BALTIMORE
MARITIME MUSEUM

The nose of the U.S.S. Torsk, decorated to look like a shark.

U.S.S. TORSK

On April 14, 2001, I went with a group of friends and coworkers to the Baltimore Inner Harbor. While there, we saw the ships on display at the Baltimore Maritime Museum and visited the Baltimore National Aquarium.


BALTIMORE MARITIME MUSEUM

Submarine U.S.S. Torsk, moored in the inner harbor next to the aquarium.

U.S.S. TORSK

Length:311 Feet
Beam:27 Feet
Performance:
 
18 knots surfaced
9 knots submerged
Armament:
 
10 Torpedo Tubes
24 Torpedoes
Crew:80
On August 14, 1945, the U.S.S. Torsk (above) was responsible for sinking the last Japanese ship to be lost during World War II. The Torsk attacked a Japanese cargo ship escorted by a frigate with torpedoes, sinking the escort. The Japanese responded by sending a second frigate after the Torsk. The Torsk fired two torpedoes at the second frigate, sinking it.
 
The Torsk is currently a historical monument in dry dock in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. A view of the Torsk's conning tower is seen at right.
The conning tower of the U.S.S. Torsk
The lightship Chesapeake

LIGHTSHIP CHESAPEAKE

From 1933 to 1971, except for a brief period during World War II, the Chesapeake used the 1,000-watt lamp on its masthead to mark the entrance to the Cheasapeake bay. The Chesapeake is currently on display at Baltimore's Maritime Museum.

BALTIMORE NATIONAL AQUARIUM

The Baltimore National Aquarium is also located in the Inner Harbor. An exterior view of the Aquarium is seen at right.
 
Wile visiting the aquarium, we saw seahorses, seals, and more.
The National Aquarium at Baltimore.

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