 B'way, h 648 B'way
Fuller Addison G. pianos, 55 Mercer, h 365 Broome
Fuller John I. pianos, 55 Mercer, h 365 Broome
Fuller Robert M. pianos, 55 Mercer, & physician, h 365 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Gabler Emit, pianos, 14 Sixth...manufacturer of upright & square pianos
(New York City Directory, 1867)

C

ARD. - THE COPARTNERSHIP BETWEEN

CHAMBERS & GABLER having expired, I will con-
tinue the business of manufacturing pianos at my new
manufactory, No. 140 Centre-st., between Walker and
White sts. EMIL GABLER, manufacturer of piano-
fortes, No. 140 Centre-st., New-York.
(New York Times, June 9, 1866)

E

MIL GABLER, MANUFACTURER OF
square and upright pianos, invites piano dealers and
purchaser to call and examine his new scale agraffe
pianos, at new manufactory, No. 140 Centre-st., between
Walker and White sts., New-York.
(New York Times, Oct. 26, 1866)

EMIL GABLER,

PIANO FORTE

MANUFACTURER

140 CENTRE ST., bet. Walker & White.
(New York City Directory, 1867)

Gabler Ernest, piano manf. 127 Elm
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Gabler Ernst, pianos, 311 Rivington,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Gabler Ernest, 312 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Gabler Ernst, pianos, 124 E. 22d,
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Gabler Ernest, sales, $149,484
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Gabeller Ernest 45, piano maker, Baden Ger
(Federal Census, 1870)
Gabler Ernst, pianos, 220 E. 22d, h E. 128th n Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Gabler Ernest, pianos, 220 B. 22d
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Gabler, Ernest, manufacturer of new Agraffe Pianos, with all modern improvements, 220 to 224 E. 22d Street, New York
(Crofutt's Trans-continental Tourist, 1871)
Gabler, Ernest, 220 E. Twenty-second st.
(New York as it was, 1876)

ERNEST GABLER,

Manufacturer of

GRAND, SQUARE AND UPRIGHT PIANOS,

Nos. 122, 124 and 226 East 22d Street,

Between Second and Third Avenues,NEW YORK.
Warranted for five years.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

ERNEST GABLER, manufacturer, born in Glogau, Germany, Jan. 1, 1824, died in New York city, Feb. 27, 1883. While not so famous as several other of the piano manufacturers of New York, he was a very successful man, and by quiet and persevering industry gained an excellent fortune. He came to America in 1852, and two years later began the making of pianofortes. The factory is now on East 22d street, and a large establishment. When his brother Emil became a partner, he adopted the firm name of Ernest Gabler & Bro., which is yet retained. His wife, one son, and several daughters inherit his property.

(America's Successful Men of Affairs, 1895.

Gabler Hugo, pianos
(New York City Directory, 1867)
Gale Adams H. & Co. pianos, 202 Av. 3,
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Gale Adams A. pianomaker Thirteenth
Gale, A. H. & Co. manu. 102-106 Third Avenue
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Gale A. H. & Co. 107 Twelfth
(New York City Directory, 1859)

A. H. GALE & CO.,

PIANO FORTE MANUFACTURERS,
Manufactory and Warerooms,
92, 94, 96, Third avenue, corner of 13th st.,
107, 109, 111, 113, 115 East 12th st., near Third av.
NEW YORK.
(New York City Directory, 1857)
A. H. GALE & CO., PIANO-FORTES, NO.
407 East 12th-st., invite attention to their new Scale
Pianos. Guaranteed to give entire satisfaction.
(New York Times, Sep. 6, 1859)

A.

H. GALE & CO., PIANO-FORTES, NO.
107 East 12th-st. invite attention to their new Scale
Pianos. Guaranteed to give entire satisfaction.
(New York Times, Feb. 18, 1860)
A. H. GALE & CO. - PIANO-FORTES.
Manufactory and Warerooms,
No. 107 East 12th-st., New-York.
(New York Times, Jan. 19, 1864)
A. H. GALE & CO. - PIANO-FORTES.
Manufactory and Warerooms.
No. 197 East 12st, New-York
(New York Times, Aug. 20, 1865)

A. H. GALE & CO.,

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURERS

107, 108, 111, 113 AND 115 EAST TWELFTH STREET, (Near Third Avenue,)

NEW YORK.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Gassin Andrew, pianomaker, 103 Lexington Av.
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Gassin Joseph, Nunns & Clark
(Met. Museum, Nunns & Clark 8054 "Augt 20/1853")
Geib A. & W. manufactory, Barton Street, Greenwich
(1822; Furn. of our Forefathers)
Geib, A & W., music store, 23 Maiden Lane [1822-1823]
Geib, A. & W., & Co., piano and music store, 23 Maiden Lane [1824]
Geib, A. & W., piano and music store, 23 Maiden Lane [1825-1827]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)


New Patent, A. & W. Geib, 23 Maiden Lane, New York
(ca.1823-1828; The Furniture of our Forefathers, 1906)

[A. & W.] Geib have reopened their store, 23 Maiden Lane, where they offer an extensive assortment of pianofortes of their own manufacture, also some by Clementi and Broadwood.

(1823; The Furniture of our Forefathers)

Geib, Adam, 23 Maiden-lane
(New-York Directory, 1820-1)
Geib, Adam, music store, 23 Maiden Lane [1828]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Geib Adam, music store, 23 Maiden-lane
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Geib Adam music 23 Maiden lane
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Geib Adam, music, 73 Third Avenue [1844]
Geib, Adam, 71 Third Avenue [1845-1847]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Geib, Adam 361 Broadway (formerly 23 Maiden Lane)
(Herald, 1848)
Geib, George, 146 Fulton
(New-York Directory, 1820-1)
Geib Geo. H. pianos, 345 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Geib George H. pianos, 831 B'way, h Morrisania
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Geib, John Jr., Carmine near Bedford
(New-York Directory, 1820-1)
Geib, John & Co. organ builders, Bowery, corner North Street [1802]
Geib, John & Son, organ builders, Bowery, corner North Street [1803]
Geib, John & Son, organ builders, Bowery [1804]
Geib, John & Son, organ builders, corner Gardner and Leonard Streets [1805]
Geib John & Son, organ builders, Leonard Street [1806]
Geib John & Son, organ builders, Leonard Street [1807-1809]
Geib John & Son, organ builders, 95 Leonard Street [1810]
Geib John & Son, organ builders, 95 Leonard Street and 36 Sugar Loaf Lane [1811-1812]
Geib John & Son, organ builders, 55 Sugar Loaf Lane [1813-1814]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

[John Geib and Son] respectfully inform the public and lovers of the arts that they have just constructed a Forte Piano on a new plan, it having 4 pedals : 1st, the Harp ; 2d, the Bassoon ; 3d, the Full Chorus ; 4th, the Swell, to which they invite the curious and ingenious, hoping it will meet their approbation.

(1807; The Furniture of our Forefathers, 1906)

Geib, John, organ builders, 55 Sugar Loaf Lane [1815]
Geib J. & A., pianoforte makers, Leonard Street near Broadway [1806]
Geib, John & Adam, & Co., music store, 23 Maiden Lane [1816-1817]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

[John and Adam Geib & Co. advertise a] superb musical clock manufactured in Paris, which plays a large variety of the best music, set on six barrels, and is united with a first-rate time-piecs. It is perhaps superior to anything of the kind imported into the United States ; being valued at thirteen hundred dollars ; and is offered for sale at that price, or will be exhibited to any Lady or Gentleman who will honour the above named firm with a call at their Piano Forte warehouse and wholesale and retail music store, No. 23 Maiden Lane.

(1817; The Furniture of our Forefathers, 1906)

Geib, J. A. & W., music store, 23 Maiden Lane [1818-1821]
Geib, William, Eleventh Street
(1828; Furn. of our Forefathers)
Geib William, 3rd Avenue & 201 Broadway
("ca.1825"; Edward Swenson)
Geib W. Piano & Music Warehouse [1829?]
(pub., "Pres. Jackson's Inaug. March")
Geib, William H., pianofortes, 23 Maiden Lane [1844-1847]
Geib, William H., & Co., pianofortes, 361 Broadway [1848]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Geib William H. pianos, 361 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Geib, William H., pianos, 783 Broadway [1859]
Geib, William H., pianos, 4 Leroy Place [1860-1869]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Geib William H. pianos, 4 Leroy pl h S. I.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Geib, William H., pianos, 94 Bleecker Street [1870-1872]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Geib & Walker, music store, 23 Maiden-lane
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Geib & Walker, music store, 23 Maiden Lane [1829-1842]
Geib & Walker, pianofortes, 23 Maiden Lane [1843]
Geib & Jackson, pianofortes, 361 Broadway [1849-1851]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Geib & Jackson, pianos, 361 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Geib & Jackson, pianofortes, 499 Broadway [1852-1854]
Geib & Jackson, music, 783 Broadway [1855]
Geib & Jackson, pianos, 783 Broadway [1856-1858]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

PIANO FORTES. - New and second-hand Piano

Fortes and Melodeons, for sale or to let, by GEIB &
JACKSON, No. 499 Broadway
(New York Daily Times, Apr. 14, 1853)

Geslain, Charles T., music store, 357 Broadway [1840]
Geslain Charles T., music store, 361 Broadway [1841]
Geslain Charles T. music store, 72 Lispenard Street [1842]
Geslain, Alexander C., jr., music, 547 Broadway [1844]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Gibson Thomas, pianoforte maker, 61 Barclay
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Gilbert T. & Co. Aeolian pianos, 333 & 447 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Gilbert T. & Co. 419 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Gilfert, George, musical magazine, 13 Maiden Lane [1804-1805]
Gilfert, George, pianoforte warehouse, 13 Maiden Lane [1806]
Gilfert, George, music warehouse, 13 Maiden Lane [1807-1808]
Gilfert, George, pianoforte warehouse, 13 Maiden Lane [1809-1814]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Gill John, hardware, 99 E. 26th
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Gill John, 101 E. 26th [piano forte hardware]
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Gill John, piano forte hardware, 149 E. 26th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

JOHN GILL,

Manufacturer of

PIANO-FORTE HARDWARE,

And Sole Importer of Smith & Houghton's Patent
MUSIC WIRE, FRENCH SCREWS, TUNING PINS, &c., also Manufacturer of Improved
PATENT CRIBBAGE BOARDS.
No. 101 East Twenty-Sixth Street, near Third Avenue, New York.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Gill Robert, pianos, r. 99 E. 26th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Glenn Robert, pianos, 194 Fulton
(New York City Directory, 1852)

R. GLENN,

Piano Forte Manufactory and Warerooms,

192 & 198 FULTON STREET,
NEW YORK.
(The Canada Directory, 1851)

PIANO-FORTE. - R. GLENN & CO. will remove,

on the 1st May, their Piano-forte Manufactory and
Wareroom from 184 Fulton-st. to No. 83 String-st.
two doors east of Broadway.
(New York Daily Times, Apr. 14, 1853)

Goeb John C. teacher, 127 W. 30th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Goeb John C. piano tuner, 221 W. 36th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Goetz & Werth..Agents for the sale of the Geo. Steck & Co. Pianofortes, Pianos Tuned and Repaired, Warerooms, 195 Atlantic St. near Court
(Brooklyn City Bus. Dir., 1873)
Goll George F. pianofortemaker, 10 Goerch
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Gomien Jos. H. pianos, 927 B'way, h 326 W. 25th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Gonzalez Richard 241 Ninth av.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Good I. pianos, 52 Court (Brooklyn)
Gordon James, pianos, 196 Bleecker
(New York State Directory, 1870)

THE GREAT UNION PIANOFORTE COMPANY ARE
finishing some 2,000 Pianos for the trade. Give them a
call. Corner of Tenth avenue and Thirty seventh streets.
(New York Herald, Apr. 13, 1869)

Griflin Charles, 260 W. 32d
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Grim David, pianoforte maker, 117 Grand
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Gordon Stephen T. music, 706 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Gordon Stephen T. pianos, 706 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Grovestein & Co. manu. 487 Broadway.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Grovesteen James H. pianofortes, 122 Grand & 44 W. 14th
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Grovesteen James H. pianos, 26 Wooster,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Grovesteen Jas. H. pianos, 55 Mercer, h 354 W. 27th
Grovesteen James H. jr. pianos, 55 Mercer, h 354 W. 27th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Grovesteen Townsend D. pianomaker, 348 Av. 6
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Grovesteen, Fuller & Co. pianos, 55 Mercer
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Grovesteen, Fuller & Co. sales, $96,825
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Grovesteen & Fuller, piano fortes, 55 Mercer
(New York State Directory, 1870)

$150BEST PIANO
GROVESTEEN & HALE, having
$150
removed to their new warerooms, No. 476 Broadway, have
now prepared to offer the public a magnificent new scale
full 7-octave rosewood piano-forte, containing all improve-
ments known in this country or Europe, over-strung bass,
French grand action, harp pedal, full iron frame, for $150
cash, warranted for five years. Rich []ing cases,
$175 to $200, all warranted made of the best seasoned ma-
terial, and to stand better than any sold for $400 or
$500 by the old methods of manufacture. We invite the
best judges to examine and try these new instruments, and
we stand ready at all times to test them with any others
manufactured in this country
GROVESTEEN & HALE, No. 478 Broadway, N. Y.
(New York Times, May 22, 1862)

GROVESTEEN & Co.

PIANO FORTE

MANUFACTURERS

499 BROADWAY,

NEW YORK.

  THE attention of the public and the
trade is invited to our NEW SCALE 7 OC-
TAVE ROSEWOOD PIANO FORTES,
which for volume and purity of tone are
unrivalled, by any hitherto offered in this
market. They contain all the modern im-
provements, French, Grand Action, Harp
Pedal, Iron Frame, Over-Strung Bass, &c.,
and each instrument being made under
the personal supervision of Mr. J. H.
GROVESTEEN, who has had a practical ex-
perience of over 35 years in their manufac-
ture, is fully warranted in every particu-
lar.
The "Grovesteen Piano Fortes" have
  received the award of merit over all
  others at the celebrated World's Fair.
Where were exhibited instruments from
the best makers of London, Paris, Ger-
many, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Boston,
and New York ; and also at the American
Institute for five successive years, the gold
and silver medals from both of which can
be seen at out ware-room.
  By the introduction of improvements we
make a still more perfect Piano Forte, and
by manufacturing largely, with a strictly
cash system, are enabled to offer these in-
struments at a prive which will preclude
all competition.
PRICES - No. 1, Seven Octave, round cor-
      ners, Rosewood plain case, $275.
      No. 2 Seven Octave, round corners,
      Rosewood, heavy moulding, $300.
      No. 3, Seven Octave, round corners
      Rosewood Louis XIV style $325.
Terms - Net Cash in current Funds.
  DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS SENT
FREE.
July 2w9, 1y. "A&C"
(The Columbia Spy [PA], Dec. 2, 1865)

GROVESTEEN & CO.

PIANO FORTE

MANUFACTURERS,

499 Broadway,New York.

T

HE attention of the Public and the trade is
invited to our NEW SCALE 7 OCTAVE
ROSEWOOD PIANO FORTES, which for vol-
ume and purity of tone are unrivalled by any hith-
erto offered in this market. They contain all the
modern improvements, French grand Action;
Harp Pedal, Iron Frame, Overstrung Bass, etc.,
and each instrument being made under the per-
sonal supervision of Mr. J. H. Grovesteen who
has had a practical experience of over 36 years in
their manufacture, is fully warranted in every
particular.
The GROVESTEEN PIANO FORTES
received the Award of Merit over
all others at the Celebrated
World's Fair,
Where were exhibited instruments from the best
makers of London, Paris, Germany, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Boston and New York ; and also at the
American Institute for five successive years, the
gold and silver medals, both of which can be seen
at our ware-room.
  By the introduction of improvements we make
a still more perfect Piano Forte, and by manufac-
turing largely, with a strictly cash system, are en-
abled to offer these instruments at a price which
will preclude all competition.
Terms: Net Cash in Current Funds.
Descriptive Circulars Sent Free.
(Liberty Weekly Tribune [MO], Dec. 7, 1866)

Grow Wales F. pianofortes, 130 Av. 3,
Grow & Christopher, pianofortes, 130 Av. 3
Grubler Philip, pianomaker, 196 Ludlow
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Grupe William, pianos, 5 First,
Gueutal George, Imp. French pianoforte hardware, 158 Franklin
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Guental George, piano-forte materials, 39 W. 4th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

GEORGE GUETAL,

IMPORTER OF

FRENCH PIANO-FORTE HARDWARE

SCREWS, REST-PINS, MUSIC AND COVERING WIRE,

French Hammer Felt, of superior quality, Buckskin, Scarlet Cloth, &c., &c., Ivory and Sharps con-
stantly on hand. Agent for Smith & Rollaston's Patent Music Wire.

NO. 37 WEST FOURTH STREET, NEW YORK.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Hagen Theodore, proprietor music and pianos, 596 B'way, h 304 W. 14th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Haines Alfred, 114 E. 14th & 116 Third av. [piano action makers]
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Haines Francis. W. pianos, 46 E. 14th, h 352 Second av.
Haines Napoleon J. pianos, 46 E. 14th, h 305 E. 17th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Haines Brothers, 830 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Haines Brothers, pianos, 46 E. 14th & 360 Second. av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Haines Brothers, sales, $287,051
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Haines Brothers, pianos, 27 Union Square
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Haines Alfred, pianoactions, 114 E. 14th,
Haines Francis W. pianos, 334 Second av.
Haines Napoleon J. pianos, 334 Second av.
Haines Brothers, pianos, 334 Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Haines Bros., Second av. cor. 21st st.
(New York as it was, 1876)

HAINES BROTHERS PIANOS OF VARI-

ous styles to let or sold on installments, at their man-
ufactory, Nos. 328, 330, 332 2d av., corner of 21st st., New
York, byJ. M. PELTON
(New York Times, Sep. 11, 1858)

H

AINES BROS., MANUFACTURERS OF
first class piano-fortes at extreme low prices. Sales-
room, No. 676 Broadway, next to Laura Keene's. Fac-
tories corner of 2d-av. and 21st.-st. Pianos for hire, and
rent deducted if purchased.
(New York Times, May 12, 1860)

HAINES BROTHERS'

NEW SCALE, OVERSTRUNG PIANO-FORTES

Are now universally acknowledged to be the best Pianos
made. They are superb, and no mistake. On sale at
wholesale and retail, at their new warerooms,
NO. 756 BROADWAY, NEW-YORK.
  Their cottage pianos cannot be beat the world over. So
say all the best dealers of the country. Every instrument
warranted for five years.
  NEW PIANOS TO LET.
(New York Times, Oct. 20, 1862)

P

IANOS. - A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF
Pianos, at the new warerooms of HAINES BROS.,
No. [] Broadway, just below Stewart's new store.
These instruments embrace all the late improvements,
overstrung bass, full iron frame, all made of the very best
seasoned materials, and are now acknowledged to be
equal to any made for depth and purity of tone, and are
fully arranted for five years.
   N. B. - First-class pianos to rent, and rent allowed if
purchased within one year.
HAINES BROS., No. 758 Broadway
(New York Times, Feb. 10, 1863)
HAINES BROTHERS'
EXCELSIOR
PIANO-FORTES.
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST
PIANOS MADE,
FOR SALE AND
TO LET,
No. 736 Broadway.
(New York Times, Apr. 10, 1863)

HAINES BROS.' PIANO-FORTES.

WAREROOMS, NO. 7[58] BROADWAY.

  HAINES BROTHERS' Pianos are unquestionably the
VERY BEST INSTRUMENTS MADE. The reputation
of this firm for making the cheapest first-class Pianos in
market is fully established. - N. Y. Evening Mirror.
  Messrs. HAINES BROS. turn out the best Piano at the
lowest possible price. - N. Y. Sun.
  Considering their durability, excellent qualty of tone
and superb finish, they are the cheapest Pianos we know
of, and need not be distrusted because they are low
priced. - N. Y. Musical Review.
  They are the very best instruments made in this coun-
try ; they excel in beauty of form - and their tone is of
surpassing sweetness and great brilliancy. - N. Y. Chris-
tian Times.

  For a square Piano it cannot be surpassed. - Ithaca (N.
Y.) Journal.

  We would take pleasure in showing to those desiring
to purchase, testimonials from thousands, who for the
last ten years have used our instruments - a mass of evi-
dence which proves inconstestably the superior excellence
of our Pianos.

TERMS OF PURCHASE EASY.

(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1863)
HAINES BROTHERS,
PIANO-FORTE
MANUFACTURERS
WAREROOMS
No. 758 Broadway.
(New York Times, Jan. 19, 1864)
GREAT BARGAINS
A fine assortment of
FIRST-CLASS PIANOS
AT REDUCED PRICES
No. 758 Broadway, up stairs.
(New York Times, Oct. 26, 1864)

HAVE YOU SEEN HAINES BROTHERS'

NEW PIANOS?

  If not, go and see them at once, at the manufacturers'.
No. [] 2d-av., corner of 21st-st.
  They are splendid Pianos, at moderate prices.
  N. B. - Pianos to rend, and rent allowed on purchase.
(New York Times, Oct. 23, 1865)

H

AINES BRO.'S PIANOS. - ACKNOWLEDG-
ed to be the best in America ; first premium award-
ed whenever exhibited ; full satisfaction guaranteed. For
sale, on reasonable terms, at the manufacturers', No. []
2d-av., corner 21st-st.
(New York Times, Jan. 10, 1866)

H

AINES BROS.' SUPERIOR OVER-
STRUNG PIANOFORTES. - Dealers and the public
will find it to their advantage to call and see for them-
selves at our large and extensive warerooms, Nos. 354,
356, 358, 360, 362, 364, 366, 368, 370, 372 2d-av., both corners of
21st-st.
(New York Times, Mar. 15, 1866)
HAINES BROTHERS
NEW IRON-FRAME OVERSTRUNG PIANOS,
with [] wooden bridges - a construction peculiar to
ourselves, producing a very superior tone, and of won-
derful power.
  For sale at their extensive
MANUFACTORY AND WAREROOMS,
corner 21st-st. and 2d-av. All those wanting a really
good piano at a moderate price are invited to call before
purchasing elsewhere.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1866)

HAINES BRO'S PIANOS.

THE PIANO OF AMERICA.

  These Pianos are universally acknowledged
by competent judges equal to the best Piano
made. For references, they have many thou-
sand city and country residents, including
large numbers of high schools, Seminaries, &c.
  These Pianos have not only stood the contin-
ual use and heavy practise of one Year, but
have been used the last Fifteen Years to the ut-
most satisfaction of those using them.
  They have taken PREMIUMS AND MEDALS
WHEREVER EXHIBITED. Such has been the de-
mand for these Pianos, that MESSRS. HAINES
BRO'S. have been compelled to enlarge their
works to the extent of 24 to 30 Pianos a week.
  Having now one of the most extensive and
complete Factories in the United States, Facto-
ries alone covering over 3/4 of an acre of
ground, comprising a frontage of 219 feet on 2d
Avenue.
  They are undoubtedly the cheapest first class
Pianos in market. Fully guaranteed for 5
years. Send for illustrated circular.
HAINES BRO'S
356, 358, 360, 362, 364, 366, 368, 370, 372,
Second Ave., N. Y. City
(Daily Denver Gazette [CO], Feb. 21, 1868)

A

T HAINES BROS. MAY BE HAD DURING THIS
week great bargains in Pianos ; 25 per cent discount on
account of late fall in gold.
Warerooms - 45 East Fourteenth street, Union square
Factories - 356, 358, 360, 362, 364, 366, 368, 370, 372 Second
avenue
(New York Herald Dec. 29, 1869)

A

T HAINES BROS'.,
27 Union square
Those desiring a first class Piano should not purchase
before calling at our salesrooms. Elegant Pianos, unri-
valled in tone and finish, at prices to please. Every
Piano warranted as represented. N. B. - A few Pianos in
from rent will be sold at great bargains.
(New York Herald, May 16, 1872)

Hale Joseph P. agent for The great Union Pianoforte Co. 479 Tenth av. bet, 36th & 37th st. h 449 W. 34th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Hale Joseph P. sales, $207,355
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Hale Joseph P. pianos, 417 10th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)

S

TOLEN PIANO SCALE. - SOME ONE HAV-

ing entered the piano-rooms of the late Grovesteen &
Hale, on Thursday night, and taken therefrom our
splendid new piano scale, which has created such en-
viable excitement, the past season, among all the old
manufactories, consequently we feel compelled to bring
out an entire new scale, and have decided to close out the
entire stock made from the last scale, consisting of nearly
200 new pianos, of different styles, at great bargains, and
we invite dealers, teachers, and the public to examine
three fine, rich-toned instruments, at No. 478 Broadway,
New-York.J. P. HALE & CO.
(New York Times, Oct. 20, 1862)

(Industrial America, 1876)


DESTRUCTION BY FIRE OF HALE'S PIANO FACTORY, ON WEST THIRTY-FIFTH STREET, SEPTEMBER 3D.
(1877; Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection)

A Large Piano Factory. - Hale's new piano-forte factory, Philadelphia, is said to be the largest building of the kind in the United States. It is of brick, with walls 24in. thick, and is eight stories in height. On the top floor three immense iron tanks have been placed, which are filled with water from the roof. Connected with these are iron pipes extending through each floor. To the pipes hose is attached, so that a flood of water can be poured upon any part of the building. On every floor rows of pails filled with water are keps contantly standing. The building is a vast storehouse of inflammable material, however, and a fire once under headway could not be extinguished. The only hope would be that the 1,200 workmen could all get down the stairways at either end of the building, or make their escape by the endless chain fire escapes which hang outside the windows on each of the four sides of the building. Iron shutters protect the exposed windows, and the drying rooms are of solid iron. The stoves and glue pots stand on immense brick hearths, and on every floor is stationed a man whose duty it is to keep an eye on inflammable material. When all the machinery is in place the capacity of the factory will be 200 pianos a week.

(English Mechanic and World of Science, Aug. 2, 1878)

Within the last two years, one of the New-York factories (that of Joseph P. Hale) has begun to do business on a scale which promises to put its sales ahead of the houses of both Chickering and Steinway. Mr. Hale, a Massachusetts man by birth, began piano-making in New York in 1860, after having first accumulated a fortune in the crockery and real-estate trades in Worcester, Mass. His purpose was to cheapen the selling-cost of the piano. He wasnted "the people," as contrasted with the upper ten thousand, to have a piano which would be both good, and cheap enough for them to afford. He entered upon the manufacture on a large scale, and by 1872 had a factory in New-York City capable of building sixty pianos a week. He has recently undertaken to increase the capacity of his factory to a hundred and fifty pianos a week ; which would be three times greater than that of any other factory in the world, and would supply one-fifth of the trade of the continent. Mr. Hale's operations made a great sensation in the piano-trade in 1877.

(Industrial History of the United States, 1878)

Hall James F. pianos, 543 B'way, h Garrisons
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Hall John A. pianos, 239 B'way & 16 White,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hall William mus. inst. m. 1 Franklin-sq.
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Hall, William & Son, music warehouse, 239 Broadway [1848-1849]
Hall, William & Son, music warehouse, 239 Broadway and 1 Park Place [1850-1951]
Hall, William & Son, music, 239 Broadway [1852}
Hall, William & Son, pianos, rear 16 White Street [1852]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Hall William & Son, music warehouse, 239 Broadway & 1 Parl Pl.
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Hall, William & Son, manu. 239 Broadway.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Hall, William & Son, music warehouse, 230 Broadway and 1 Park Place [1853-1854]
Hall, William & Son, music, 239 Broadway [1856-1857]
Hall, William & Son, pianos, musical instruments and music, 239 Broadway p[1858]
Hall, William & Son, pianos and music, 543 Broadway [1859]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Hall William & Son, pianos, musical instruments and music, 239 B'way & 16 White,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hall, William & Son, music, 543 Broadway [1860-1870]
Hall, William & Son, music, 751 Broadway [1871-1874]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

WILLIAM HALL & SON,

543 BROADWAY, NEW YORK,

Publishers of Music, Manufacturers of Piano Fortes, Guitars, Banjos, Flutes, &c.
Band Instruments and all sorts of Musical Merchandise

WILLIAM HALL

JAMES F. HALL.


THE BEST AND MOST DURABLE PIANO FORTES IN AMERICA.

    Every variety of Piano Fortes, of 6 1/2, 6 3/4, 7 and 7 1/4 Octaves, at the lowest price for FIRST CLASS
INSTRUMENTS.
    Recommended as the best Piano Fortes by all the principal Artists and Professors in America. See
Letters from Gottschalk, Strakosch, Mason, Root, and others.
    "I have never found an article of Square Piano that would pleas me as well." - GOTTSCHALK.
    "I have played upon many Square Pianos, both in this country and in Europe, yet I am confident I have
not played upon better ones than those you make." New York, Feb. 9, 1856. WM. MASON.
    "They have about the strength and fullness of tone of a Grand Piano, and combine great sweetness and
delicacy of tone, with precision of touch." M. STRAKOSCH.
    "In the use I have made of your Instruments, (accompanying voices,) I assure you I have found
them most satisfactory." GEO. F. ROOT.

WM. HALL & SON, 543 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

(Don Giovanni, 1857)
THE DRIGGS PATENT PIANO-FORTE
are all of the full scale of 7 octave. The most expe-
rienced workmen, the greatest perfection of mechanical
skill, and the best seasoned materials are employed in
their manufacture.
They are constructed on a solid iron frame or bed-plate,
entirely separate from the case, thuse relieving the case,
sound-boards and all the wood-work from the strain of
the strings making them much more solid and enduring.
There are two sounding boards, arranged as those of a
violin, giving three times the amound of vibrating sur-
face found in any other piano : which being free from the
strain of the strings becomes more sonorous and pure on
their vibrations as the piano becomes older. Their con-
struction is the most simple and scientific, and they are
the most enduring and full-toned pianos ever made.
Call and see them, atWM. HALL & SON'S
New store, No. 543 Broadway,
Between Spring and Prison sts.
(New York Times, Sep. 6, 1859)
WM. HALL & SON,
  No. 543 Broadway, (between Prince and Spring sts.,)
Publishers of Music, dealers in all kinds of Musical In-
struments and merchandise. The celebrated Briggs
Patent Pianos.
(New York Times, Sep. 19, 1860)

W

ILLIAM HALL & SON, NO. 543 BROAD-

WAY, manufacturers of New Scale Piano Fortes,
with iron frame, over-strung, andall modern improve-
ments, from $375 to $600, warranted for 5 years.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1863)

Hallet, Davis & Co., 20 East Fourteenth street
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Hansen Henry, pianos, 100 Centre,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hansen Louisa, pianos, 331 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Hardenbrook William A. pianos, 107 Fourth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Hardman Hugh, pianos, 103 W. Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Hardman Hugh, pianos, 233 W. 26th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hardman Hugh, pianos, 126 Macdougal
(New York State Directory, 1870)

H. HARDMAN,

Manufacturer of

Piano-Fortes,

No. 118 and 120 Amity Street,

Near 6th Avenue,NEW YORK.
TUNING AND REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

Special Wholesale Rates to Catholic Institutions.

   Pianos shipped to all parts of the world. Every Piano warranted for five years. Send
for Illustrated Catalogue to H. HARDMAN, Pianoforte Manufacturer, corner 57th
Street and 10th Avenue, New York City.
(The Illustrated Catholic Family Annual, 1874)

Harrison Vivaldi F. pianomaker, 23 Canal
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Harrison Vivaldi F. 357 Canal
(New York City Directory, 1859)

V. F. HARRISON, PIANO-FORTE MANU-
facturer, No. 357 Canal st., offers a fine stock of his
celebrated instruments, fully warranted, at low prices.
(New York Times, Sep. 6, 1859)

Harper John, pianomaker, 407 Av. 1
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Hausmann Christian, cabinetmaker,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hausmann Christian, pianos, 244 W. 27t, h 205 W. 27th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Hausmann Christian, pianos. 244 W. 27th
Hawes C. H. piano tuner, 199 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)

CHRS. HAUSMANN & CO.,

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURERS

No. 1
BROOME ST.,
Cor. of EAST STREET,
NEW YORK.
CHRS. HAUSMANN,ADAM SCHMITT,JOHN MILLER.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Hawkey Henry, pianos, 118 Amity
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Hawkey Henry, 31 King
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hazelton & Brother, manu. 219 Centre street.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Hazelton Henry, pianos, 209 Centre,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hazelton Henry, pianofortes, 219 Centre
Hazelton H. & F. pianofortes, 219 Centre
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Hazelton John E. pianos, 209 Centre,
Hazelton Brothers, pianos, 209 Centre
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hazelton and Brothers, 269 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Hazelton Brothers, pianos, 34 University pl.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Hazelton Brothers, sales, $104,661
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Hazelton Bros. pianos, 34 University Place
(New York State Directory, 1870)

PIANO-FORTES. - HAZLETON & BRO., Manu-

factory and Ware-rooms, No. 219 Centre st., near Grand,
where may be found a fine assortment of Rosewood Pianos,
made in the most substantial manner and latest style.
(New York Daily Times, Dec. 15, 1852)

PIANO-FORTES - HAZLETON & BROTHER,

manufacturers. Wareroom No. 219 Centre-st., where
may be found a fine assortment of Pianos. Also 2 second
hand pianos of Nuns & Chickering's make. For sale cheap.
(New York Daily Times, Apr. 14, 1853)

HAZLETON & BROTHERS offer at their manu-

factory and warerooms, No. 219 Centre-st., near
Grand, a fine assortment of Piano-Fortes, in plain and or-
namented cases, with all the modern improvements.
(New York Daily Times, June 4, 1853)
HAZLETON BROS. PIANO-FORTE MAN-
ufactrurers. No. 208 Centre st., offer a fine assortment
of brilliant and full-tones Pianos at the lowest rates.
Warranted to give satisfaction :guaranteed for 3 years.
(New York Times, Sep. 6, 1859)

P

IANOS-PIANOS.

HAZELTON BROTHERS,
Manufacturers of
THE FULL IRON FRAME AND OVERSTRUNG
BASS PIANO-FORTE,
IN ALL STYLES OF CASES,
AT VERY MODERATE PRICES.
Warerooms No. 90 Prince-st., near and West of Broad-
way.
(New York Times, Jan. 1, 1861)
HAZLETON BROTHERS,
OVERSTRUNG GRAND AND SQUARE
PIAN0-FORTE MANUFACTURERS.
No. 29 Prince-st., a few doors west of Broadway, New-
York. These pianos have always received the first pre-
mium wherever they have been exhibited. A written
guarantee for five years accompanies each piano. These
instruments will be sold at prices to suit the times.
(New York Times, Jan. 5, 1863)
HAZELTON BROTHERS.
OVERSTRUNG GRAND AND SQUARE PIANO-
FORTE MANUFACTURERS,
No. 29 Prince-st., a few doors west of Broadway, N. Y.
These pianos have always received the first premium
wherever they have been exhibited. A written guaran-
tee for five years accompany each piano.
(New York Times, Dec. 28, 1865)

H

AZELTON BROTHERS, PIANO-FORTE

manufacturers, would call the attention of mu-
sicians and the public generally to the many and great
improvements in the construction of their pianos.
Their "EUPHONIC AGRAFFE TREBLE" has been
conceded by all to possess power, brilliancy and sweet-
ness in the highest degree.
   Warerooms No. 90 Prince-st.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1866)

HAZELTON BROTHERS,

Manufacturers of the

FULL IRON FRAME AND OVERSTRUNG

GRAND AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES,

WAREROOMS, 99 PRINCE STREET, a few doors west of Broadway.
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Healy Thomas, Pianoforte mker., 167 1/2 Division Street, badge no. 652
(Documents, Bd. Aldermen N.Y., 1859)
Heerwagen William, pianos, 252 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Henderson John Y., music, 549 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Henderson John Y. r. 39 Marion
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Henrich Charles, piano, h 159 Seventh av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Herbert George W. pianos, 543 B'way, h 112 Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)

HERTER & BROTHER,

PIANO-FORTE ACTION MAKERS,

Nos. 142-146 Elizabeth St., near Broome, N. Y.
  Beg to imform the publich that they manufacture
Piano-Forte Action for Upright, Grand, Square
Pianos, Organs and Melodeons. Action Moulidings,
Shanks, Darnuls, etc., of the most accomplished
kind. All orders thankfully received and punctu-
ally attended to.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Hewitt J. 59 Maiden Lane [grand pianofortes, uprights and longways, with additional keys, squares ditto with or without additional keys
(1801; Furniture of our Forefathers, 1906)
Higgins Albion P. pianos, 789 B'way, h 164 Lafayette av. B'klyn
Hintz Adolph, pianos, 173 Lewis & 393 E. 4th, h 281 E. 4th
(New York City Directory, 1869)

HINTZ & SCHRAIDT,

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURERS,

Corner of Fourth and Lewis Streets,
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Hoffman, Charles H. pianofortemaker, r. 386 Grand
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Hoffman Chas. piano legs, 3 1st
(New York State Directory, 1870)

CHS. HOFFMAN,

Manufacturer of

Piano Legs, Lyres, &c., &c.,

No. 99 FORSYTH STREET,
New York.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Hoffman & Co. pianos, 78 Barrow
Hoffman J. pianos, &c. 50 Court (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Hoffman Theodore, pianomaker, 161 Mercer,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Hoffman Theodore & Co. pianos, 78 Barrow, h 43 Carmine
Hoffman & Stuehler, pianos, 78 Earrow
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Hoffmaster Charles A. piano legs, 147 Baxter, h 122 Eldridge
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Holder Charles J. pianofortes, r. 188 Spring
(New York City Directory, 1852)

FIRST PREMIUM 1841-42-44 AND 52. -

The splendid 7 1/3 octave Instruments of the subscriber
are now eliciting the admiration of professors and musi-
cal families, these instruments are destined to supercede
the Grand Piano, as they possess all their melody and
power, and are afforded at half their price, together with
Pianos of 7 and 6 3/4 octaves at the lowest manufacturing
pricesCHAS. J. HOLDER, No. 188 Spring-st.
(New York Daily Times, Apr. 14, 1853)

H

OLDER'S PATENT RADIATING SOUND-

ING BOARD PIANOS. - Four first premium med-
als awarded. Warerooms No. 100 Spring-st., under St.
Nicholas Hotel
(New York Times, June 10, 1863)

$225 - HOLDER'S PIANOS - $500.

FOUR FIRST-PREMIUM MEDALS.
Wareroom, No. 100 Spring-st., under St. Nicholas.
(New York Times, July 25, 1863)

Holmes David S. staioner, 12 Av. D
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Holmes D. S. pianos, &c. 89 4th, E. D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Holmes D.S..Music Publisher, Stationery, Blank and Misc., Pianos, Musical Instruments; 89 4th St, E.D.
(Brooklyn City Bus. Dir., 1873)
Holmes George F. pianos, 14 Av. 3,
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Holmes George F. pianos, 20 Sixth
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Holt, Charles, jr., pianofortes, publisher of music and of the Hutchinson song book, 156 Fulton Street, 2d door east of Broadway [1847]
Holt, Charles. jr., pianofortes, 82 Fulton Street [1848]
Holt, Charles, jr., pianofortes, 134 Fulton Street.
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

PATENT ACTION PIANO FORTES

some of which are to be opened this very day, direct
from the manufactory. Those wishing to examine
these celebrated instruments, are respectfully invi-
ted to call at the residence off the subscriber, where
they can be seen.
   Piano Covers and Stools. Pianos tuned. Old
Instruments exchanged.C. HOLT, JR,
210 Pearl, near Tillary st, Brooklyn.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 14.11.1845)

Howe Arron B. pianomaker, 609 Fourth
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Howe Michael, pianos, 127 E. 26th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Howe Michael, piano and harp strings, n. 207 E. 22d
(New York State Directory, 1870)

MICHAEL HOWE,

Manufacturer of

PIANO FORTE STRINGS & WIRES,

No. 130 EAST 28TH STREET,
Bet. 2d and 3d Aves,New York
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Huebner Otto, piano tuner, 9 Delancey
Hughes H. F. piano maker, 369 Broadway, E.D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Hutchings Walter, pianos, 91 Elizabeth, h 313 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ihlsing Louis, pianos, 224 E. 18th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
lhlseng & Holmstrom..Manufrs of Pianofortes, Warerooms, 531o Fulton St
(Brooklyn City Bus. Dir., 1873)

L.

IHLSENG OFFERS FOR SALE VERY

low for case, or on instalments, several very
fine square and upright Pianos. Also second-hand
pianos. Apply at No. 190 East. 21st-st. Factory No. 163
East 33d-st.
(New York Times, Jan. 25, 1865)

LARS C. IHLSENG,

PIANO-FORTE MAKER,

103 EAST THIRTY-THIRD STREET,

Between 3d and 4th AvenuesNEW YORK.
Pianos Tuned and Repaired. Old Pianos taken in Exchange.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

L.

IHLSENG, PIANOFORTE MANU-

facturer. Warerooms 16 Fulton st. Those piano-
fortes are much used and favored by the best professors
to Brooklyn and New York. They are sold greatly bel-
ow other first class pianos, and to hire and rent applied
if purchased.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 24.01.1868)

IHLSENG & HOLMSTROM

Manufacturers of

PIANO-FORTES,

Warerooms, No. 530 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, N.Y.

Pianos, Parlor and Church Organs for sale
on monthly instalments. Old Pianos
taken in exchange.
(New York State Directory, 1870)

Ihne John, tuner
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Ihne John, pianos, 112 E. 14th, h 200 E. 17th
Ihne John jr. pianos, 112 E. 14th, h 407 E. 24th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ihne & Son, pianos, 112 E. 14th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

I

HNE & SON'S PIANO-FORTES. - THE

best instrument in the United States. No. 111 East
14th-st., near the Academy of Music.
(New York Times, May 27, 1865)

IHNE & SON,

Manufacturers of

SQUARE OVERSTRUNG PIANO-FORTES,

WAREROOMS AND MANUFACTORY,
111 East 14th Street, and 118 and 120 Third Avenue,
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Jackson James jr. pianos, 361 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Jacob Brothers, piano manufacturers, no. 55 Bushwick Parkway
(1880s; Brooklyn's Eastern District, 1942)

JAMES & HOLMSTROM, Manufacturers of Grand, Square, and Upright Pianos, 233 and 235 East Twenty-first Street.-The, firm of Messrs. James & Holmstrom has been for several years before the American people, as manufacturers of first-class grand, square, and upright pianos, and their standing has always been of the highest character. There are a number of other houses more pretentious, which advertise in high-sounding phraseology, but for an honest, reliable, trustworthy firm with which to deal, we do not know a better one than Messrs. James & Holnstrom's in the piano trade. The present firm was organized in 1872, the copartners being F. P. James and Andrew Holmstrom, both of whom are practical and experienced piano makers, fully conversant with every detail and feature of the business and the requirements of patrons. The premises occupied comprise a superior four story and basement building, 50x100 feet in dimensions. The workshops are fully supplied with the latest-improved tools, appliances, and machinery known to the trade. Highly-skilled workmen are employed, and the machinery is driven by steam power. By adopting sundry new and valuable improvements, suggested by years of experience, the firm have succeeded in imparting to their pianos a matchless purity and evenness of tcne throughout the entire scale. The touch of these splendid pianos is light and elastic, the tone brilliant and sonorous, with an exquisite, clear treble, devoid of that metallic ring so noticeable in pianos made by many celebrated manufacturers. In point of finish, style, durability, and quality of tone, these pianos are fully up to the stardard so long sought for by leading professional and amateur pianists, being desirable alike for the requirements of the parlor, or the severer tests of the concert, hall. Messrs. James and Holmstrom have received numbers of flattering testimonials from eminent musicians throughout the United States and abroad, many of whom have tested these pianos for years, and without hesitation rank them among the leading instruments of the present day. The firm warrant every grand, square, or upright piano that leaves their warerooms, for a term of five years. Messrs. James & Holmstrom make a specialty of upright pianos. and are prepared to furnish upright instruments that will stand in tune as long as sny grand or square piano ever manufactured, while in point of quality and quantity of tone, strength, elegance, and durability, these piano fortes are absolutely unrivalled in the United States or Europe. This responsible firm does not aim to compete with the so-called cheap pianos that flood the market, but desires only to furnish an instrument that will be a credit to the partners and a pleasure to the buyer: consequently the prices have been arranged as low as good workmanship and first-class materials will admit. Mr. James is a native of New York State, while his partner, Mr. Holhnstrom, was born in Sweden, but has resided in America for the last quarter of a century. During the civil war, Mr. James enlisted in the Forty-fourth New York Volunteer Infantry, and served with credit and bravery from 1861 to 1865 in the Army of the Potomac. He was present at several important battles, and was noted for his devotion to the cause of the Union. Both gentlemen are highly esteemed by the community as liberal honorable, and conscientious business men, and their prospects in the near future in the piano trade are of the most encouraging and flattering character. They take pleasure in extending to any persons contemplating the purchase of a piano a cordial invitation to hear, see, and examine their splendid instruments before purchasing elsewhere.

(Illustrated New York, 1888)

Jaques John D. music, 385 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Jaques, John D., music publisher, 538 Broadway [1853]
Jaques, John D., pianos, 538 Broadway [1854-1855]
Jaques, John D., pianos, 510 Broadway [1856]
Jaques, John D. pianos, 493 Greenwich Street [1857]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Jardine Geo. organbuilder, 548 Pearl
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Jardine John pianomaker 459 Broadway
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Jardine, John 457 Hudson Street
(Herald, 1848)

J

ARDINE PIANOS - OF SWEET, FULL, BRIL-
liant voice, beautifully finished and moderate prices.
JARDINE & SONS' warerooms, No. 82 East 14th-st., op-
posite Academy of Music.
(New York Times, Dec. 13, 1865)

Jennys John L. R. pianos, 333 E. 21st
Jennys John L. R. jr. pianos, 235 E. 21st
Jennys & Son, pianos, 233 E. 21st
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Jennys & Son, pianos, 233 E. 21st
(New York State Directory, 1870)

A

S PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS MESSRS.
JENNYS & SON, 235 East Twenty-first street, between
Second and Third avenues, are eminently in advance of all
their competitors. Every instrument manufactured by them
has the "patent Agraffe" attachment, affording a superiority
of tone that cannot be produced without it. The instruments
of this firm are used and selected by many of the first insti-
tutions throughout the country on account of their immense
power, brilliancy and sweetness of tone and great durability,
and also for a first class instrument they are the most rea-
sonable in price offered to the public. Every instrument is
fully warranted six years.
(New York Herald, May 18, 1869)

Johnston David B. pianos, 107 Fourth av. h 96 Barrow
(New York City Directory, 1869)

D. B. JOHNSTON,

PIANO-FORTES,

99 Bleecker Street,
One block West of Broadway,NEW YORK.
N. B. - Particular attention paid to repairing and tuning.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Johnston & Hardenbrook, pianos, 107 Fourth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Jollie Allen R. mus. inst. mkr. 300 Broadway
Jollie Edward, inst'mnts, 300 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Jollie, Samuel C., & Co.., music store, 385 Broadway [1838-1840]
Jollie, Samuel C., music store, 385 Broadway [1841-1845]
Jollie, Samuel C., music store, 413 broadway [1846]
Jollie, Samuel C., pianos, 201 Broadway [1847-1848]
Jollie, Samuel C., pianos, 300 Broadway [1849]
Jollie, Samuel C., music, 300 Broadway [1850]
Jollie, Samuel C., pianos, 300 Broadway [1851-1852]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Jollie Samuel C. pianos, 300 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Jollie, Samuel C., music 300 Broadway[1853-1854]
Jollie, Samuel C., music, 519 Broadway [1855]
Jollie & Millet, music store, 385 Broadway [1835]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Jones Isaac F. 52 Ann
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Jones Isaac F. pianos, 52 Ann, h 331 W. 22d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Johnson, Stimpson & Co. 9 Mercer [piano leg makers]
Judson & Munger, 722 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)

J

UDSON & MUNGER HAVE REMOVED

from 723 to No. 630 Broadway, (next door to Laura
Keene's Theatre,) with Haines Bros. Pianos to let.
(New York Times, May 2, 1860)

Kanouse Abraham M. 435 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Karr William H. pianos, 646 B'way & 149 Baxter, h 32 Jones
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Kearsing J., pianoforte maker, 293 Bowery
Kearsing Thomas, pianoforte maker, Sixth n. Avenue 3d
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Keller I. & Co. piano keys, r 196 Elm
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Keller Isaac & Co. piano keys, 196 Elm
Keller J. & Co. pianos, 196 Elm
(New York State Directory, 1870)

KELLER & CO.,

PIANO-FORTE KEY MAKERS,

196 ELM STREET,
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Kindt Louis, pianos, 413 W. 42d, h S. I.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Kindt Louis, pianos, 421 W. 42d
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Kindt & Manz, pianos, 413 W. 42d
(New York City Directory, 1869)

KINDT & MANZ

MANUFACTURERS OF GRAND AND SQUARE

PIANOS,

have removed to their new and spacious warerooms,
No. 385 Broadway, between 17th and 18th sts., New-York,
would respectfully ask the attention of those wishing to
purchase pianos to their improved and superior instru-
ments. These are all manufactured under their per-
sonal supervision, and from their great experience and
close attention, they are enabled to guarantee them un-
surpassed by any in brilliancy, delicacy and compass of
tone, combined with a superiority of workmanship,
which insures the greatest possible durability.
  All of these are constructed with the Agraffe arrange-
ment, and each instrument will be warranted for five
years.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1866)

KINDT & MANZ,

MANUFACTURERS OF FIRST CLASS

GRAND SQUARE PIANOS,

WAREROOMS, No. 865 BROADWAY,

NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Klein Chas. piano tuning, 348 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Klix Alberecht. pianos, 99 Bleecker & 196 W. Houston, h 14 Market
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Klix Albrecht pianos 14 Market
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Knabe William & Co., 112 Fifth Avenue
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Knabe, Wm. & Co. 112 Fifth av.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Knauff Fred'k, pianos, 250 Third av. h 240 E. 25th
(New York City Directory, 1869)

FREDERICK KNAUFF,

Manufacturer of

PIANO-FORTES,

228 THIRD AVENUE,
Bet. 20th and 21st Streets,NEW YORK.
Tuning, Repairing, &c., &c., &c.
Every Instrument warranted for five years.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Koelbe Rudolph, pianos, r. 235 W. 24th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Kohl & Witzel, piano legs, tops, lockboards, backs, lyers, 94 Clinton
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Kohl & Witzel, piano legs, r. 94 Clinton
Kompff Philipp, pianos, 174 3d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Kompff Philip, pianos, 125 Third av. h 174 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)

PHILIP KOMPFF,

162 THIRD AVENUE,
Bet. 16th and 17th Sts.,NEW YORK.
  NEW and SECOND-HAND PIANOS, best City
make, warranted in the most perfect order, always
on hand. Also, Pianos Repaired and Regulated
Hammers newly covered, &c.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Koth Frederick, 96 Walker
(New York City Directory, 1859)

FREDRICK KOTH,

125 and 127 Worth Street, New York,
Manufacturer of

PIANO-FORTE ACTION,

  Also, ACTION MOULDED TO ORDER,
  Piano Leather and all articles in my line kept
constantly on hand.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Krakauer Simon, musician,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Krakauer, D., Piano Manufacturer, 352 Bowery.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)

D.

KRAKAUER,

MANUFACTURER OF PIANO FORTES,

352 Bowery, near Fourth st, N. Y.
  I offer this month a first class stock of new and second
hand pianos, at extraordinary low prices for cash. Pianos
sold on monthly installment, exchanged and to rent.
Rent taken if bougfht. Don't fail to call before buying
elsewhere.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 04.09.1874)

KRALL & FAKLER,

Manufacturers of

PIANO-FORTES,

FACTORY AND WAREROOM, No. 291 West 24th Street,
Bet. 9th and 10th Avenues,NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Kranich Hellmuth, pianos, 241 E. 23d h 225 E. 35th
Kranich, Bach & Co. pianos, 243 E. 23d.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Kranich, Bach & Co. sales, $42,622
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Kranich, Bach & Co. piano forte makers, 241 E. 23d.
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Kranich & Bach, 241 and 243 E. 26ths st.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Kraushaar Anton, pianos, 19 Houston, h 122 Sullivan
(New York City Directory, 1869)

KRAUSHAAR & CO.,

Manufacturers of

PIANO-FORTES,

Wareroom and Factory, 19 West Houston Street,
Near Broadway,NEW YORK.
ANTON KRAUSHAAR,CHARLES J. SCHONEMANN,TOBIAS HAMM.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Kroeger Bernhard, pianos, 10 Second av. & 224 W. 27th, h B'klyn
(New York City Directory, 1869)

B. KROEGER & SIVERT,

Manufacturer of

GRAND, SQUARE, AND UPRIGHT PIANO-FORTES.

Manufactory, 156 West Twenty-seventh Street,
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Kroeger & Hausmann, pianos, 244 W. 27th
Kuhn Anthony D pianos, 10 Second av. h 30 First
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Kunebel S. pianos, 161 Duffield (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Kurten Peter, piano teacher, h 162 Seventh
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lamson A. L. pianos, 47 Johnson (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Landenberger Godfrey, pianos, 91 Elizabeth, h 56 Spring
Landenberger & Hutchings, pianos, 91 Elizabeth
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Landenberger & Hutchings, piano action, 91 Elizabeth
(New York State Directory, 1870)

GEORGE LANGE,

Manufacturer of

Piano-Forte and Organ Keys,

IVORY AND PEARL,

No. 127 East 22d Street.
Bet. 1st and 2d Avenues,NEW YORK.
  Keeps constantly on hand all kinds of Sharps.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Lankola, Jean, manu.
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Lankola John, 5 Mercer
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Lee James, pianos, 236 E. 28th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lee James J. piano and harp strings, n. 236 E. 28th
Lent J. E. pianos, 61 Smith (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Lighte & Newton, manu. 23 Canal street
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Lichte Ferdi'nd C. pianos, 120 Wooster & 421 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Lighte E. C. & Co., 289 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Lighte Ferdinand C. pianos, 421 Broome, h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lighte C. F. & Co. sales, $155,000
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Lighte, Newton & Bradburys pianos, 120 Wooster & 421 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)

MESSRS. LIGHTE & NEWTON, No. 22 Canal-

st., in consequence of the increased demand and un-
rivaled popularity of their PIANO-FORTES, have extend-
ed their business, and are now prepared to offer to their
friends, and those withing a superior instrument, and exten-
sive assortment, in plain and ornamental cases, of modern
style, from 6 1/2 to 7 1/3 octave. Second-hand Pianos taken in
exchange. Broadway Ware-rooms, No. 423
(New York Daily Times, Dec. 15, 1852)
MESSRS. LIGHTE & NEWTON, No. 22
Canal st., in consequence of the increased demand
and unrivaled popularity of their PIANO-FORTES, have
extended their business, and are now prepared to offer to
their friends, and those withing a superior instrument, an
extensive assortment, in plain and ornamental cases, of
modern style, from 6 1/2 to 7 1/3 octave. Second-hand Pianos
taken in exchange. Broadway Ware-rooms, No. 423.
(New York Daily Tines, Apr. 14, 1853)

GREAT IMPROVEMENT IN PIANO-
FORTES. - Messrs. LIGHTE, NEWTON & BRAD-
BURYS, No. 421 Broome-st., respectfully invite atten-
tion to their Piano-fortes, constructed with the patent
arch wrest-plank, which is undoubtedly the most substan-
tial improvement ever introduced into this instrument.
(New York Times, Jan. 8, 1858)
LIGHTE, NEWTON & BRADBURYS, NO.
421 Broome st., near Broadway, have a splendid as-
sortment of the celebrated Piano-Fortes, in all styles,
constructed with the patent Arch Wrest-Plank. Pur-
chasers in want of a superior instrument will find it for
their advantage to call.
(New York Times, June 19, 1858)

ANOTHER VICTORY!

LIGHT, NEWTON & BRADBURY'S Piano FOrte Ahead

in New England. Received the First Premium

at the Connecticut State Fair.

L

OWELL MASON, JAS B. WEBB, NATHAN RICHARD-
SON, well known as the best Musical Authority in
Boston pronounce them equal to any Piano FOrte made
in the United States. All disinterested Professors, Ama-
teurs and Judges of a good Piano in New York pronounce
them the best.
  BOARDMAN, GRAY & CO.'S CAMPANA ATTACHMENT, cer-
tainly are the only Piano Fortes, whose exquisite sweet-
ness of tone, and so celebrate all over the world, compare
with the above instruments.

E. M. MANN, ERIE, PA.,

Is sole agent for the above manufacturers, and has a five
assortment at New York prices on time for approved paper,
or a liberal discount for cash.
Also an assortment of other Pianos at great bargains.
4 Second hand Pianos at bargains.
15 Piano Stools from $5 to $12.
12 Piano Spreads, Beautiful Patterns, cheap.
25 Music Portfolios, 4 to, the most splendid.
150 Guitars, Violins, Banjos, Flutinia, Accordeons,
Flutes, &c., &c.
   Sheet Music at Reduced Prices.
  Erie, Dec. 8, 1855. 30MANN'S Music Store.
(The Erie Observer [PA], Jan. 26, 1856)
LIGHTE & BRADBURYS, MANUFACTU-
RERS OF GRAND AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES -
Constructed with all the improvements conducive to
superiority of tone, touch and durability, and to any re-
quired style of furniture. An extensive assortment
always on sale at their Warerooms and Office, No. 428
Broome st. ; also, at their Depot, No. 22 Cortland st.
(New York Times, Sep. 6, 1859)

L

IGHTE & BRADBURYS, MANUFACTU-
RERS OF GRAND AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES
- Constructed with all the improvements condusive to
superiority of tone, touch and durability, and to any
required style of furniture. An extensive assortment
always on sale at their Warerooms and office, No 421
Broome-st.
(New York Times, Feb. 18, 1860)

A GREATLY IMPROVED PIANO-FORTE.

LIGHTE & BRADBURYS.
Manufacturers of
GRAND AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES,
No. 421 Broome-st.
  We desire to inform the Profession, the Trade and the
Public generally, that having rebuilt our Factory, re-
cently destroyed by fire, on a greatly enlarged and im-
proved plan, we are now prepared to supply our friends
with our
NEW SCALE
OVERSTRUNG BASS
PATENT INSULATED FULL IRON-FRAME
PIANO-FORTES.
  In rebuilding our factory, years of experience have
enabled us to introduce very many improvements, both
in the structure of the building and in the machinery,
and in getting up our new PIANO-FORTE our aim and de-
termination has been to produce an instrument that
shall defy competition. Our first artists have cheerfully
testified to the great superiority of our NEW SCALE
PIANO-FORTES. We cordially invite all to examine
for themselves.
(New York Times, May 8, 1860)
A GREATLY IMPROVED PIANO-FORTE.
LIGHTE & BRADBURYS.
  Manufacturers of a NEW SCALE OVERSTRUNG
BRASS, PATENT INSULATED, FULL IRON FRAME.
GRAND and SQUARE PIANO-FORTES, 421 Broome.
(New York Times, Sep. 19, 1860)

D

ISSOLUTION OF COPARTNERSHIP. -
Notice is hereby given to all persons having claims
against the firm of LIGHTE & BRADBURYS to present
the same for payment at the office of said firm, at No. 421
Broome-st., in the City of New-York, on or before the 31st
day of January, instant, as said firm will be dissolved on
that day, of which dissolution notice is hereby given.
LIGHTE & BRADBURYS
  Dated New-York, Jan. 25, 1863.
(New York Times, Jan. 25, 1863)

Lighte F. C. & Co. pianos, 421 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lighte F. C. & Co. pianos, 421 Broome
Lighte F. C. & CO. pianos, 985 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
F. C. Lighte & Co., 164 & 166 State Street, Chicago
(Inter-State Exposition, 1873)

F.

C. LIGHTE & CO., PIANO-FORTE
MANUFACTURERS - No. 421 Broome-st., second
block east of Broadway. Mr. F. C. LIGHTE was the
senior partner and only practical piano-forte maker of
the late firm of LIGHTE & BRADBURYS. Pianos for
sale and to let.
(New York Times, Mar. 25, 1863)

F. C. Lighte, & Co.

Manufacturers of
FIRST CLASS GRAND & SQUVRE

Piano Fortes.

  Sole Patentee of LIGHT'S celebrated Pat-
ent Insulated Iron Frame. Are also makers of
the very BEST PIANO-FORTES in the Market,
Having been awarded the
Highest Premium at the American
World's Fair,
and the Exhibition of the Industry of all Na-
tions. Besides numerous other Gold and Sil-
ver Medals, together with testimonials from all
the most distinguished Musical celebrities in
Europe and America.
  They have just received the Highest prem-
ium at the Illinois State Fair - The Indiana
State Fair - The Iowa State Fair - The Wis-
consin State Fair, etc. In competition with
the most celebrated Manufacturers of New
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, &c.
  Warerooms - 421 BROOME STREET, Near
Broadway, New York city. Orders by
mail promptly attended to - send for circular.
(Daily Denver Gazette [CO], Jan. 7, 1868)

Lichte & Ernst, 12 E. Fourteenth st.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Lindell Eric J. pianofortes, 36 White
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Lindeman Ferdinand, pianos, 2 Leroy pl. h. 114th n Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lindeman Harman, pianos, 636 B'way & 56 Franklin
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Lindeman Herman, pianos, 2 Leroy pl. h E. 93d n Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lindeman Henry, pianos, 636 B'way & 56 Franklin
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Lindeman Henry, pianos, 2 Leroy pl. h 128 E. 78th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lindeman William, pianos
(New York City Directory, 1850)
Lindeman William, pianos, 56 Franklin, h. 56 Franklin
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Lindeman William, pianos, 2 Leroy pl. h Mount Vernon
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lindemann William & Sons, pianos, 636 B'way & 56 Franklin
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Lindeman and Sons, 233 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Lindeman & Sons, pianos, 2 Leroy pl.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Lindeman & Sons, sales, $62,980
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Lindeman & Sons, pianos, 92 Bleecker
(New York State Directory, 1870)

LINDEMANN, Wilhelm
(Article entitled Der aelteste deutsche Pianofabrikant in Amerika" [The Oldest German Piano Manufacturer in America]). ... The reputation of STEINWEG, WEBER, KNABE, DECKER, STECK, and other factories in the East, and that of Messrs. BRITTING and BIERE & son in Cincinnati is well-known. [We present] the biography of the oldest of them, Herr Wilhelm LINDEMANN. The owner of the well-known piano factory Lindemann and Sons came from the capital and residence city of Dresden, Saxony, from whence the father [Wilhelm LINDEMANN] emigrated to New York more than forty years ago. He was the third son of the preacher Karl Gotthilf LINDEMANN of Mauersberg, a village near Annaberg in the Erzgebirge. The family had a tradition of having come from Thuringia and that they were related to the mother of Dr. [Martin] Luther, who was a Lindemann. Wilhelm [Lindemann's] father came from a simple bourgeois family (his father was a weaver) and attended the municipal gymnasium [highschool] in Zwickau, thereafter [the University of] Wittenberg, an institution famous from the time of Luther. [The father] studied Theology and thereafter became the poorly paid rector of the municipal school in Joehstadt on the Bohemian border in a rough and lonely area of the Erzgebirge. Here he became the father of numerous children by his wife Amalia LANGER (five of the thirteen children died young). Of the seven surviving sons, six attended universities and only the third, Wilhelm [Lindemann], born on 28 Mar. 1794, devoted himself to ... craftsmanship.
After having learned cabinetmaking from an uncle on his mother's side in his birthplace of Joehstadt, Wilhelm Lindemann decided to perfect his craft in places outside this small and remote mountain village. He went to Wien [Vienna] in 1812 and devoted himself to perfecting himself in artistic cabinetmaking [Kunsttischlerei], an art which he was later to use in the manufacture of pianos. He then worked for a year as a pianomaker in Muenchen [Munich] and thereafter in the famous establishment of BREITKOPF and HAERTEL in Leipzig, and lastly with ROSENKRANZ in Dresden. He then went into business for himself, not limiting himself to old methods but inventing many improvements in pianomaking which were innovations in Europe and eventually led him to come to America. Unfortunately, he did not have sufficient capital to maintain a large warehouse or to become a salesman, which was a great disadvantage, because the dealers in Dresden and Leipzig to whom he sold his pianos took all the profits, leaving him poor.
As a consequence, [Lindemann] decided to turn his back on the Fatherland and to emigrate to America leaving his family in Germany. He landed on 19 Dec 1834 in New York without knowing the language or business practices of the country. While staying at one of the many German boardinghouses in New York, he learned that there were only two piano factories in America : DUBOIS and STODART in New York and CHICKERING in Boston. [Footnote : The firm of Dubois and Stodart later became Stodart and DUNHAM, when Herr Dubois left the firm and came to Cincinnati, where he founded a piano and billiard factory on Sycamore Street. His firm was unprofitable, but he carried on the business until the beginning of the 1850s in Cincinnati.] The New York firm [Dubois and Stodart], wherein a Frenchman was principle sotckholder, was the leading firm. Employing an interpreter, Herr Lindemann went to [Dubois and Stodart] where he met a German named -- UNGER, a salesman. Lindemann asked for work and [Unger] promised to speak on his behalf but informed him that the pianomakers had a protective association which had to give its agreement to the hiring of new workers. The next day the association held a shop meeting and approved his hiring. However, the delay of several days in finding work made [Herr Lindemann] highly indignant.
At that time, New York was not yet the powerful "world city" it is today, but for America it was a metropolitan center. The piano and musical business was still quite primitive. The most important of the stores was the firm of GEIB and WALKER at 23 Maiden Lane. It was in this store that Herr Lindemann became the tuner and repairman... Herr Lindemann was paid eight dollars weekly in salary.
Herr Lindemann left the boardinghouse and rented a room together with a shipmate, Herr -- PRUNO. He bought a pair of ordinary chairs, a table, and a stove, and cooked his own meals. By such economies he was able to save $80 in a few months, which he sent to his family in Germany. It was not long until his weekly salary was increased to twelve dollars, and, since he also made repairs and did other work privately, he soon earned between eighteen and twenty dollars per week -- then a really good sum. The next year he sent for his family ; they arrived safely in New York on 27 Oct 1835 accompanied by his brother-in-law Dr. Anton GESCHEIDT.
The next year (1836) Lindemann established his own business at the corner of Bank and Fourth streets. The business was small, with only one journeyman worker, and came near to being closed, when the bank crisis of 1837 caused many enterprises to fold. During this crisis Lindemann met Herren -- SIMON and -- GERDING who offered him a place in Jamaica, Long Island, which he found necessary to accept. In 1842 he moved back to New York and established his business on James Street, where his oldest son, Hermann [LINDEMANN] helped him. By 1844 Lindemann had so expanded his business that he was able to produce two instruments per week ; consequently he had to move his shop to Centre Street and to enlarge it.
Five years later (1849) Lindemann made his son Hermann a parnter in the business. Inn the same year he moved the shop to 56 Franklin Street and began producing four instruments per week. He remained here until 1858, when he moved his factory to 171-173 Mercer Street. It was here that Hermann Lindemann developed the "Cycloid" piano in 1860, which brought the firm considerable fame.
The Civil war had its influence on the firm, and half of the workers had to be dismissed. In 1863-1864 the business improved and, when the "Cycloid" piano began to be promoted, the firm flourished. The factory again had to be expanded, so that the building at 92 Bleeker street was rented and about eight pianos per week were manufactured. In 1864 two additional sons, Heinrich and Ferdinant LINDEMANN became partners in the firm which today is one of the most prosperous in the country.
Lindemann pianos are to be found throughout the world -- Germany, France, Mexico, the West Indies, South America, California, Oregon, and even in the Sandwich Islands. Since sales in the American West were particularly important, the firm found it necessary in 1874 to found a branch [Zweighaus] in Cincinnati at 173 West Fourth Street under the management of the oldest son Hermann Lindemann. 1st March [1875] Herr Wilhelm Lindemann, the oldest [living] manufacturer in America, celebrated his 82nd birthday.

(Early 19th Century German Settlers..., 1984)

L

INDEMAN & SONS, NO. 636 BROADWAY,
- Who have been established for twenty-five years
as manufacturers, take pleasure in offering their new
scale, over-strung, full iron-framed PIANOS, which
combine beauty with equality, power of tone, and elas-
ticity of touch. These pianos are highly recommended
by the following eminent artists : Gustave Satter, Carl
Anschutz, John N. Pattison, Max Maretzek, Wm.
G. Dietrich, John Suckert, Gustav J. Stoeckel.
(New York Times, Aug. 23, 1860)
LINDEMAN & SONS, NO. 636 BROAD-
way, Piano Manufacturers. These Pianos are highly
recommended by the following artists.Gustav Satter,
Carl Anschutz, John N. Pattison, Max Maretzek.
(New York Times, Sept. 19, 1860)

THE NEW GOLD MEDAL PIANO

LINDEMAN & SONS'

CELEBRATED AND UNEQUALLED

PATENT CYCLOID PIANO-FORTES

Were awarded at the late Fair of the American Institute
The

FIRST-PREMIUM GOLD MEDAL

FOR

NOVELY, SUPERIORITY AND EXCELLENCE.

  Similar testimonials were awarded these Unequalled
Instruments at the State Fairs of Michigan, Indiana,
Kansas, and wherever they have been Exhibited in Com-
petition during 1865. The Cycloid Piano has superiority
of actual melodious power, and a purity and vocality of
tone, a perfection of touch, a just mechanical construc-
tion, and will stand in tune longer than any other form of
piano. N. B. - Warranted for six years. Warerooms No.
2 Le Roy-place, Bleecker-st., one block west of Broad-
way.
  Send for our new Gold Medal Circular.
(New York Times, Dec. 25, 1865)

L

I N D E M A N & S O N S ,
MANUFACTURERSCYCLOID AND SQUARE
PIANOS, offer their stock at very low prices for the holidays ;
also several second Pianos from $200 to $300. Pianos to
let and sold on instalment. No. 2 Leroy place (Bleecker
street.
(New York Herald Dec. 29, 1869)

L

INDEMAN & SONS,
manufacturers of Cycloid and Square Pianos, have
removed to their
new warerooms
14 East Fourteenth street,
where they are prepared to offer a large stock of
the most elegant and very best
Pianos manufactured
(New York Herald, May 16, 1872)

Lindemann & Sons, Manufacturers of Pianos, No. 92 Bleecker Street. - The firm of Lindeman & Sons has long been before the American people as manufactueres of first-class pianos, their standing being amongst the highest. There are other houses more pretentious who advertise in high-sounding phraseology, by for an honest, reliable, trustworthy firm with which to deal we do not know a better in the piano trade. The history of the house is one which dates away back to the year 1821, when the firm began to manufacture in Dresden, Saxony. The date of the establishement of the New York house is 1836. A full and comprehensive line of grand, square and upright pianos are made by this reputable firm, which find a large and constantly increasing sale throughout the length and breadth of the United States, and which are ever to be found highly endorsed by those using them. The following award for distinctive excellence may be given as few amongst many prizes, namely the gold medals at the American Institute Fair, 1865 and 1867 ; Indiana State Fair, 1865 ; Kansas Agricultural Society, 1863 ; Ohio State Fair, 1882. It is not too much for us to say that the Lindeman piano is sought after in every corner of the globe, and may be found in France, Germany, Mexico, South America, Japan and the Sandwich Islands. Their sweet, deep, sympathetic tone is their distinctive characteristic. This, combined with their faultless action and elegance of design and fineness in finish, make them the most desirable pianos in market. The patent cycloid pianos of this firm's manufacture well merit them the universal approbation and large patronage given them. In fact we do not consider them other than equal to the best concert grand. For tone and strength and expression we cannot conceive of any better, and have no hesitancy in recommending them as such to the readers of this review. Since the introduction of the cycloid it cannot be denied but that the square pianos are becoming articles of ancient furniture and are not held in the esteem they once were. It is needless for us at this writing to prolong the article bearing on this house. Thousands of endorsements of those who have used them might be here given. It is sufficient to say that the house has an untarnished name for honor, honesty and square dealing. They may be consulted either from their New York headquarters, No. 92 Bleecker Street, or their Cincinnati branch, No. 173 West Fourth Street.

(New York's Great Industries, 1884)

Linden William, pianomaker, 478 Broadway
Linden & Fritz, pianofortes, 478 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Linden & Fritz, 478 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)

J. E. L. LINDSTEDT,

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURER.

WAREROOM, No. 16 FULTON STREET,
Near the Fulton Ferry,BROOKLYN.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Loader Thomas, 83 E. 29th
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Thomas Soud, 63, P Forte Maker, United States, United States
Philogus Soud, 25, P Forte Maker, United States, United States
(18 June 1825; London to New York on "Hudson")

PIANO FORTES.

T. LOUD, - PIANO FORTE MAKER, (from London,) respectfully informs the
public that he has replenished his stock, and has for sale a handsome assortment of
very superior Piano Fortes of touch and tone, seldom to be equalled ; one of which, just
finished, with four pedals, is of unusual and unrivaled splendour, united with real ex-
cellence. Merchants visiting the city, would consult the interest of themselves and
friends, (from whom they may have brought orders) by examining the above. Prices
moderate, and all Pianos warranted. Pianos tuned and repaired, and old ones taken in
exchange. No. 102 Canal-street, (Between Broadway and Lafayette Circus.)
April, 1826.
(New American Practical Navigator, 1826)

Ludke Ferdinand, pianos, 367 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ludke Ferdinand, pianos, 45 2d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Ludke & Schuier, pianos, 367 Broome
Ludolff August, pianos, 452 Broome, h 128 Forsyth
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Luther John F. pianos, 349 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Luther John F. pianos, 349 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Luther J. F. pianos, 349 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J. F. LUTHER,

Manufacturer of

PIANO-FORTES.

349 Broome Street,
Near Bowery,NEW YORK.
Pianos on hire, Tuned, Repaired, and taken or exchanged.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Lydecker Theodore, pianomkr,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Lydecker & Schmidt, piano hammer coverers, 150 E. 14th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Lynch Patrick, pianos, 827 B'way,
(New York City Directory, 1859)

A

GREAT BARGAIN. - A MAGNIFICENT SE-

VEN OCTAVE PIANO, that has been a short time
in use, will be sold for $100 less than the usual price.
Warranted for three years. P. Lynch, Manufacturer,
No. 921 Broadway, near the Fifth Avenue Hotel.
(New York Times, May 1, 1860)

Lynch & Gomien, pianos, 932 Broadway
Mahon John, pianos, 316 E. 39th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Malcolm, Stodart
(Stodart 7535)
Malcolm Thomas, pianoforte
(New York City Directory, 1850)
Malcolm Thomas, pianofortetuner, 76 Morton
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Malcolm Thomas B. 60, piano forte, Scotland
(Federal Census, 1850)
Manhattan Piano Forte Co. 229 E. 22d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Manhatton Piano Forte Co. 229 E. 22d
(New York State Directory, 1870)

THE MANHATTAN

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURING CO.,

No. 129 East Twenty-second Street,
Between 2d and 3d Avenues,NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

THE MANHATTAN

PIANO FORTE

MANUFACTURING CO.,

229 East 22d Street,

New York.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)

Manner Charles G, 78 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Manner G. C. & E. Gabler, 311 Rivington
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Manner G. C. pianoforte manuf. 311 and 315 Rivington st.
(Masonic Directory, 1860)
Manner George C. pianos, 187 Bowery & 554 B'way, h L. I.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Manner & Co., pianos, 187 Bowery
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Manner Chas. 38, piano maker, Germany
(Federal Census, 1870)

M

ANNER & CO. HAVE REMOVED

their manufactory and warerooms to No. 187 Bowery
above Delaney-st., and are now prepared to furnish their
various styles of Grand, Square and Upright ARION
PIANO-FORTES at retail and to the trade. These
pianos are constructed of the best-seasoned materials
with all the latest improvemetns and warranted equal
in every respect to the best manufactured. Pianos made
to order with any style of case that may be desired.
Old pianos taken in exchange. Pianos to rent
(New York Times, June 5, 1866)

T

HE ARION PIANO-FORTE. - MANNER

& CO., No. 187 Bowery, are now prepared to furnish
at retail or to the trade, their various styles of grand,
square and upright Arion piano-fortes, with their new
scales and all recent improvements. These pianos are
constructed of the best selected and thoroughly-seas-
oned material, and are warranted in every respect equal
to the best manufactured. Pianos made to order, with
any style of case desired. Old pianos taken in exchange
and to rent. Manufactory and warerooms, No. 187 Bow-
ery, near Delaney-st.
(New York Times, June 16, 1866)

Manz George M. pianos, 411 W. 42d, h 307 E. 17th
Marschall & Mittauer, pianos, 149 E. 14th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Marschall & Mittauer, sales, $80,172
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Marschall & Mittauer, piano makers, 149 E. 14th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

MARSCHALL & MITTAUER,

Manufacturers of

FIRST CLASS PIANO-FORTES.

88 WALKER STREET, between Broadway and Elm Street,
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

The Marchal & Smith Piano and Organ Company, No. 453 West 36th Street. - In this historical review of the great mercantile and manufacturing interests of the metropolis, the piano trade holds an important place. New York has always been the great national centre of this most thriving industry. The great advancement made of late years in musical culture, has rendered the task of the piano manufacturer one demanding no ordinary skill and enterprise. As in every other branch of industry, competition in this has grown to be of the keenest, and the growth of capable players and critics has advanced with the appearance of superior instruments. As a consequence many piano manufacturers of reputable standing for some years have been pushed out of existence, through inability to meet the exacting demand of the times. There is no risk therefore in hazarding the opinion that any firm which has stood the strain of the last twenty-five years' marvellous improvements in musical culture, and the construction of musical instruments, and whose merits are still unchallenged, has every reason to be proud of the ordeal through which it has passed and to be highly sanguine as to its career in the future. Such has been the fortunate lot of the Marchal and Smith Piano and Organ Company, whose products are to-day in the full light of advanced musical intelligence, rated among the very best example of American inventive genius and mechanical skill. In the manufacture of pianos this company is unexcelled. Chief among the points of superiority of their instruments, are their great strength, durability and beauty, coupled with a peculiar musical quality and richness entirelly their own. Their upright pianos are unsurpassed for beauty and originality of design, superiority of workmanship and finish. Their many noble qualities make them favorites everywhere. Compact and handsome, they occupy but small space, and are adapted to adorn the boudoir, or to ornament the parlor. The company manufacture reed organs for church, chapel and parlor use. These instruments combine all the most modern improvements, and have attained a standard reputation, and given perfect satisfaction wherever used. The products of the Marchal and Smith Piano and Organ Company are well known all over the United States. The business was founded in 1859, and has always enjoyed a prosperous career. A large stock is carried at their establishment, No. 453 West 36th Street. Mr. Robert W. Smith, the President of the company, was born in this city, and is well known to the trade as an honorable, straight-forward business man, prompt and reliable in all transactions. Mr. Geo. L. Hammedieu, the Secretary, is an energetic and talented gentleman, very popular in the highest social circles. Under their judicious management the affairs of the company are prospering, and their instruments attaining a world-wide celebrity.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Martin John, piano fortemaker, r. 110 Wooster
Martin Lewis, pianomaker, 116 Twelfth
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Martin Louis C. piano tuner, 240 ave. A
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Martine Louis C. tuner
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Martine Louis J. piano tuner, 607 E. 9th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Martins Eugene, pianos, 34 E. Houston, h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Martins Martin, pianos, 83 Leonard
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Martins Martin, pianos, 539 Houston
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Martins Martin, pianos, 34 E. Houston
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Martins & Ouvrier, pianos, 83 Leonard
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Martins & Ouvrier, pianos, 539 Houston
(New York City Directory, 1859)

FOR SALE AND TO HIRE - Seven octave Pi-

ano-Fortes, perfect instruments in all respects -
Warerooms and Factory 539 Houston st., a short distance
East of Broadway MARTINS & OUVRIER.
(New York Daily Times, June 6, 1853)

U

PRIGHT PIANOS. - MARTIN & OUVRIER,

manufacturers of upright and square pianos, No. 36
East Houston-st., near Broadway. First-class instru-
ments for sale or to hire. Upright Pianos in black cases,
ornamented with gilt mouldings, for sale at prices to suit
the times.
(New York Times, Oct. 20, 1862)

MARTINS & OUVRIER,

Manufacturers of

SQUARE AND UPRIGHT PIANOS,

34 EAST HOUSTON STREET, near Broadway,
Upright Piano-Fortes warranted perfect in all respects. Pianos to Hire.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Martins & Son, pianos, 34 E. Houston
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Martins & Son, pianos, 34 E. Houston
(New York State Directory, 1870)

UPRIGHT PIANOS- A LARGE SELECTION OF FIRST

class instruments of that shape either for hire or for
sale at the manufactory of MARTINS & SON, 34 East Hous-
ton street, near Broadway
(New York Herald, Apr. 13, 1869)

Mathushek Hermine, pianos, 694 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Mathushek Fredk 56 piano maker - 5000 Baden [New Haven]
(Federal Census, 1870)


Mathushek's "Table Piano," from the Ibach Collection [c.1840]

(Pianos and Their Makers, 1911)

Frederick Mathushek the well-known piano manufacturer and inventor of this city, died Monday, in the seventy-seventh year of his age, at 242 West One Hundred and Twenty-third Street, the residence of his grandson, Victor Hugo Mathushek, with whom he had been living for the past five years. His death was due to the natural infirmities incumbent on old age.
Frederick Mathushek was born June 9, 1814, in the Palace of Mannheim, Germany. From his early youth he showed a great desire to learn the secrets of the piano-making trade, which at that date was in its infancy. The story goes that one day the reigning Grand Duchess, Stephany, caught the youngster in her drawing room calmly dissecting her grand piano. Rather amused than otherwise at this thirst for knowledge, the noble lady had the lad apprenticed to a leading piano manufacturer in the town. With this man Mathushek stayed till his seventeenth year, and then he started on a tour through all the principal cities of Germany, Austria, and Russia inspecting the progress of foreign manufacture. His fame as a young of remarkable inventive genius had already preceded him, and when he reached London he easily obtained a most responsible position with the great house of Erard.
In 1849 he came to this country, his first connection being with John B. Dunham, then the leading maker of this city. While with this firm Mathushek constructed the first overstrung piano ever made in this country but Dunham hesitated to adopt it, saying that it was twenty years ahead of the times. In 1854 Mathushek joined the Wallace Pianoforte Company, which made a specialty of his inventions. While with them Mathushek produced the double sounding board piano, the lifting hammer rail for soft pedal purposes, the mammoth grand piano used in Gilmore's memorable musical festival at Boston, the orchestral equalizing scale, and the little Colibri. This latter piano gained the highest diploma awarded by the American Institute at the exhibition in this city of 1864.
Mathushek's last invention was that of the equilibre system of pianoforte, patented in 1879. Owing to that inherent carelessness common to many inventive geniuses. Mathushek neglected to patent more than one-half of his numerous inventions. At the time of his death he was superintendent of the Mathushek & Son Piano Company, 344 and 346 East Twenty-third Street.

(New York Times, Nov 11, 1891)

H

AVE YOU HEARD THE WONDERFUL COLIBRI
Piano? "Great soul in a small body" - A sample for
sale and can be seen at 83 Nassau street, office No. 3.
(New York Herald, Apr. 13, 1869)

"G

REAT SOUL IN A SMALL BODY." - WONDERFUL
Mathushek Piano. Sample at 85 Nassau street, office
No. 5. Also strictly private lessons - Piano, Guitar, Organ,
Violin, Singing. Circulars ready.
(New York Herald, May 18, 1869)

Messrs. Norris & Soper. - The establishement of Messrs. Norris and Soper, wholesale and retail piano and organ dealers, No. 8 Adelaide street east, is a neat and solid three storey brick building, with a frontage of 25 feet and a depth of 140 feet. Modern pianofortes are so near a duplicate of one another that generally there is but little to particularize ; but, in this case, their leading piano, "The Mathushek," is something of a novely, the arrangement of strings and bridges being such as to give greater length, partuclarly to the latter, this being a point being admitted by manufacturers as a very important one, giving more bridge room and individuality to the strings, purity of tone and vibration in proportion to the grain of the sounding board crossed by the bridges, and whne it is remembered that the pitch of a tone is determined byu the number of vibrations in a second - some a hundred and some a thousand, and all intermediate numbers between - the importance of the bridge room is evident, and in this particular piano there is nearly two feet more of bridge than in any other square piano made. The makers, and many artists, claim for this a volume and beauty of tone found elsewhere only in concert grands. Over five thousand of these pianos are now in use, with a contantly increasing demand. They are made in three sizes, viz. : 5 feet 9 inches, and 6 feet 10 inches long, and also concert grands. This firm also handles pianos from other makers, but their trade is principally wholesale, controlling the Mathushek and Fischer pianos for the Dominion, and Prince organs for Ontario and Quebec. They have about seventy-five local agents throughout the Dominion, and are contantly extending their wholesale trade. See plate 42.

(Illustrated Toronto, 1877)

M

ATHUSHEK

MATHUSHEK.
MATHUSHEK,
THE PERFECTION OF

  Having established our headquarters in New York, at
the warerooms of J. W. FRENCH & CO., after twelve
years of unparalleled success thoughout the world we
invite the public to examine our
WONDERFUL NEW EQUALIZING SCALE,
A complete triumph in piano making, until the invention
of which that most expensive of instruments, the Piano,
was the soonest to fail. We insure
UNEQUALED POWER AND PURITY OF TONE AND
PERFECT DURABILITY.
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
PRICES AND TERMS MODERATE.
MATHUSHEK PIANO MANUFACTURING CO.,
Warerooms, No. 20 East Fourteenth st, New York.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 24.12.1878)

M

ATHUSHEK.

MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
MATHUSHEK | 
THE PIANO FOR A
LIFETIME.
| PIANOS
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  All persons desiring to
procure a piano will find
it greatly to their interest
to call and examine our
wonderful improvements in
the art of piano making, as
given below : First - In
our Equalizing Scale. Sec-
ond - In our Linear Bridge.
Third - In our Tuning Pin
Bushing. Fourth - In our
good, honest construction.
A fine assortment of
Grands, Squares and Up-
rights always on exhibition.
Pamphlets mailed Free.
MATHUSHEK PIANO
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY, NO. 23 EAST
FOURTEENTH ST.,
NEW YORK.
  The public are cautioned
against bogus instruments
represented as genuine
Mathushek Pianos, at auc-
tion sales and elsewhere.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 17.03.1880)

THE ONLY

GENUINE MATHUSHEK

PIANO

WITH THE

EQUILIBRE SYSTEM!

Invented and Manufactured by the

ORIGINAL MATHUSHEKS

IN NEW YORK, CAN ONLY BE BOUGHT AT THE

GENUINE MATHUSHEK

Warerooms, 257 Chapel Street.

  This new system removes all causes whereby ordinary pianos fail. It prevents
the sounding board from being displaced and admits the adaptation of an iron
plate with four times teh resisting power of any plate ever introduced by any
piano maker, without increasing its weight. Each string controls a bearing of
nearly 15° upon the sounding-board, or (similar to a violin) fifteen times more than
on an ordinary piano. It must be apparent that a piano thus constructed must
produce a longer vibration, which by actual demonstration is found to be the case.
Not only is this advantage gained, the formerly unnatural strain being completely
withdrawn, a purer, sweeter and inspiring sympathetic tone takes the place of
the ordinary noisy, stringy tone, and bears in its intensity a very near approach
to an organ.

CAUTION.

  There being a piano in the market, manufactured in West Haven, Conn., and
bearing our name, ofttimes represented as our Equilibre System Piano, we wish
to warn the public to investigate before purchasing. None are genuine unless
the name, "Mathushek," New York, is cast on the iron frame. Information
cheerfully given on appliation at our warerooms, No. 257 Chapel street, New
Haven.
(The Yale Banner, 1881)
MATHUSHEK PIANOS.


THE MOST COMPLETE PIANO FACTORY EXTANT
OUR OWN IRON FOUNDRY.
OUR OWN CASE AND ACTION FACTORY.
  In fact, we manufacture our Piano entire, this being a
sufficient guarantee of the reputation already established
as being the most durable and tone sustaining Piano
now before the public.
21 DIFFERENT STYLES.
UPRIGHTS, SQUARES and GRANDS.
  Our new warerooms being replete with the most elegant
designs seen in New York.
RENTALS and INSTALLMENTS A SPECIALTY.
NO BROOKLYN AGENCY.
MATHUSHEK PIANO MANUFACTURING CO.
WAREROOMS.


NO. 3 EAST FOURTEENTH ST, NEW YORK.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 27.11.1886)

"THE NAME THE GUARANTEE."

M. & S.

KNOWN TO THE PUBLIC FOR OVER HALF A CENTURY.

MATHUSHEK & SON PIANOS

LATEST ARTISTIC DESIGNS IN ALL WOODS.

SOLD at REASONABLE PRICES on INSTALMENTS, or LIBERAL DISCOUNT for CASH.

A variety of second-hand pianos in serviceable condition
always on hand at lowest prices and terms to suit.

PIANOS TO RENT.

Pianos and Organs taken in exchange.
Tuning and repairing by factory experts.
Moving, hoisting, boxing and shipping by experienced men.

MATHUSHEK & SONS PIANO CO.

FACTORY AND WAREROOMS:

Broadway and 47th Street, New York City.

(Cornell & Shober's Dir. of Trained Nurses, 1900)

Mathushek & Kinkeldey, Piano Manufacturers, No. 210 East 129th Street. - The manufacture of pianos is one of the great industries of the United States, on the the leading representative firms in this line being that of Messrs. Mathushek & Kinkeldey, No. 210 East 129th Street. Mr. V. H. Mathushek, the founder of the house of Mathusek & Kinkeldy, is a grandson of the celebrated inventor, Mr. F. Mathushek, and has been exceedingly fortunate in obtaining a thorough training as a piano-maker from his grandfather. Not desiring to learn the theoretical art alon, Mr. Mathushek entered a large manufacturing establishment of renown to acquire by manual labor and among strangers the practical art of piano-making. Mr. Charles Kinkeldey is also a practical piano-maker, having obtained his knowledge from first-class manufacturers in Europe. Since his arrival in this country in 1866 he has been in the service of nearly all the leading manufacturers throughout this country, occupying the responsible position as final examiner of pianos before leaving the factory. Prior to his partnership with Mr. H. Mathushek he held the prominent position of superintendent at Messrs. Dunham & Sons' establishment. This firm was established 1832, and from the well known character and ability of the partners in rapidly assuming a leading position in the trade, in consequence of the sweetness and brilliancy of tone of their instruments. Their pianos are made in the best manner possible from well-seasoed materials, in the latest and most fashionable styles, and are always warranted and sold at prices much less than inferior articles which are extensively advertised over the country. Their elegant productions are forwarded to almost every portion of the civilized world. The names of Mathushek & Kinkeldey are already household words and guarantees of unsurpassed excellence and superiority. The firm have a patent which relieves the sounding-board of all strain, and produces a longer vibration, making it more of the nature of an organ. This is the genuine Mathushek piano, and this house has no connection with any other firm or company. Their warehouses are located at No. 210 East 128th Street.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Mazzinghi D. [pianofortes] 11 Murray Street
(1803; The Furniture of our Forefathers)
McCoun Henry T. pianos, 427 Broome, h 221 Adelphi, B'klyn
McDonald C. E. pianos, 215 E. 26th, h B'klyn
McDonald C. E. & Co. pianos, 215 E. 26th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
McDonald C. B. pianos, 144 4th, E. D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
McDonald James, pianos, 1161 B'way
McDonald John, pianos, 1161 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
McDonald John, pianos, 26 Fourth av. h 28 Third
(New York City Directory, 1869)
McDonald John, pianos, 264th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
McDonald Peter, pianostools, 5 Clarke
(New York City Directory, 1859)
M'Donald & Brother, manu. 291 Bowery
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
McDonald & Co. pianos, 26 Fourth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)

A

SSORTMENT OF ROSEWOOD SEVEN

octave pianofortes at manufacturers' prices; war-
ranted for five years references to 1,000 sold ; second-hand
pianofortes from $24 to $300; splendid seven octave
pianofortes short time used, for nearly half its original
price. McDONALD & CO., No. 20 4th-av., opposite
Cooper Institute. Established 1845.
(New York Times, Oct. 11, 1865)

A

BARGAIN FOR CASH - ONLY $150 ; ROSEWOOD,
full seven octave Pianoforte, modern improvements
and style ; celebrated makers ; in perfect order ; splendid
toneMcDONALD & CO., 26 Fourth avenue.
(New York Herald, March 15, 1870)

$600 PIANOS FOR $250.

And all other styles in the same proportion, inc-
cluding Grand, Square and Upright - all first-
class - sold direct to the people at factory prices.
No agents ; no commissions ; no discounts.
  These pianos made one of the fines displays
at the Centennial Exhibition, and were unani-
mously recommended for the Highest Honors.
New Manufactory - one of the largest and finest
in the world. The Square Grands contain Mat-
husek's new Duplex Overstrung Scale, the great
est improvement in the history of Piano making.
The Uprights are the finest in America. Don't
fail to write for Illustrated and Descriptive Cat-
alogue, - mailed free.

MENDELSSOHN PIANO CO;

NO. 56 Broadway, N. Y.
(The Phelps County New Era [MO], Apr. 7, 1877)

  When bran new pianos can be baught for $125, and pianos containing Mathushek's New Patent Duplex Overstrung Scale - which the highest musical authorities acknowledge to be the greatest improvement ever put into a square piano - for only $200, we ought to become a musical and music-loving people. This is what the Mendelssohn Piano Co., 21 East 15th Street, New York, are doing - selling pianos from their factory at these prices, and all style - Grand, Square and Upright. The great reputation of these pianos - having been unanimously recommended for the highest honors at the great Centennial Exhibition - and the high character of the company for honorable and straightforward dealing, should insure for them liberal patronage. Their illustrated and descriptive catalogue, of forty odd pages, giving an account of their vulcanized lumber process, and highest testimonials of leading musicians, will be mailed free to all, and all inquiries by letter cheerfully answered.

(The Phelps County New Era [MO], May 4, 1878)

MENDELSSOHN PIANO CO.

Will make, for the next 60 days only, a Grand Offer of

PIANOS AND ORGANS.

$850 Square Grand Piano for only $245.

STYLE 3

Magnificent rosewood case elegantly finished, 3 strings 7 1/4 Octaves, full patent can-
tante agraffes, our new patent overstrung scale, beautiful carved legs and lyre
heavily serpentine and large fancy moulding round case, full iron Frame, French Grand Action,
Grand Hammers, in fact every improvement which can in any way tend to the perfection of the
instrument has been added.
Our prices for this instrument boxed and delivered on board cars at New York
with fine Piano Cover, Stool and book, only $245.00
  This Piano will be send on test trial. Please send reference if you do not send money with
order. Cash sent with order will be refunded and frieght charges paid by us both ways if Piano
is not just as represented in this Advertisement. Thousands in use. Send for Catalogue. Every
instrument fully Warranted for five years.

PIANOS,

$165 to $400 (with Stool, Cover and Book). All strickly First-class and sold at
Wholesale factory prices. These Pianos made one of the finest displays at the Cen-
tennial Exhibition, and were unanimously recommended for the Highest Honors. The Squares
contain our New Patent Scale, the greatest improvement in the history of Piano making. The
Uprights are the finest in America. Positively we make the finest Pianos, of the richest tone and
greatest durability. They are recommended by the highest musical authorities in the country.
Over 14,000 in use, and not one dissatisfied purchaser. All Pianos and Organs sent on 15 days'
test trial - freight free if unsatisfactory. Don't fail to write us before buying. Positively we
offer the best bargains. Catalogue mailed free. Handsome Illustrated and Descriptive Catalo-
gue of 48 pages mailed for 3c. stamp. Every Pianos fully warranted for 5 years.

ORGANS

Our "Parlor Grand Jubilee Organ," style 35 is the finest and sweetest toned Reed
organ ever offered the musical public. It contains Five Octaves, Five sets of
Reeds, four of 2 1/2 Octaves each, and One of Three Octaves. Thirteen Stops with Grand Organ -
Diapason, Melodia, Viola, Flute, Celeste, Dulcet, Echo, Melodia-Forte, Violina Flute-Forte,
Tremolo, Grand-Organ and Frand-Swell, Knee-Stops. Height, 74 in.; Length, 45 in.; Weight
boxed, 353 lbs. The case is of solid walnut, veneered with choice woods, and is of an entirely
new and beautiful design, elaborately carved, with raised panels, music, closet, lamp stands,
fretwork, &c., all elegantly finished. Possesses all the latest and best improvements, with great
power, depth, brilliancy and sympathetic quality of tone. Beautiful solo effects and perfect stop
action. Regular retail price $285. Our wholesale net cash price to have it introduced, with
stool and book, only $97 - as one organ sold sells others. Positively no deviation in price. No
payment required until you have fully tested the organ in your own home. We send all Organs
on 15 days test trial and pay freight both ways if instrument is not as represented. Fully war-
ranted for 5 years. Other styles - 8 stop organ only $55; 9 stops, $85; 11 stops, $115. Over 32,000
sold, and every Organ has given the fullest satisfaction. Illustrated circular mailed free. Fac-
tory and Warerooms, 57th St. and 10th Ave.

SHEET MUSIC

at one-third price. Catalogue of 5000 choice pices sent for 3c stamp.
This Catalogue includes most of the popular music of the day and every
variety of musical composition, by the best authors. Adress,

MENDELSSOHN PIANO CO., P. O. Box 2058, New York City.

  The MENDELSSOHN PIANO CO., N. Y., whose advertisement appears elsewhere, is selling Pianos direct to the people at Factory Prices, without the intervention of agents or dealers, thereby saving them more than one-half the prices usually charged for strictly first-class instruments.
  The leading papers of the country speak in the very highest terms of the Company and their Pianos, as will be seen in the following exctracts selected from their Catalogue:
  The Mendelssohn Piano impressed us greatly, first by its power, and second by its rare beauty of tone. It is brilliant without being thin, and powerful without noise. The treble is bright and pure, the middle range warm and sympathetic, and the bass decided and sonorous, while the touch is excellent. - Watson's Art Journal, New York.
  One of the Square Pianos, (Mathushek's Scale) exhibited by the Mendelshon Piano Co. is constructed upon entirely new principles, and is said to be the most powerful toned square piano in the world, with a singing quality rarely, if ever, before obtained in any Piano. - Chicago Times.
  For a number of years the Mendelshon Piano Co. have aimed at the production of a splendid piano at a low price. They have more than succeeded. Modern mechanism, skill and genius cannot produce a better piano, while the price is below that of any other first-class make. - Louisville Courier-Journal.
  The revolution in the American Piano trade has begun under the leadership of the Mendelsshon Piano Co. of New York. That revolution means - lower prices for instruments equal in material, construction and elegance to the best yet produced. - St. Louis Republican.
  We notice that the Mendelsshon Piano Co., of New York, have taken the field against high prices. The matchless perfection of the Mendelsshon piano disarms criticism. - Cleveland Herald.
  The culture and exacting musical taste of Cincinnati gives the Mendelsshon a rank second to no other pianoforte ; and their sale is rapidly increasing. They are splendid instruments and the wonder is how they can be sold at so low price. - Cincinnati Gazette.
  We would recommend any of our readers who have any idea of buying a piano, not to fail to write at once for their Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue, which will be mailed free.

(The Rolla New Era [MO], Jan. 15, 1881)

Merrell M. M. pianos, 8 Union Square
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Meyer Othmar, carver
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Meyer Ottmar, piano stools, 206 Eldridge
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Miller John D. 41 Wooster
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Miller John, pianos, 715 Fifth, h 97 Lewis
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Miller J. H. pianos, 107 Orchard, E. D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)

P

IANO-FORTES. - WILLIAM MILLER, Manu-
facturer of the celebrated "Modern improved Piano-
fortes," invites all lovers of music to call and test the
quality of his instruments, which have become so cele-
brated, and the demand so great, that he has enlarged
his facilities for manufacturing and will keep on hand
and for sale, at the lowest factory prices, the most beau-
tiful as well as durable Pianos ever made in the United
States, fully warranted by the manufacturer. Nos. 156 and
154 East 31st-st.
(New York Daily News Apr. 24, 1856)

Millet, William E., music store, 375 Broadway [1836-1838]
Millet, William E., music store, 329 Broadway [1839-1842]
Millet, William E. music and pianofortes, 329 Broadway [1843-1845]
Millet, William E., music, 329 Broadway [1846-1851]
Millet, William E., musical instruments, 329 Broadway [1852]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Millet William E. music, 329 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Millet, William E., music, 329 Broadway [1853-1860]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Minot Aaron, pianos, 178 Wooster
Minot Henry, pianos, 178 Wooster, h Melrose
Minot John M. pianos, 178 Wooster, h 216 E. 20th
Minot & Son, pianos, 178 Wooster
(New York City Directory, 1869)

M

INOT & SON, MANUFACTURERS OF

UPRIGHT PIANO-FORTES, No. 16 Leroy-place,
(Bleecker-st.) corner of Greene, New-York. Square,
Grand and Upright Pianos repaired.
(New York Times, May 27, 1865)

Mittauer George, pianos, 149 E. 14th, h 404 E. 9th
Mixsell Peter, pianos, 299 E. 19th, h 216 Second av.
Mixsell & Co. pianos, 209 E. 19th
(New York City Directory, 1869)

MIXSELL & CO.,

Manufacturers of

OVERSTRUNG, GRAND AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES,

Also, only Manufacturers of

CARPENTER'S PATENT HARMONIUM GRAND PIANOS.

Warerooms, 117 E. 19th Street.
Factories, 117 East 19th Street, and 118 East 13th Street.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Morris Charles A. 32 Merchant NY
(Federal Census, 1850)
Morris Charles A. pianos, 501 Broadway, 194 W 35th & 15 Tenth
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Morris Charles A. 41 Piano Maker, 2,500 1,000 New York
(Federal Census, 1860)
Morris C. A. pianos, 684 B'dway and 322 W. 35th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Muhs, Stodart
(Stodart 7535)
Muhs Frederick W. pianomaker
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Muller Henry, piano forte, 307 Myrtle ave (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Mundy Edward N., pianoforte maker, 641 Greenwich
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Munger Calvin A. pianos, 722 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Munger Calvin A. pianos, 75 University pl.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Munger Calvin A. pianos, 75 University Place
(New York State Directory, 1870)

UPRIGHT PIANOS FOR RENT.
City or Country, at OUVRIER & SONS.
Manufacturers. No. 26 West 13th-st.
(New York Times, July 10, 1872)

Munroe Thaddeus, pianoforte manufacturer, Bowery n. Art
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Narveson Conrad, pianos, 224 E. 18th
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Narvesen Conrad, pianos, 121 E. 22d, h E. 119th n Third av.
Narvesen Nicholas, pianos, 121 E. 22d, h E. 119th n Third av.
Narvesen & Son, pianos, 121 E. 22d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Narveson & Son, pianos, 121 E. 22d
(New York State Directory, 1870)

P

IANOS - AFTER NINE YEARS' AB-

sence from the old piano manufactory, established
more than fifty years ago in New York, by Rober and
Wm. Nunns, (from Clementi & Co.'s manufactory in Lond-
don) Mr. NASH, at the head of the MUSICAL ACA-
DEMY, 177 Washington av, cor. of Myrtle, has again as-
sociated himself with the same. The pianos are first
class in every respect, and guarantee to stand any cli-
mate 20 years ; the tones have the full and singing quality
of Collard & Collard's celebrated pianos of London ;
for sale in Brooklyn at manufactory prices. Tuning done
at short notice.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 07.12.1872)

Neilson Jason, pianoforte maker, 112 Amos
Neilson Samuel, pianoforte maker, 154 Chambers
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Nembach George, pianos, 141 Eighth, h S. I.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Neppert Francis, upholsterer
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Neppert Francis, piano stools, 390 Canal
(New York State Directory, 1870)

F. NEPPERT,

Piano Stool and Music Rack

MANUFACTURER,

390 CANAL STREET,near West Broadway
  Piano Stools in great variety. Wholesale and
Retail
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Neppert John P. pianostools, 390 Canal
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Newman Edward G. pianos, 87 3d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)

EDWARD G. NEWMAN,

Piano Manufacturer,

154 Fourth Ave., cor. of 14th St., N. Y.

THE NEWMAN PIANO.

   In POWER and QUALITY of Tone, Perfection of MECHANISM, DURABILITY,
and General EXCELLENCE, these instruments cannot be excelled. The COM-
BINE all those rare and GRAND QUALITIES that constitute a really first-class piano.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)

Edward G. Newman, Pianoforte Manufacturer, No. 54 East 13th Street. - A prominent house engaged in this business is that of Mr. Edward G. Newman, No. 54, East 13th Street, which was established by the present proprietor in 1870 on Third Avenue, corner 12th Street, and eventually removed to its present eligible location in 1877. Mr. Newman has for several years been associated with the celebrated firm of Steinway & Sons, and was employed on the most important branches of the business, and has made a special study of the piano in Europe, and consequently is fully competent to turn out an instrument in every respects first-class. The Newman piano possesses great power and quality of tone, perfection of mechanism, durability and general excelence, and is rarely excelled, if equalled, by any instrument, domestic or imported. It is always desirable that parties about to purchase a piano should make a personal inspection of the same, yet should those at a distance, unable to make a selection, leave the choice to the proprietor they may rest assured that their wishes will be carefully attended to, and their interests protected by receiving a "perfect piano." Believing that the best is always the cheapest, Mr. Newman does not deal in the class called cheap pianos, but will furnish a really first-class instrument at a very moderate price. Mr. Newman is a native of Sweden, and arrived in this country when a youth.

(New York's Leading Industries, 1884)

New York Piano-forte Company, 139 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)

394.

HUDSON-STREET.

394.

BUSINESS OPENING.
  Referring to our former advertisement, "the incorpora-
tion of the New-York Pianoforte Company," we take the
liberty to invite the musical as well as the artistic public
to convince themselves of our abilities. We flatter our-
selves that the different well-known piano players will
find their expectations greatly surpassed, so that we can
invite every connoissueur of music with the greatest con-
fidence to try our pianos. Having a large establishment
we are able to furnish any number at a short notice.
THE NEW-YORK PIANOFORTE COMPANY.
(New York Times, June 25, 1864)

NEW-YORK PIANO-FORTE COMPANY,

NO. 394 HUDSON-STREET, NEW-YORK.


  The members of this company being superior practical
workmen is a guarantee that Pianos of our make are not
suprassed by those of any establishment in this country
or Europe.
  We invite with confidence the musical and artistic
public to thoroughly test the merits of our instruments.
(New York Times, July 26, 1864)

NEW YORK PIANO-FORTE COMPANY.

MANUFACTURERS OF

GRAND & SQUARE PIANOS.

WAREROOMS,

394 Hudson Street, New York.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Newson J. W. 424 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Newton Henry J. pianos, 22 Canal
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Newton H'y J. pianos, 421 Broome, h 128 W. 48d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Nicolai Louis, piano, h 37 First
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Nitschke John, 139 E. 28th
(New York City Directory, 1859)

NITSCHKE & SON,

PIANO FORTE MAKER,
No. 150 FOURTH AVENUE,
Near Fourteenth street
New York.
Pianos tuned and repaired.
(New York City Directory, 1857)

Associations of Capital and Labor.
  We are right glad to see practical men uniting their capital and labor together in mutual associations. No other way appears to be so reasonable as this for the elevation of our mechanical classes. The general way in which manufacturing operations are conducted is for one, or a few men of great wealth, to unite together (often without the knowledge to construct a single article of manufacture) and hire practical men at so much per day or week, the capitalists reaping the greatest share of the benefits. We do not mean to say a word against men of capital doing this every man has a right in this country to invest his money when, and how he pleasescapital has its rights. But why should not workmen enjoy both the fruits of their toil and the benefits of capital also. We have known a number of such associations that were perfectly successful, and they all might be, it care was taken that kindred spirits alone formed the association. When capital and labor are united, a direct advantage over mere capital is apparent, and this is right. It is too bad, to behold mechanics - industrious and sober men who have served a good apprenticeship condemned for the want of a little capital to labor hard as journeymen when their heads are covered with the frosts of many winters. The only way for mechanics to rise above this evil is to associate their capital and labor together. The amount each may possess may be small, but ten with $300 each make a joint capital of $3000, and every days labor is so much capital added to the stock.
  To be successful, the company must be composed of sensible, honest and industrious meneach looking to his neighbors rights as well as his own. We believe that no country on the face of the globe offers so many advantages to our mechanical and operative classes, as the United States of America. Our political organization in reference to social elevation, is only of a negative nature - it is to prevent evils and is the very best for that purpose, but the happiness, comfort and advancement in civilization of our people, rests on the foundation of moral worth and intelligence.
It is therefore our opinion, that to elevate our mechanical classes, there is not an absolute necessity of exploring a new territory and removing to new fields. The materials for elevation are at command and the tools are in our mechanics hands, while the field of operation is at their own doors, and we are glad to know that many of our mechanics have sense enough to perceive this. We have been led to make these remarks, having been informed, that a number of our practical pianoforte makers - men whom we know to be of sterling stuff, have associated their capital and labor together and formed the North American Piano Forte Manufacturing Company. The manufactory is at No. 88 Walker st. near Broadway, and from the qualifications of the members of the company the best and most improved piano fortes will be made by them. This is to be expected for every one has an interest in the business and no doubt (it is reasonable to expect it) their work and fame will soon be wide spread. Our wealthy classes, yea all our people wish success to such enterprises - it is part of the American character, to rejoice in the prosperity of industrious and enterprising men.

(Scientific American, Oct. 21, 1848)

Nunns & Clark, 257 Broadway
(Herald, 1848)
Nunns & Clark, pianos, 277 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Nunns & Clark, manu. 257 Broadway
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Nunns & Clark, pianos, 785 Broadway & 96 E. 26th
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Nunns and Clark, Setauket
(1858; The Setaukets, Old Field, And Poquott, 2005)
Nunns & Clark, pianos, 785 B'way & 98 E. 26th
(New York City Directory, 1859)

PETERS, FIELD & CO.
PIANO FORTE & MUSIC STORE,
MELODEON BUILDINGS, CINCINNATI, O.

MUNN'S & CLARK'S GRAND ACTION
Piano Fortes, of every style and finish.
New and Fashionable Music and Musical Mer-
chandize, always on hand.
(Daily Sanduskian, Jan. 9, 1849)

NUNNS & CLARK,

PIANO FORTE MANUFACTURERS,
And Proprietor's of Coleman's
PATENT AEOLIAN ATTACHMENT,
No. 785 Broadway,
Corner Tenth streetNEW YORK
(New York City Directory, 1857)

R.

NUNNS & CLARK HAVE REOPENED

for a few days, at their old stand, No. 783 Broad-
way, corner of 10th-st., and now offer the balance of their
stock of piano-fortes, at greatly reduced prices for cash,
to close the concern.
(New York Times, Oct. 24, 1860)

Nunns John F. pianomaker Seventeenth Avenue
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Nunns John F. 44, piano f. maker, England
(Federal Census, 1850)
Nunns John F. pianomaker, 330 Av. 3
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Nunns John F. pianos,
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Nunns John F. pianos, personal attention to tuning & repairing, 97 E. 36th.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Nunns John F. pianos, 147 E. 26th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Nunns John F. pianos, 147 E. 26th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
John F. Nunns, 74, retired piano maker, England
(Federal Census, 1880)

Nunn, John F.500,000
Is a native of England, but has been resident in this country many years. Glancing at his history, we find him at first an apprentice to a piano forte maker in London, where he became a very skilled workman. At the termination of his apprenticeship, for some reason he went to sea as a hand before the mast, and made several voyages. At length he left the sea and settled again at his old trade and soon made some property. A singular circumstance, however, offended him, and he determined to leave the country. He made a very superiour piano forte, which was to be sold for a high price to a person of distinction. As usual he placed his name, "Nunn, Piano Forte maker," on the front of the instrument. The dealer for whom it was made objected to this and, as Mr. Nunn was then unknown, required him to remove his name, and place that of a celebrated maker instead. This so offended him that he resolved to leave the country for the United States. He arrived here between thirty and forty years ago, and obtained employment as a journeyman, till at length he commenced business on his own account. He seems to have laid it down as an inevitable rule in trade never to get in debt, and hence, notwithstanding all the changes in the commercial work, and the vicissitudes of inflation and collapse in currency and credit, he has rarely felt any inconvenience. In only one instance we find him at a loss for capital. During the year 1837, when many of his debtors failed, he borrowed fifty thousand dollars of John Jacob Astor, on property in the 3d avenue ; a sum which probably the wily Dutchman wished he might not be able to pay. Pay, however, he did. He has of late years built extensive workshops and dwelling houses, among the rest a row of houses for his workmen, near the 3d avenue, which property is rapidly improving in value. He has also a good farm on Long Island. The whole of his property is entirely unencumbered.
(Wealth & Biography...New York, 1855)

Nunns John W. 44, piano maker, New York
(Federal Census, 1880)
Nunns Robert pianomaker 137 Broadw.
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Nunns Robert, pianos, 257 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Nunns Robert, pianos, 785 Broadway & 96 E. 26th,
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Nunns Robert, pianos, 785 B'way & 98 E. 26th.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Nunns Robert 67, piano maker, 7,000, 3,000 England
(Federal Census, 1860)
Nunns Robert, pianos, 121 E. 22d, h 170 E. 32d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Nunns Robert 30, piano [..] Eng.
(Federal Census, 1850)
Nunns Robert, jr. pianoforte tuner, 191 E. 21st
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Nunns Robert jr. tuner, 736 B'dway
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Nunns Robert jr. pianos,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Nunns William & Co. pianomakers, 88 Walker
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Nunn William, 39 Piano tuner, England [Setauket]
Nunns Wm. 56 piano maker 800 50 England [Cecil, MD]
(Federal Census, 1860)
Nunns Wm. pianos, 147 E. 26th
Oborne A. piano tuner, 905. 3d, E.D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Oestreich H'y L. pianos, 2 Leroy pl. h 51 Suffolk
Otis Dwight P. pianos, 199 Wooster.
Ott Siberia, pianos, 783 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ottis, D. P., Manuf'r of the celebrated Bloomfield & Ottiss Piano, 209 E. 19th.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)
Ouvrier Julius J. pianos, 27 W. 13th, h N. J.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ouvrier Peter, pianos 83 Leonard
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Ouvrier Peter, pianos, 539 Houston
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Ouvrier Peter, pianos, 27 W. 18th, h 321 E. 26th
Ouvrier & Sons, pianos, 27 W. 13th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ouvrier & Sons, pianos, 27 W. 13th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Paff John and Michael, 127 Broadway
(1802; The Furniture of our Forefathers)
Paff John [pianofortes from London, from $200 to $300]
(1816; The Furniture of our Forefathers)

PAPPENBERGER & TAUBALDS,

Upright & Grand Pianos.

Factory, 515 W. 42d STREET,

NEW YORK.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)

Palmer Jas. W.
(Stodart 7535, "Sept 19, 1853")
Palmer James 21, piano maker, N. Jersey
(Federal Census, 1850)
Palmer James W. pianomaker,
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Parker George, piano tuner, 418 W. 29th
Pattison John N. & Co. pianos, 48 E. 23d
(New York State Directory, 1870)

C. D. Pease & Co., Manufacturers of Piano-Fortes, Nos. 318, 320 and 322 West 43rd Street. - A prominent house engaged in the manufacture of these instruments is that of Messrs. C. D. Pease & Co., which was established in 1873,and has now increased to such an extent, that over 3000 pianos are manufactured per annum. They occupy a fine eight-story brick manufactory, on West 43rd street, that for convenience and arrangements throughout, cannot be excelled by any in this or any other country. They have never had to leave the city, or employ a man on the road to build up this immense trade, as it is well known among dealers that they are practical manufacturers, and personally attend to the production of every piano in all its details. Their new three stringed upright instruments cannot be excelled by any in the market for tone, beauty and style, either at home or abroad, and must be seen to be appreciated. Every piano employed undergoes a thorough examination by experts, who are under the immediate supervision of the proprietors, and so rigid are the tests applied, that every instrument made by the firm may be said to be as near perfection, as art can make it. The pianos of this company have a national reputation, and sales are effected all over the United States and Canada. Mr. C. D. Pease is a native of Worthington, Mass., and has resided in this city for the last twenty years, having been brought up with the firm of Boardman & Gray.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

C. D. PEASE & CO., Manufacturers of Grand, Square and Upright Pianofortes, Nos. 314, 316, 318, 320 and 322 West Forty-third Street.-The firm of Messrs. C. D. Pease & Co. established in business fifteen years ago, and during the intervening period have achieved marked success and an enviable reputation as manufacturers of the finest pianofortes placed upon the market. The claims of the Pease piano to the patronage of the public are numerous and important. In the first place, Mr. C. D. Pease, the head of the house, is a manufacturer of vast practical experience, acquainted with every detail of the construction of the modern pianoforte. His factory is one of the largest industrial establishments in the city, centrally located, at Nos. 314, 316, 318, 320 and 322 W. 43rd street, near Eighth avenue. It is a substantial eight-story structure 60x100 feet in size, with handsome ware rooms, known as the Pease Buildings, adjoining. It is fitted up throughout with the latest improved machinery and appliances, and one hundred and sixty hands find steady employment, the capacity of the establishment being upwards of three thousand instruments per year. Mr. Pease selects all the materials used in their construction with the utmost care. The best only of seasoned woods, highly tempered steel and iron, extra heavy felts, the finest wire, the most substantial sounding boards, and improved actions are found here, while the most skilful piano makers are employed at the highest wages. When, in addition, it is realized that these pianos are abreast of the times in every phase of improvement and perfected construction. They are worthy of their high reputation for richness of tone, the fullest, most sonorous and pure of any make, while they are perfect in action, and of remarkable durability, remaining in tune and good order for the greatest length of time, and are in fact far beyond comparison the best piano for the trade to handle, and the public to use. There have been made and sold during the last thirteen years, no less than, 40,000. Pease pianos to-day giving most perfect satisfaction, and the surest guarantee of the standard excellence of these widely known instruments. Messrs. Pease & Co. are constantly bringing out new styles, and their new uprights are the most beautiful and serviceable in the market. When desired they are provided with the firm's new patent glass fronts, the panels being furnished in any desired color or combination of colors, that is preferred by the purchaser. This change from the old fashioned sawed fret-work fronts is immensely popular. The German Silver Octave Rails used in these pianos is a patent of Mr. Pease which is used by many manufacturers from whom he receives a royalty. The Pease pianos are standards with the pianotrade of the United States, and for the convenience of parties residing at a distance from New York, the firm issue a beautifully illustrated descriptive catalogue, containing exact cuts of each style of piano, so that selections can safely be made by the pictures, the firm, noted for their sterling integrity and responsibility, pledging themselves to select the instruments personally doing as well, if not better for buyers, than if they stood in the warerooms bewildered amid the scores of beautiful pianos, each one equally worthy of attention. Our city readers will be made welcome there and can test the merits of the Pease piano and recognize its claims to consideration as the best type of American achievement in this branch of industry.

(Illustrated New York, 1888)

V

IOLIN PIANOS - SOMETHING ENTIRELY

new - manufactured under the patents and superin-
tendence of S. B. Driggs. They are superior in volume
and purity of tone to any in the world. Price $300 to
$400. They may be seen at the warerooms No. 767 Broad-
way, or at the Proprietor's. J. B. PECK, 579 Broadway
(New York Times, Aug. 27, 1863)

PECK'S OVAL PIANOS.

  Driggs' new harmonic scale and patent string clamp.
They are superior in power and purity of tone to any
pianos now known. They may be seen at the warerooms
No. 767 or 579 Broadway. or at the American Institute
Fair.J. B. PECK.
(New York Times, Sep. 11, 1863)

OVAL PIANOS.

DRIGGS' HARMONIC NEW SCALE AND PATENTS.
  These magnificent Pianos, which, for power and pu-
rity of tone, are superior to any Piano-fortes known.
One other important fact is, that like the Cremona Violin,
they will improve by age. Every instrument guaranteed
for five years. Those who wish to purchase and others
are invited to call at the manufacturer's warerooms, No.
744 Broadway, and examine them.J. B. PECK.
(New York Times, Dec. 10, 1863)

Established 1820.

PECK & SON,

Manufacturers of

PIANOS & ORGANS,

MANAGERS OF AMERICAN MUSIC CO.

23 Clinton Place (8th st.,) near Broadway.
Sent for Catalogues and chromo cards.
(Important Events of the Century, 1876)

Peek David C. piano tuner 41 Delancey
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Peek David C. pianof. tuner, 112 G'wich Av.
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Peek David T. & Co. pianos, 152 W. 29th, h Westchester
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Peek & Son, pianos, 146 Bleecker
(New York State Directory, 1870)

Peek & Son, Manufacturers of The Opera Piano, Nos. 112 to ll6 West 47th Street, Cor ner Broadway. - This business was founded in 1860, and at once won its way into popular favor. The firm have occupied their present eligible location for the past three years, the factory being supplied with all the most approved modern machinery and appliances. The "Opera Piano," made by Messrs. Peek & Son, has won a national reputation for the volume and purity of its tone, and sympathetic singing qualities. For beauty and originality of design, superiority of workmanship and finish, durability and general excellence, it is unrivalled by the best product of any other maker. It is used in many academies, conservatories and concert rooms in preference to all others, and has found a place in the parlors of our best families. Messrs. Peek & Son have done much to advance the interests of the piano trade, by the introduction of many artistic improvements in the manufacture of pianos. The house does a very large business, their trade extending all over the continent.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Pelton J. M. pianos, 334 Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1859)

J. M. PELTON,

841 BROADWAY, and 59 EAST 13th STREET,
NEW YORK,

DEALER IN FIRST CLASS PIANO-FORTES,

MELODEONS, ORGANS, AND HARMONIUMS

  Sale and Retail Depot of the FIRST PRIZE "PELOUBET ORGANS" and MELODEONS.
Instruments to let.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

J. M. Pelton, Manufacturer of Pianos and Organs. Office and Warerooms, No. 28 East 14th Street. - Mr. J. M. Pelton has been closely identified with the manufacture and sale of the best classes of pianos and organs known in the trade since 1854. As a large dealer he early built up one of the best connections throughout the United States, and possessed unrivalled facilites for meeting all orders promptly and to the letter. One June 1, 1865, he became a member of the firm of Peloubet, Pelton & Co., manufacturers of cabinet organs, and whose factories were located at Bloomfield, N. J. He remained active in this branch of the business until January 1, 1880, whne he sold out his interest in the firm, and has subsequently devoted his whole time and attention to his most extensive interests as a wholesale and retail dealer in pianos and organs. He occupies unusually spacious and central warerooms in 14th Street, where can at all times be inspected one of the finest and complete stocks of pianos and organs from great makers, and all at fair prices, while sales are effected upon the easiest of terms. Every class and style of make are here to be seen, and to suit the tastes and pockets of all patrons, and his sales are of corresponding wide range and magnitude, both in his wholesale and retail departments. Mr. Pelton is a gentleman of large practical experience ; both as a manufacturer and a dealer he has had ample opportunity to study the best tastes of a critical community. His excellent judgment and scrupulous care in securing none but instruments of thorough reliability point to him as good authority upon all matters pertaining to thes two most important classes of musical instruments.

(New York's Leading Industries, 1884)

Perkins Theodore & Co. pianos, 143 8th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
D. Perrin?
(Met. Museum, Nunns & Clark 8054)
Peterson Peter M. pianos, 105 Bleecker
Phelps & Son, pianos, 308 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)

P

HELPS & SON, PIANOS,


HIGHEST PREMIUM AWARDED
BROOKLYN'S INDUSTRIAL FAIR,


MATHUSHEK COLOBRI PIANOS.
$5 to $20, MONTHLY, $5 to $20.
Until paid.
308 FULTON ST, opposite Johnson.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 23.11.1872)

Phyfe's Cabinet Warehouse, Fulton Street [grand upright pianos]
(1802; The Furniture of our Forefathers)
Phyfe Isaac piano maker 215 Mulberry
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Pirsson James, pianoforte maker, 193 1/2 Hudson
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Pirsson Jas. pianomakr. 87 Leonard
(New York City Directory, 1852)

  Queeen Victoria and Yankee DOodle - The London Correspondent of the New York Spirit of the Times, writes:
  Her Majesty Queen Victori and the Royal consorts have been extremely attentive to the UNited States portion of the Industrial Exhibition and pursue their walks through the Yankee avenues, filled with works of art, greatly to the satisfaction of Brother Jonathan, who, albeit they refur the Republivan modes, seem highly honored at the Royal condescension. A few days ago she was present, and Mr. Pirsson, of New York city, who has a large double grand piano in the American division, somehow or other forestalled his neighbors by getting wind of her coming, and engaged four splendid performers, and hand them all waiting. As her Majesty approached down the grand aisle, he gave a signal, and they struck up "Yankee Doodle," with variations, much to the Queen's admiration, for she leaned on the arm of the Prince and waited until it was over. Pirsson, with shrewd discrimination, saw by the pretty smiles that lit up her Majesty's face, that she was pleased with the national idea, and immediately there was an encore. With the promptness of Julien, he jumped upon the platform, seized a cane, and using it for a baton, recommenced that same "good old air," and his performers dashed through it, excecuting the sparkling but difficult variations with a force and elegance that again enchained the Royal presence, and elicited the cheers adn vivas of the whole assembly.

(Liberty Weekly Tribune [MO], Aug. 29, 1851)

PIANO-FORTES. - JAMES PIRSSON respectfully

informs his friends and the public that he has re-
moved his Piano-forte Warerooms to the elegant saloon
No. 482 Broadway, over the entrance to Wallack's Thea-
tre, where he will keep constantly on hand a splendid as-
sortment of Piano-fortes of his own manufacture, and also
those of other makers, from the lowest price Piano up
to his splendid grand Pianos at $1,000 each. He will
also keep an assortment of new and second-hand Pianos
to let on hire. Pianos bought and sold, exchanged and
repaired. N. B. - No connection with any other establishment.
(New York Daily Times, June 4, 1853)

P

IRSSONS' PIANO-FORTES, - JAS. PIRS-

SON respectfully informs the public that he has
reestablished himself in the piano-forte business and in-
vites attention to a fine stock of pianos at his warerooms,
No. 478 Broadway, near Broome-st.
(New York Daily Times, May 10, 1864)

P

IRSSON'S PIANO-FORTES. - J. PIRSSON

respectfully informs his old customers and friends
that he has opened a PIANO-FORTE WAREROOM at
No. 26 Howard-st. where, in addtion to his new pianos
he will repair, exchange, buy and sell second-hand pianos.
(New York Daily Times, July 11, 1864)

Pleslin William, pianofortes, 744 Barrow
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Pleslin William, 72 Barrow
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Pollack & Lux, piano caps, 494 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Pond William A. music, 1 Franklin sq.
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Pond, William A., & Co., music, 547 Broadway [1863-1866]
Pond, William A., & Co., music and pianos, 547 Broadway [1867-1869]
Pond, William A., & Co., music and pianos, 896 and 547 Broadway [1870]
Pond, William A., & Co., music and pianos, 547 Broadway, 9 Mercer Street and 39 Union Square [1871-1874]
Pond, William A., & Co., music and pianos, 118 Mercer Street, 39 Union Square and 547 Broadway [1875]
Pond, William A., & Co., pianos, organs and sheet music, 547 Broadway and 39 Union Square [1876-1877]
Pond, William A., & Co., music store, 25 East 15th Street and 25 Union Square [1878-1895]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

WM. A. POND & CO.
WM. A. POND & CO.
WM. A. POND & CO.
UPRIGHT AND SQUARE
Pianos to rent.
(New York Times, Feb. 18, 1860)

Pries Ernst, piano tuner, h 178 1/2 Chrvstie
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ramacciotti Francisco, pianos, h 247 E. 30th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ramacciotti Francis, piano strings 305 E. 22d
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Randle, Culver & Jesse, piano makers, 12 Amos
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Ranft Richard, piano matls. 2 Leroy pl. h 303 State, B'klyn
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Ranft Richard, piano forte hardware, 7 Washington Place
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Rautenhaus Joseph, r. 208 Sullivan [piano key makers]
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Raven John, 19 pianofortes, N. York
(Federal Census, 1850)
Raven Richard M. pianomaker 240 Elizabeth
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Raven Richard M. pianos, 162 Centre,
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Raven Richard, pianos 135 Grand & 149 Baxter,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Raven Richard, pianos, 646 B'way, h 46 W. 28th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Raven Richard 60 piano forte manufacturer, New York
(Federal Census, 1870)
Raven Thomas, pianos, 122 Orange
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Raven Thomas, pianos, 135 Grand,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Raven Thomas, 44 pianofortes, N. York
(Federal Census, 1850)
Raven, Thomas & Co. pianos, 151 Baxter
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Raven, Bacon & Co. pianos, 135 Grand & 149 Baxter
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Raven & Bacon, pianos, 646 B'way & 149 Baxter
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Raven, Bacon & Co. sales, $57,531
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)

RAVEN, BACON & CO., - Successors to BACON &

RAVEN,

PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURERS

wareroom No. 135 Grand-st., near Broadway, where a full
assortment of instruments, exclusively of our own manu-
facture, may be found. Warranted in every respect.
(New York Daily News Apr. 24, 1856)
RAVEN, BACON & CO. - (SUCCESSORS TO
BACON & RAVEN.) Piano-forte Maufacturers.
wareroom No. 135 Grand st., near Broadway, where a full
assortment of Instruments may be found, exclusively of
our ouwn manufacture, warranted in every respect.
(New York Times, Sep. 11, 1858)
RAVEN, BACON & CO.
(Successors to Bacon & Raven,) piano forte manufac-
turers, warerooms No. 135 Grand st., near Broadway,
where a full assortment of instruments may be found, ex-
clusively of our own manufacture, warranted in every
respect.
(New York Times, Sep. 6, 1859)

RAVEN, BACON & CO.,

OVERSTRUNG PIANOS.

  We are now offering a full assortment of piano-
fortes, all of which are of our own manufac-
ture, and warranted in every respect. By permission
we refer to the undersigned partise, who, from per-
sonal experience for many years, can recommend our
instruments, both as to their quality and durability :
Winslow, Lanier & Co.R. D. Morgan & Co.
Cary, Howard, Sanger & Co.Colgado & Co.
Bowen, Holmes & Co.J. H. Ransom & Co.
Brokaw, Butler & Co.Betts, Nichols & Co.
Hazlehurst & Smith.Sheldon, Hayt & Co.
Thomas Owen & Son.Joseph Foulkes' Sons.
Merrick & Bull.Ivison & Phinney.
(New York Times, May 2, 1860)

R

AVEN, BACON & CO.

Manufacturers of Grand and Square
PIANO-FORTES,
In every variety of scales and patterns.
Warerooms,No. 136 Grand-st.
Near Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1861)
RAVEN & BACON
Manufacturers of Grand and Square Piano Fortes.
Wareroom No. 135 Grand-st., near Broadway, N. Y.
The long experience and the many facilities we possess
enable us to produce instruments unsurpassed by any
other establishment. Our personal attention is given to
the construction, improvement and introduction of all
essential changes that may be required to make a perfect
piano forte. Purchasers are invited to call and examine
our large assortment of pianos which we are now offering
on favorable terms. Descriptive circulars sent by mail.
(New York Times, Jan. 5, 1863)

RAVEN & BACON

Piano-Forte Manufacturers, Warerooms, No. 135 Grand-
st., near Broadway. A full assortment of our well-known
PIANOS constantly on hand, warranted in every re-
spect. Purchasers will do well to examine our stock
and prices before making their selections.
(New York Times, Mar. 11, 1864)

ESTABLISHED IN 1829


RAVEN & BACON,

PIANO MANUFACTURERS,

No. 135 Grand-st., near Broadway, New-York.
  The musical production having of late become quite
prominent in connection with newspaper advertisements
of four or five piano manufacturers in this city, each
firm claiming superiority for their instruments from the
indorsements fo the same distinguished artists, we fear
the innocent public, unacquainted with the tricks of the
trade, may find themselves mystified as to where to se-
lect the best piano for their holiday gifts.
  We would state that, as our pianos have been favora-
bly known in this marked for nearly forty years, it has
not been necessary for us to obtain the opinion of the
profession in regard to their quality, the instrument
speaking for themselves. We are continuously introduc-
ing improvements in our pianos, and they are up to the
age in every particular. Parties desiring pianos will do
well to examine our stock and prices before making
their selection
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1864)

R

AVEN & BACON, NEW SCALE PIANO-

FORTES - Wareroom No. 135 Grand-st., near Broad-
way. - A full assortment fo these instruments, which
have been well known in this market for more than thir-
ty years, constantly on hand. Our facitities are such as
enable us to furnish pianos at terms and prices satisfac-
tory to purchasers. Descriptive circulars sent by mail.
Storage for pianos.
(New York Times, Sept. 1, 1865)

NEW PATENT PIANOS.

  RAVEN & BACON, manufacturers of PIANO-
FORTES with PATENT COMBINATION SOUNDING-
BOARDS, patented Aug. 15 18[]. - This invention, in-
troduced exclusively into our Pianos, to the greatest
advantage to the tone of the instrument, as it affects the
Sounding-Board - the very soul of the Pianos - and pro-
duces thereby a pure liquid tone, greatly superior in
quality and power to that of the ordinary Piano. The
Sounding-Board, released from its connection with the
piano-case and resting upon under sounding-boards, is
relieved from the rigidity caused by such connection,
and its vibratory quality greatly increased. All lovers
of this eminently household instrument, as well as per-
sons proposing to purchase new Pianos, are invited to
call and examine our assortment.
  WAREROOMS - 135 Grand-st., near Broadway, N. Y.
(New York Times, Dec. 22, 1866)

RAVEN & BACON,

Piano-Forte Manufacturers,

Wareroom, 135 GRAND STREET, near Broadway,
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Raven & Co., 116 and 118 W. 14th st.
(New York as it was, 1876)

R

AVEN & CO. PIANOS.

Known for forty-five years the best.
Buy direct from the Manufactory and save dealers' per
centage. Organs $100, upward.
RAVEN & CO. ;
Warerooms Nos. 116 and 118 West 14th st. near 5th av.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 04.09.1874)

Rautenhaus Joseph, piano, r 208 Sullivan
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Rehbein M. pianos, 825. 3d, E. D (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Reinwarth Charles, pianos,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Reinwarth Charles, piano strings, n. 117 Prince
(New York State Directory, 1870)

CHAS. REINWORTH, Manufacturer of Pianoforte Covered Strings, No. 144 East Fourteenth Street. - The days in which we live are full of close and keen competition in business. The time is past when one machinist attempts to make everything from a needle to a steam-engine. Everything now seems to tend towards the manufacture of specialties. Some of these, to the inexperienced, may be seemingly small things, but if used in current demand and in large quantities, the experienced manufacturer knows how to make his estimate. The strings of a piano may appear a small item of commerce, but from the immense number of them in continual use they become a very valuable item of trade. Mr. Chas. Reinworth makes a special and exclusive business of the manufacture of pianoforte covered strings, and in such has achieved a reputation which is national. He is able, through a system of his own, and in the employment of special machinery for the purpose, to produce these at prices which cannot be touched by any other manufacturer in the United States. He supplies a very large portion of the manufacturing and jobbing trade in the city with these goods. Mr. Reinworth is the inventor and patentee of the famous duplex string-covering machines, which are now so extensively used, both in the United States and in Europe. This gentleman has been established here in this business for the past thirty years, and for the greater part of this time has occupied his present position. The premises occupied by Mr. Reinworth are directly opposite the Academy of Music, No. 114 East Fourteenth Street, and consist of a spacious and elaborately fitted-up establishment, in dimensions 25x80 feet. Here a very extensive stock of these goods is all the time kept on hand to meet the requirements of the trade, the whole affording employment to some thirty skilled assistants, who are intimately acquainted in this character of business. Mr. Reinworth is a Russian by birth, but has been a resident of New York most of his life.

(Illustrated New York, 1888)

Rickers John J. piano & music store, 7 John
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Rickers John J. agent 245 Rivington
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)

JOHN J. RICKERS,

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF

PIANO FORTES, &c., AND MUSIC SELLER,

No. 187 BROADWAY, NEW-YORK.

Piano Fortes repaired in a very superior style.May, 1826.
(New American Practical Navigator, 1826)

Rindge Joseph F. piano tuner, 853 3d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Robb Alickam piano maker 235 Henry
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Robertson James H. pianos, 417 Broome, h 3 Third
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Rogers Abel pianomaker, 148 Fulton
Rogers & Winant, pianofortes, 148 Fulton
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Rogers & Winant, 9 Mercer
(New York City Directory, 1859)

ROGERS & WINANT,

P

IANO FORTE MANUFACTORY AND
SALESROOM,
No. 9, 11, & 13 Mercer street, opposite Howard st.,
  We have something entirely new on hand in the
line of Piano Fortes, (patented).
(New York City Directory, 1857)

Roos, Stodart
(Stodart 7535)
Roz Theodore, 127 Elm
Ruperich J. 199 Prince [piano key makers]
Safford Isaac T. 75 White
(New York City Directory, 1859)

SAFFORD & BROTHER,

PIANO FORTE MAKERS.
PIANOS TO RENT
  423 B R O A D W A Y ,
NEW YORK.
(New York City Directory, 1857)

Sakmeister Charles P. H. 138 Amity
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Sander Julius, piano, h 54 First
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Sander Julius, pianos, 541st
Sawyer C. C. pianos, Fulton c. Jay (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J

UST THE PIANO. - OUR BIJOU COTTAGE

square 7-octaves, carved legs, &c., are perfect gems for
small parlors. Great in tone and durability ; small in
size and price. SAWYER & THOMPSON, No. 768
Broadway, New-York, and No. 59 Fulton-av., Brooklyn
(New York Times, Jan. 25, 1865)

T

HE SAWYER AND THOMPSON

SQUARE AND UPRIGHT

P I A N O F O R T E S .

  Messrs. SAWYER & THOMPSON having greatly in-
creased their manufacturing facilities, are happy to an-
nounce that they will hereafter be able to supply the remar-
kable demand for their justly
CELEBRATED PIANOFORTES.
  It is not considered necessary to say anything farther in
praise of these well-known instruments than the manu-
facturers have heretofore been unable to finish them fast
enough to meet the unprecedented demand for them.
  They can refer with pride to all who have tested them, and
they do no hesitate to pronounce them the
BEST MADE AND MOST POWERFUL TONED
INSTRUMENTS IN USE.
  Each piano fully guaranteed for five years.
SAWYER & THOMPSON,
Warerooms 59 Fulton avenue,
Brooklyn. N. Y.
  Pianos Tuned, Repaired, Removed, Stored, Packed, Ship-
ped, or Taken in Exchange.
PIANOS TO LET.
  Rent allowed on purchase.
SAWYER & THOMPSON,
59 Fulton avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 21.05.1864)

Saxe George G. pianos, 417 Broome, h 42 Tayior, B'klyn
(New York City Directory, 1869)

P

IANOS, HARMONIUMS AND MELODE-

ONS. - Best quality ; lowest prices ; fully warranted.
G. C. SAXE, No. 37 Park-row, New-York.
(New York Times, Mar. 11, 1864)

GEORGE G. SAXE,

Manufacturer and Dealer in

PIANOS, MELODEONS,

AND CABINET ORGANS,

417 BROOME STREET,

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Saxe & Robertson, pianos, 417 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Scharfenberg & Luis, music, 361 Broadway [1845-1846
Scharfenberg & Luis, music, 483 Broadway [1847-1852]
Scharfenberg & Luis, music, 722 Broadway [1853-1854]
Scharfenberg & Luis, music, 769 Broadway [1855-1862]
Scharfenberg & Luis, music, 758 Broadway [1863-1866]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)

C

ABINET PIANOS AT


SCHARFENBERG & LUIS,
No. 758 BROADWAY
(New York Times, Oct. 25, 1864)

Schmidt Bernhard, pianos, 94 Clinton, h 215 E. 41st
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Schmidt Charles, pianos, h 4 1st
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Schmidt Charles, piano tuner, 4 1st
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Schmidt Louis, pianos 423 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Schmidt & Ramseyer, piano stools, 125 4th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Schmitt Adam, pianos, 719 Fifth
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Schraidt Louis, tuner
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Schraidt Louis, pianos, 719 Fifth, h 255 E. 4th
Schraidt, Schmitt & Co. pianos, 719 Fifth
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Schraidt & Schmitt, pianos, 719 5th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Schroeder Henry, pianos, 211 Fourth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Schroeder Henry, pianos, 211 4th ave. and 723 6th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Schuetz Ignatius C. pianos,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Schuetz I. C. pianos, 373 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Shuetze Otto, pianos, 452 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Schuetze Otto, pianos, 452 Broome, h 128 Macdougal
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Schuetze & Ludolff, 452 Broome. Received first prize gold medal American Institute, N. Y. Crystal Palace
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Schuetze & Ludolff. pianos, 452 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Schnetze Ludolff, piano fortes, 452 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Schuetze & Tudolff, 452 Broome st.
(New York as it was, 1876)

SCHEULZTE & LUDOLFF'S

GOLD MEDAL GRAND AND SQUARE
No. 452 Broome-st., west of Broadway
(New York Times, Aug. 23, 1860)

SCHUETZE & LUDOLFF,

First Premium Gold Medal

Piano-Forte Manufacturers,

452 BROOME STREET, WEST OF BROADWAY,
NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Schuler Charles F. pianos, 367 Broome, h 315 Sixth
Schuler Frederick, pianos, 367 Broome, h 315 Sixth
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Shuler F. pianos, 367 Broome
Schuler Frederick, pianos, 367 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)

F SCHULER, Manufacturer of Piano-fortes, No. 19 East Fourteenth Street. - Mr. Schuler established this business twenty-three years ago, and has since built up a liberal and permanent patronage. There are a number of houses more pretentious which advertise in high-sounding terms, but for an honest, reliable, trustworthy concern with which to deal, we do not know a better in the piano trade than that of Mr. Schuler. Schuler's square, grand, and upright pianos are unrivalled for the perfect evenness of the scales throughout the entire registers, power and quality of tone, delicacy of touch, durability of workmanship, and beauty of finish, while the prices quoted are much lower than those of other first-class houses. All his upright and other pianos are finished with the same care, the same quality of materials used, and at the same time all are equally guaranteed without regard to the price of the instrument, and all Schuler's pianos are fully warranted for five years. Mr. Schuler rents, exchanges, and sells on monthly payments all kinds of pianos, and makes a specialty of tuning and repairing. He was born in Germany, but has resided in the United States for the last thirty-seven years.

(Illustrated New York, 1888)

Seabury, Charles, Brookhaven
(Federal Census, 1840)
Seabury Charles S. Brookhaven, abt 1803 NY
Seabury Thomas P. Brookhaven, abt 1808 NY
(Federal Census, 1850)
Seabury, Thomas P. aged 70; funeral to-morrow, 152 Freeman's street E.D.
(8 February; Brooklyn Union Argus, 1878)
Seele & Schiel, piano carvers, 101 Mercer
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Shaff Thomas piano maker Tenth c. Bowery
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Sherwin Win. F. pianos, 543 B'way, h 32 Gt. Jones
Sherwin & Herbert, pianos, 548 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Sherwin & Herbert, pianos, University Place c. E. 11th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Shields Thomas, pianoforte maker, 125 Orange
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)

T. SHRIVER & CO.'S,

IRON FOUNDRY & ORNAMENTING WORKS,

East 56th Street, between 1st and 2

NEW YORK.

Iron Frames for Piano Fortes,

CAST, DRILLED, JAPANNED AND ORNAMENTED.

LETTER COPYING PRESSES of all sizes.

(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Sieh Charles & Adolph Hintz, 709 Fourth
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Sillick Sands F. piano maker 641 Greenwich
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Simpson John B. imp. 554 B'way, h 14 E. 24th
Simpson John B. jr. mer. 554 B'way, h 14 E. 24th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Slade A. C. & Co. pianos, 605 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Smith David, pianomaker, 19 Av. 6
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Smith David, 15 Sixth av. & 112 Macdougal
(New York City Directory, 1859)

DAVID SMITH,

(Successor to SAMUEL STEBBINS,)
Formerly Stebbins & Smith,
Manufacturer of PIANO-FORTE ACTION,
14 and 16 Amity Place, between Bleecker and
Amity Streets.
Established 1849.
Refers to all the principal Piano-Forte Manufac-
turers. Orders respectfully solicited.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Smith Freeborn G. pianos, 427 Broome, h 61 St Mark's pl.
Smith F. G. & Co. pianos, 427 Broome & 116 Elizabeth
(New York City Directory, 1869)

Rachel PEARSON SMITH, wife of Freeborn G. SMITH, the piano manufacturer, died at her home, 197 Washington Park, yesterday from pneumonia, after one's days illness. A resident of Brooklyn for thirty-five years, Mrs. SMITH was always active in church and philanthropic work. She was interested in many Brooklyn institutions which aim to improve the condition of the poor, and up to the time of her death she was one of the managers of the Home for Consumptives and the Home for destitute Children. Mrs. SMITH was born in Wakefield, England, seventy-five years ago. Nearly all her life in this country was spent in Brooklyn. She is survived by her husband and two children.

(Brooklyn Daily Standard Union, 14.12.1906)

Smith Henry, pianofortes, 4 Patchin pl.
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Smith, T. G., 14 E. Fourteenth st.
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Smith, T. G., 14 E. Fourteenth st.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Smith Tunis, pianomaker, 316 Rivington
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Smith Tunis, piano actions, 16 Amity pl.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Smith, Atherton & Co. 637 B'way
Soebbeler, Nicholas, pianos, 423 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Soebbeter Nicholas, pianos, 101 Second av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Soebbeler William, pianos,
Soebbeler & Schmidt, pianos, 423 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Soebbeler Nicholas, pianos, 103 2d ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Soebbeler & Schmidt, 423 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1859)

PIANO-FORTES,
SOEBBELER SCHMIDT.
No. 423 Broome st.,
One block east of Broadway.
Manufacturers of GRAND and SQUARE PIANO-
FORTES. Purchasers in want of a first-class article are
invited to inspect our instruments
(New York Times, June 19, 1858)

SOEBBELER & SCHMIDT,

MANUFACTURERS OF

PIANO-FORTES.

WAREROOM, 423 BROOME STREET, one Block East of Broadway, New York.
NICHOLAS SOEBBELER,BRUNO SCHMIDT.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

MERIT AND ENTERPRISE.
REMARKABLE RECORD OF SUCCESS - THE PIANO OF THE MUSICIAN.
The firm of Sohmer & Co. are regarded, not alone by the piano trade, but in business circles generally, as one of the most enterprising and deservedly successful houses in the business. Starting in 1873, with limited facilities, and passing safely in the early stages of its existence through a period of unprecedented financial depression, this house, though it has had to contend with established concerns of many years' experience and almost unlimited resources, has by the exercise of business tact and through the merit of its instruments won for itself a leading position in the piano trade. It is due to the skill and care exhibited in the construction of these instruments and their consequent strength, durability, and unsurpassed musical qualities that the limited production of 15 years ago has expanded into its present large production. Where they then made four pianos their present average production reaches the high figure of 40 pianos per week and is yet insufficient to supply the extensive demand, and the firm is to-day largely in arrears of its orders. The Sohmer piano combines a rich, pure tone of great volume and sympathetic quality with a precision, delicacy, and responsiveness of touch seldom found in other instruments, and these characteristics have not only made it popular with performers generally, but have also made it the prime favorite among artists for both concert and private use.
The firm makes every variety of instruments - square, upright, and grand - and, constantly striving to meet every demand, has produced the Bijou Grand, the smallest grand piano ever made - the most practical novelty yet presented to the public. This instrument, while occupying little space, has great power and volume of tone, together with the tone-sustaining quality and elastic touch heretofore only found in the concert grand.
Exceptional durability, combined with perfection of tone and touch, make the Sohmer piano peculiarly adapted to the use of pupils and teachers in establishments where piano playing is taught. The writer some time since, through the courtesy of Mr. Fahr, who has the general charge of the financial affairs of the house, had an opportunity of visiting the factory, and the tour was a source of as much surprise as gratification.
When in 1879 the old factory on Fourteenth-street was found to be too small to accommodate the business it was enlarged by taking in the houses numbered from 149 to 155 on that street. Very soon this was found to be insufficient to meet the demand, and the works were transferred to Twenty-third-street, but on a considerably larger scale, while the salesroom, which now requires considerable space, remains on Fourteenth-street.
While Sohmer & Co. have relied upon the inherent value of their instrument rather that upon the ofttimes factitious advertisements obtained from Exposition awards, they have yet received the highest distinction in many exhibitions - notably Philadelphia, 1876; Montreal, 1881-2, and at Minneapolis and Sacramento - and they can point with pride to the magnificent indorsements their instruments have received at the hands of the best native and visiting musicians, prominent among whome are Ed Neupert and Gottschalk, the celebrated composers and pianists, and other native and visiting artists. It is not, therefore, surprising that the name of Sohmer & Co. upon a piano has become a guarantee for its excellence.

(New York Times, Jan. 1, 1886)

THEY WANT EIGHT HOURS. - The Executive Committee of the New York Piano Makers Union held a meeting yesterday and decided to demand eight hours as a day's work. The question of wages is left for arrangement between the bosses and employes. Sohmer & Co. have announced their acceptance of the reduced hours of labor.

(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 02.05.1886)

TO BUILD A PIANO FACTORY. - The Messrs. Sohmer, piano manufacturers, have purchased a large tract of land on Jamaica avenue, in Long Island City, and it is said will erect a building thereon for the manufacture of their pianos, giving employment to several hundred men.

(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 31.07.1886)

ASTORIA, N. Y. - Sohmer & Co., of New York, intend to erect a piano factory, at a cost of $100,000. Berger & Baylies, architects.

(The Manufacturer and Builder, 1886)

S

OHMER & CO., PIANO MANUFACT-

turers - Their strictly first class pianos will be sold
at manufacturers' prices, for cash, installments or rented.
Each piano fully warranted for six years. Pianos taken in
excange. Please call for their price list at their ware-
rooms 222 Fulton st.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 25.10.1878)

A

T SOHMER & CO.'S, 222 FULTON ST.

- In consequence of removal to our new warerooms
322 Fulton st, special bargains this month in the first class
square and upright pianos, new and second hand ; lowest
prices, cash, installments and to rent ; rent applied, if pur-
chased. SOHMER & CO., 322 Fulton st.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 11.03.1879)

T

HE "SOHMER" PIANO, ACKNOWL

edged by all musical authorities as superior to all
others, in quality of tone and durability, can be bought
direct from the manufacturers, SOHMER & CO., 322 Ful-
ton st. at almost the same prices asked for inferior pianos.
Call for catalogue. Several good second hand pianos at
great bargains. Pianos to rent and rent applied if pur-
chased.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 02.03.1880)

Somers & Co., 149 and 155 E. Fourteenth st.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Spence Henry, pianofortes, 201 E. 21st
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Spiekers & Brothers, 110 Centre
(New York City Directory, 1859)

J. SPITZ, Manufacturer of Piano-forte Hammers, No. 309 East Twenty-second Street. - This gentleman is an extensive manufacturer of piano-forte hammers, in which industry he has won a high reputation and a widely-extended trade. The business was originally established in 1875 by Messrs. Seabury & Spitz, the present proprietor succeeding to the sole control in 1884. The premises occupied for manufacturing and trade purposes are spacious in size, and equipped with every modern convenience and facility for rapid, systematic and perfect production, and for conducting the business in a successful manner in all its departments. From twelve to twenty skilled and expert hands are employed in the business, only the best materials are utilized and the most improved methods of manufacture are in use, resulting in a product that is unsurpassed for durability, utility, and reliability either in this country or in Europe. The proprietor relies entirely upon the standard quality and excellence of his output for success in his field of labor, and his large and steadily-increasing patronage throughout all parts of the United States and Canada proves conclusively his skill and ability as a manufacturer. He is eminently fair and conscientious in all his dealings, prompt in filling orders, reliable in meeting all engagements and very reasonable in his terms and prices. Business relations entered into with him are sure to prove pleasant and profitable to all parties. Mr. Spitz is a native of Switzerland, and a young man of business experience, ability, and integrity.

(Illustrated New York, 1888)

Sprowll Robert piano maker Bowery n. Tenth
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Stanford David R. pianos, 343 Broadway and 15 & 21 Tenth
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Stanford David, late pianos, 501 B'way,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Stanford D. R. & Co. pianos, 684 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Stanford, D. R. & Co., 17 Union sq.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Stebbins & Smith, 16 Amity pl. [piano action makers]
Steck George, pianos, 5 First
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Steck George and Co., 244 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Steck George & Co. pianos, 512 W. 34th, h 141 Eighth
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Steck George & Co. sales, $145,500
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Steck George & Co., 25 East Fourteenth street
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Steck G. & W. Grupe, 5 First
(New York City Directory, 1859)

G

EORGE STECK'S INIMITABLE GRAND

AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES. - Manufactory and
warerooms No. 102 Elm-st., between Canal and Walker,
New-York. I invite the attention of the public to my
stock of newly-improved Overstrung Grand and Square
Pianofortes, which for their peculiar musical qualities of
tone and power of durability they stand unsurpassed.
Every piano warranted for five years.GEO. STECK.
(New York Times, Oct. 20, 1862)

G

EORGE STECK'S INIMITABLE GRAND

AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES. - Manufactory
and Warerooms No. 113 Walker-st., corner of Centre,
New-York. Every Piano warranted for five years.
(New York Times, Jan. 24, 1863)

G

EORGE STECK'S INIMITABLE GRAND

AND SQUARE PIANO-FORTES. - Manufactory
and Warerooms No. 113 and 115 Walker-st., corner of Centre,
New-York. Every Piano warranted for five years.
(New York Times, July 25, 1863)

G

EORGE STECK & CO.'S GRAND AND

SQUARE PIANO-FORTES - Manufactory and ware-
rooms, Nos. 113 and 115 Walker-st., corner of Centre-st.,
New-York. Every Piano warranted for five years.
(New York Times, Feb. 25, 1864)

THE

CELEBRATED PIANOS OF GEO.

STECK & CO. - pronounced by all competent judges
to [sound?] unrivaled. for sale at the Warerooms Nos. 113
and 115 Walker-st.
(New York Times, June 24, 1864)

GEORGE STECK & CO.,

Manufacturers of

GRAND & SQUARE PIANO-FORTES.

WAREROOM, 141 EAST 8TH STREET,
Near Broadway, opposite The Mercantile Library,NEW YORK.
MANUFACTORY, 113 & 115 WALKER STREET.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

GEO. STECK & CO.'S

GRAND,

SQUARE AND UPRIGHT

PIANO-FORTES

  Are considered by every Musician of
note

The Best and Most Durable Piano

NOW MANUFACTURED.

WAREROOMS 25 EAST 14TH STREET

NEW YORK
(New York State Directory, 1870)

GEORGE STECK & CO.

MANUFACTURERS OF

Grand, Square & Upright

PIANO FORTES,

  The reputation of the STECK PIANO FORTES is firmly established throughout the United
States and in Europe. Having been practically tested for a number of years by the leading mem-
bers of the musical profession and the public generally, these instruments are unhesitatingly
pronounced the most perfect, in point of Tone, mechanism and workmanship, now made. In
every instance where honorable competition could be had with other instruments, the STECK
PIANOS have won the prize, and it is notorious in musical circles that a combination was
formed to especially exclude the Steck instruments from the Paris Exposition after space had
been awarded them by the United States Commission—a fact which in itself affords the very
highest testimonial of their superiority.

  The characteristic features of the STECK PIANO FORTES, Grand, Square and Upright, in every
variety of finish, are a rich and singing quality of tone, immense power, absolute evenness
throughout the scale, a facile action, and a durability wholly unsurpassed.

Purchasers will find it to their Advantage to call and try these Pianos.

Illustrated Catalogues sent by mail on Application.

WARE ROOMS, 141 EIGHTH STREET,

Between Broadway and 4th Avenue,

NEW YORK.

(Boyd's Business Directory, N.Y., 1870)

Steedman James, pianos, 55 W. 16th, h Sixth av. n W. 57th
(New York City Directory, 1869)

JAMES STEEDMAN
After an illness of one month with heart disease, James STEEDMAN, a retired piano manufacturer, died at his home, 96 South Elliott place, on Saturday. He was born in Scotland eighty-five years ago, but had been a resident in this country since a young man. Mr. STEEDMAN had been a member of the Hanson Place Baptist Church for Fifteen years, and the Rev. Dr. C.D. CASE, pastor of the church, will officiate at the services, which will be held to-night at 8 o’clock. The interment will be made to-morrow morning at Evergreen Cemetery. Mr. STEEDMAN is survived by a widow and four sons, James, Mart, William and George.

(Brooklyn Daily Standard Union, 16.01.1905)

P

IANO FORTES - NOTICE. - JAS STEED-

MAN begs to inform dealers, professors and the pub-
lic that he is manufacturing first-class piano-fortes, with
all the recent improvements, at moderate prices. All
pianos warranted for five years. No. 40 West 18th-st.,
between 5th and 6th avs. Pianos repaired, tuned or
taken in exchange.
(New York Times Dec. 24, 1864)

P

IANOS. - STEEDMAN'S IMPROVED OVER-

strung iron frame pianos, at greatly reduced prices;
fully waranted for five years ; a first-class second-hand
piano for sale, $175. No. 78 West 14th-st., between 6th
and 7th av.
(New York Times May 16, 1866)

JAMES STEEDMAN,

PIANO-FORTE

MANUFACTURER,

NO. 79 WEST FOURTEENTH STREET,
Bet. 6th and 7th Avenues,NEW YORK.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Steedman & Hollyer, pianos, 55 W. 16th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Steedman & Hollyer, pianos, 55 W. 16th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

A

GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICE OF FIRST CLASS
Pianos for cash or instalments, at STEEDMAN &
HOLLYER'S factory and warerooms, 55 West Sixteenth
street, between Fifth and Sixth avenue.
(New York Herald Dec. 29, 1869)

A

T STEEDMAN & HOLLYER'S 55 WEST SIXTEENTH
street - Square and upright Pianos to rent and on
instalments ; 7 octave from $150 to $250, with all
recent improvements.
(New York Herald, May 16, 1872)

Steinway Albert, pianos, 109 E. 14th & Fourth av. c E. 52d, h 125 E. 52d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Steinway Charles, pianos, 84 Walker & 91 Mercer,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Steinway Charles F. T. pianos, 109 E. 14th, h 123 E. 52d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Steinweg Henry, piano manuf. 199 Hester
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Steinway Henry, pianos, 84 Walker & 91 Mercer,
Steinway Henry jr. pianos, 84 Walker & 91 Mercer
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Steinway Henry, 63, Piano Manufacturer, 100000, 25000, Prussia
(Federal Census, 1850)
Steinway Henry, pianos, 109 E. 14th, h 121 E. 52d
Steinway Theodore, pianos, 109 E. 14th, h 123 E. 52d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Steinway William, pianos, 84 Walker & 91 Mercer
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Steinway Wm. pianos, 109 E. 14th, h 267 Lex. av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Steinway & Sons, pianos, 84 Walker & 91 Mercer,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Steinway & Sons, 71 East 14th St., $525.00
(Hist. Brooklyn and Long Isl. Fair, 1864)
Steinway & Sons, 1,944 instruments
(1866; Bluethner, Lehre des Piano'baues)
Steinway & Sons, pianos, 109 E. 14th & Fourth av. c E. 52d
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Steinway & Sons, sales, $1,205,463
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Steinway & Sons, 100 E. 14th.
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Steinway & Sons, 107 to 111 East Fourteenth street
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Steinway & Sons, 107 to 111 E. 14th st.
(New York as it was, 1876)

FIRST PREMIUM PIANO FORTES,

MANUFACTURED BY

STEINWAY & SON'S

88 Walker Street, near Broadway, N. Y.


  S. & S. respectfully call the attention of the public to their
splendid assortment of semi-grand and square Piano Fortes, em-
bracing every style, from 6 1-4 to 7 1-2 octaves, and from the
plain round cornered Piano to the most richly carved. In con-
sequence of the construction of their semi-grand Piano Fortes, all the treble strings running parallel with the
keys, which gives to the grings as well as the sounding board a greater sounding power, the tone combines the
power of a grand Piano with the sweetness of a square. The touch, on account of the superior action used, is of
great elasticity, and as pleasant to the infant player as to the greatest professional artist ; their durability is un-
surpassed, and they are warranted to stand any climate, in consequence of an additional double gross iron bracing.
   The tone is nobler, richer and greater than in any other Piano. 1. On account of having four bridges on the
sounding board instead of two. 2. The upper half of the Piano having three strings to a note instead of two.
3. The sounding board being like that in a grand, nearly twice as large as in any other square Piano.
As proof of the superiority of their Pianos, S. & S. only need to state, that at the Metropolitan Mechanics'
Fair, held in Washington City, they were unanimously awarded the first Premium in both classes, (semi-grand
and two-stringed.) over all competitors, among whom were the most distinguished makers from Boston, New-
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
   In addition to this, they have received the highest and most flattering testimonials from the greatest and best
musical talents through the United States, pronouncing their instruments superior to any other. Being thus en-
couraged, STEINWAY & SONS feel confident that their Piano Fortes are not excelled by those of any other maker,
and therefore invite purchasers and dealers to call and examine for themselves. Every Piano is warranted to give
entire satisfaction, or the purchase money returned.
(The Knickerbocker, 1855)
GOLD-MEDAL GRAND AND SQUARE
PIANOS. - STEINWAY & SONS, Manufacturers, No.
84 Walker-st., rear Broadway, New-York, were awarded
the First Premium where and whenever they brought
their Piano-Fortes into competition with the best makers
of Boston, New-York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
  Received the two First Prize Medals at the Metropolitan
Fair, Washington, 1855.
  The First Premium, a Gold Medal, for the best Piano-
Forte at the American Institute, Crystal Palace, New-
York, 1855.
  The First Premium, a Gold Medal, for the Best Piano-
Forte at the Maryland Institute, Baltimore, 1856.
  The First Prize Medal for the Best Piano-Forte at the
American Institute, Crystal Palace, New-York, 1856.
  (We had no piano-fortes in the Crystal Palace, 1857)
  The First Premium, a Gold Medal, for the best Grand
Piano at the Maryland Institute, Baltimore, 1857.
  The First Premium at the State Fair, Detroit, 1857.
  The First Premium at the State Fair, Richmond, 1857.
  Among the Judges were the first musical talent of the
country, such as W. Mason, Gottschalk, Wollenhaupt, &c.
Grand and Square Pianos constructed with the full
wooden and iron frame combined, and warranted for
three years, and will now be sold at greatly reduced
prices to suit the times.
(New York Times, Jan. 8, 1858)

WONDERFUL IMPROVEMENT IN
GRAND PIANOS.

  STEINWAY & SONS invite artists and the public in
general to call and examine their newly-invented
OVERSTRUNG GRAND PIANO, which, for power and
quality of tone, is pronounced superior to any other
grand piano by all who have examined it, among whom
are the best musical judges in the country, such as R.
GOLDBECK, TH. HAGE, (Ed. of the Musical Review,)
U. G. HILL, W. A. KING, W. MASON, R. C. TIMM, H.
A. WOLLENHAUPT, A. H. WOOB, O. SAAR, and many
othersSTEINWAY & SONS,
Manufacturers, Nos. 82 and 84 Walker-st., New-York.
(New York Times, 28.09.1859)

STEINWAY & SONS'

PATENT OVER-STRING GRAND PIANOS.

  We hereby inform the public that we have secured our
newly-invented Over-string Grand Piano by Letter
Patent, dated Dec. 30, 1859.
  Having ascertained that several piano manufacturers
have lately commenced making OVERSTRING GRANDS,
we hereby notify them to desist, as we shall prosecute
any infringements on our patent to the full extent of the
law

STEINWAY & SONS,

Nos. 82 and 84 Walker-st., New-York.
(New York Times, 01.01.1860)

STEINWAY & SONS


PATENT OVERSTRUNG GRANDS

AND SQUARE PIANOS.

  Are now considered the Best Pianos manufactured.
Opinion of nearly all the greatest and most prominent
  Musicians and Artists regarding these instruments:
  The undersigned, having personally examined and
practically tested the improvement in Grand Pianos,
invented by H. STEINWAY, in which the covered
strings are overstrung above those remaining, do here-
by certify :
  1. That as a result of the said improvement the voice
of the Piano is greatly improved in quality, quantity,
and power.
  2. The sound by Steinway's improvement is much
more even, less harsh, stronger, and much better pro-
longed, than that realized in any other Piano with which
we are acquainted.
  3. The undersigned regard the improvement of Mr.
Steinway as most novel, ingenious and important. No
Piano of similar construction has ever been knonw or
used, so far as the undersigned know or believe :
GUSTAV. SATTER,WILLIAM MASON,
S. B. MILLS,JOHN N. PATTISON,
WM. SAAR,ROBERT GOLDBECK,
U. C. HILL,GEORGE W. MORGAN,
WM. A. KING,CARL BERGMANN,
GEO. F. BRISTOW,HENRY C. TIMM,
And many others.
Each instrument warranted for the term of 3 years.
Warerooms, 82 and 84 Walker-st., near B'dway, N.Y.
(New York Times, 01.05.1860)

STEINWAY & SONS'

GRAND, SQUARE AND UPRIGHT
PIANOFORTES,
are now acknowledged the best instruments in America
as well as in Europe, having taken thirty-two First Pre-
miums, Gold and Silver Medals, at the principal fairs
held in this country within the last ten years, and in ad-
dition thereto they were awarded a First Prize Medal at
the Great International Exhibition in London, 1862, in
competition with two hundred and sixty-nine pianos,
from all parts of the world.
  Among the many and most valuable improvements in-
troduced by Messrs. STEINWAY & SONS in their Pia-
no-fortes,
THE SPECIAL ATTENTION OF PURCHASERS
is directed to their
PATENT AGRAFFE ARRANGEMENT.
  The value and importance of this invention having
been practically tested in all their grands and highest-
price square Piano-fortes, and admitted to be the greatest
improvement of modern times, they now announce that
they have determined to introduce their "Patent Agraffe
Arrangement" in every Piano-forte manufactured by
them, without increase of cost to the purchaser, in order
that all their patrons may reap the full advantage of the
great improvement.
Extract from the testimonial of the most distinguished
Artists of STEINWAY & SONS:
  Among the chief points of the uniform excellence of
the STEINWAY Pianos are:
  Greatest possible depth, richness and volume of tone,
combined with a rare brilliancy, clearness and perfect
evenness throughout the entire scale, and, above all, a
surprising duration of sound, the pure and sympathetic
quality of which never changes under the most delicate
or powerful touch.
  We therefore consider the STEINWAY Pianos in all
respectes the best instruments made in this country or in
Europe, use them solely and exclusively ourselves in
public or private, and recommend them invariably to
our friends and the public
S. B. MILLS,WM. MASON,A. H. PEASE,
ROBERT GOLDBECK,ROBERT HELLER,F. L. RITTER,
HENRY C. TIMM, WM.BERGE,THEO. E[]FELD,
GEO. W. MORGAN,K. MUZIO,C. BERGMANN,
THEO. THOMAS,CARL ANSCHUTZ,MAX. MABETZER.
And many others.


STEINWAY & SONS'
WAREROOMS, Nos. 71 and 73 EAST FOURTEENTH-
ST., between Union-square and Irving-place, New-
York.
(New York Times, Dec. 28, 1865)

A.

STEINWAY & SONS,
manufacturers of Grand, Square and Upright
PIANOFORTES,
beg to announce
A GENERAL REDUCTION
in their prices, in accordance with the decline in the pre-
mium on gold, and consequent decreased cost of imported
articles used in the manufactur of pianofortes. In addi-
tion to their established styles of pianofortes STEINWAY &
SONS, in order to meet a long felt and frequently expressed
want, by persons of moderate means, teachers, schools &c.,
have perfected arrangements for the manufacture of an en-
tirely new style of instrument, termed
THE "SCHOOL" PIANO.
A thoroughly complete instrument of seven octaves, pre-
cisely the same in size, scale, interior mechanism and work-
manship as their highest priced seven octave Pianos, the
only difference being that this new style of instrument is con-
structed in a perfectly plain, yet exceedingly neat exterior
case. These new instruments will be supplied to those who
desire to possess a thoroughly first class "Steinway Piano,"
yet are limited in means.
AT EXCEEDINGLY MODERATE PRICES.
STEINWAY & SONS also desire to call special attention
to their new
PATENT UPRIGHT PIANOS,
with double iron frame, patent resonator, tubular frame
action, and new soft pedal, which are matchless in volume
and quality of tone, and expressing facility of action,
while standing longer in tune and being more impervious to
atmospheric influences than any other piano at present man-
ufactured.
Price lists and illustrated catalogues mailed free on appli-
cation.
EVERY PIANO IS WARRANTED FOR FIVE YEARS.
WAREROOMS, FIRST FLOOR OF STEINWAY HALL,
Nos. 109 and 111 East Fourteenth street, New York
Between Fourth avenue and Irving place.
(New York Herald Dec. 29, 1869)

(Industrial America, 1876)

Steles, George H. piano maker, No. 30 Oakland street
(Brooklyn's Eastern District, 1942)
Stoddart Adam, 45, 1832
(Arr. Port New York, 1830-1832)
Stodart Adam, 1836
(Naturalizations in the Marine Ct, NYC, 1834-1840.)
Stodart Adam, 361 Broadway
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Stodart Adam, 361 Broadway
(New World, 1843)
Stodart Adam
(1846; Gen.l Soc. of Mech's and Tradesmen of NYC)
Stodart Adam, pianos
(New York City Directory, 1849-50)
Stoddard Adam, 56, piano forte, Scotland
(Federal Census, 1850)
Stodart Adam & Co. pianos, 343 Broadway, 15 and 21 Tenth, and W. 35th n. Av. 8,
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Stodart Adam, pianos, 510 B'way, 194 W. 35th,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Stoddart Adam, 75 piano forte maker, 14,000 50,000 Scotland
(Federal Census, 1860)
Stodart & Morris, 684 Broadway
(American Educational Monthly, 1866)
Stodart Adam, pianos, 684 B'way
(Trow's Directory, 1867)
Stodart Adam, pianos, 684 B'way, h 747 Lex. av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Stodart Adam, baptised: 24 Oct. 1783 Death: 27 Jul. 1872 in New York, United States Burial: Covington Churchyard, (commemoration), Lanark, Scotland
(Descendants of Adam Reid, Covenanter)
Stodart Adam, born 1783, died in New York 27.7.1872 [Covington g/s]
(Scottish-American Gravestones, 1998)

STODART. - In this City, on Saturday morning, July 27, ADAM STODART.
The funeral services will take place at St. George's Church, Stuyvesantq-suare, on Tuesday, 30th inst., at 3 P. M. The friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend.

(New York Times, July 28, 1872)

A

T PRIVATE SALE -

An excellent Piano
Forte, of Stodart, Worcester and Dunham's
make, which cost $350, can be bought for $180,
at the auction room, 14 Fulton street.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 12.09.1843)

S

TODDART PIANO. --

We have in store a second hand
Piano, made by Stoddart, Worcester
& Dunham, of New York ; cost originally nearly four
hundred dollars, has been in use only a few years -
price $175
May 8
MASON, COLBURN & CO.,
No. 140 Main street, Cincinnati.
(Daily Sanduskian [Ohio], June 4, 1849)

Stodart & Dunham, at the corner of Thirteenth-street and Irving place.
(1846; The Fireman, 1858)
Stodart & Dunham, 343 Broadway
(Mirror, 1848)

WE are well pleased to learn that the extensive piano-forte establishment of Messrs. STODART AND DUNHAM, which was some time since destroyed by fire, has been again rebuilt, and is now in successful operation, with its full complement of workmen. As the pianos from this old established house are held second to no instruments in the world, we are performing a public service in mentioning that all orders can now be supplied by the proprietors with 'promptness and despatch.'

(The Knickerbocker, 1846)

Among the most beautiful specimens of wood for furniture, the American Black Walnut occupies of late a very prominent place ; and we really think some of the furniture made of this wood is quite equal to any rosewood or mahogany we ever say. We have just seen a splendid specimen of furniture made of this material ; a beautiful Piano-Forte from the manufactory of Messrs. STODART AND DUNHAM, N0. 343 Broadway, where the curious in such matters may find a large and choice assorment of pianos. The celebrity of their instruments is well-deserved and long-established...
AMONG the most beautiful and appropriate holiday presents we have seen, we may mention a splendid seven-octave piano-forte, from the manufactory of Messrs. STODART AND DUNHAM, those sanspareils of other piano-makers. This is a square instrument, in a modest, plain but very beautiful rose-wood case, and with mother-of-pearl keys ; a style as beautiful as it is novel. Touching the quality of the tone of this instrument, we can only endorse the opinions of the most eminent professors and amateurs who have seen it, all of whom agree that it surpasses even Messrs. STODART AND DUNHAM ever before manufactured. It was made to order as a New-Years present...
MESSRS. STODART AND DUNHAM, whose pianofortes, by their elegance of finish and excellence of tone, have attained so high and wide a reputation, have been compelled the 'enlarge their borders.' They have removed their sales-rooms to Number Three Hundred and Forty-three, Broadway, the splendid establishment formerly occupied by Messrs. WILLIAMS AND STEVENS as a looking-glass, picture, and print store. Messrs. STODART AND DUNHAM have had at no previous period so large and superb a collection of instruments as at the present moment. Nor does their supply consist of pianos alone. 'Musical instruments and that of all sorts,' and of the best quality, may be ordered through their establishement.

(The Knickerbocker, 1846)

'IN the fashionable locality of Broadway,' writes Mr. ARCHIBALD PRENTICE, a recent English traveller in the United States, whose 'Tour' has lately appeared in London, 'I found STODART, the piano-forte maker, whose reputation here is equal to his uncle's in London, when he and the BROADWOODS had almost the monopoly of the trade.' This reminds us to say, that any one curious in such matters would find great interest in visiting Adam Stodart's Piano-forte Manufactory, occupying four large lots of ground in Tenth-street, near Sixth Avenue, with a backward wing seventy feet by thirty, and four stories in height. This, the most complete establishment of its kind in the United States, if not in the world, is the only manufactory where STODART's pianos are made, he having no longer a partner in business. His sales-room is at 343, Broadway. A dozen or more piano-fortes are made every week at this manufactory, which for tone, durability, brilliancy and finish are pronounced by the best musical professors to be equal to any, and superior to most others, manufactured either here or in Europe. They are sold as fast as they can be manufactured - a sufficient evidence of their excellent quality...

(The Knickerbocker, 1849)

A. & S. NORDHEIMER

PUBLISHERS AND IMPORTERS OF

MUSIC, & MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,

14 KING STREET, EAST

An extensive assortment of the Celebrated PIANO FORTES of CHICKERING and STODART
& DUNHAM, at manufacturers prices
(in Toronto; The Canada Directory, 1851)

NEW YORK AND BOSTON

Piano Forte, Melodeon, Reed Organ,
Seraphine, Book and Music

WHOLESALE & RETAIL WAREHOUSE

Milwaukee Street, Janesvill, Wis.

T

HE UNDERSIGNED

are now prepared
to furnish direct from the manufactory,
PIANO FORTES from the best makers in the Union,
such as Chickering, Gilbert, A. W. Ladd & Co.,
Hallet, Davis & Co., Hallet & Cumston, Geo.
Hews of Boston ; Bacon & Raven, A. H. Gale
& Co., Nun & Clark, Stodart & Co., New
York ; Boardman & Grey, Albany. Many Per-
sons have an idea that they can get Pianos
much better and cheaper at the East than here.
To such we would say that we are connected
with one of the oldest Houses in the East, our
Instruments are selected by men who have been
for years in the business, and we sell at the
manufacturers' prices. All instruments fully
warranted.
  Church and Parlor Seraphines from the
celebrated Manufactory of D. M. Dearborne,
Concord, New Hampshire. These instruments
are unlike those of any other make, that are
sold for the same price, being constructed on a
different plan, and having a different made
reed, giving a firmer, deeper, smoother, and
more powerful tone than any yet offered to the
public. Those in want of a Church or Parlor
Instrument, are invited to examine ours before
purchasing elsewhere.
  Carhart's Patent Melodeons, with Dearborn's
Improvement. These Melodeons are acknow-
ledged to be superior to any others manufac-
tured, and are furnished at all prices from $45
to $125.
  Violins, Bows, Strings, Accordeons, Flutes,
Instruments, &c., &c.
  Singing Books, Instruction Books, Blank
Music paper, all the new and popular Music
received as soon as published.
  Merchants and Teachers supplied on favor-
able terms.
JOHN F. PEASE & Co.
Janesville, Wis. Aug.
(Wisconsin and Iowa farmer, and northwestern cultivator, 1853)

PIANOS! PIANOS! PIANOS!


ONE HUNDRED

PIANOS FOR SALE AT THE MAKERS PRICES, OR TO HIRE, AT

SHEPPARD'S

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

PIANO EMPORIUM

No. 5 EAST SWAN STREET,

BUFFALO, N. Y


PRICES FROM $50 TO $1000.

Various makers' Pianos will be kept on hand, viz:

CHICKERING AND STODART'S

Grands, Parlor Grands, elegantly Carved Louis XIVths,

THE STODART SERPENTINE,

With pearl and ivory keys, round corner and square, in Rosewood, Ma-
hogany and Blackwalnut cases, of various patterns - forming the largest
and most complete assortment of Pianos in Buffalo.

RETAIL AGENCY FOR THE SALE OF

PRINCE & CO'S

MELODEONS.


  Second hand Pianos wanted, for which cash will be paid, if made by
Stodart or Chickering. Second hand Pianos taken in exchange for
new ones.

PIANOS TUNED AND REPAIRED.

(Buffalo Business Directory, 1855)

Stodart & Morris, pianos, 510 B'way & 194 W. 35th
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Stodart & Morris, 501 Broadway, manufactories 194, 196, 198, 200 and 204 Thirty-Fourth and Thirty-Fifth sts.
(The Canada Directory, 1859)
Stoddart & Morris, $400.00
(Hist. Brooklyn and Long Isl. Fair, 1864)
Stodart & Morris, manufacturers of the "Stodart" Piano Forte ; warerooms 684 B'way, factory, W. 34th & 35th streets, near Eighth av.
(Trow's Directory, 1867)
Stodart & Morris, pianos, 684 B'way & 479 First av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)

S

TODART PIANO FORTES. - A LARGE AS-

sortment of these celebrated instruments, well known for
the last 25 years for their great power and purity of tone, and
substantial workmanship, are now offered for sale or to rent on
the most liberal terms. Second-hand pianos exchanged, re-
paired, and sold at the lowest prices. Melodeons of the best
makers. Sheet Music and Musical Instruments. JAMES E.
LENT, Brooklyn Music Store, 559 Fulton st. (opposite City Hall).
(Brooklyn Eagle, 20.08.1857)

STODART PIANO FORTES.

  JAMES E. LENT, having been appointed by the Manufac-
turers of Stodart & Morris, Exclusive Agent for the sale of
the above Celebrated Instruments in Brooklyn, begs to inform
the public that he is prepared at all times, with a full assort-
ment, which will be sold on the most accommodating terms,
and at the lowest Manufacturer's Prices. those who prefer
can always hire, with the privilege of purchasing. Thus secu-
ring to all parties one of the finest Instruments ever manufac-
tured (as has been fully proven for the last 30 years), for tem-
porary use or otherwise. JAS. E. LENT feeling determined to
offer sufficient inducements to all, desired a call from those in
want of a Piano, when he will prove the fact.
  Second-hand Pianos and Pianos of other makers, always on
hand, for sale or hire, at prices to suit the most economically in-
clined. Melodeons of Prince and other makers, for sale or to
hire. Piano-stools, Piano-covers, and all articles of musical
merchandise, imported direct from the manufactory in Europe,
and overing at the lowest rate.
  Sheet Music, Books, &c., &c., from a well selected stock, and
every piece published furnished from the shelves or procured
to orderJAS E. LENT,
Brooklyn Musical Emporium
349 Fulton street.
(Brooklyn Eagle, 29.04.1858)

STODART PIANOS

JAMES E. LENT.
  Having been appointed by the manufacturers, Stodart &
Morris, Sole Agent for the sale of the above justly celebrated
instrument in Brooklyn, begs to inform his friends and the
public that he is prepared at all times with a full assorment of
all sizes and styles, which he is enabled to offer at the lowest
manufacturers' prices. J. E. L. deems it quite unnecessary
to refer to the merits of the STODART PIANO, as it is well
known by all makers and dealers, as well as by thousands who
own and have used them for the last quarter of a century, who
will testify that they are beyond all doubt one of the best (if
not the very best) Piano Fortes ever manufactured ; justly
known as the sweetest toned and the most durable.
  The manufacturers can with pride point to every Piano as an
advertisement, and claim every owner as a friend. Having
ample capital, J. E. K. is prepared to give time purchasers
every facility. Parties desiring, can always hire and make ar-
rangements to apply the rent towards the purchase.
JAMES E. LENT, 359 Fulton street,
opposite City Hall.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 19.10.1858)
STODART PIANO-FORTES.
GRAND, LARGE AND UPRIGHT.
STODART & MORRIS,
Manufacturers.
New-York.
Warerooms
No.501 Broadway.
(New York Times, Sep. 6, 1859)
STODART PIANOS.
GRAND, SQUARE AND PICOLO.
The best manufactured.
Warerooms,
No. 506 Broadway
(New York Times, Apr. 17, 1860)
STODART PIANOS.
REMOVAL
The salesroom of the Stodart Pianos has been removed from No. 501 to 506 Broadway, opposite the St. Nicholas Hotel, where will be kept a full assortment of the various styles manufactured, viz., Grand, Upright and Square, of every fashion, overstrung and otherwise. The merits of these instruements are well known by the every body in the City and by the profession throughout the United States, who will honestly pronounce them the best Pianos now made. STODDART & MORRIS, manufacturers, No. 506 Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, Apr. 28, 1860)
STODART PIANOS.
GRAND, SQUARE, AND UPRIGHT.
A full assortment of these unrivaled instruments for
sale, at the lowest prices, by the manufacturers, at their
warerooms, 506 Broadway, opposite the St. Nicholas Hotel.
(New York Times, Dec. 9, 1860)
"STODART" PIANOS,
GRAND, SQUARE AND RICCOLO
We would call the attention of those in search of a
GOOD piano forte to a full assortment of our unrivaled
Instruments, which we are offering at low prices. The
"Stodart" Pianos have always been regarded as the
BEST manufactured, and therefore need no puffing.
STODART & MORRIS.
Warerooms No. 506 Broadway,
Opposite St. Nicholas Hotel.
(New York Times, Jan. 5, 1863)

R

EMOVAL - THE STODART PIANO-FORTE. -

The subscribers have removed their warerooms to No.
526 Broadway, corner Spring-st., where they will be happy
to see all those desirous of securing a really first-class in-
strument. They take special pleasure in recommending
their new scale, 7-octave, overstrung and iron-frame
piano-fortes as instruments unsurpassed by any makers
in the world, and feel sure of satisfying the public in
every point as regards power, delicacy of touch, beauty of
tone and great durability.STODART & MORRIS.
(New York Times, Mar. 25, 1863)
REMOVAL - STODART PIANOS.
  The Warerooms of these UNRIVALED INSTRU-
MENTS have been removed to No. 526 BROADWAY.
corner of Spring-st., where the subscribers offer for sale
a splendid assortment of their NEW SCALE 7-octave,
Overstrung, full iron fram PIANO-FORTES.
STODART & MORRIS
(New York Times, Apr. 10, 1863)
STODART & MORRIS,
Manufacturers of grand
SQUARE AND UPRIGHT PIANOS.
Warerooms,
No. [] Broadway
(New York Times, Jan. 19, 1864)

THE GREAT "STODART" PIANO


"Not for a day, but for all time."

  Thousands of Piano Fortes are made, like cheap furni-
ture, to look at, but not to last, and the unfortunate pur-
chaser soon finds himself "done" out of a few hundreds of
dollars, when it is too late to remedy the evil in any other
way than by disposing of his worthless piano at any price
and replacing it with a first class instrument.
  All this loss and disappointment can be avoided by pur-
chasing a
"STODART" PIANO,
known and appreciated by the musical community and the
profession as the most reliable, and in every respect the
best instrument manufactured. They have stood the
of time, (over a quarter of a century) and the manufacturer-
ers have always kept pace in introducing
EVERY MODERN IMPROVEMENT,
Until it is conceded by judges to be in every respect a per-
fect Piano.
  Over eleven thousand families now have them in use, and
in every case reference is made to those who have them
with perfect assurance that they will advise the purchase
of none other than a "STODART."
  The prices of these celebrated Pianos are very little higher
than those offered for sale without any reputation, and the
subscriber having the sole agency for sale of the
"STODART" PIANOS
in Brooklyn, is prepared to grant facilities in the way of
payments that less extensive establishments are unable to
do.
OPINION OF THE GREAT PIANIST GOTTSCHALK.
  I consider the "STODART" square Pianos to be among
the very best I have ever heard. They have a power and fullness
of tone in the bass which cannot easily be surpassed by any
other Pianos, whilse the higher notes possess a pure chrys-
tal like sonority, which is one of the peculiar characteristics
of the "STODART" instruments.
L. M. GOTTSCHALK.
  A large assortment of Pianos always on hand for hire.
JAMES E. LENT.
Agent for the sale of "Stodart" Pianos,
359 Fulton street, Brooklyn, directly opposite the City Hall.
(Brooklyn Eagle, 22.12.1864)

STODART PIANOS,

Known and esteemed as one of the BEST PIANOS manu-
factured, and for years have been used by the MOST
HIGHLY CULTIVATED MUSICAL PEOPLE, and
who will have none other.
  Reference is made in all cases to parties who have the in-
strument, and they number thousands in this city alone,
as to their qualities as a PERFECT PIANO in every
respect. A fine assortment, recetly from our factory,
at our warerooms, No. 624 Broadway, opposite St. Nicho-
las Hotel.STODART & MORRIS.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1864)

"A WORD TO THE WISE IS SUFFI-

CIENT"

THE

STODART.

PIANO-FORTE!

Recomends itself to those desirous of purchasing an
instrument of musical durability of wear, strength of
mechanism, beauty of tone and finish and exquisiteness
of touch.
  Thousands of these unrivaled instruments have been
sold since the factory has been in operation, and in no
case has a single one failed to give the most unqualified
satisfaction to the purchaser.
  Thirty years of continued business, with the proper ap-
plication of all REALLY valuable improvements, has
proved them far superior to any instrument now manu-
factured, both for sweetness of tone, power and brilliancy.
STODART & MORRIS, Manufacturers,
No. 674 Broadway, New-York.
(New York Times, Dec. 25, 1865)

S

TODART

NEW SCALE
Overstrung, full Iron Frame
PIANO-FORTES.

STODART & MORRIS.
MANUFACTURERS OF
GRAND, SQUARE AND UPRIGHT PIANO-FORTES.

  Our New Scale Pianos, in addition to their PECULIAR
merits, contain every really valuable modern improvement,
rendering them the most complete and perfect instrument
ever offered to the public, and for
PURITY OF TONE,
DELICACY OF TOUCH,
DURABILITY, and also standing the
TEST OF SEVERE CLIMATES,
THE NEW SCALE
STODART PIANO-FORTE
STANDS UNRIVALLED.
  The Piano-Fortes of this manufacture have stood the test
of more than a Quarter of a Century, and the manufac-
turers are at liberty to refer to over
THIRTY-FIVE THOUSAND FAMILIES,
who have them in use in nearly every part of the civilized
world.
  Parties favoring us with their orders, which will be
promptly attended to, can rely upon being as honorably
dealt with as if their selections were made in person.
STODART & MORRIS,
Warerooms, 681 Broadway, New York,
J. E. LENT, Agent, 359 Fulton street, Brooklyn.
(Brooklyn Eagle, 12.10.1866)

STODART & MORRIS,

(Established over 30 Years,)
MANUFACTURERS OF THE

"STODART" PIANOFORTE,

684 BROADWAY, New York.

None but FIRST CLASS INSTRUMENTS.
(Trow's Directory, 1867)

F

OR SALE - PIANO - $225 FOR A $600

Stodart piano, 7 octave, round corners, front and
back finished alike, and in good order ; stool included.
Can be seen at 321 State st.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 25.04.1873)

Stodart William, music store, 167 Broadway
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Stodart, William
(1832; Saint Andrew's Society)
Stodart William musicstore
(New York Reg. & Directory, 1835)
Stodart William
(1835; Saint George's Society)
Stodart Sophia, widow of William, 39 Av. 3
(New York City Directory, 1852)

BOOKSTORE AND CIRCULATING
LIBRARY,

No. 6 COURTLAND-STREET, NEW-YORK.

  This Establishment will be found particularly convenient for Stran-
gers, and it shall be the object ofthe Subscriber to furnish the Public
with NEW and other PUBLICATIONS at the lowest prices, and
to afford every information to Strangers.

WILLIAM STODART.

(New York Annual Register, 1832

TREVALL, STODART & CO.

6 CORTLAND-STREET,

IMPORTERS OF HATTERS' PLUSH AND TRIMMINGS.

Hats, Caps, Stocks, &c., at wholesale.

(New York City Directory, 1836)

Stone J. E. pianos, 411 W. 42d
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Strauch Peter D. piano action maker, 516 W. 25th, h 12 W. 60th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Strauch Bros. piano action makers, 530 W. 25th
(New York State Directory, 1870)

STRAUCH BROS Manufacturers of Grand, Square, and Upright Piano-forte Action, Nos. 22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 Tenth Avenue.A representative and successful house in the metropolis, extensively engaged in the manufacture of grand, square, and upright piano-forte actions, is that of Messrs. Strauch Bros. In every branch of business there is some one firm that has excelled therein and is thoroughly representative of the best efforts and the largest measure of success. In the line of the manufacture of all descriptions of piano-forte actions such a house is that of Messrs. Strauch Bros., whose magnificent factory is so eligibly and centrally located at Nos. 22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 Tenth Avenue, and No. 67 Little West-twelfth Street. This business was established twenty-five years ago by Messrs. P. D. and Wm. Strauch, under the now so popular and widely known name of Strauch Bros. They first located their factory in Twenty-fifth Street. subsequently removing to Fifteenth Street, thence to Gansevoort Street. and finally to their present handsome and specially-constructed factory at Nos. 22 to 30 Tenth Avenue, and No. 67 Little West-twelfth Street, having been forced to do so by their enormous growth of trade. The buildings are their own property, erected by themselves, and consist of a main building 78x100 feet in dimensions and four stories in height, being fully equipped with the choicest machinery, including many valuable improvements of the firm's own invention, and an adjoining building containing boiler and drying-rooms They possess facilities and conveniences here for carrying on their line of business superior to those of any other concern in the United States, and have a capacity for producing 500 actions a week. Their great establishment is a great scene of busy industry, some 300 skilled hands finding steady employment at good wages. Messrs. Strauch Bros. give the closest personal supervision to every detail of their immense concern, and manufacture carefully to specification all kinds of grand, square, and upright piano-forte actions. Their name is a sufficient guarantee as to the excellence and thorough reliability of their actions all through the trade. They number among their permanent customers all the leading piano-manufacturers of America, and have in their possession hosts of unsolicited testimonials as tothe unqualified satisfaction their actions invariably give. It is well known that these gentlemen are the recognized leading experts in this branch of enterprise in the United States. Both copartners are popular throughout commercial circles, noted for their honorable methods and sterling integrity, and well merit the degree of success which has extended their able exertions.

(Illustrated New York, 1888)

Stuehler Joseph, pianos, 78 Barrow, h 2 Lafayette av. B'klyn
(New York City Directory, 1869)

Stultz & Bauer, Manufacturers of Upright and Square Pianos, Nos. 701 to 707 First Avenue. - Fifty years ago America imported all her pianofortes from Europe, and so great has been our advance in this industry that at the present time our manufacturers not only satisfy the immense demand of the domestic market, but now export great numbers to Europe, South America and Australia. This extraordinary result is due in a great measure to the remarkable inventions by means of which the American pianoforte has attained the proud position of being beyond dispute the finest made. A prominent house engaged in this trade is that of Messrs Stultz & Bauer, Nos. 701 to 707 First Avenue, which was originally founded in 1880, at Bleecker Street, and eventually, in 1883, removed to its present eligible location. Messrs. Stultz & Bauer determined from the beginning to make none but strictly first-class pianos, and having worked themselves for years in all departments of piano making, from the first process of case making through all the finer and intricate ones up to the last finish and fine tuning, it was comparatively easy for them to select the most skilful workmen, and those best adapted for the business. They also determined from the inception of the concern that in every case they would exert themselves to the utmost to give satisfaction to every customer and to depend on this to bring their name into favor with the public, and obtain an endorsement and recommendation from each customer who used their pianos, instead of adopting the patent-medecine system of advertising, upon which the sale of so many worthless instruments depends. The result of this line of policy has been successful beyond their most sanguine expectations, and though a young firm their pianos are known and admired all over this vast country and several countries in Europe, the sweet and powerful tone of the Stultz & Bauer instrument surprising and delighting the most critical listeners. These pianos are sold at prices which are as low as can be named for first-class instrumenmts, although of course higher than the figures placed upon the miserable apologies with which the marked is flooded. The individual members of this firm are Messrs. Henry Stulz and Frederick Bauer. Personally, they are held in the highest estimation in social and commercial circles for their strict integrity, and justly merit the success attained by their ability, energy and perseverance.

(New York's Great Industries, 1884)

Syverson Ole, 114 E. 14th [piano key makers]
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Tallman John, pianoforte maker, 15 Barclay
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Taubald Edward, pianos, h 278 E. 10th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Taylor Edward L. pianofortes, 125 Orchard
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Taylor Edward L. pianos, 15 Mercer,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Taylor Francis, pianos, 157 Franklin
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Taylor Francis, pianos, r. 208 Sullivan,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Taylor Francis, pianos, 12 Carroll pl. & 208 Sullivan, h 129 S. 8th, B'klyn
Taylor & Dupuy, pianos, 12 Carroll pl. & 208 Sul livan
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Taylor & Dupuy, pianos, 151 Bleecker
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Taylor & Young, 13 Mercer
(New York City Directory, 1859)

S

UPERIOR 7-OCTAVE PIANOS RETAILED

at wholesale prices, direct from the manufactory of
TAYLOR & YOUNG, No. 15 Mercer-st., near Canal.
Each piano warranted for five years. Two old pianos
cheap.
(New York Times, 28.09.1859)

Thalsa C. pianos, &c. 7 Hicks (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Thompson Artemas E. pianos, 458 B'way,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Thomas Daniel, 596 Washington
Thompson Charles S. jr. piano maker, 198 Stanton
Thompson Jesse, pianos, 7 Barclay
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Thompson C. F. Bradbury pianos, 533 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Thompson,
(Met. Museum, Nunns & Clark 8054)
Thomson James M. pianofortemaker, 235 Av. 3
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Thompson Wm. J. piano forte maker, Washington ave. near Fitch st.
(Henry's Dir. of Morrisania, 1853-4)
Thurston Joshua, pianomaker, 259 William
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Thurston Jasper piano maker, 259 William
Thurston Joshua piano maker 259 William
Thurston Peter R. piano maker 60 Sullivan
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Thurston N. & Sons, 665 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Thurston Nathaniel jr. pianos, 42 Union pl. h 65 Irving pl.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Torp, Otto, professor of music, 87 Greene Street [1832-1833]
Torp, Otto, music store, 465 Broadway [1835]
Torp, Otto, music store, 465 Broadway [1836-1837]
Torp, Otto, music, 229 Broadway [1838-1839]
Torp, Otto, music, 435 Broadway [1840]
Torp, Otto, music, house 378 Houston Street [1841]
Torp & Love, piano makers, 465 Broadway [1836-1837]
Torp & Unger, piano makers, 229 Broadway [1838-1839]
Torp & Viereck, music store, 465 Broadway [1834]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Tremaine Charles M. pianos, 435 Broome, h 381 Henry, B'klyn
Tremaine William B. pianos, 435 Broome, h 381 Henry, B'klyn
Tremaine C. M. & Brother, pianos, 435 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Tremaine C. M. & Bro. pianos, 435 Broome
(New York State Directory, 1870)

P

IANOS.

ORGANS.

435 Broome st, near Broadway, New York,
C. M. TREMAINE & BRO.
PIANOFORTE Manufacturer and general agents for the
BURDETT COMBINATION ORGAN, containing Car-
penter & Burdett's new improvements.
THE GREATEST SUCCESS OF THE AGE.
  The disagreeable reedy tone entirely overcome in this in-
strument. The verdict is unanimous. We challenge the
world to equal it.
  We can furnish new Seven-Octave Pianofortes from $275
to $950. Second hand Pianos, Organs and Melodeons from
$40 to $250. New Cabinet Organs $45 to $1,000.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 23.11.1872)

Trost Herman, pianos, 248 E. 33d
(New York City Directory, 1869)

A.

F. TEYON & CO., NO. 25 HOWARD-ST.,

have now on hand, for sale, an assortment of piano-
fortes of their own manufacture, made of the best mate-
rials and workmanship, combining all of the latest im-
provements, which they offer at very moderate prices.
Dealers and others are respectfully invited to examine.
(New York Times, Sep. 11, 1863)

Turner Richard, pianoforte maker, 28th n. Avenue 3rd
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
United Piano Makers, 101 Bleecker c Greene
(New York City Directory, 1869)
United Piano Makers..Grand. Square and Upright Pianofortes, Factory and Warerooms, cor. of S. 3d & 1st Sts. E.D.
(Brooklyn City Bus. Dir., 1873)

U

NITED PIANO-FORTE MAKERS, - CHAS.

SIEH & CO., corner of South-st. and 1st-sts.; Brooklyn
E. D. Depot No. 547 Broadway, N. Y. We invite the
attention of the public to our stock of improved over-
strung, iron frame piano-frotes, which for their power,
musical qualities and durability, stand unsurpassed.
(New York Times, Dec. 24, 1861)

U

NITED PIANO-FORTE MAKER'S STOCK

COMPANY, NO. 88 WALKER-ST., NEW-YORK.-
All the Stockholders being superior practical piano mak-
ers, this Company are able to offer first class overstrung
pianos at greatly reduced prices. Every instrument guar-
anteed for five years.
(New York Times, Jan. 5, 1863)

UNITED PIANO-FORTE MAKERS,

No. 84 Walker-st., New-York.
  All the stockholders being superior practical workmen,
this company is able to
OFFER THEIR LARGE AND SPLENDID PIANOS
AT LOWER PRICES
THAN ANY OTHER FIRST-CLASS HOUSE.
  Every instrument guaranteed for five years.
(New York Times, Apr. 25, 1863)

U

NITED PIANO-FORTE MAKERS,

No. 84 Walker-st., New-York,
  Our company being composed entirely of superior
workmen, we are enabled to produce a more perfect
Piano-forte than any other house.
  Every instrument guaranteed for five years.
(New York Times, Dec. 28, 1865)

U

NITED PIANO-FORTE MAKERS,

No. 84 Walker-st., New-York.
  Our company being composed entirely of superior
workmen, we are enabled to produce a more perfect
Piano-forte than any other house.
  Every instrument guaranteed for five years.
(New York Times, Dec. 22, 1866)

UNITED PIANO-FORTE MAKERS' STOCK COMPANY.

SALESROOM, No. 84 WALKER STREET, near Broadway,
NEW YORK.
MANUFACTORY & WAREROOM, CORNER SOUTH THIRD AND FIRST STREETS,
WILLIAMSBURGH, L. I.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

UNITED

PIANO MAKERS,

OF NEW YORK.

TESTIMONIAL FROM

FRANZ ABT

,
(Composer of "When the Swallows Homeward Fly," Etc., Etc.)

(TRANSLATION.)

  At the recent concert in Williamsburgh, June 23d, arranged by the different Sing-
ing Societies in my honor, I had occasion to make myself acquainted with a GRAND
PIANO from the UNITED PIANO MAKERS. This Grand Piano distinguished itself by
its harmonious sounds, immense body of tone, and remarkable touch, so much, that
it gives me pleasure to express by highest consideration in favor of this manufactory.
(Signed) FRANZ ABT.
  New York, July 3d, 1872.

THOMAS MAIN & SON,

- SOLE AGENTS FOR NEW ENGLAND,

488 Washington St., Boston.

(Lawrence Mass. Directory, 1873)

U. Mutual Piano Forte Assn. 627 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1869)
United States Piano Co., 865 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)

trons in 40 States in Circular.
(The Waynsboro Village Record [PA], Apr. 11, 1872)
You ask WHY we can sell First Class
7 Octave Pianos for $290? We an-
swer - It costs less than $300 to make
any $600 Piano sold through Agents,
all of whom make 100 per ct. profit.
We have no Agents, but ship direct to
families at Factory price, and warrant
5 years. Send for illustrated circular in
which we refer to over []00 Bankers, Merchants, &c. (some
of whom you may know), using our pianos, in 44 States and
Territories. Please state where you saw this notice.

U. S. Piano Co., 365 Broadway, N. Y.

(To-Day, 1872)

Utter Samuel, 286 Bowery
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Vanderbeck Abraham, pianoforte maker, 115 Orange
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Vanderbeek, Alfred H., music and pianoforte warerooms, 143 Broadway [1853]
Vanderbeek, William, music, 201 Broadway [1845]
Vanderbeek, William, music, 385 Broadway [1846]
Vanderbeek, William, agent, 479 Broadway [1848]
Vanderbeek, William, music and pianoforte warerooms, 479 Broadway [1849-1852]
Vanderbeek, William, music and pianoforte warerooms, 843 Broadway. [1853]
Vanderbeek, William, music and pianoforte warerooms, 831 Broadway [1854]
Vanderbeek, William, music, 831 Broadway [1855]
Vanderbeek, William, 831 Broadway [1856]
Vanderbeek, William, merchant, 140 Pearl Street [1857]
Vanderbeek & Son, music and pianoforte warerooms, 843 Broadway [1853]
(Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1917)
Van Riper James, 178 Wooster
(New York City Directory, 1859)

P

IANO-FORTES OF EVERY VARIETY OF

style and pattern, warranted of the best material and
workmanship, and unsurpassed in strength and delicacy
of tone, or elasticity of touch. Apply at manufactory of
JAS. VAN RIPER, No. 178 Wooster-st., between Hou-
ston and Bleecker sts.
(New York Daily Times, May 7, 1864)

Vanshaick D. L. pianofortes, 158 Av. 3
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Vanwinkle C. 1 Bedford
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Vanwinkle David. I. pianos, 82 W. 16th
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Vanwinkle David L. 1 Bedford
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Vanwinkle John D. pianofortemaker, 90 Thompson
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Vaupel Adam, pianos, 383 W. 36th, h 405 W. 46th
Vinton Charles A. pianos, 841 B'way & Second av. n E. 74th, h E. 71st c Third av.
Vinton Henry A. pianos, 841 B'way & Second av. n E. 74th, h E. 71st c Third av.
Vinton & Son, pianos, 841 B'way & Second av. n E. 74th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Vinton & Sons, pianos, 841 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Wake John P. pianos, 184 Fulton
Wake William, piano hardware, 10 Reade
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Wake William, 10 Reade [piano forte hardware]
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Wake William. piano forte hardware, 8 Reade
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J.

P. WAKE, PIANO-FORTE MANU-

FACTURER, respectfully informs his friends and the
public that a few of his new pianos, improved scale, can
be seen at the piano-forte warerooms of BRISTOW &
HARDENBROOK, No. 147 10th-st., between Broadway
and 4th-av.
(New York Times, Oct. 10, 1865)

Wale William, pianoforte maker, 569 Greenwich
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Wale William, 75, Piano Forte Maker, Eng.
(Federal Census, 1850)
Walker Daniel, pianos, 413 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Walker Daniel, pianos, 1 Clinton hall & 6 Astor pl.l
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Walker Daniel, pianos, 47 E. 12th, h 120 E. 30th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Walker John, pianos, 6 Astor pl.l
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Walker J. & D. pianos, 413 Broadway, (see card, page 3, in front)
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Walker J. & D. 6 Astor pl.
Walker J. & D. pianos, 1 Clinton hall
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Walker J. & D. Pianos, 47 E. 12th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Walker J. & D. pianos, 47 E. 12th
Walker & Becht, pianos, 245 Fulton (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)

J. & D. WALKER'S

PIANO FORTE
W A R E R O O M ,
6 ASTOR PLACE,  
New York.
  Pianos of every description for Hire.
(New York City Directory, 1857)

J. & D. WALKER,

Piano-Forte Wareroom,

CLINTON HALL,
ASTOR PLACE AND EIGHTH STREET, (near Broadway,) New York.
Pianos of every description for hire.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Walker William H., 47 East Twelfth street
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Wall William, 656 DeKalb avenue
(Brooklyn's Eastern District, 1942)

R. M. Walters, Pianos, Nos. 57, and 59 University Mr. W. B. Stone, who has had twenty years' experience Place, cor. East Twelfth Street. - By years of unremitting effort in the piano trade, Mr. R. M. Walters, Nos. 57 and 59 University University Place, has established a high reputation as a manufacturer of Narvesen celebrated pianos, which are unsurpassed for delicacy, sweetness, and sympathy of tone, exquisite singing quality, and sustained power. Mr. Walters is a thorough musician, having a theoretical and practical knowledge of the art in all its branches. In August, 1880, he purchased the business of the Narvesen Piano Manufactory, at Nos. 230 and 232 East Thirty-sixth Street, from the proprietors, Messrs. Narvesen, Hangaard & Bergman, and still retains these gentlemen at their different departments. The Narvesen piano was introduced to the public in 1847, and the proprietor has now in his employment some of the piano-makers who have been uninterruptedly connected with the business since that period. Mr. Walters opened his first warerooms at No. 27 East Fourteenth Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, in the heart of the piano trade, but the growing wants of his business required more room, and he purchased the lease of his present eligible and commodious premises. In January, 1883, he purchased from W. H. Walker, No. 47 East Twelfth Street, his piano business, which is one of the oldest in this country, having been established by Messrs. Geib & Walker in 1791, J. & D. Walker, in 1810, and Walker Bros., in 1869, who were considered among the best manufacturers in the United States. Mr. W. H. Walker, who has had twenty-nine years' experience, is retained in the employment of Mr. Walters, having the management of the department, No. 57 University Place. Mr. Walters is also fortunate in securing the services of Mr. W. B. Stone, who has had twenty years' experience in the piano trade, and who manages the premises No. 59 University Place. The factory at Nos. 54-58 West Thirteenth Street, is a four-storied building, well lighted and supplied with all the latest improved machinery and appliances ; the workmen being all experts in their various departments, and all under the personal supervision of Mr. Narvesen, who founded the business thirty-seven years ago. Ever since Mr. Walters took charge of the business, he has derived the greatest satisfaction from the reputation voluntarily accorded him by the professional and amateur world, of making all his pianos of equal excellence and maintaining the highest standard of perfection in manufacture that has yet been reached. Mr. Walters has been very successful in his enterprise, and his motto, "Not for a day, but for all time," adopted by him when commencing business, has been happily realized. He is a native of New York, and is held in the highest estimation, socially and commercially, for his inflexible honor and integrity. During the past year he received a well deserved compliment from the Board of Education of New York, who have selected the Narvesen piano for use in the public schools. The pupils and schools, as well as Mr. Walters, should be congratulated on the choice made.

(New York's Great Industries, 1885)

Wardell C. piano tuner, 52 Court (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Wardwell John H. pianos, 905 B'way, h 29 E. 21st
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Wardwell J. H. piano fortes, 907 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Warner James F. pianos, 411 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Warner J. F. & Co. 635 B'way
(New York City Directory, 1859)

SUPERIOR PIANO-FORTES. - The subscri-

bers have taken unwearied pains and been at great ex-
pense to produce a Piano-forte worthy of the name. They
have made material improvements in the scale and in the
general structure of the instrument. Extra large size,
uncommon strength, chaste elegance of exterior and very
full, rich, beautiful tone, are among their leading fea-
tures. They are admired by the ablest pianists, and have
given very marked satisfaction wherever they have been
soldJ. P. WARNER & CO.
No. 411 Broadway, New-York
(New York Daily Times, June 4, 1853)

Warner William, pianoforte maker, 18 Renwick
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Waters Horace, pianos, 447 and 333 Broadway
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Waters, Horace, prop. & agent 333 Broadway
(New York Exhibition, 1853)
Waters Horace, agt. pianos, melodeons & musc, 333 B'way,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Waters Horace, pianos, 481 B'way & 48 Mercer, h 98 Pierrepont, B'klyn
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Waters, Horace, pianos, melodeons &c. 481 Broadway
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Waters Horace & Sons, 481 Broadway
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Waters, Horace, & Sons, 481 Broadway.
(New York as it was, 1876)

PIANOS!


MELODEONS!!

AND

MUSIC!!

PRICES GREATLY REDUCED!!

H

ORACE WATERS, 333 Broadway, New
York, Agent for the sale of the best Boston
and New York Pianos and Melodeons. The lar-
gest assortment of Music Merchandise in the Uni-
ted States. Pianos from five different manufac-
tories, of every variety of style - from those in plain
rosewood cases, for $200, to those of the most
elegant finish, for $1000. No house in the Union
can come in competition for the number, variety
and celebrity of its instruments, nor the extreme-
ly low prices at which they are sold.

Horace Water's Modern Improved Pianos.

  With or without iron frames, have in their new
scale and improved action, a power and compass
of tone, equalling the grand, with the beauty and
durability of the square piano. The press and the
first music masters have justly pronounced them
equal, if not superior, to any other make. They
are guaranteed to stand thet action of every cli-
mate.
  HORACE WATER'S MELODEONS (tuned
equal temperament) superior in each desirable
quality. Can also furnish Prince's Carhart's
& Smith's Melodeons. Prices from $45 to $125;
for two sets of reeds, $150; two banks of keys,
$200. Organ pedal bass melodeons $250, $275 and
$300, less a liberal discount.
  Each instrument warranted to give satisfaction
or purchase money refunded. SECOND HAND
PIANOS AT GREAT BARGAINS constantly in store;
prices from $30 to $140.
  MUSIC. - One of the larges, adn best cata-
logues of Music now published in the United
States, for sale at this Establishment. Martin's
celebrated Guitars, and all kinds of musical In-
struments and Music Merchandize at the lowest
prices.
  Music sent wherever ordered, post-paid. Cata-
logues sent by mail. A liberal discount to deal-
ers, teachers, seminaries and clergymen.

Testimonial of the Horace Waters Pianos

and Melodeons

  "The Piano came to hand, and in first-rate or-
der. It is a beautiful instrument and make no mistake."
- LEE & WALKER, Dealers in Music and Musi-
cal Instruments, Philadelphia.
  John Hewitt, of Carthage, New York, who has
had one of the Horace Waters Pianos, writes as
follows : -
  "A friend of mine wishes me to purchase a pi-
ano for her. She likes the one you sold in De-
cember, 1856. My piano is becoming popular in
this place, and I think I can introduce one or two
more ; they will be more popular than any other
make."
  "We have two of Waters' Pianos in use in our
Seminary, one of which has been severely tested
for three years, and we can testifu to their good
quality and durability." - WOOD & GREGORY,
Mount Carroll, Illinois.
  "H. WATERS, ESQ. - Dear Sir: Having used
one of your Piano-FOrtes for two years past, I
have found it a very superior instrument.
ALONZO GRAY, Principal Brooklyn
Heights Seminary."
  Rev. Hiram Haynes, writes as follows:
"PRESTON HOLLOW, N. Y., July 28, 1858.
  MR. WATERS. - Dear Sir : I received the Mel-
odeon safe and in good order ; am well pleased
with the external appearance, and the tone also.
Hope I shall have occasion to order one or two
more the present season."
"TIOGA, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1858.
  HORACE WATERS, ESQ. - SIR: The Melodion
you sent me was duly received in good order. -
I am now fully prepared to say that the instrument
is highly satisfactory; and I beg you will accept my
thanks for the very liberal terms on which you
furnished it, and for the very honorable manner
in which you have fulfilled, more than fulfilled all
that you promised. Very respectfully yours, &c.,
J. L. SMITH."
  "The Piano I received from you continues to
give satisfaction. I regard it as one of the best
instruments in the place." - JAMES L. CLARKE,
Charleston, Va.
  "The Melodion has safely arrived. I feel ob-
liged to you for your liberal discount - will do
all I can for you in these parts." - Rev. J. M.
McCORMICK, Yarquesville, S. C.
  "The Piano was duly received. It came in
excellent condition, and is very much admired by
my numerous family. Accept my thanks for
your promptness." - ROBERT COOPER, Warren-
ham, Bradford co., Pa.
  "Your Piano pleases us well. It is the best
one in our county." - THOS. A. LATHAM, Camp-
belton, Ga.
  "We are very much obliged to you for having
sent such a fine instrument for $250, and we shall
take pains to recommend it." - BRANK, HELD &
Co., Buffalo Democrat.
  "The Horace Waters Pianos are known as a-
mong the very best. We are enabled to speak of
these instruments with confidence, from person-
al knowledge of their excellent tone and durable
quality." - N. Y. Evangelist.
  "We can speak of the merits of the Horace Wa-
ters Pianos from personal knowledge, as being of
the very best quality." - Christian Intelligencer.
  "Nothing at the State Fair displayed greater
excellence in any department than the Horace
Waters Pianos." - Churchman.
  "The Horace Waters Pianos are built of the
best and most thoroughly seasoned material. -
We have no doubt that buyers can do as well,
perhaps better, at this than any other house in the
Union." - Advocate and Journal.
  "Waters' Pianos and Melodeons challenge com-
parison with the finest made anywhere in the
country." - Home Journal.
  "Horace Waters Piano-Fortes are full, rich,
and even tone, and powerful," - New York Mus-
ic Review.
  "Our friends will find at Mr. Water's store the
very best assortment of Music and Pianos to
be found in the United States, and we urge our
southern and western friends to give him a call
whenever they go to New York." - Graham's
Magazine.

War rooms, 333 Broadway, New York.

October 15, 1858
(Liberty Weekly Tribune [MO], Oct. 15, 1858)

R

EMOVAL. - HORACE WATERS, AGENT, HAS

removed to No. 481 Broadway, between Grand and
Broome sts., where he sells new 7-octgave Pianos for $157
and warranted ; second-hand pianos and melodeons at
war prices ; pianos and melodeons to rent from $3 up-
wards. Monthly payments received for the same. Al-
exandre organs for churches at low prices.
(New York Times, June 27, 1861)

T

HE HORACE WATERS MODERN IM-

proved overstrung base full iron-frame pianos are
built of the best and most thoroughly seasoned materials.
The tone is deep, round, full and mellow ; the touch elas-
tic. Each piano warranted for five years. Prices from
$325 to $700.
TESTIMONIALS.
  The Horace Waters Pianos are known as among the
very best. - Evangelist.
  Waters' pianos and melodeons challenge comparison
with the finest made anywhere. - Home Journal.
  NEW 7 OCTAVE PIANOS, of different makers, from
$100 to $225. Second-hand pianos from $40 to $100.


WATERS' MELODEONS AND HARMONIUMS.
rosewood cases, tuned the equal temperament, with the
patented divided swell. Prices from $30 to $200.
  New and second-hand pianos and melodeons to let ;
monthly payments received for same. Instruments tuned.
HORACE WATERS, Agent, No. 461 Broadway
(New York Times, Mar. 25, 1863)

T

HE HORACE WATERS GRAND SQUARE

and upright Pianos, Melodeons, Harmoniums and
Cabinet Organs, wholesale and retail, at reduced prices.
To let, and rent allowed if purchased. Monthly pay-
ments received for the same. Second-hand pianos at
bargains from $50 to $200. Factory and Warerooms, No.
481 Broadway. Cash paid for second-hand Pianos.
(New York Times, June 24, 1865)

T

HE HORACE WATERS GRAND

Square and Upright Pianos, Melodeons and Cabinet
Organs. Wholesale and retail. To let, and rent al-
lowed if purchased. Monthly payments received for
the same. Second-hand pianos and barains, from $40 to
$225. Factory and warerooms, No. 481 Broadway. Cash
paid for second-hand pianos. Pianos tuned and repaired.
Sheet music a little soiled at 1 3/4 cents per page.
(New York Times, Feb. 16, 1866)

THE HORACE WATERS

GRAND SQUARE AND UPRIGHT

PIANOS, MELODEONS, HARMONIUMS,

AND CABINET ORGANS,

music, a little soiled, at 1 1/2c. per page. Pianists in attendance to try new music. Cash paid for second-
hand Pianos. One of the larges stock of sheet music, music books and music merchandise in the United
States, Warerooms and Factory, 481 Broadway.
  TESTIMONIALS. - The Horace Waters Pianos are known as among the very best. - N. Y. Evangelist
  We can speak of the merits of the Horace Waters Pianos from personal knowledge, as being of the
very best quality. - Christian Intelligencer.
HORACE WATERS, 481 BROADWAY.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)
WATERS' FIRST-PREMIUM PIANOS
with Agraffe Treble. - Melodeons, parlor, church
and cabinet organs, the best manufactured : warranted
for six years, second-hand pianos, melodeons and organs
at great bargains. Any of the above instruments to
let, and rent applied if purchased ; montly install-
ments received from one to two years. Chickering's.
Steinway's, Bradbury's, Worcester's and the Arion Pi-
anos to let. Pianos tuned and repaired. Cash paid for
second-hand pianos and melodeons.
Illustrated cata-
logues mailed. Warerooms No. 381 Broadway, New-
York.HORACE WATERS & CO.
(New York Times, Jan. 4, 1868)

The "Philharmonic" Piano.

  This entirely new instrument possessing all
the essential qualities of more expensive and
higher-priced Pianos is offered at a lower price
than any similar one now in the market. It is
durable, with a magnificent tone hardly sur-
passed and yet it can be purchased at prices and
on terms within the reach of all. This instru-
ment has all the modern improvements, includ-
ing the celebrated "Agraffe" treble, and is fully
warranted. Catologues mailed.
WATERS'

NEW SCALE PIANO

Are the best made. The touch is elastic, and a
fine singing tone, powerful, pure and even.

WATERS' CONCERTO ORGANS

Cannot be excelled in TONE or BEAUTY; they defy
competition. The Concerto Stop is a fine imi-
tation of the Human Voice.
  PRICES EXTREMELY LOW for cash during
this month. Monthly Installments received ;
On Pianos, $10 to $20, Organs, $5 to $10; Second
hand instruments, $3 to $5; montly after first
deposit. AGENTS wanted. A liberal discount
to Teachers, Ministers, Churches, Schools,
Lodges, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Illustrated Catologues mailed. HORACE WAT-
ERS & SONS, 481 Broadway New York.
TESTIMONIALS OF
Waters' Pianos and Organs
  Waters' New Scale pianos have peculiar merit.
-[New York Tribune.
  The tone of the Waters Piano is rich, mellow
and sonorous. They possess great volume of
sound and the continuation of sound or singing
power is one of their most marked features. -
New York Times.
  Waters' Concerto Organ is so voiced as to
have a tone like a full rich alto voice : It is es-
pecially human in its tone, powerful yet sweet.
- [Rural New Yorker,
(The Phelps County New Era [MO], Dec. 25, 1875)

Weber Albert, mer. 37 Wall
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Weber Albert, pianos, 155 W. B'way,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Webber Albert, 266 pianos
(1866; The Piano in the U. S.)
Weber Albert, pianos. 119 Seventh av. & Fifth av. c W. 16th, h 117 W. 17th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Weber Albert, sales, $221,444
(1869; The Great Industries of the U. S.)
Weber, Albert, pianos, 108 5th ave. and 121 7th ave
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Weber Albert, 108 Fifth Avenue
(The Elite Directory, 1875)
Weber, Fifth av. cor. Sixteenth st.
(New York as it was, 1876)
Weber Albert, piano manufacturer, died [June 26 1879]
(Handbook of the United States, 1879)

Weber Pianos, Warerooms Fifth Avenue, corner West 16th Street, New York. - A review of the great mercantile and manufacturing interests of the metropolis would be incomplete without a sketch of the world-renowned piano house of Weber, which for years has been recognized as one of the leading and most successful in its line. About thirty-five years ago the elder Mr. Weber established a pianoforte manufactory. It was located down town, and for a time was considered a rather risky venture. Its enterprising proprietor, however, was a man of indomitable pluck and energy. He soon overcame all obstacles and gained a substantial footing on the road to fame and prosperity. As years rolled by the business great to large proportions, and the little down-town factory became inadequate to accommodate the trade. A site was purchased at Seventh Avenue and 17th Street, and the erection of the present immense factory was begun. After having gained the topmost round of success, which was accomplished by years of industrious work, Mr. Weber passed away, leaving the continuation of the business to his son Albert. The house of Weber is to-day a monument to the energy, capacity and honorable methods which have ever animated its worthy founder. The extensive manufactory at Seventh Avenue and 17th Street is an imposing structure, substantially constructed, well lighted and ventilated throughout. Its floors cover a space equal to many acres. Throughout this large establishment there is a wilderness of machinery of the best and most modern description dirven by powerful engines. The internal fittings, both as regards motive power and machinery, are absolutely unsurpassed on the continent. A force of six hundred workmen are constantly employed. They constitute the best trained talent ans skill of Europe and America. The warerooms and offices occupy a handsone edifice on the corner of Fifth Avenue and West 16th Street. The amount of floor space is extensive, and yet none too large for the stock of pianos on exhibition. The grand, square and uprights are marvels of beauty and art. The Weber piano is known the world over. It has a reputation built solely on merit. That it is recognized as the best product of American skill and mechanical genius is evinced by the fact of its enormous sale. They are used in preference to any other piano in conservatories, schools, seminaries and the concert room, on account of their volume and purity, great durability and singing qualities. Carreno has said "I am not surprised that every great artist prefers the Weber piano. They are truly noble instruments, and meet every requirement of the most exacting artist." Nearly all the celebrities of the musical world have declared the Weber to be, without exception, the most magnificent instrument made. Mr. Albert Weber, who is now the head of the business, possesses all the sterling qualities and indomitable energy of his father. He has displayed marked aptitude and ability, and is generally regarded as one of our most promising young business men. He has won the admiration of every one by the honorable, manly, and liberal system which characterizes all his transactions. Mr. Weber has exerted a marked influence in advancing the interests of the piano trade. He is very popular in the highest social circles, and is a gentleman in every way able to sustain his social and commercial status.

(New York's Great Industries, 1884)

ALBERT WEBER,

PIANO FORTE MANUFACTURER,
103-5 West Broadway,
  Every Pianoforte warranted to be made of the best
material and workmanship, and sold at the lowest
manufacturers' price.
(New York City Directory, 1857)

A

LBERT WEBER, PIANO FORTE

MANUFACTURER, No. 155 West Broadway, New
York, sole manufacturer of the celebrated Concert
Piano. The subscriber would inform his numerous
friends and customers that he has greatly enlarged his
manufacturing department, in order to meet the increase
in demand for his unrivalled Pianos, and as every piano,
especially tone and touch, is personally superintended
by the subscriber, the public will be warranted an in-
strument which, for beauty, strength, and durability,
power and sweetness of tone and touch, stands unsur-
passed. Every piano sold at the lowest manufacturers'
prices. A call is respecfully solicited. oc29-6m.
(Philadelphia Press, Dec. 14, 1857)

A

LBERT WEBER, PIANO-FORTE MAN-

ufacturer, No. 155 West Broadway, near Canal.
The best assortment of Pianos, warranted for 3 years, at
the lowest prices. Call and examine before purchasing.
(New York Times, 28.09.1859)

A

LBERT WEBER'S OVERSTRUNG

grand-action iron-frame piano-fortes, unsurpassed
in sweetness and power, beauty and durability. War-
ranted for 3 years. 155 West Broadway, near Canal-st.
(New York Times, May 2, 1860)

A

LBERT WEBER'S NEW OVERSTRUNG

iron fram Piano-fortes, warranted unsurpassed in
every respect, and sold at the lowest price, at the manu-
factory, No. 155 West Broadway, near Canal-st.
(New York Times, 01.01.1861)

THE WEBER PIANO FORTE

  Is admitted the best piano forte made, because the maker,
beside being a practical mechanic of long experience, is
also a thorough musician, thus combineing advantages
possessed by no other manufacturer in the United States.
Such is the testimony of S. B. Millis, Robert Heller, Geo.
F. Bristow, Wm. Mason, C. Jerome Hopkins, Chas.
Fradel, Max Maretzek, Carl Anschutz, John Zundle,
Maurice Strakosch, Giovani Sconcia, and every good
musician in the United States. All musical ears at once
admit their great superiority. Warerooms No. 185 West
Broadway, near Canal-st.
(New York Times, June 25, 1864)

REMOVAL

  The great demand for the
WEBER PIANO-FORTE
has made it necessary to remove to the spacious marble
building,
No. 429 BROOME-ST., near Broadway,
where the manufacturer respectfully invites his old
friends and the public. A. WEBER.
(New York Times, May 11, 1865)

THE WEBER PIANO-FORTE

is called the best instrument by all the leading mu-
sicians of this city and elsewhere. It is pronounced by
the National Piano-forte Association, after a trial in
their rooms with the first manufacturers of this country,
eminently the best piano in America, and used by the Con-
servatory of Music and other high music schools, alto-
gether because of their immense power, equality, sweet-
ness and brilliancy of tone, elastic touch and great dura-
bility. Warerooms No. 429 Broome-st., near Broadway.
(New York Times, Dec. 25, 1865)

WEBER

GRAND, SQUARE & UPRIGHT

PIANOS.

The Best Piano Manufactured,

Filling all the requirements of service, from that of the student to the
finished artist.
   It is for the interest of all to examine our stock before purchasing.
   Pianos sold on Instalments. Orders for Tuning and Repairing
promptly and thoroughly executed.

Retail and Wholesale Warerooms,

125 TREMONT ST., BOSTON MASS.

GEO. H. DAVIS, Manager. Branch of 108 Fifth Ave., New York.
(Stranger's Guide to Boston, 1882)

Wells Ralph, pianos, 8 Jnion pl. h 116 E. 16th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Wheeler E. L. pianos, 470 Myrtle ave (Brooklyn)
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Wheeler Lewis, piano maker, 31 Second
Whiting Luther, pianoforte maker, 195 h. 192 Mulberry
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Wigand Ferdinand, piano tuner, 336 2th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Wihler Charles, pianos, 94 Clinton, h 235 E. 46th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Wilkie Francis, pianoforte maker, 73 Amos
(Manhattan Directory, 1829-30)
Wille Emil, pianos, 151 Wooster
Willie E. pianos, 42 Thompson, h 151 Wooster
(New York City Directory, 1869)

Willis Woodward & Co., Music Publishers and Pianoforte Manufacturers, Nos. 842 and 844 Broadway. - A prominent house engaged as music publishers and piano manufacturers is the well known firm of Messrs. Willis Woodward & Co., No. 842 and 844 Broadway, which was established by the present proprietors in 1878, and since its foundation at that date has obtained a liberal and influential patronage. As music publishers they issue Woodward's Musical Monthly, a publication that has received the highest commedation from the press, professionals and the general public. The circulation of this admirable work has already reached twelve thousand copies per month. The premises occupied are commodious and elegant, and are completely stocked with grand, square and upright pianos of their own manufacture, Stratton's violins, flutes, German accordeons, banjos, guitars, metronomes, music folios, etc. These musical instruments are the very best of their kind in the market ; the pianos especially contain all the latest improvements of any merit or value, and every one is fully warranted for five years. The same perfect workmanship is applied to the manufacture of the case as to the action and scale. The tone of Woodward's pianos is rich and powerful, possessing rare singing quality, and this, combined with their elegance, durability and workmanship, makes them the most desirable instruments in the market. The factory is located at Bridgeport, Conn., and is admirably equipped with all the latest machinery and appliances, employment being given to a large number of highly skilled workmen. Every piano undergoes a thorough inspection by experts, who are under the immediate supervision of Mr. Joseph Keller, the manager, and so rigid are the tests applied that every instrument sold by the firm may be said to be as near perfection as art and talent can make it. These instruments are sold at prices which are as low as can be named for first-class pianos. The individual members of this co-partnership are Messrs. Willis and F. W. Woodward, the former a native of Galena, Ill., and the latter of Connecticut. Both gentlemen are highly esteemed in social and commercial circles.

(New York's Leading Industries, 1884)

V

ENEERS OF ROSEWOOD AND MAHOG-

ANY, (Wilson's Patent Cut,) from very choice woods,
cut by a machine recently invented. The Veneers are cut
with mathematical exactness, and are left with a smooth
finished surface. E. B. WILSON, No. 180 Gosreck-st., corneer of 3d.-st.
(New York Times, Mar. 8, 1862)

Wing John G. pianos. 219 E. 23d, h 336 Fourth av.
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Witzel Charles, piano legs, 94 Clinton, h 273 Broome
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Wolf Anthony I. pianos,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Wolf Anthony J. & Son, pianos, 118 E. 13th, h 279 E. 10th
(New York City Directory, 1869)
Wolf A. J. & Son, piano hammer coverers, n. 118 E. 13th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Worcester Horatio pianomaker
(New York Reg. & Directory, 1835)
Worcester Horatio pianom. 361 B'way
(Manhattan Directory, 1839-40)
Worcester Horalu, 46, piano maker, 7000 Mass
(Federal Census, 1850)
Worcester Horatio, pianofortes, E. 14th c. Av. 3
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Worcester Horatio
(1852; Gen.l Soc. of Mech's and Tradesmen of NYC)
Worcester H. Third av. c. E. 14th
Worcester Horatio, pianos, 117 Third av.
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Worcester Horatio, 57, piano forte maker, 10,000 15,000 Massachusetts
(Federal Census, 1860)
Worcester Horatio, 65, none, NY
(Federal Census, 1870)

There are forty or fifty manufactories of these beautiful, and almost indispensable instruments, which at the present day adorn nearly every mansion. But less than a dozen do the most of the business in this department.
I recently had the pleasure of going through Mr. H. Worcester's manufactory, on the corner of Fourteenth-street and Third Avenue, and although he does not turn out so many instruments as some other shops, yet I believe there are no better ones made in town, than he manufactures. At any rate I was well paid for my visit, and saw in his wareroom as beautiful and fine-tones pianos as will often fall to the lot of delicate fingers to handle. The prices ranged from $225 to $1,000.
The high and low priced instruments are made very much alike internally, at all the shops ; the principal difference in the expense, depends upon the external finish.
Like all modern pianos the instrument valued at a thousand dollars, was made of rosewood. The ends, front, and back were beautifully ornamented with inlaid woods of different hues, representing flowers, landscapes, birds, &c., and so exquisitely done, as to be easily mistaken for paintings.
The legs which supported the instrument, were beautifully carved from large solid blocks of rosewood, and cost about $150. The tone of the model-piano was as sweet to the ear, as honey is to the tongue.
Mr. Worcester employs sixty workmen, at an average wage of about $11 per week. In the manufacture of these articles, which contribute so much to domestic comfort, there are about thirty distinct branches, to say nothing about those who manufacture the lumber, the wire for the strings, the screws and nails, glue, varnish, brushes, sandpaper, and various other materials.

(What I Saw in New York, 1851)

H. WORCESTER'S

PIANO FORTE MANUFACTORY & SALES-
rooms
FOURTEENTH STREET,
  Corner Third avenue,
New York.
(New York City Directory, 1857)

H. WORCESTER'S

IMPROVED PIANO-FORTES.
MANUFACTORY AND SALESROOM,
FOURTEENTH-ST.,
Corner of 3d.-av.
  For a quarter of a century the instruments manufac-
tured at the above establishment have ranked among
the first in the country. In durability, strength and
delicacy of tone and touch, they are highly appreciated
by all who have given them a thorough trial. The pro-
pretor by giving his personal attention to the manu-
facture of each instrument, in all its details, is enabled
to guarantee superior excellence and reliability in every
respect.
(New York Times, Aug. 23, 1860)

H.

WORCESTER'S

IMPROVED PIANO-FORTES.

MANUFACTORY AND SALESROOM,
FOURTEENTH STREET,
Cor. of Third avenue N. Y.
  For a quarter of a century the instruments manufactured
at the above establishment have ranked among the first in
the country. In durability, strength, and delicacy of tone
and touch, they are highly appreciated by all who have given
them a thorough trial. The proprietor, by giving his perso-
nal attention to the manufacture of each instrument, in all
its details, is enabled to guarantee superior excellence and
reliability in every respect.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 26.11.1860)

H. WORCESTER'S
IMPROVED PIANO FORTES,

Manufactory & Salesrooms,
14th St., cor. 3d Av. N. Y.
(Harper's Weekly, July 13, 1861)

W

ORCESTER'S HINGED-PLATE PIANO-

FORTES - These instruments are recommended by
Gottshalk, Mason, Millis, Morgan, Berge, Fradel and
others, as possessing double the volume and musical
quality of pianos of a corresponding scale made upon the
ordinary method. Warerooms corner 14th-st. and 3d.-av.
(New York Times, Nov. 10, 1863)

H. WORCESTER'S

PATENT HINGED PLATE PIANO-FORTES.

Manufactory and Salesrooms,
THIRD AVE., corner E. 14th Street, NEW YORK.
  These instruments possess double the volume
and musical quality of other Pianos of similar scales.
(Trow's New York Directory, 1867)

Hinged Plates for Pianofortes.
Science and mechanical skill undertake one of their most difficult and delicate tasks when they attempt to improve the pianoforte. The sensitive ear of the skillful musician detects the slightest inaccuracy, not merely in the harmony, but also in the volume, the tone, the rythm, the melody, of all the various sounds that enter into the composition of music, and the formation of these sounds of the proper quality, and their combination in exact harmony is certainly one of the nicest of all arts. The universal love of music has created an enormous demand for the most fashionable musical instrument, the piano ; and this great demand is constantly stimulating the numerous manufacturers to make improvements in the instru ment, in order that their own articles may be more acceptable to the public than those of their rivals. Many of the patents granted are for modifications which are no improvements, but the few actual improvements which have been patented have shown that there is hardly any department in which good inventions are more profitable.
Horatio Worcester, an old-established and well-known manufacturer of pianofortes, of this city, has recently invented a modification in the plate of pianos designed especially to improve the quality of the tone. The modification consists in making the plate in two pieces, and connecting the piece to which the strings are attached with the stationar piece by a hinged joint, so that the hinged piece may vibrate with the strings. The invention is illustrated in the annexed engravings.
The stationary piece a, Fig. 1 of the plate, is secured firmly to the piano in the usual manner, and the piece, b, is connected with it by a hinge at c. This piece is represented detached in Fig. 2. The hinge is formed by catching the slot, c, upon a short stud which rises from the stationary plate below. The strings are attached to the opposite eddge of the hinged piece, b, as indicated, supporting this end of the plate simply by their tension. As the combined strain of so many strings amounts to some five or six tuns, it is necessary to counteract it by devices of corresponding strength. Braces, d and e, are accordingly introduced to hold the piece, b, against the strain of the strings. These braces are made of metal and are represented detached in Figs. 3 and 4. By this arrangement the vibration of the strings is imparted to the piece, b, prolonging the note, giving increased volume to the tone, and imparting to it a singing quality which has been much admired by the eminent musicians of the city. The inventor describes the freedom given to the sounding board by the hinged plate as similar to that found in the violin, the action of the tail piece of which beautiful instrument furnished the suggestion for this improvemement. It will be observed that this plate strengthens the treble and tenor portions of the stace which are usually the weakest parts of the keyboard. It is estimated by the inventor and by impartial musicians who have tried pianos with this hinged plate, that the improvement doubles the volume of sound.
The patent for this invention was granted June 3, 1862, and further information in relation to it may be obtained by addressing the inventor at the corner of Third avenue and Fourteenth street, New York City.

(Scientific American, 1862)

PIANOSMUSIC.
READ THIS. NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE, BUT TRUE.
  Our world-renowned PIANOS - the result of all modern
improvements - are offered now at extremely low rates.
All Pianos warranted from five years, and taken back if
not suitable. Our prices are from $250 upward. Dealers
and Teachers will find it to their own profit by recom-
mending our Pianos.
  MUSIC. - In spite of the high premium on gold and 20
per cent duties, we concluded to sell all foreign and do-
mestic Music of every description at only 2c to 3c per
page (nearly 1/2 of the former prices.)
  All orders from the country promptly filled and mailed,
postage paid, on receipt of price.
P. A. WUNDERMANN, No. 629 Broadway, N. Y.
(New York Times, Sep. 10, 1863)

Young Frederick R. piano maker, no. 13 Union Avenue
(Brooklyn's Eastern District, 1942)
Young James, pianofortes, 1011 Broadway
Young James jr. pianofortemaker, 3 Attorney
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Young James, pianos, 15 Mercer,
(New York City Directory, 1859)
Young & White, piano tuners, 222 E. 28th
(New York State Directory, 1870)
Zetler John, cabinetmaker r. 28 Rivington
(New York City Directory, 1852)
Zettler John, pianos
(New York City Directory, 1857)
Zetter John 45, piano maker, Germany
(Federal Census, 1870)
Ziegler A. pianos, 110 Bleecker
(New York State Directory, 1870)

Boardman & Gray's Dolce Campana Attachment Piano-Fortes (1854)

The Piano Forte Manufactories (1866)

The "Lockout" (1880)

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