Troop 322 By-Laws









 

Troop 322 Bylaws and Operations

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENT

1 – INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………………. 5

2 – MEMBERSHIP, SCOUT MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES………………. 5

2.1 – MEMBERSHIP………………………………………………………. 5

2.2 – REGISTRATION……………………………………………………. 6

2.3 - Troop Meetings ………………………………………………… 6

2.4 - Patrol Meetings ………………………………………………. 6

2.5 - Troop Leadership Council …………………………………. 7

2.6 - Court of Honor ………………………………………………... 7

2.7 - Monthly Meeting SCHEDULE……………………………….. 7

2.8 – DUES………………………………………………………………… 7

2.9 - Camping …………………………………………………………… 8

2.10 – PHILMONT………………………………………………………… 8

2.11 - OTHER ACTIVITIES………………………………………………. 8

2.12 - Information about activities…………………………... 8

 

3 – ADVANCEMENT……………………………………………………………. 9

3.1 - Overview …………………………………………………………. 9

3.2 - ADVANCEMENT PROCESS……………………………………….. 9

3.3 – UNDERSTANDING THE RANK REQUIREMENTS……………... 10

3.4 - Service Hours…………………………………………………… 10

3.5 - Scoutmaster’s conference………………………………... 10

3.6 - Board of Review………………………………………………... 10

3.7 - Rank Badges …………………………………………………….. 11

3.8 - REQUIREMENTS FOR EAGLE …………………………………… 11

3.8.1 - Eagle Honors …………………………………………. 12

3.9 - merit badges…………………………………………………….. 12

3.9.1 - Merit badge earning process…………………… 12

3.9.2 - Merit badge Cards…………………………………... 12

3.9.3 - Merit Badge Patches……………………………….. 12

3.9.4 - ALTERNATE EAGLE MERIT BADGES………………… 13

3.9.5 - Merit Badges Counselors ……………………….. 13

3.9.6 - TROOP HONOR SCARF………………………………….. 13

3.10 – Records…………………………………………………………. 13

4 - SCOUTS-ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES………………………………… 14

4.1 - TROOP OFFICES……………………………………………………. 14

4.1.1 - SENIOR PATROL LEADER……………………………… 14

4.1.2 - Other Troop Offices………………………………… 14

4.2 - PATROL OFFICES…………………………………………………... 14

4.2.1 - PATROL LEADER………………………………………… 14

4.2.2 - Other Patrol Offices………………………………. 14

4.3 – Elections, appointments and training……………….. 15

4.3.1 – ELECTIONS……………………………………………….. 15

4.3.2- Troop Elected Office ………………………………. 15

4.3.3- Patrol Elected Office ……………………………... 15

4.3.4 - Troop and Patrol Appointments………………. 15

4.3.5 - OTHER APPOINTMENTS………………………………... 16

4.3.6 - SCOUT LEADERSHIP TRAINING ……………………... 16

5 - The Scout Uniform ……………………………………………………. 16

5.1 - The "A" and "B " Uniforms …………………………………… 17

6 - Equipment ………………………………………………………………… 17

6.1 - Troop Equipment……………………………………….. 17

6.1.1 - Repair and Replacement …………………………. 18

6.1.2 - Equipment Lending Policy ……………………….. 18

6.2 - Personal Equipment…………………………………………...18

6.2.1 – FOOD……………………………………………………….20

6.2.2 – MONEY……………………………………………………. 20

6.2.3 - KNIVES AND AXES……………………………………… 20

6.2.4 - OTHER …………………………………………………….. 20

7 - SCOUT-CONDUCT & DISCIPLINE……………………………………….. 21

7.1 – CONDUCT…………………………………………………………... 21

7.1.1 - General Conduct……………………………………. 21

7.1.2 - Conduct During Activities………………………. 21

7.2 - Discipline Policy ……………………………………………... 22

7.2.1 - Disciplinary Steps …………………………………... 23

8 - ADULTS-MEETINGS………………………………………………………...<< 23

8.1 - Committee Meetings …………………………………………. 23

8.2 - Troop Adult Organization ………………………... 24

8.2.1 - The Troop Committee……………………………….. 24

8.2.2 - Troop Committee/Adult

Leadership Positions .……………………………... 25

8.2.2.1 - Troop Committee Chairperson ………. 25

8.2.2.2 – Secretary……………………………………. 25

8.2.2.3 – Treasurer……………………………………. 25

8.2.2.4 - Scoutmaster ………………………………... 26

8.2.2.5 - Assistant Scoutmasters ……………….. 26

8.2.2.6 – Advancement……………………………….. 26

8.2.2.7- Chartered Organization

Representative …………………………….. 26

8.2.2.8 - Chaplain ……………………………………… 27

8.2.2.9 - Newsletter Editor…………………………27

8.2.2.10 - Quartermaster …………………………... 27

8.3 - Adult Leader Training……………………………………… 27

9 - TROOP ADMINISTRATION……………………………………………….. 28

9.1 - The Chartering Institution ………………………………. 28

9.2 - Re-chartering…………………………………………………... 28

9.3 - ADULT REGISTRATION……………………………………………28

9.4 – FINANCES…………………………………………………………... 28

9.4.1 - General …………………………………………………. 28

9.4.2 – DUES………………………………………………………. 28

9.4.3 - CAMPING AND ACTIVITY FEES……………………….. 29

9.4.4 - personal Accounts…………………………………. 29

9.4.5 - FUND RAISING…………………………………………… 30

9.4.6 - Checking Account ………………………………….. 30

9.4.7 - payment of adult fees…………………………….. 30

10 – FORMS……………………………………………………………………… 30

10.1- MEDICAL INFORMATION………………………………………... 30

10.2 - Adult Resource Survey …………………………………… 30

10.3 - ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF BYLAWS…………………………... 30

 

RETURN TO TOP

 

 

1- INTRODUCTION

 

It is the intent for Troop 322 to operate under the guidelines established by the National Office of the Boy Scouts of America, Circle 10 Council and the Tawakoni District. Our objective is to offer an opportunity for youth to learn by participating in an organization that strives to develop strong character, strong leadership abilities, habits, and attitudes of good citizenship, good sportsmanship, team spirit and pride in growing strong in mind and body.

 

Troop 322 was first chartered in the 1960s and has been in continuous existence ever since. During this period of time the troop has had many different Scoutmasters who have given their time, talent and personal interest in the furthering of the Scouting ideals. As of 2003, there have been approximately 40 Eagle Scouts who have graduated from its ranks - a testimony to the program and the commitment of its leaders. With this continuing commitment to the Scouting program, we hope to instill qualities of leadership and character that will help guide Scouts for the rest of their lives.

 

This document is the operating policy for Troop 322 and is provided for the parents and Scouts as guidelines to the general operation of the troop. It is important that Scouts and their parents be familiar with this document, especially sections 1, 2 and 7.

 

Troop 322 strongly supports the B.S.A. concept of a boy-led Troop. The Troop is a big team led by the Senior Patrol Leader, and is made up of Patrols; each led by a Patrol Leader. Teamwork is required by all Scouts to make the strongest possible troop.

 

The Troop Leadership Council and the Troop Committee provide support for the Troop. Through these groups, adults and Scouts provide the planning and oversight required to help the Troop function smoothly.

 

2 – MEMBERSHIP, SCOUT MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES

 

2.1 – MEMBERSHIP

The facility, available troop equipment, and adult leadership will limit membership in Troop 322. A Scout must be active to remain on the Troop roster. A Scout will be considered inactive if he does not attend any Troop meetings, camping, service projects, or special events for three calendar months.


 

2.2 - REGISTRATION

Registration for new Scouts or transfers into Troop 322 can be done at any time. For Webelos Scouts, registration is usually done after completion of the Scout's Webelos year and/or Arrow of Light rank in conjunction with the Crossover Ceremony. Requirements are that boys be at least 11 years old or have earned the Arrow of Light. Anyone who is at least 18 years old must register as an adult.

 

The process for registering a new Scout or a transfer is as follows: The boy and at least one parent must come to one of the regularly scheduled Scout meetings on Monday night. At that time the following forms need to be completed.

Medical Information

Adult Resource Survey (one for each parent)

Acknowledgement of Bylaws

 

Transferring Scouts should also bring a transfer application filled out and signed by the previous troop's advancement chairperson. This sheet should include all available records and dates for rank advancement, merit badges, leadership positions and any noteworthy awards and honors. These records should be as complete as possible. If the Scout advances to the rank of Eagle, these records must also be verifiable. The district and national advancement committees check a Scout's records very carefully.

2.3 - Troop Meetings

The troop meets in the fellowship hall of Grace Presbyterian Church located at 1914 Joe Ramsey Blvd in Greenville. The meetings start promptly at 7:00 p.m. and end promptly at 8:30 p.m. Boy Scout troops, unlike Cub Packs, meet all year around. Refer to the annual calendar and other troop communications for further information.

 

The Boy Scout Handbook is required at each meeting. Every attempt will be made to dismiss the Troop on time, but, on occasion, activities or cleanup may run over. Parents are asked to bear with the Scoutmaster so that each Scout can complete activities and his share of cleanup tasks.

2.4 - Patrol Meetings

Patrol meetings are held as needed during weekly Troop meetings. These meetings are directed by the Patrol Leader, and are used to plan the Patrol’s part in Troop activities.


2.5 - Troop Leadership Council

The Troop Leadership Council (TLC) is the governing body for the troop. This group consists of the Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Scribe, all Patrol Leaders, Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters. The TLC is responsible for planning the weekly meetings and monthly campouts and seeing that they are executed properly. The TLC meets once a month.

2.6 - Court of Honor

The Court of Honor is one of the most important family gatherings for the Troop. This is a time when the Scouts are recognized for their achievements over the past several months. . It is very important that parents attend the Court of Honor to encourage their sons as they progress in Scouting. Troop 322 will hold two Courts of Honor per year.

2.7 - Monthly Meeting SCHEDULE

Mondays Regular troop meeting 7:00-8:30 p.m.

Monday after campout Troop Leadership Council (TLC) 6:00-6:30 p.m.

Troop Committee meeting 6:30-8:00 p.m.

(No regular troop meeting on night of TLC)

As Required Court of Honor (two times per year)

 

Note: The date, time and location should remain constant but may change due to special activity requirements or conflicts that cause adult leaders to be unavailable.

 

2.8 - DUES

The main purpose for dues is to help Scouts learn responsibility. It is encouraged that the Scouts earn their own dues money. For active Scouts, dues will be $3.00 per month. To encourage participation in the Troop, dues for Eagle Scouts will be on a voluntary basis. Dues are payable on any meeting night of the month - preferably, the first one. Dues are required to be current before the Scout can advance in rank or receive any merit badges at the next Court of Honor.

 

This money will be used for re-registration, Boys' Life Magazine, awards, Merit Badge costs, and other Troop needs. Before a rank advancement is awarded the Scout must be paid up "in full" on his dues. Should a Scout quit or become inactive, any funds in that Scout's personal account will be used to pay any outstanding dues, fees or debts with the remainder reverting to the Troop.

 

Financial hardships may be brought to the attention of the Troop Committee for special consideration.


 

2.9 - Camping

Generally, the troop will participate in camping activities at least once a month. Scouts are encouraged to attend as many campouts as possible to learn and apply Scouting skills.

Troop 322 will camp in all types of weather. Safety of the Scouts is the foremost consideration during all outings so unnecessary risks are never taken. It will be up to the discretion of the adult leadership as to whether the campouts will be called off due to weather

 

2.10 - PHILMONT

When treks to Philmont are available, the maximum crew size is 12. Up to 9 Scouts will be included. In order to insure 2-deep leadership, 3 adults will make up the rest of the crew. Up to 2 alternates will also be selected, in case one of the first 9 Scouts cannot attend.

 

To be eligible to join a Philmont crew, a Scout must meet the following requirements:

·        Either complete 8th grade before the trek, or

·        Be 14 by January prior to the trek.

·        Must have earned the rank of Star before the trek.

If more than 9 Scouts that meet these requirements want to go on the trek, the following priorities will apply:

·        First priority will be given to Scouts who have not yet participated in a Philmont trek

·        Second priority will be given to older Scouts who may not have another chance to go to Philmont

·        Third priority will be given to Scouts who are active, show maturity according to expectations during the activities, have the physical abilities to make the challenging trek, meet the Philmont weight requirements, and rank.

Final selection will be determined by the Troop Committee with input from the Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters.

 

2.11 - OTHER ACTIVITIES

Special Council, District and Troop projects are held throughout the year with all Scouts expected to participate as a Troop. These projects vary from Scout expositions to participation in community functions such as parades and conservation projects.

2.12 - Information about activities

Information about Troop activities will be provided verbally at the weekly meetings, at least 2 weeks prior to the outing. Information will also be included in the newsletter, and additional information such as flyers or maps will be provided as needed. Scouts can also obtain specific information from their Patrol Leaders.


 

3 - ADVANCEMENT

3.1 - Overview

Rank advancement is a central theme of the Scouting movement and is an indicator of the individual boy's involvement in the program. If the program is successful and the Scout is involved, advancement comes naturally. A Scout can work on Tenderfoot, Second Class and First Class ranks at the same time, but the ranks must be awarded in order. (If a Scout completes a requirement for First Class but is not yet Tenderfoot, then that requirement can be marked off in his handbook. No matter how the Scout finishes the requirements; he will be awarded the ranks only in the Tenderfoot, Second Class and First Class order.) With the exception of Merit Badges, Star, Life and Eagle rank requirements may not be worked on at the same time.

 

3.2 - ADVANCEMENT PROCESS

Rank advancement is a shared responsibility of the Scout and the adult leaders. The adult leaders are there to help advise Scouts and to see that a good program is offered through the boy leaders. It is the Scout's responsibility to see that his advancement requirements are signed off. There are several steps involved in the advancement process that must be done in order for a Scout to earn the next rank:

1 – The Scout attends troop functions

2 – The Scout completes the requirements for the various ranks

3 – The Scout gets the appropriate signatures in his handbook as the

requirements are completed

4 - The Scout requests and attends a Scoutmaster's conference with the

Scoutmaster or an Assistant Scoutmaster

5 - The Scout requests a Board of Review via the Scoutmaster or Assistant

Scoutmaster and attends a Board of Review

6 - The Scout receives informal recognition of advancement at the next troop

meeting.

7 - The Scout receives formal recognition of advancement at the next Court of

Honor.

 

It should be especially noted that the Scout requests everything to be done. He is expected to take charge and be responsible for his advancement. It is important for parents to help the Scouts by checking their sons' progress and encouraging them to contact those adults or boy leaders that can help them complete rank requirements. Parents cannot vouch for completion of rank requirements, but they can help the Scouts learn what is needed to advance. Parents can also encourage their sons to read and understand the Scout Handbook.

 

Before a rank advancement is awarded the Scout must be paid up "in full" on his dues.


3.3 – UNDERSTANDING THE RANK REQUIREMENTS

Rank requirements vary widely from Tenderfoot to Eagle. The advancement requirements are summarized in the Scout handbook. A Scout is expected to read and understand the material in the Scout Handbook that relates to a rank before the Scout earns that rank.

It should be noted that there are sign-off lines after each requirement. Each Scout is responsible for obtaining those signatures and dates upon completion of the requirement. To receive full credit, the dates obtained must include the month, day, and year. B.S.A. requires these signatures and dates. Omission may be cause for the rejection of applications for Eagle by the National Headquarters.

3.4 - Service Hours

Service hours are required as part of rank advancement. The Scoutmaster or the Service Project Committee Chairman before service project accomplishment must approve projects. Credit will be discussed before each project. Participation in Eagle projects is credited at one half the time actually worked. Attendance alone will not guarantee credit. The Scoutmaster or his designated representative will determine if a Scout's performance warrants credit.

3.5 - Scoutmaster’s conference

The Scoutmaster’s conference is a time when the Scout and the Scoutmaster or an Assistant Scoutmaster get together and review the Scout’s progress and discuss his future expectations as a Scout. The purpose is for the leaders and Scouts to get to know each other better and to set realistic goals for the next step toward Eagle. This conference may be held at any time after the rank requirements are completed and prior to a Scout’s Board of Review. The Scout is to bring his Scout Handbook with all the proper signatures and dates to the conference. The conference can normally be conducted on the regular troop meeting night. However, the Scout should let a Scoutmaster know before the Scout meeting night so time can be allotted.

3.6 - Board of Review

When a Scout has completed all the requirements for a rank, he requests a Board of Review through the Scoutmaster. The Scoutmaster will assign available members of the Troop Committee or Assistant Scoutmaster to provide the review board. The Scoutmaster may sit as an adult advisor to make sure the Board of Review is conducted properly. Boards of Review will be held as needed on regular Troop meeting night.

 

The purpose of the Board of Review is:

To make sure the Scout has completed the requirements for the rank.

To see how good an experience the Scout is having in the unit.

To encourage the Scout to progress further.

Additionally, the Board of Review provides "quality control" on advancement within the unit, it provides an opportunity for the Scout to develop and practice those skills needed in an interview situation, and it is an opportunity for the Scout to review his accomplishments.

 

The Board of Review is NOT a retest; the Scout has already been tested on the skills and activities required for the rank. However, the members of the Board of Review should ensure that all the requirements have been "signed off" in the Scout's handbook. Additionally, the members should ensure that leadership and merit badge records are consistent with the requirements for the rank.

 

The Board of Review is an opportunity to review of the Scout's attitudes, accomplishments and his acceptance of Scouting's ideals. If necessary, it is also the time to discuss with him his lack of progress, and to try to help him get back on track.

 

The Scout must wear a full Class A Uniform to his Board of Review. He must also bring his Scout Handbook with all the proper signatures. The Scout will not be given his Board of Review if he does not wear his Class A Uniform or bring his Scout Handbook. In that event, the Board of Review will be rescheduled.

At the end of his review the Scout leaves the room while the Board discusses his qualifications. He is then called back and told that he has qualified, or what additional action he must take to qualify. When he passes the Board of Review, the Scout should make sure to notify the Scoutmaster.

3.7 - Rank Badges

The cloth rank advancement patches are awarded to the Scout following a successful board of review. This is done so the uniform can be updated when the advancement is actually achieved. The advancement card and mother's pin are then awarded at the next Court of Honor.

3.8 - REQUIREMENTS FOR EAGLE

All requirements for the Eagle rank must be completed before a candidate's 18th birthday. The B.S.A. makes no exceptions to this rule. An Eagle board of review can, by exception, be held after a Scout's 18th birthday. However, if a Scout is found to be deficient in any of the requirements, he then has no recourse to correct the problem and cannot be approved for the Eagle rank. Therefore, the Troop Committee strongly urges the Eagle candidate to work with an Eagle advisor to avoid this situation.

 

The Eagle Board of Review differs from all others in that this board requires that a District staff member be included. Other Eagle Board Members shall consist of from 3 to 6 members of the committee. It is desirable that the make up of the Eagle board include Committee Members who have achieved the rank of Eagle Scout. The committee may choose to include adult Eagle Scouts who are parents associated with the troop but who are not members of the committee or who are from the community-at-large.

All forms and requirements for attaining the rank of Eagle must be in accordance with B.S.A. guidelines. Details are available from the Scoutmaster, Advancement Chairman, or Eagle Advisor.

3.8.1 - Eagle Honors

Troop 322 would like to honor its Eagle Scouts in a manner befitting this high rank. These items will be provided to the Scout:

Eagle Neckerchief

Eagle Mother’s pins and Father’s tie tacks

100 Invitations

Plaque

Newspaper Announcement

Cake (1/2 sheet)

Due to the significance of the Eagle rank, this achievement will have its own Court of Honor.

3.9 - merit badges

Merit badges are a key part of rank advancement. Besides teaching important Scouting skills, Merit Badges expose the Scout to many different hobbies and professions.

 

3.9.1 - Merit badge earning process

The following steps are required to earn each Merit Badge:

1.      Decide upon the merit badge.

2.      Get the name of the merit badge counselor from the Scoutmaster.

3.      Obtain merit badge book (many are available from the troop library).

4.      Get a blue merit badge application card from the Scoutmaster.

5.      Contact the merit badge counselor and complete the requirements.

6.      Return sections 1 and 2 of the completed blue card to the Scoutmaster.

3.9.2 - Merit badge Cards

The Scout must present a properly completed BLUE MERIT BADGE APPLICATION CARD to the Scoutmaster before presentation of the merit badge can be made. The Scoutmaster must maintain the blue merit badge card with valid signature of counselor for district and council verification of Eagle applications. Family members cannot individually sign-off merit badge requirements for their sons (except for special circumstances).

3.9.3 - Merit Badge Patches

The merit badge patch is presented to the Scout at the next regular Scout meeting and the merit badge patch card is presented at the next Court of Honor. Scouts MUST keep the signed merit badge cards as an Eagle Board of Review may require the cards.


3.9.4 - ALTERNATE EAGLE MERIT BADGES

Some merit badges for Eagle do have alternate merit badges available for handicapped boys who are not able to participate fully in certain badges. Any Scout can earn only one badge from the alternate list and count it as an Eagle required badge. For example, Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving may be earned as Eagle required. If both badges are earned, only one can be counted as an Eagle required badge. The other badge becomes an elective toward the Eagle rank. The same ruling applies to Personal Fitness or Swimming or Sports. Only one can apply toward the required badge for Eagle.

3.9.5 - Merit Badges Counselors

Scouts may earn merit badges only from approved Merit Badge Counselors. An approved counselor is an adult who has been approved by the Troop Committee and Scoutmaster, and has officially registered as either an adult leader or as a Merit Badge Counselor. The Merit Badge Counselor must also have a Merit Badge Counselor Application approved before beginning to work as a merit badge counselor. This is a requirement set forth by B.S.A. national policy. A merit badge can be refused if the counselor is not registered. Troop 322 maintains a listing of volunteer counselors from within the troop. Troop 322 encourages parental participation in the merit badge program. A counselor does not have to be specially trained to counsel for merit badges. Generally, all one needs is basic knowledge of the subject and a desire to teach Scouts. The merit badge pamphlet lists all the requirements for the merit badge.

 

3.9.6 - TROOP HONOR SCARF

When a Scout reaches the rank of First Class and has been in Troop 322 for at least 4 months, he has earned the Troop Honor Scarf. The Scoutmaster may award the Troop Honor Scarf to an adult who: 1) is active in Troop meetings, activities and the Troop Committee, 2) has a Scout uniform shirt, 3) has a son who has earned a Troop Honor Scarf or has no son in the troop and has been active for four months

3.10 - Records

The Advancement Chairman maintains the records of Troop 322. The Advancement Chairman must be notified of rank advancements or merit badges completed so that they are properly recorded and awarded at the next Court of Honor. Parents or Scouts may request the latest listing of the Scout’s records.


 

4 - SCOUTS-ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

 

4.1 - TROOP OFFICES

4.1.1 - SENIOR PATROL LEADER

The Senior Patrol Leader office is very important to the overall operation of the troop. The Scout elected to the position should be very responsible and willing to perform the job. This office carries a high priority and the Senior Patrol Leader must treat it accordingly. He is an example to the Scouts and must conduct himself accordingly. The Senior Patrol Leader Qualifications are:

·        Age 14 minimum

·        Must be Star rank or higher

·        Must have been a member of Troop 322 for a minimum of One year

·        Must have served as Patrol Leader or Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

·        Must have participated in both long- and short-term camping with Troop 322

·        Must be able to attend 80% of troop functions

·        Must have completed basic Boy Scout Leader Training.

 

4.1.2 - Other Troop Offices

·        Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

·        Quartermaster

·        Scribe

·        Historian

·        Librarian

·        Chaplain Aide

·        Bugler

·        Junior Assistant Scoutmaster

·        Troop Guide

·        Den Chief

 

4.2 - PATROL OFFICES

 

4.2.1 - PATROL LEADER

The Patrol Leader office is very important to the operation of each patrol. The Scout elected to the position should be responsible and willing to perform the job. He is an example to the Scouts in his patrol and must conduct himself accordingly. The Patrol Leader Qualifications are:

·        Should be active in patrol and troop activities and meetings for at least 6 months

·        Should complete basic Boy Scout Leader Training

 

4.2.2 - Other Patrol Offices

·        Assistant Patrol Leader

·        Patrol Quartermaster


 

4.3 – Elections, appointments and training

 

4.3.1 - ELECTIONS

Elections will be conducted in February and August. The Scout must be in attendance on election night to be elected or he must receive approval of the majority of the current Leadership Council to run in absentia, given a valid excuse. A Scout may not hold the same office more than two consecutive six-month terms. No Scout may hold more than one of the following leadership positions at a time: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leader, Instructor, Quartermaster, Scribe, Librarian, Historian, Troop Guide, or Chaplain Aide.

 

Election will begin with the election of the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader. After six months, he will be eligible to become Senior Patrol Leader. Then, each patrol will elect their Patrol Leader. Elections will be held in the following manner. Upon the closing of nominations for an office, a vote will be cast by all eligible Scouts at that time. If no Scout secures a majority of the votes on a ballot, a runoff will occur. The runoff will be between the two Scouts who received the most votes. Runoffs will continue in this manner until one of the Scouts has received a majority of the votes cast.

4.3.2        - Troop Elected Office

The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) is the only office elected by the troop as a whole. The Senior Patrol Leader and Assistant Patrol Leader select all other troop offices with concurrence of the Scoutmaster and Troop Committee.

4.3.3        - Patrol Elected Office

The members of their patrol elect patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders and Patrol Quartermasters.

4.3.4 - Troop and Patrol Appointments

At the troop meeting two weeks prior to troop elections, the Senior Patrol Leader of available troop appointments will notify the Scouts. Scouts wishing to be considered for the appointments should notify the Senior Patrol Leader of their interest. The existing Senior Patrol Leader will pass to the newly elected Senior Patrol Leader and the Scoutmaster the list of Scouts and their preferences for troop positions. The newly elected Senior Patrol Leader should strongly consider these Scouts for available positions. Appointments will be made within two weeks of completion of the troop elections. Appointments will be subject to the Scoutmaster’s approval and confirmed at the first Troop Committee meeting following troop elections. Each appointed position will have a Scoutmaster to assist him in fulfilling the requirements of the position. Requirements and duties are described in the patrol leader’s handbook.


 

4.3.5 - OTHER APPOINTMENTS

The following positions if desired will be appointed by the Scoutmaster:

·        Junior Assistant Scoutmaster

·        Troop Guide

·        Instructor

·        Den Chief

4.3.6 - SCOUT LEADERSHIP TRAINING

Before a Scout can be eligible to hold the position of Senior Patrol Leader, he should attend the appropriate leader training. Junior Leaders should attend Oakleaf training. Den Chiefs must attend Den Chief training. The district and council provide this training. Information regarding training will be provided by the troop. Additional training provided by the district and council includes Golden Acorn training. Junior leaders are encouraged to participate in this advanced training. The Scoutmaster and the Troop Committee will guide all elected and appointed Junior Leaders in their duties.

 

5 - The Scout Uniform

The uniform is the Scout's identification with the brotherhood of Scouting and should be worn with pride. The uniform displays the Scout's rank, his leadership position and his personal accomplishments. The Scout is expected to wear his uniform to all of the following activities:

  • Troop Meetings

·        Camping Trips (to and from required for insurance purposes)

  • Boards of Review
  • Scoutmaster Conferences
  • Troop Functions
  • District Scout Events
  • Council Scout Events
  • National Scout Events

The Scout uniform is probably the first purchase of the Scout. Most parents who have never been involved in Scouting are at a loss as to what to buy in the way of uniform parts and insignia.


 

5.1 - The "A" and "B " Uniforms

Item:

"A" Uniform

“B" Uniform

Troop 322 Neckerchief and slide

Optional

 

Troop 322 T-shirt

 

Optional

Troop 322 Hat

Optional

Optional

Scout uniform shirt

X

 

BSA T-shirt

 

X

Scout shorts or solid colored shorts

Optional

Optional

Scout long pants or jeans

Optional

Optional

Scout belt

Optional

Optional

 

The "A” uniform is to be worn to all functions as listed above.

 

The "B" uniform can be worn in camp and to designated informal meetings. The Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters are asked to wear the full uniform to all functions.

 

During campouts, the Troop T-shirt or other appropriate clothing may be worn. The Scoutmaster will decide when non-uniform clothing will be authorized for other special activities or extenuating circumstances. Camouflage clothing is not allowed.

 

The scout handbook shows the placement of all patches and insignias on the uniform.

 

Parents should encourage the Scout to properly wear his uniform

 

6 - Equipment

6.1 - Troop Equipment

Troop 322 provides the major camping equipment required for the troop to conduct safe and effective campouts. This equipment is set up on the patrol basis and much of it is maintained in the patrol chuck boxes. This equipment is under the jurisdiction of the adult Quartermaster and the Scout Troop Quartermaster. They are responsible, with the help of the Patrol Quartermasters, for all the troop equipment.

 

Following is a list of troop-supplied equipment that may be used on campouts.

Patrol chuck boxes

Trailer

First aid kit

Charcoal

Propane tanks / trees

Camp tables

Fire buckets

Rope

Propane stoves

Patrol cooking gear

Fire extinguishers

Flag pole

Propane lanterns

Dutch ovens

Tools

Dining flies

Water jugs

Axes and saws

Cleaning supplies

Flags

 

All scouts will be responsible to help set up and take down equipment as a regular part of any campout.

 

The Quartermaster is responsible for insuring that cooking equipment is clean before it is stored in chuck boxes. If equipment is taken home for cleaning after a campout, the Patrol Leader will make a list of assignments and turn one copy over to the quartermaster before leaving camp.

 

6.1.1 - Repair and Replacement

It is normal for equipment to wear out when there are boys and adults using it at least once a month. The troop will replace, upon the recommendation of the Troop Quartermaster, any equipment that has reached the end of its useful life.

If personal or troop equipment is damaged by intentional abuse or carelessness, the person responsible will have to replace the damaged part or the whole equipment piece as determined by the adult Quartermaster. If the person who damaged the equipment cannot be determined, then the Scout members in attendance at the outing will all share equally in the cost to replace the damaged equipment. The troop equipment should be treated with the same respect as if it were bought and paid for by the individual.

 

6.1.2 - Equipment Lending Policy

It is the policy of Troop 322 not to loan troop equipment.

6.2 - Personal Equipment

Following is a list of recommended equipment each Scout should bring to campouts. Notice the different columns indicate different camping trips and what is appropriate for each. This is by no means a complete and comprehensive list of equipment but will certainly assure a safe and comfortable campout.

 

DESCRIPTION

FALL/SPRING WEEKEND

WINTER WEEKEND

SUMMER WEEKEND

SUMMER CAMP WEEK

O = Optional S = Suggested R = Required

Underwear

2-3 Pair

2-3 Pair

2-3 Pair

10 Pair

Underwear / Long

O

R

O

O

Socks

3 Pair

3 Pair

3 Pair

10 Pair

Shirts / Long (Scout or other)

2

2

2

2

Shirts / Short (Scout or other)

2

2

2

6

Pants / Long

2

2

1

2

Pants / Short

1

1

2

5

Sweatshirt / Jacket

1

1

O

1

Gloves / Winter Cap

O

R

O

O

Cap / Hat

R

R

R

R

Rain Gear / Poncho

R

R

R

R

Swimsuit

O

O

O

R

Hiking Boots

S

S

R

R

Extra Tennis Shoes

S

O

R

R

Merit Badge Sash

O

O

O

O

Order of the Arrow Sash

O

O

O

R

Sleeping Bag

R

R

R

O

Mosquito Netting

S

O

S

S

Cot / Foam Pad / Air Mattress

S

S

S

S

Pillow

S

S

S

S

Cook Kit (fork, knife, spoon, cup)

R

R

R

R

Toiletries

 

 

 

 

Toothbrush / Toothpaste

R

R

R

R

Soap

R

R

R

R

Washcloth

R

R

R

R

Towel

R

R

R

R

Deodorant

R

R

R

R

Toilet Paper

S

S

S

S

Comb / Brush /Mirror

O

O

O

O

Suntan Lotion / Sunscreen

O

O

O

O

Miscellaneous Items

 

 

 

 

Small First Aid Kit

S

S

S

S

Sewing Kit

S

S

S

S

Insect Repellent

S

S

S

S

Flashlight

S

S

S

R

Extra Batteries

S

S

S

S

Knife (folding blade)

O

O

O

O

Rope

S

S

S

S

Canteen/Water Bottle

R

R

R

R

Tissue / Handkerchief

S

S

S

S

Watch

O

O

O

O

Paper / Pencil

R

R

R

R

Pack / Frame / Duffel Bag

R

R

R

R

Compass

S

S

S

R

 

All Scouts should have a copy of The Boy Scout Handbook with them on all camping trips unless otherwise noted. A plastic bag or waterproof cover on all outings should protect the Scout book.

 

6.2.1 - FOOD

Each Scout is normally expected to provide his own food and drink (no sodas) for the first meal on the day of departure. Junk food such as candy, goodies and soda are not allowed by the Scouts in their personal packs. This only attracts bugs and ants into the tents and sleeping bags. Any such food, if found, will be confiscated by the Scoutmasters and disposed of properly.

 

Scouts should drink water, juices or sports drinks. Carbonated drinks are not allowed because they will not keep the Scout hydrated.

 

6.2.2 - MONEY

Scouts are discouraged from taking money on local, short-term camping trips unless directed to do so by the Scoutmaster. Enough money to cover expenses on long-term camping trips is authorized but should not exceed expected spending requirements. Money for telephone calls is allowed. Scouts will be responsible for their own money. Troop "Bank" envelopes will be available for long-term (over 72 hours) trips. Any money not in the Troop bank will be responsibility of the Scout.

6.2.3 - KNIVES AND AXES

As stated in the TOTIN’ CHIP course, sheath knives are not approved for use by Scouts. Sheath knives have inherent dangers built in to them. B.S.A. does not allow Scouts or adults to carry sheath knives. Acceptable knives are pocketknives and lock-back knives such as Buck knives with a blade no longer than 4 inches.

Any Scout who has earned the WHITTLING CHIP card in Cub Scouts will have to re-earn the Boy Scout equivalent TOTIN’ CHIP card before he may carry a knife to a Scouting campout. All Scouts in the troop are required to pass the TOTIN’ CHIP course that is designed to teach respect and handling of knives, axes and saws. Each boy is issued a TOTIN’ CHIP card upon completion of the course. The Scout is required to carry the card on all troop outings. Any breach of the rules learned in the TOTIN’ CHIP course will be cause for removal of one corner of the card. If all four corners are removed, the card is confiscated and the course must be taken and passed again.

6.2.4 - OTHER

No electronics, tobacco, alcohol, drugs, candles, fireworks, firearms, aerosol cans or adult reading materials will be allowed. Regular cards will be allowed, but no specialty cards (Pokemon, Magic, etc.) will be allowed.

 

7 - SCOUT-CONDUCT & DISCIPLINE

 

7.1 – CONDUCT

Scouts are expected to live by the Scout Law and the Scout Oath and to demonstrate Scout Sprit. Behavior that is not up to standard will be brought to the attention of the parents and may mean the dismissal of a Scout from a Scouting function. In extreme cases, a Scout may not be allowed to attend meetings or function and/or a parent may be required to attend with him. Repeated behavioral problems will be presented to the Troop Committee for action. Behavioral problems that cannot be resolved by the troop Committee may result in a parent being called and/or the Scout being dismissed from the Troop.

 

7.1.1 - General Conduct

1.                  All Scouts are required to wear Scout uniforms to all Scout activities unless other directed. Camouflage clothing is not allowed.

2.                  Absolutely no fighting, horseplay, hazing or profanity.

3.                  Disobedience of instructions by any Scout will not be tolerated.

4.                  Scouts are expected to attend all Troop functions. Notify your Patrol Leader if you cannot attend.

5.                  Respect will be shown to leaders, Scouts, other people, animals, the environment, and public and private property.

6.                  Be punctual for all activities

7.                  Everyone will help with setup and cleanup for all activities

8.                  The Troop Committee upon the Scoutmaster’s recommendation will dismiss anyone who intentionally misuses or destroys Scout or Church property from the Troop.

 

7.1.2 - Conduct During Activities

Scouts must conduct themselves in a controlled manner, not loud and obnoxious to others in the camping environment. The following rules will be followed during activities.

1.      All campsites will be left cleaner and in better condition than they were found. Scouting follows the “leave no trace” rule.

2.      Radios, tape player, video games and specialty playing cards are not allowed on any camping trip. Unauthorized equipment will be confiscated and returned to the Scout after the camping trip.

3.      The Scoutmaster must be notified of any Scout requiring medication, and the dosage and schedule or conditions/symptoms that would indicate how the medication should be administered.

4.      10 PM is lights out on camping trips. Scouts should be in tents, talking softly and making no loud noises. The Scoutmaster will determine when there will be exceptions to this rule.

5.      Safety rules must be followed at all times. Buddy System, Safe Swim and Safety Afloat will be enforced during all aquatic activities.

6.      Combustible fuels (white gas, Coleman lantern fuel, LP bottled gas, etc.) will be controlled and under the direct supervision of an adult at all times. When unattended, fuels will be stored in a locked container.

7.      No gas lanterns, lighted candles, matches or open flames of any kind are allowed inside tents (battery operated devices only).

8.      Before using knives or axes, a Scout must have earned a TOTIN’ CHIP card. The Scout is required to carry the card on all troop outings. If the Scout cannot produce a TOTIN’ CHIP card upon request then his ax and knife handling privileges will be suspended until such time as the card is produced. If a Scout is observed handling these tools in an unsafe manner, the observer may report the infraction to the Scoutmaster who will tear off a corner of the offender's TOTIN' CHIP card. If all four corners of the card are removed, the Scout is required to pass the TOTIN’ CHIP course before another card is issued.

9.      Before a Scout is allowed to build or tend a fire, he must have earned the FIRE'M'CHIT. He is not required to have it in his possession, but he must have earned it.

7.2 - Discipline Policy

In view of safety and liability issues, when at any Troop sponsored activity or campout, the following discipline policy shall be the rule for Troop 322.

 

Discipline problems will normally be handled within the troop. If a Scout's actions are continually distracting or disruptive to the operation of the troop, or are beyond the control of the patrol leader, senior patrol leader, and Scoutmasters, the Scout will be warned by two adult leaders present at the activity that the behavior is unsatisfactory and if the behavior persists, he will be asked to leave the activity. If the behavior continues, he will be escorted to a telephone, and he will call his parents to come get him and take him home.

 

Behavior that will result in disciplinary action, as outlined in Discipline Steps, includes, but is not limited to the following examples:

1.      Not following Scoutmasters' or leaders' instructions.

2.      Significantly unsafe actions.

3.      Physical or verbal hazing or harassment of another person.

4.      Leaving designated areas without Scoutmaster’s or adult leader’s permission (e.g., not telling the Scoutmaster of his whereabouts at all times; going to another area other than requested; entering property marked "no trespassing").

5.      Exploring physical hazards without Scoutmasters' permission and adult supervision (e.g., lakes, creeks, cliffs, caves or underground areas, boats, abandoned structures, etc.).

6.      Going near any type of vehicle, machinery, or equipment without the permission of the Scoutmaster.

7.      Any intentional property damage to natural or man-made areas, nature, or private or troop equipment.

8.      Excessive rowdy, unruly, loud, disrespectful, or disobedient behavior.

9.      Use of cursing or foul language.

10.  Smoking, or the use of other tobacco products.

11.  Use of alcohol or any controlled or illegal substance.

12.  Gambling.

13.  Playing with fire, combustible substances or possession of fireworks.

 

Generally adults not related to the Scout being disciplined will handle all discipline problems. If a parent observes their son misbehaving, they are strongly encouraged to seek another adult to handle the situation.

7.2.1 - Disciplinary Steps

On the first offense, the Scout will discuss the behavior with the Scoutmaster and/or adult leaders, and the Senior Patrol Leader.

 

On the second offense the Troop Committee and parents must be notified by the Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmasters, or leaders in charge and given all details of the offense in writing at the next Committee Meeting or as soon as practically possible. The Troop Committee Designee will notify the parents or guardians of the Scout involved within 6 days of the offense or as soon as practically possible and the parents or guardians and the Scout must appear before the Troop Committee to discuss the problem.

 

Following the third offense, generally occurring within a 6 month period, the parents or guardians will be notified that a hearing with the Troop Committee will be convened to determine their boy's eligibility to remain a member of Troop 322, and if necessary the Troop Committee can remove his membership from the Troop.

 

8 - ADULTS-MEETINGS

 

8.1 - COMMITTEE MEETINGS

 

The Troop Committee meetings are held on the first Monday after a campout unless otherwise agreed upon. The committee should meet at least once per month starting at 6:30 p.m. at Grace Presbyterian Church located at 1914 Joe Ramsey Blvd in Greenville. These meetings are for the purpose of reviewing all the activities of the troop for the current month and planning any support needed by the troop for the execution of those plans. The committee also discusses and plans for large future events that require advanced preparation and support. The committee meetings are open to all adult Scout Leaders and parents of registered Scouts.


 

8.2 - Troop Adult Organization

8.2.1 - The Troop Committee

The Troop Committee, the governing body of the troop, has established a policy that encourages all families to take an active part in the operation of the troop. Because the Committee makes all decisions related to how the troop will be run, all families, whether they have a parent serving in the adult leadership corps or not, are strongly encouraged to have at least one family member on the Troop Committee to represent that family in any troop decisions.

 

While membership in the Committee can be on an at-large basis, with no firm commitment to any specific activity, all members of the Committee are welcome to work on any committee function or activity in the hope that parents will gain a better understanding of what is involved in running a troop and also to help spread the work load. Anyone wishing to serve on the Troop Committee should contact the Troop Committee Chairman or the Scoutmaster. Listed below are some of the ongoing functions of the Committee.

  • Selection of a Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters
  • Helping the Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters receive the necessary adult leader training.
  • Advise Scoutmaster on policies relating to the Boy Scout program and the charter organization.
  • See that leadership is assigned in case the Scoutmaster is absent or is unable to serve.
  • Carry out the policies and regulations of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • Be responsible for finances, adequate funds, fund raising, and disbursements in line with the approved budget plan.
  • Obtain, maintain, and care properly for troop property.
  • Provide for adequate meeting facilities.
  • Provide an adequate camping and outdoor program (minimum 10 days and nights per year).
  • Support the operation of the Troop by staffing the various Adult Leadership Positions.
  • Coordinate transportation.
  • Provide new and sustaining membership coordination.
  • Provide long range planning.
  • Coordinate with local Webelos Scouts.
  • Provide Eagle Advisors.

 

8.2.2 - Troop Committee/Adult Leadership Positions

The following is a summary of the committee/adult leadership positions and their basic responsibilities.

 

Positions that are necessary for the troop to function properly follow:

8.2.2.1 - Troop Committee Chairperson

·        Organize the committee to see that all functions are delegated, coordinated and completed.

·        Maintain a close relationship with the chartered organization representative and the Scoutmaster.

·        See that troop leadership and committee members have training opportunities.

·        Interpret national and local policies to the troop.

·        Work closely with the Scoutmaster in preparing the troop committee agendas.

·        Call, preside over and promote attendance at monthly troop committee meetings and any special meetings that may be called.

·        Ensure troop representation at monthly Roundtables.

·        Secure top-notch, trained individuals for camp leadership.

·        Arrange for charter review and re-charter of the troop annually.

8.2.2.2 - Secretary

·        Keep minutes of meetings and send out committee meeting notices.

·        Handle publicity.

·        Conduct the troop resource survey.

·        Plan for family night programs and family activities.

·        Plan the charter presentation program.

·        Keep transportation list, including drivers license and insurance information on adults who will drive for Scouting activities.

8.2.2.3 - Treasurer

·        Handle all troop funds. Pay bills on recommendation of the Scoutmaster and authorization of the troop committee.

·        Maintain checking and savings accounts.

·        Train and supervise the troop scribe in record keeping.

·        Receive troop income each week from the Troop Scribe.

·        Keep adequate records in the Troop/Team Record Book.

·        Supervise money-earning projects, including obtaining proper authorizations.

·        Supervise the camp savings plan.

·        Report to the troop committee at each meeting.

·        Lead in the preparation of the annual troop budget.


 

8.2.2.4 - Scoutmaster

·        Train and guide boy leaders.

·        Work with other responsible adults to bring Scouting to boys.

·        Use the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting.

·        Term of office is two years with an option for a third year upon approval of the Scout committee. The Scoutmasters' Scouter's Key requires a Scoutmaster serve for three years.

8.2.2.5 - Assistant Scoutmasters

Take full responsibility for one or two monthly programs during the year. Above responsibility includes following:

·        Advise TLC during meeting and campout planning.

·        Adults do not plan programs for Scouts.

·        Make sure the monthly program is written and concise - work with SPL.

·        Be prepared with ideas on monthly program to feed TLC.

·        File Local Tour Permit with the council office before campouts.

·        Collect all permission slips before campout - advise primary contact person.

·        Help as needed with campout transportation.

·        Work with the SPL to keep program on schedule.

·        Serve as new Scout Patrol and Troop Guide advisor as assigned by Scoutmaster.

·        Be prepared to take over troop operation in the absence of the Scoutmaster.

·        Be a non-voting member of the committee.

 

 

8.2.2.6 - Advancement

·        Encourage Scouts to advance in rank.

·        Arrange and conduct troop boards of review.

·        Conduct courts of honor two times per year.

·        Develop and maintain a merit badge counselor list.

·        Make a prompt report on the correct form to the council service center when a troop board of review is held. Secure badges and certificates.

·        Work with the troop scribe to maintain all Scout advancement records.

·        Work with the troop librarian to build and maintain a troop library of merit badge pamphlets.

·        Troop Merit Badge Coordinator.

8.2.2.7- Chartered Organization Representative

·        Secures a committee chairperson and encourages training.

·        Helps recruit troop leadership.

·        Serves as liaison between charter organization and troop.

·        Encourages service to charter organization.

·        Assist with re-chartering.

·        Coordinates Scout Sunday.


 

Positions that are optional for the troop to function properly, to be filled at the discretion of the Troop Committee:

8.2.2.8 - Chaplain

·        Provide a spiritual tone for troop meetings and activities.

·        Give guidance to the chaplain aide.

·        Promote regular participation of each member in the activities of the religious organization of his choice.

·        Visit homes of Scouts in time of sickness or need.

·        Give spiritual counseling service when needed or requested.

·        Encourage Boy Scouts to earn their appropriate religious emblems.

·        Provide opportunities for Boy Scouts to grow in their duty to God and their fellow Scouts.

8.2.2.9 - Newsletter Editor

·        Collect information from the committee and troop leadership council on upcoming events.

·        Publish and mail or distribute the troop newsletter once a month.

·        Submit articles to the charter institution newsletter on troop activities.

·        Develop means of promoting the troop both in the charter institution and in the community.

·        Submit articles on the troop to the local newspapers.

8.2.2.10 - Quartermaster

·        Maintain a solid troop inventory list.

·        Inventory troop equipment quarterly.

·        Report to the committee on equipment damage and loss.

·        Collect reimbursement from Scouts for damaged equipment.

·        Input equipment requests to the committee for approval.

·        Input equipment requests to the annual budget.

·        Train the troop and patrol quartermasters.

·        Maintain policies for equipment check-in and checkout.

·        See that all equipment is accounted for after each campout.

·        Coordinate building patrol boxes as required.

 

8.3 - Adult Leader Training

All registered adults and committee members are encouraged to attend a Boy Scout New Leader Essentials course and Outdoor Leader Skills within 12 months of their registration. All registered adults must also take Youth Protection Training, and so should any adults that attend campouts. All registered adults are encouraged to attend any additional training offered by the district or council. Registration fees are to be paid by the individual. For additional information on adult leader training, see the Circle 10 website (www.circle10.org/training/training.cfm).


 

9 - TROOP ADMINISTRATION

9.1 - The Chartering Institution

The Boy Scouts of America requires that a Scout troop have a sponsoring organization. This may be a church, synagogue, civic club, school or some similar organization or group. Each year the sponsoring institution must make a request to the National Boy Scout Headquarters seeking permission to use the Boy Scout program for the youth in their community. This is known as the re-chartering process. This is done annually for Troop 322. Through this re-chartering process, Grace Presbyterian Church has agreed to provide a safe meeting place, leadership and storage facilities for the troop.

9.2 - Re-chartering

Re-chartering must be done by the 15th day of January each year. The troop is responsible for paying all registration fees at the time of re-chartering. The troop will also pay for the cost of Boys Life magazine. Each active Scoutmaster is re-chartered out of the troop general fund.

 

9.3 - ADULT REGISTRATION

According to the Boy Scouts of America regulations the following adults must register with the Boy Scouts: Committee Members, Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmasters, Scouting Coordinator, and those adults that will be accompanying Scouts on campouts. The Scoutmaster must interview those interested in participating as an Assistant Scoutmaster. These people are required to pay the current registration fee that is in effect at the time they join. Merit Badge Counselors are also required to register but are not required to pay the registration fee.

 

Because of the problems encountered with insurance and liability, Troop 322 requires registration of adults who expect to accompany the troop on several campouts per year. In addition, this ensures the fulfillment of the B.S.A. requirement for two registered leaders with the Scouts on every outing.

 

9.4 – FINANCES

 

9.4.1 - General

Troop 322 is primarily supported through the efforts of various fund raising activities as approved by the Troop Committee and through monthly dues paid by individual Scouts. All money raised by fund-raising projects conducted by the troop goes toward troop funds. These funds may or may not be distributed to the individual Scouts in their individual "Scout accounts.” The Troop Committee reserves the right to redirect funds to the troop budget in whatever manner best supports the Troop 322 program and goals.

 

9.4.2 – DUES

For information on dues, see paragraph 2.8.


9.4.3 - CAMPING AND ACTIVITY FEES

Food money for camping must be paid to the troop on the Monday night preceding the outing. A standard fee of $8.00 has been set for food. If this money is not paid by the Monday night preceding the campout, the Scout will not be allowed to go on the trip. Refunds of food money, after purchase of food, may not be available.

The adults that attend campouts owe $8.00 to the adult in charge of the meals for the campout.

Additional fees will be charged for activities that include extra cost. These fees will be as small as possible while covering the cost of the activity.

9.4.4 - personal Accounts

In order to foster greater responsibility and dedication to the troop, a personal account will be established for each boy in the troop for his commissions. The purpose of this account is to defray expenses associated with personal camping equipment, summer camp, high adventure and other long duration activities associated with Boy Scouts. This account is not intended to be used for other purposes such as regular campouts or dues, nor will it be paid in cash except for approved reimbursements.

The Troop Treasurer in conjunction with the Troop Committee shall maintain a personal account for each registered Scout in the troop. Upon joining the Troop, a Scout will become eligible to accrue credits in his personal account. From that time until he leaves the troop, he will maintain a balance based upon his contribution to designated fund raising events. When he leaves the troop, his balance will be divided equally among the remaining vested scouts. To become vested, a scout must have a balanced account. The Treasurer is responsible for accurately maintaining the balances and the activity of the accounts. The Fundraising Chairperson shall provide information as to the contribution of each Scout in the particular fund raising activity.

Scouts will earn credits based on fund raising activities. The Troop Committee will determine the total percentage of the fund raising activity that will be divided among the Scouts that participated in its execution. Manning a booth would be based on the time spent, while activities, which were comprised of individual sales, would be based on the percentage of the total sales. Methods for determining the distribution from mixed activities will be determined at the discretion of the Troop Committee.

Withdrawals from the account will be allowed to defray the expenses of long term and high adventure activities and other activities at the discretion of the Troop Committee. Typically summer camp, National Jamboree and Philmont type activities are the events for which disbursement will be made. Disbursements are subject to the approval of the Troop Committee and will typically be made for events that the Troop is participating in at a group 1evel.


 

9.4.5 - FUND RAISING

Troop 322 will conduct money-raising projects throughout the year. Parents, as well as Scouts, are expected to participate in these activities. Examples include popcorn sales, pancake breakfast and spaghetti dinner.

9.4.6 - Checking Account

Troop 322 will maintain a checking account for the purpose of paying bills incurred by the troop. The Troop Treasurer who is a Committee Member will maintain this account. The Treasurer, and others as required will have signature capability.

9.4.7 - payment of adult fees

On a funds-available basis, Troop 322 will make payment for registered, authorized adult leadership to cover fees for attendance to summer camp. Troop Committee approval is required before any payment of such funds.

 

10 - FORMS

 

10.1- MEDICAL INFORMATION

Official B.S.A medical forms must be current and on file. Forms are available at the Circle 10 website (www.scouting.org/forms/34414.pdf). Current medical insurance for Scouts and adults must also be kept on file.

10.2 - Adult Resource Survey

This form is to be filled out by every adult in Troop 322. It is available from the Troop Committee.

 

10.3 - ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF BYLAWS

Each new Scout and his parents or guardians must sign this form, stating that they have read the Troop bylaws and agree to abide by them.

 

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF BYLAWS FORM