FIRST ASIAN TEAM CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP, Part 2

The Penang Chess Association had the honour to assist the Malaysian Chess Federation organise the First Asian Team Chess Championship from 9-21 Dec 1974. This event was organised concurrently with the Golden Jubilee celebration of the World Chess Federation which held its Bureau Meeting here.

The Malaysian team - from right, Quah Seng Sun (from Penang), Jerry Augustus (from Johor), Tan Kai Ming (from Penang), Chew Soon Keong (from Selangor, originally from Penang) and Abdul Rahman Ahmad (from Kelantan). Seated to the right of the Malaysian team were the Indonesians and the Australians.

The Life Chess display during the opening ceremony of the championships. The performers were pupils from the Han Chiang Primary School.

 

OPENING CEREMONY

Tuesday, 10th December 1974

5.00pm Arrival of His Excellency the Governor of Penang, Tun Datuk Syed Sheh Barakbah, SMN, SSM, DUPN, SPMK, PSB

State Anthem

5.05pm Welcoming speech by Chairman, Organising Committee, YB State Secretary, Encik Mohamed bin Yeop Abdul Raof, KMN
5.15pm Speech by President, FIDE Zone 10, Prof Dr Lim Kok Ann
5.25pm Speech by Hon Chief Minister of Penang, Dr Lim Chong Eu
5.35pm Speech by His Exellency the Governor of Penang and declaring open the competition
6.20pm Life Chess display
6.40pm State Anthem

Refreshment

His Excellency the Governor leaves for Residency

 

CLOSING CEREMONY

Friday, 20th December 1974

10.00am Arrival of YAB Tun Haji Abdul Razak bin Hussein, SMN, the Prime Minister
10.10am Speech by President, Malaysian Chess Federation, Mr Tan Chin Nam
10.20am Speech by President, FIDE, Prof Dr Max Euwe
10.30am Speech by the Honorable Tun Haji Abdul Razak bin Hussein, SMN
10.45am Presentation of prizes
11.15am Refreshment

 

PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES
   
AUSTRALIA

Mr Max Fuller 2365
Mr Michael Woodhams
Mr Arthur Pope
Mr William Jordan
Mr Philip Viner (Captain)

HONGKONG

Mr Kan Wai Shui 2360
Mr Sin Kuen
Mr Ko Chi (Captain)
Mr Fung Yee Wang
Mr Chan Yau Fan
Mr Pang Chun Kau

INDONESIA

Mr Arovah Bachtiar 2305 (Captain)
Mr Jerry S Sampouw 2280
Dr Max Wotulo
Mr M Simulingga
Mr Dipo

Manager: Rear Admiral F Sumanti

JAPAN

Mr I Haruyama
Mr Sato
Mr H Tenjinbayashi
Mr S Sugaya
Mr N Seki
Mr Y Matsumoto (Captain)

MALAYSIA

Mr Abdul Rahman Ahmad
Mr Chew Soon Keong
Mr Quah Seng Sun
Mr Tan Kai Ming
Mr Jerry Augustus
Mr Atan Ahmad (Captain/Manager)

NEW ZEALAND

Mr Andrew Day (Captain)
Mr Peter Goffin (Manager)
Mr D Flude
Mr Murray Chandler
Mr Robert Gibbons
Mr Peter Clarke

PHILIPPINES

Mr Rodolfo Tan Cardoso 2335 (Captain)
Mr Glenn Bordonada
Mr Roger Adella
Mr Cesar Caturla
Mr Rico Mascarinas
Mr Rafaeltis Maninang

SINGAPORE

Mr Giam Choo Kwee 2210 (Captain)
Mr Lim Seng Hoo
Mr Goh Cheng Hong
Mr Chan Peng Kong
Mr Terrence Wong
Mr Koh Sei Hian

 

FIRST ASIAN TEAM CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP, PENANG 1974
Placing NATION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 TOTAL
1 PHILIPPINES   2.0 2.5 3.5 3.5 4.0 3.0 4.0 22.5
2 AUSTRALIA 2.0   3.0 2.0 3.5 2.0 4.0 4.0 22.0
3 INDONESIA 1.5 1.0   3.0 4.0 3.5 3.5 3.0 19.5
4 SINGAPORE 0.5 2.0 1.0   4.0 0.5 3.5 4.0 17.5
5 NEW ZEALAND 0.5 0.5 0.0 0.0   0.5 2.0 3.5 10.5
6 JAPAN 0.0 2.0 0.5 3.5 3.5   3.0 3.0 8.5
7 HONGKONG 1.0 0.0 0.5 0.5 2.0 1.0   3.5 8.5
8 MALAYSIA 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 0.5   3.0

 

 

HOPING FOR A CHESS CHAMP OF OUR OWN

PENANG, Fri - Tun Abdul Razak expressed the hope today that Malaysia would one day be able to produce an lnternational Chess master.

"The Philippines, Indonesia, India, Australia and New Zealand have their own masters. But Malaysia still lacks one," he said.

The Prime Minister was speaking at the closing of the first Asian chess championship at Dewan Sri Pinang here, marking the conclusion of the Golden Jubilee celebrations of FIDE, the world chess federation.

Tun Razak presented to the Philippines the Asian chess team championship challenge trophy which he had donated and dedicated "to every chess player in Asia, and also to world peace."

Mr F Campomanes, manager of the champion team and a deputy president of FIDE, received the trophy on behalf of the Philippines.

Keen Interest

Mr Tan Chin Nam, president of the Malaysian Chess Federation, said the championship - the first in Asia - had generated tremendous interest in the country, particularly among chess enthusiasts.

If a greater number of youths in the country could be persuaded to take a greater interest in the game, they could be kept off the streets and away from anti-social pursuits like drug-taking.

Prof Dr Max Euwe, president of FIDE, predicted 35 years would suffice for Asian countries to improve their standard of performance.

"Chess originated in Asia, and Asians have a natural talent for it," he said.

With China's entry, the World Chess Federation now covered the whole world, Prof Euwe said.

He paid tribute to the Malaysian Chess Federation and tbe Government for organising simultaneously the first Asian chess championship, the FIDE seminar and bureau meeting.

"The organisation of these three activities here is among the best I have ever seen," Dr Euwe said.

Tun Razak described chess as "a battle of the fittest - the triumph of strength over weakness."

"In its ultimate analysis, it is a victory of brains over brawns," he said.

World peace

Although chess originated in Asia, the Fischer-Spassky contest brought home the point that Asians had been left far behind and that some urgent steps must be taken to redress the situation.

"It is, therefore, an honour and a source of pride for me and for Malaysia to donate this
trophy which we dedicate to every chess player in Asia, and also to world peace," the Prime Minister said.

"With this first contest I hope there will be renewed interest and enthusiasm in the game, so that chess will be made popular to every man and woman of every age, especially the young."

(New Straits Times, 21 Dec 1974)

 

TUN CALLS FOR STEPS TO CATCH UP WITH WEST

PENANG, Fri - TUN ABDUL RAZAK today said urgent steps should be taken to break the West's domination in chess so that Asia would reign supreme in the game which originated from the region.

"We are proud that this game has caught up with the imagination of the Western world and in fact has spread to every country in the world," the Prime Minister said.

"Unfortunately, due to lack of patronage and other factors, we Asians not only lose the game but have to be contented with the fact that supremacy in this game had to be decided between the two modern super-powers.

"The Fischer-Spassky contest brought home the poInt that we are left far behind and some urgent steps must be taken to redress the situation, particularly in Malaysia," he added.

He was closing the First Asian Chess Team Championship at the Dewan Sri Pinang here.

Tun Razak said it was still disputed today whether chess originated from India or China but according to eminent orientalists, the game originated during the Mogul period in India about 570 AD.

"Chess is a game depicting war between countries and it is a vlctory of brains over brawn,'' he said.

"But, unlike modern warfare, where tanks and missiles predominate, it is a war of the old-order - where horses and elephants were in theIr prime, where soldiers were still strong on the feet.

PATIENT

"In fact, it is a battle of the fittest - the triumph of strength over weakness," Tun Razak said.

"I mention this not because I encourage war nor do l condone it. Our country is a small country and we can ill afford to indulge in the luxuries of war with its catastrophic consequences." he said.

In the game of chess, Tun Razak said: "We learn to be patient but not complacent. We learn to be alert, to be always vigilant to the many pitfalls that face us. We learn to be disciplined, as chess is an exercise of self discipline. Above all, we learn to be friendly and tolerant."

Also present at the closing ceremony were Chlef Minister Dr Lim Chong Eu, former Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman, the President of the MCF, Mr Tan Chin Nam, the president of the Federation International Des Echecs, Prof Max Euwe.

(The Star, 21 Dec 1974)

 

WHY ASIANS FARE POORLY AT CHESS

PENANG, Fri - Due to lack of patronage and other factors, Asians not only performed poorly in chess competitions, but had to be content with the fact that supremacy in chess had to he decided between the two modern super powers, said the Prime Minister, Tun Abdul Razak.

Tun Razek was speaking at the Prize Giving and Closing ceremony of the First Asian Chess Team Competition at the Dewan Sri Pinang here this morning. Tun Razak later declared the championship closed and also presented the prizes to the successful participants from eight countries.

Earlier on arrival Tun Razak was greeted by a Kompang and Silat group. Also present was the Chief Minister, Dr Lim Chong Eu, and the former Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman.

"The Fischer - Spassky contest brought home the point that we are left far behind and some urgent steps must be taken to redress the situation, particularly for us in Malaysia," he added.

Tun Razak pointed out that although there is some dispute as to the origin of chess it could not be disputed that chess started in Asia and Asians should be proud of that fact.

HONOUR

"We are proud that this game has caught up the chanipionshlp the imagination of the Western World and In fact has spread to every country throughout the world without exception," stressed Tun Razak.

the Prime Minister said it was an honour and a source of pride for him and the country to donate the challenge trophy which is dedicated to every chess player and also to world peace.

Tun Razak praised the Malaysian Chess Federation for successfully organising the championship and hoped that it would mark out its plan for the future in pursuit of attaining greater and higher standards of the game in the country. Tun Razak added that he was confident that the MCF would live up to the expectations the country has concerning the future of this very taxing and highly intellectual game.

"It is said that chess is a game depicting war between two countries. But unlike modern warfare where tanks and missiles predominate, it is a war of the old-order where horses and elephants were in their prirne, where soldiers were still strong on their feet. In fact it is a battle of the fittest - the triumph of strength over weakness. In its ultimate analysis it is a victory of brain over brawn," continued Tun Razak.

Tun Razak pointed out that Malaysia is a smail country and can ill-afford to indulge in the luxuries of war with its catastrophic consequences and the reason for his mentioning of war was to remind ourselves that in the game of chess every person will learn something of value.

HABiTS

"We learn to be pa:tient but not complacent. We learn to be alert, to be always vgilant to the many pitfalls and challenges that face us. We learn to be disciplined, as chess is an exercise of self-discipline. And, above all, we learn to be friendly and tolerant:

"This is important both to the person as an individual and in the context of the nation," Tun Razak stressed.

Tun Razak expressed his strong belief that the young would benefit much from the game. He said that although the game depicts war it is most unlikely that it will influence the young minds to warlike or violent activities.

"On the other hand, chess will develop in them the habit of patience, dedication and sound judgment. It will teach our youth to be disciplined and to understand the nature of struggle and the true meaning of achievement," said the Prime Minister.

tun Razak refuted the common belief that chess is regarded as a serious game and could only be played by the genius or eccentric.

"Chess can be simple or complicated depending on how the game is handled. It is in fact a game which everyone can enjoy, and enjoy it in an intelligent way. furthermore, it has been demonstrated to us that the game can be played alone, like the game of patience. In fact, it is a game which can be regarded as a companion," Tun Razak concluded.

(The Straits Echo, 21 Dec 1974)

 

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