Native American Goddesses
Native American Goddesses
Asagaya Gigagei - The Cherokee Red Man or Woman who is evoked in spells to cure the sick.  Asgaya Gigagei is either male or female depending on the sex of the patient.

Atira - The Pawnee Sacred Mother of every living creature, personification of the earth.

Auchimalgen - The moon goddess of the Araucanian (Chile) and wife of the sun.  All gods except Auchimalgen are malevolent, but she cares for the human race and wards off evil spirits and turns red when an important person is about to die.

Estanatlehi - The Navajo First Woman's adopted daughter. 

Evaki - Bakairi goddess of the night who places the sun in a pot every night and moves the sun back to its starting point in the east every day. 

Nokomis - The Algonquin "Grandmother"; the Scared Earth Mother who nurtures all living things.

Sedna - the Inuit (Eskimo) goddess of the sea and sea creatures.  She is a one-eye giant, frightful old hag but once she was beautiful and young when her father threw her into the sea as a sacrifice.  On who wishes to visit her must first pass through the realms of death and cross an abyss where a wheel of ice spins eternally and a cauldron of seal meat stews endlessly.  If the visitor wishes to return he must cross another abyss on a bridge as narrow as a knife edge.

Selu - Cherokee for "corn" sometimes she is called the First Woman.  She is Kanati's wife.  Selu created corn in secret by rubbing her belly or by defecating.  She had two sons, the Twin Thunder Boys who killed her because when they spied upon her and decided she was a witch.

Sun - A Cherokee goddess.

Sun - An Inuit (Eskimo) beautiful young maiden carrying a torch who is chased through the sky by her brother Aningan, the moon. 
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