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Vigo County, Indiana Biographies - H.C. Bradsby


STEPHEN ADAIR, grocer and cooper, Terre Haute, was born in Wayne county, Ind., July 14, 1843, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (RIGLER) ADAIR, former a native of Virginia, of Scotch-Irish descent, latter of Pennsylvania, of German lineage. Stephen, who is the second in a family of six children, was married November 19, 1868, in Terre Haute, to Rebecca A., daughter of Edward and Sarah (RICHARDSON) DERRICKSON, natives of Philadelphia, Penn., her father of German descent, and her mother of English. Mrs. ADAIR is the third in a family of five children who grew to their majority, and was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, October 17, 1845. Mr. and Mrs. ADAIR had born to them four children, viz.: Joseph Edward, Emma, Lester (deceased) and Mabel.

Mr. ADAIR was reared in Terre Haute until he was thirteen years of age, and was educated in the schools of the city, also in Putman and Hendricks counties. He has had to depend on his own resources from the time he was thirteen years of age, and worked on a farm until he was eighteen years old; then returned to Terre Haute in the spring of 1861, and worked at whatever he could get to do. February 8, 1864, he enlisted in Company C, Thirty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and with his command marched at once to the front. Some of the important engagements in which he participated were the battles of Atlanta, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Jonesboro, Franklin, etc. He was mustered out at Indianapolis in January, 1866, and returned to Terre Haute, where he worked for seven years in Thompson's flour-mill and cooper shop, during which time he learned the cooper's trade. He then engaged in the cooper business for himself, and has since followed it. In 1880 he embarked in a grocery business at Thirteenth street and College avenue, which he sold out in July, 1883. He then erected a two-story brick building, with store-room on the first floor, at No. 800 South Seventh street, where he again engaged in the grocery trade. His cooper shop is in the rear of No. 900 South Ninth street. Mr. ADAIR is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 86, also of the I.O.O.F., No. 51, Terre Haute; has passed the chairs, and is a member of the Encampment; is also a member of the A.O.U.W. He eschews politics, and gives his attention to his large and increasing business affairs; his sympathies and votes are in favor of Democratic principles.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Terre Haute, pp. 655-56

Submitted by Kim Holly


JOHN BAILEY, stock-grower, P.O. Prairie Creek, was born in Ohio July 25, 1818, and is a son of Resin (Rezin) and Susiana (Susanna) BAILEY, who came to this county in 1825. The mother died here, and the father in Illinois. Their family consisted of six children, of whom John is the third in order of birth. He was married October 1, 1838, to Fannie S., daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (ELLIOTT) SHOEMAKER, natives of Kentucky, and early settlers of this county, where they died. They had a family of seven children, Fannie S. being the eldest, having been born in Kentucky November 28, 1818. Mr. and Mrs. BAILEY have been blessed with a family of seven children, viz: Joseph, who married Jemima FRAKES; William H., who married Nancy HEMTER; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas SCOTT; Mary A., wife of Charles HANDY; Nancy, wife of Theodore HANDY; James, who married Sarah KIRKHAM; and Oliver M., who married Mollie FRAKES. Mrs. BAILEY died June 2, 1889. Mr. Bailey was reared on the farm, and has made his way in the world by his own exertions. He is an old settler of Prairie Creek Township, and owns a farm containing 103 acres. In his political convictions he is a Republican.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Prairie Creek Twp., pp. 663-64

Submitted by Derek Gilbert


J.W. KING, dairyman, Harrison township, P.O. Terre Haute, was born in Union county, Penn., in 1859, and is a son of Joseph and Maria KING, who were the parents of seven children. Our subject was reared on a farm, and has carried on agriculture, and raised and handled stock. He came to the West in 1882, and settled in Vigo county. Mr. KING was married in Union county, Penn., in 1880, to Polly E. HOLLENBACH, also a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1862, and they are the parents of five children, as follows: Isaac, Annie, Robert, Irving, and Johnnie. Mr. KING is a man of great industry, and by his own efforts and the assistance of his life companion he has prospered well. He has over one hundred cows-a fine herd of Jerseys, Herefords and Holsteins, some of which are registered. Mr. KING is a member of the F.M.B.A., and in politics he is a Democrat. He is a highly respected citizen.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Harrison Twp., p. 815

Submitted by Deb Murray


ANDREW LEWSADER, Nevins Township, P.O. Fontenet. [The family name was originally spelled LUZADER.] Andrew LEWSADER is a successful farmer of Nevins Township, and is the owner of 170 acres of valuable land which he has well improved and stocked. He is one of the few who never had the advantage of schooling, and who grew up in the wild country, but after he arrived at manhood's estate he was taught by his wife, and learned to read and write! He was born in Fountain County, Indiana October 9, 1835 and is the son of Andrew and Rebecca (DAVIS) LEWSADER, natives of Virginia and of French descent. The father worked at farming like many other pioneers, but hunting and trapping was the chief occupation of his life. His family consisted of twelve children, ten of whom grew to maturity, Andrew being the youngest. The father was twice married, and had two children by his last wife. Andrew spent his childhood and youth in Vermillion Co. Ind. and was "bound out" to a farmer who reared him, but attended more to teaching him how to work than to cultivating his mind. When he reached his majority he started in the world for himself by working as a farm hand at $10 per month. He hired to drive cattle for a drover and worked by the day and month where he could get the best wages. He was ambitious to be his own master, and saved his earnings until he was able to buy a team when he rented land, subsequently busying himself, and has met with success. Mr. LEWSADER was married in 1859 to Miss Mary, daughter of Martin FARIS and of English descent. This union has been blessed with seven children: Joseph F.; Sara, wife of James Crothers; Hester, wife of C. LATHONS; Nathan; Laura; Andrew and Thomas. Mrs. LEWSADER is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. LEWSADER affiliates with the Republican party.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Nevins Twp., pp. 828-29

Submitted by Wayne O. Cunningham


SAMUEL A. McPHEETERS, farmer and stock-grower, Honey Creek township, P. O. Terre Haute, was born in Orange county, Indiana, April 27, 1843, and is a son of Alexander and Nancy J. RIGNEY, natives of same county, of Scotch-Irish descent. The father who is still living at the age of seventy-eight years, has been a very hard-working farmer, and has succeeded in accumulating a handsome fortune, ranking among the large land owners of Vigo county. Samuel A. is the eldest now living in a family of thirteen children, six of whom lived to the age of maturity, but only five—two boys and three girls—are now living. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, receiving his education in the common schools of the neighborhood, and chose farming as a business. He works early and late, and attends to all the details of the affairs on the farm, having a great attachment for his home, and his success in life is largely due to his energy and determination and industry. He is the owner of 163 acres of valuable land, all well improved and stocked. Mr. McPHEETERS was married in 1875 to Miss McKINNEY, daughter of J. W. and Jane (WHITE) McKINNEY, natives of Orange county, Indiana, and of Scotch-Irish descent Mr. and Mrs. McPHEETERS are members of the Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Republican, and is a member of the P. of H.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Honey Creek Twp., pp. 846-47

Submitted by Ken Reed


SOLOMON NEUKOM, grocer, Terre Haute. Among the prominent citizens of Terre Haute is Solomon NEUKOM, who has been a resident of the place for many years. He was born in Switzerland February 8, 1829, and is the son of Ulrich NEUKOM, a cooper by trade, who died in Germany. Solomon was reared in that country, attending the common schools of his native place. He came to America, landing at New York City June 11, 1847, and having learned shoemaking, he became engaged in that trade. In 1849 he came West, locating for some time at Cincinnati, Ohio, and subsequently, in 1856, came to Terre Haute, where in 1864 he embarked in his present business, in which he has since continued. Mr. NEUKOM was married in Cincinnati June 2, 1853, to Miss Regina, daughter of Gerhart and Mary (ROEKLER) TORMOHLEN, and born in Hanover, Germany. This union has been blessed with eight children, five of whom are now living -- three sons and two daughters -- viz. Jennie, wife of Charles LAMMERS; Minnie, wife of Charles NEFF; Henry, a clerk; Albert, engaged in the drug business in Terre Haute; Adolph, cashier in the Buckeye Store in Terre Haute. The family are members of the German Methodist Episcopal Church, of which Mr. NEUKOM has been the class leader and trustee. Mrs. NEUKOM has been a teacher in the Sunday-school for many years. They gave their children the advantage of good education: One daughter graduated at the city high school; Minnie attended the Indiana State Normal, and was a teacher for eight years. This family is one of the few where all are doing well, and all seem to prosper; they are among the best citizens of Terre Haute, and have many friends.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Terre Haute, p. 881

Submitted by Paul Kasameyer


JOHN ALLEN PETERS, an old and prominent citizen of Pierson township, was born in Henry county, Kentucky, August 7, 1825, and is a son of Joseph and Frances M. (CHEATHAM) PETERS, former of whom was a son of John PETERS, a native of England, and a farmer. Joseph PETERS, who was a successful farmer, and in politics a Democrat, died in Boone county, Indiana, in August, 1870, when about seventy-two years of age; his widow would be eighty-six years of age in 1890. They were for many years members of the Baptist church, she for seventy years or longer. They had six sons and five daughters, John Allen being the third in order of birth, and four sons and two daughters are still living, viz.: James M., John Allen, Joseph T., Wesley C., Martha C. and Dolly Ann. John Allen PETERS spent his school days in Kentucky, and March 7, 1840, came with his parents to Boone county, Indiana, where he remained on his father’s farm until twenty-three years of age, when he located on the Miami Reserve; a year later he sold to good advantage, and went to Tipton county. After four years he sold and came to Vigo county, when Pierson township was sparsely settled, and the splendid farm of 240 acres which he now owns was timberland. By great industry and perseverance this has been cleared and improved. August 7, 1845, Mr. PETERS married Elizabeth, daughter of George JOHNS, and born in Harrison county, Indiana, in 1817, and died September 3, 1870; she had been a member of the New Light church many years. She was the mother of seven children, four of whom are living: George W., trustee of the township [See his sketch.]; Joseph T., Jr.; Sarah F., wife of George W. TAYLOR, and John S.; those dead are William H., William P. and Eliza A. In April, 1871, Mr. PETERS married Eliza, daughter of Joseph ORR, and born in Switzerland county, Indiana, November 20, 1828. Mr. and Mrs. PETERS and one son, Ira W., are members of the U.B. [United Brethren] church, of which he is a trustee. He is a member of the F.M.B.A., and is one of the influential leaders of the Democratic party in his township, always taking an active part in the councils of his party.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Pierson Twp., pp. 894-95

Submitted by Ken Reed


JOSEPH THOMAS PETERS, Pierson township, P.O. Pimento, Vigo county is one of the foremost in Indiana, and it owes its enviable position to the enterprise and industry of its inhabitants. One who has done much toward the upbuilding of the community in which he lives is the gentleman whose name opens this brief sketch. He is a son of Joseph and Frances M. (CHEATHAM) PETERS [See sketch of J.A. PETERS], and was born in Henry county, Ky., June 28, 1838. He spent his school days in Boone county, Ind., grew to maturity on his father's farm, and at the age of twenty began farming and dealing in stock on his own account. In 1866 he removed to Pierson township, this county, where he now owns one of the best improved farms in the township. June 3, 1858, Mr. PETERS was married to Miss Sarah A. LAYTON, a native of Howard county, Ind., daughter of Preston LAYTON, who was a native of Kentucky, and died in Kansas after living for a time in Howard county, Ind. To Mr. and Mrs. PETERS seven children have been born, as follows: Malisa, wife of J.L. WEEKS; John W., a farmer of Pierson township; Malinda, wife of D.V. WEEKS; Sarah E., wife of Henry W. PAYNE; Joseph P., at home; Clara E., wife of Ben PAYNE; and William T., at home. Mrs. PETERS is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. PETERS was elected assessor of Pierson township, in 1868, and gave good satisfaction in his official capacity. Like all the PETERS family he advocates and votes the straight Democratic ticket. As a citizen he is highly respected by all who know him.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Pierson Twp., p. 896

Data Entry by Kim Holly


MOSES PIERSON, of the firm of Pierson & Brother, dealers in lumber, lath and shingles, No. 212 South Nine-and-a-half street, Terre Haute, is a native of Vigo county, and was born in 1842. His father, Moses PIERSON, was born in Kentucky, and emigrated from his native State to Vigo county about 1825, where he entered land and commenced to improve it. In time he became one of Vigo county’s most extensive farmers. In early days he engaged in the New Orleans trade—loading many boats with Wabash products for New Orleans, and buying in return sugar, molasses, rice and foreign goods. He died in 1845 at New Orleans, while there on business. He left a valuable estate which he had accumulated by his own efforts. He was a pioneer and prominent citizen of this county, Pierson township being named in honor of him. His father, Isaac PIERSON, also a native of Kentucky, came to Vigo county several years subsequent to his son Moses. Moses PIERSON was married in this county to Miss Mary LISTON, who was born in Ohio, and died in Vigo county in 1888. She was the mother of five sons and seven daughters, of whom three of the former and four of the latter are living. Our subject, who is the eleventh child, was reared and educated in Vigo county. In his twentieth year he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-fifth Regiment, Ind. V.I., and went to the war, participating in all the battles of the Atlanta campaign, only receiving a slight wound. In March, 1863, he was captured at Spring Hill, Tennessee and taken to Libby prison, where he was confined thirty days. He was discharged from the army June 14, 1865, being then corporal, having been promoted. Soon after he was discharged he returned to Vigo county, where he remained until 1867, when he went to Owen county, Indiana, where he engaged in general merchandising until 1882, when he returned to Terre Haute, and in 1884 formed a partnership with his brother in their present business. The trade of this firm amounts to $75,000 annually. They are both enterprising and successful business men. The premises occupied for the business cover about three acres, and the firm sell both wholesale and retail.

Mr. PIERSON was married in Monroe county, Indiana in 1874, to Miss Laura McNUTT, a native of Tennessee, and they are blessed with three children: Mary, Charley and Frank. Mr. PIERSON is a member of the G.A.R. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. He cast his first presidential vote for SEYMOUR.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Terre Haute, p. 898

Submitted by Ken Reed


SAMUEL PIETY, P.O. Prairie Creek, a minister and evangelist of the Christian Church, resides on a nicely improved farm at Middletown, Prairie Creek township, the home of his birth, which occurred March 6, 1853. His parents, James D. and Laurinda (THOMAS) PIETY, were early settlers of this county. James D. PEITY was born in Hardin county, Kentucky, in 1796, and died in April, 1875, on the farm where Samuel now resides, and which the latter’s father purchased in 1826. He was a successful farmer and enterprising citizen, also a prominent member of the Christian church. His father, Thomas PIETY, who died in Knox county, Ind. was of English and Irish descent. Samuel’s mother, who was of Welsh descent, was born in Vigo county in 1814, where she died in 1877. She was Mr. PIETY’s second wife, by which marriage three sons and six daughters were born, of whom two sons and four daughters are living, Samuel being the eighth child. When a boy our subject attended the common schools, subsequently the State University at Champaign, Ill., and Butler University of Indiana. Mr. PIETY was married April 8, 1875, to Miss Mary R. De BAUN, a native of this county, born in 1857, and they are blessed with three children, viz.: Marcus D., Edith B. and John H. Mr. PIETY has been in the ministry since 1879, traveling in several different States as an evangelist. He is an active member of the Masonic fraternity. He was formerly a Republican, casting his first vote for R. B. HAYES, but is now a Prohibitionist. Mrs. PIETY is a member of the Christian Church.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Prairie Creek Twp., p. 899

Submitted by Ken Reed


HARVEY M. POUND, artist, Terre Haute, is a native of Spencer county, Kentucky, and was born November 28, 1831, a son of David and Massie (SPARKS) POUND, natives of Kentucky, former of whom was of English and German and latter of English and Irish descent. They moved to this county in the spring of 1836. The father, who was a merchant and farmer, was born in 1800, and died August 29, 1880. Mrs. POUND was born August 1, 1807, and died September 15, 1887. Rev. Samuel K. SPARKS, grandfather of our subject, organized the first Baptist Church in Terre Haute, and others in the county. Harvey M., who is the third in a family of eight children, received a common-school education in Terre Haute. In 1855 he went to California, where he followed mining, seven years, then returned to Terre Haute in the winter of 1862, and learned the photographer’s art. He next went to Vincennes, Indiana and opened rooms, remaining eighteen months, when he returned to Terre Haute, and conducted a similar business ten years. He then turned his attention to portrait painting and crayon work, also doing some photographing. Mr. POUND was married in Terre Haute, October 30, 1865, to Elizabeth, daughter of Moses and Rebecca (KESTER) CARR, natives of Kentucky, and early settlers of this county. Moses CARR was born July 11, 1796, and died in Clark county, Illinois, December 14, 1849; Mrs. CARR was born December 13, 1794, and died in same county, September 6, 1844. Mrs. POUND is the seventh in a family of eight children, and was born in this county January 25, 1835. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. POUND has been blessed with one daughter, Lenora. Mrs. POUND and her daughter are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. POUND is a member of the A.O.U.W.; in politics he is a Republican.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Terre Haute, p. 900

Submitted by Ken Reed


SYLVESTER J. ST. CLAIR, farmer and stock-grower, Honey Creek township, P.0. Youngstown. This gentleman may also he classed among the manufacturers of Vigo county. He was born within four miles of where he now resides, in Honey Creek township, July 25, 1840, and is a son of Nelson and Eliza J. (EVANS) ST. CLAIR, natives of Indiana, and of French and English extraction. His father, who had spent his life as a tiller of the soil, died in 1883. Our subject, who is his eldest child, attended the schools of Vigo county, and chose farming as a business. For a time, however, from 1883 to 1889, he carried on a brickyard and tile factory, and then embarked in other lines of manufacturing in the city of Terre Haute. He became a member of the stock company known as the “Terre Haute Pottery Novelty Works,” with J.B. RHODS, of Ohio, Mr. ST. CLAIR being the general manager of the business. He is the owner of the farm where he now resides, comprising 202 acres of highly improved land. Mr. ST. CLAIR was married in 1861 to Miss Nancy E., daughter of John M. and Margaret McCOSKEY, and of Irish descent. They have one child living, Lucian E., who superintends the farm. Mrs. ST. CLAIR died in 1889. The family are members of the Baptist church; in politics he is a Republican. He enlisted, in 1864, in the One Hundred and Thirty-third Ind. V. I., Company H, and served until the close of the war. He is a member of G.A.R. Post, No. 158. Nelson ST. CLAIR was the second son of Eli ST. CLAIR, who is now among the oldest men living in this part of Indiana. He was born in Maryland in 1793, of German descent, and has been a farmer, coming to Sullivan county, where he settled in 1818. He reared a family of six sons and six daughters, all of whom married and have prospered. He is a Republican in politics, formerly a Whig.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Honey Creek Twp., p. 916

Submitted by Ken Reed


GEORGE W. STOUT, farmer and stock-grower, Linton town ship, P. 0. Pimento, was born in Spencer county, Kentucky, January 1, 1829, and is a son of Robert and Martha (VAN DYKE) STOUT, former, of whom was a carpenter by trade, and also followed farming. They were natives of Kentucky, and had a family of six children, of whom George W., is the third. Our subject’s paternal grandparents were Peter and ___________ (SHERWOOD) STOUT, and his maternal grandparents were Peter and Anna (STOUT) VAN DYKE, natives of Virginia. George W. STOUT was married, October 9, 1850, to Nancy R., daughter of Reuben H. and Elizabeth (KESTER) BEAUCHAMP, who reared a family of nine children, Nancy R. being the fifth. Mrs. STOUT’s parents were natives of Kentucky, where they were married, and whence they moved to Indiana. They were both members of the Baptist Church. Her paternal grandparents were both named BEAUCHAMP, Isaac and Hetty, and her maternal grandparents were John and Sarah (POUND) KESTER, the one a native of Virginia, the other of Tennessee; they moved to Kentucky, and raised a family of nine children. Mr. and Mrs. STOUT had born to them nine children, viz.: Theadore V., William P. (deceased), Martha E. (deceased), Marietta K. (deceased), James R. (deceased), Claudie D., Reuben C., John H. and George L. The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of Kentucky, and chose farming as a business. He moved to Linton township, this county, in 1849, and bought the farm on which he now resides. He has made a success of farming and owns 230 acres of land in a good state of cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. STOUT are members of the Baptist church, in the affairs of which he takes an active interest, being deacon at the present time. He has served four years as justice of the peace, and two years as assessor by appointment. In politics he is a Democrat.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Linton Twp., pp.946-47

Submitted by Ken Reed


J.W. STOUT, chief of police, Terre Haute, was born in Spencer county, Kentucky, December 3, 1852, and is a son of James and Arsula (TAYLOR) STOUT, natives of Kentucky and of English descent. They came to Indiana in 1855, and settled in Sullivan county, on a farm near the Vigo county line. J.W. STOUT, who is the second in a family of six children, remained with his parents on the farm, and attended the district schools until he was nineteen years old, when he came to Terre Haute, where he was engaged for a short time as hotel clerk. He then removed to a farm in Prairieton township, and followed agriculture three years; then returned to Terre Haute, and kept hotel until 1880, when he embarked in mercantile trade, which he continued four years. In 1884 he engaged in the livery business; which he has since carried on. Mr. STOUT was married in Clay county, Indiana, October 27, 1874, to Miss Emma, daughter of Christopher TRINKLE, and a native of Clay county. In politics Mr. STOUT is a Democrat, and was appointed superintendent of the police of Terre Haute, May 10, 1888. He has thirty-seven men under him, and is well qualified for the position he holds.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Terre Haute, p. 947

Submitted by Ken Reed


JAMES MORRISON WATSON, P.O. Prairie Creek, is a native of Nelson county, KY., born December 3, 1827 and is a son of Scarlet and Kiziah (WALKER) WATSON, former of whom was born near Fairfax Court House, VA., in 1801, and emigrated with his parents to Kentucky in an early day. His parents were John M. and Permelia (FISHER) WATSON, natives of Virginia, former of Irish descent, a farmer by occupation. They emigrated from Kentucky to Sullivan county, Ind., in 1828, subsequently moving to Vigo county where they died. Scarlet WATSON was reared and married in Kentucky, coming to Sullivan county with his family and parents in 1828, afterward moving to this county. He was an influential citizen, having served as township trustee several years, and as assessor, two terms. he died in Vigo county, February 9, 1876. His wife, Kiziah (WALKER) was born in Kentucky, July 21, 1805 and died January 4, 1885, in this county. She reared five daughters and four sons - of whom three sons and one daughter are living - James M. being the second child. Our subject has resided in Vigo county since eight years of age, his limited education being received in the subscription schools, he having to walk three miles through dense forests, then inhabited by wolves, panthers and other wild animals. He resided with this parents till March 23, 1848, when he married Miss Sarah Ann DRAKE, a native of Illinois, who died December 7, same year. October 31, 1850, Mr. WATSON married Mary E. KINSOR, who was born in Sullivan county, Ind., and died June 10,1880. Three children survive her, viz: Edmund, Ansel W. and James W. Mr. Watson is now living with his third wife, who was Miss Dosie E. THOMPSON. When our subject began life for himself he had forty acres of unimproved timberland, and by hard work and close attention to business he has accumulated considerable property, having 186 acres of good land, 98 in the farm where he resides, with 78 in cultivation. The property is located fifteen miles southwest of the county seat. Mr. WATSON cast his first presidential vote for Franklin PIERCE. He is an enterprising and highly respected citizen.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Prairie Creek Twp., p. 989

Submitted by Jamie Krebs


ALBERT D. WEEKS, sheriff of Vigo county, was born in Linton township, this county, May 8, 1855, and is a son of Joseph F. and Lucinda (POUND) WEEKS, former a native of Kentucky, and latter of Vigo county. Her parents were among the earliest settlers, and were here when the Indians still lingered in the brush, and painted their cheeks with the Wabash mud. Mr. WEEKS’ grandmother was a daughter of Joseph LISTON, and has often told some of the thrilling experiences she had with the Indians. Among other things she related that her husband had dug a deep hole under the floor large enough for her and the five children to get into when they heard the Indians coming. She would raise a plank in the floor, and after all the children got in she would follow, and the frightened chicks would crouch quiet as the grave, while the Indians would enter the cabin and take what they wanted and go away. She also related that when the corn was tall enough they would escape to the corn field. On one occasion one of the little boys was forgotten and left in the house; the mother realized the awful fact, and when she crept back in the forlorn hope of saving the child’s life, and got where she could see, to her horror she beheld the boy laughing and chattering, and turning the grindstone for an Indian to grind his tomahawk. She looked on in mute horror, but the Indian finally left and did the boy no harm.

The parents of Mr. WEEKS were of English descent, the father being a farmer. He died in Linton township, this county, in January, 1867. His family consisted of eleven children, six of whom are living, Mr. WEEKS being the eldest of those now living. He was reared on a farm, attending the public schools. He followed farming, and was thus employed until he was appointed deputy sheriff, in 1882. He was nominated and elected sheriff on the Democratic ticket, in 1886. In 1890 there was a “strike” among the employees of the Mackey Railroad System, which was a critical period in the official life of the sheriff. He was the chief peace officer in the county, and the railroad authorities would have used him, if possible, to promote their aims, which of course he would not consent to, as they were unjust to the men. It is a high compliment to his good sense to say that he so managed the most delicate matter to the entire approbation of the community, and especially to that of the railroad employees. He knew his official duty, and performed it to the perfect satisfaction of all good men. At the time there were those who criticized his actions, but now there are none but speak of his entire career with the fullest approbation. Mr. WEEKS is one of the successful men of the county, and is the owner of a farm of 120 acres, in Linton township. He was married, in Vigo county, to Miss Maria, daughter of George and Ellen (St. CLAIR) ALBIN, and of English descent; she is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. and Mrs. WEEKS are members of the K. & L. of H.; he is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Linton Twp., pp. 993-94

Submitted by Ken Reed


LOUIS L. WEEKS, farmer and stock-grower, Linton township P. O. Pimento, was born in Spencer county, Kentucky, November 14, 1820 and is a son of William L. and Nancy (KESTER) WEEKS, former a native of Virginia, of English descent, latter of Kentucky, of English and German descent. They came to this county about 1838, where he was a farmer. His death occurred August 21, 1875, and his wife’s in October, 1845. They had a family of five sons and four daughters, of whom Louis L. is the eldest. Our subject was married April 9, 1845, to Sarah Ann, daughter of David and Ruth (ARMSTRONG) KELLEY, natives of Kentucky, former of Irish and latter of Irish and German descent. They were pioneer settlers of this county, and had a family of seven children, of whom Sarah Ann is the fourth. Her father died in Prairie Creek township, Vigo county, in October, 1859, and her mother, March 18, 1847. Mr. and Mrs. WEEKS had born to them eleven children, viz.: Nancy D., deceased; John K., who married Sarah F. KESTER; David, who married Martha WATSON; Chancy, married to Mary HICKMAN; Julia B., who married Alex. BEARD; Louis H., married to Mary E. SINER; Carrie, deceased; Ruth, deceased; Ida, Daniel V. and Eura. Mr. WEEKS is a prominent farmer of Linton township, and owns a farm of 400 acres, in a good state of cultivation. He taught a subscription school two terms. He is a member of the Baptist Church, of which he is clerk at the present time. Politically he is a Democrat, and served two terms as county commissioner, and one term as township trustee.

HISTORY OF VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA: With Biographical Selections
H.C. Bradsby - 1891
Linton Twp., p. 994

Submitted by Ken Reed


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