WAINFLEET WATER and SEWER

WAINFLEET WATER and SEWER
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          WE STILL HAVE SIGNS AVAILABLE TO SHOW
YOUR SUPPORT ALONG LAKESHORE .

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(New) WELLAND TRIBUNE      WHAT READERS SAY      OCTOBER 23 , 2007

  WHAT THE HECK IS GOING ON IN WAINFLEET?  

  

First we have the water/sewer issue, then the Quarry issue and now the Northeast Secondary Plan that is on the docket.

All really bad things that spell disaster for Wainfleet.

The residents in this lovely historic and agricultural community need to start paying better attention to what is going on in this community.

If we don't it will disappear never to return.

As one lady put it the other night at the public meeting about the above mentioned secondary plan, take a look at Binbrook, once a small community such as ours and in one generation it has become what those of us out here would never wish to see, a community with thousands of houses.

Outside residential developers, putting pressure on Wainfleet to build tracts of homes out here, need to be given the bum's rush and told to take their plans somewhere where they are more welcome.

Intensified building in any rural area makes no sense, unless of course the ultimate goal is to get a small community to be a big community where infrastructure can be slapped in the ground and those dollars for the use of pipe and treatment plants can flow into the even bigger machine, the Region.

All of us in the Niagara Region have got to start waking up to the fact that the Region is on a roll and development is the name of the game. Whether the councilors want to believe it or not, that is what is happening.

All of the smaller communities that make up the Region are fair game especially if you are south of St. Catharines, which only has two years of growth left to it.

There is a "one voice" mentality at the Regional level but I think we as residents of this Region who don't want to see any more unnecessary development happening need to stand up and say with "one voice" no way.

Enough is enough.

Just because there is land available to build on do we really need to do that?

If we aren't careful the lovely open fields that we see with a crop of some sort and the bush land that is abundant at the moment is going to go the route of the DoDo bird, gone never to be seen again, just so that we can satisfy the voracious appetite of the developers out there waiting to pounce on an area that is now a prime target for just such actions.

I believe that the community meeting I held last Saturday was a success in that we have galvanized those that turned out to understand what is at stake here in this community and the response to the formation of an incorporated rate payers association was welcomed and embraced. Anyone living in the township of Wainfleet is welcome to join our association. There is a fee attached. Help us to be heard as a unified voice both at local and regional council when necessary.

We will be having another tailgate rally on Nov. 6, outside of the township offices between 5 and 7 p.m., just before the council meeting. Come out and get informed about the issues, have a hotdog, meet your fellow 'Fleeters and make some magic happen.

I can be contacted at my home number 905-834-1143, my e-mail address is bkonc@lastmilenet.ca.

Betty Konc

Wainfleet

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      MAGGIE RIOPELLE     OCT 24TH 2007

  WAINFLEET HAS TO CLEAN UP ITS ACT;  
            

It's time for Wainfleet to clean up its garbage by removing more organic and recyclable material from garbage bags.

Barry Friesen, Niagara Region's director of waste management services, met with the Township of Wainfleet last night to talk about the region's goal of 65 per cent diversion of waste by 2012.

In order to meet the target it means getting down and dirty and considering the option of going to garbage collection every second week and/or limiting the number of garbage bags at the curb and expanding the green bin (organic) program to Wainfleet.

So what's in the garbage bags? Friesen said Wainfleet has 38 per cent organic material, 19 per cent recyclables, and 43 per cent waste. Originally Wainfleet opted out of a green bin program because there was a belief that many in the rural community had backyard composting or animals that could take care of organic material.

"There is still a large number of organic," said Friesen. "Organic create landfill gas and leachate ... both are bad for the environment."

The estimated cost of participation in the organic program in Wainfleet, said Friesen, would cost $10.50 per household per year.

In two years the Station Road landfill site, used by Wainfleet residents, will be closed. A number of landfills are expected to close in the near future throughout the region, said Friesen, and the recommendation is to have four container stations set up as landfills close. There is also a recommendation to create two additional household hazardous waste sites, as well as to create more reuse centres.

"Moving to collection every other week provides an incentive to remove organic material," he said, as organic material is most often the cause of odours from garbage bags.

Ald. Evan Main questioned whether diapers would be allowed in the organic collection, however, Friesen said diapers wouldn't be accepted in organic. Pet waste and kitty litter, however, would be accepted. "So you want me to hold onto the diapers for two weeks?" questioned Main.

"I've lived with every other week collection for six years, it works very well," said Friesen.

As for the new compost facility for the region, Friesen said he expects to make a recommendation to the region in November.

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      MAGGIE RIOPELLE      OCTOBER 24 , 2007

 RESIDENTS IN WAINFLEET ARE CONCERNED THE COMMUNITY
WON'T RETAIN ITS HISTORIC AGRICULTURAL CULTURE IF THE TOWNSHIP
APPROVES ITS SECONDARY PLAN.  
  

The Township of Wainfleet held a public session last night on the draft Northeast Community Secondary Plan, which provided the community an opportunity to ask questions, provide input and voice concerns.

Residents in the gallery were fired up about the plans, applauding as residents one-after-one talked about their opposition to the plan for the Lambert Road area.

"Just because we can, doesn't mean we should," said Betty Konc. "If we have development it should be at the village ... where there's infrastructure. Most of the people are saying we don't want this."

Proposed land designations in the area allow for 375 hectares of estate residential, 637.2 hectares of agriculture, 29.2 hectares of open space, as well as space for environmental protection and environmental conservation.

Alderman Ted Hessels said council should stop looking into a secondary plan for the northeast end, which borders Welland and Port Colborne. He said maybe council should consider keeping development in the village.

"I'm wondering if (the northeast) is the area where we should be doing this," said Hessels. "I'm opposed to doing anymore secondary planning in the area."

What people didn't realize, said Richard Dykstra, a farmer who was also on the citizens committee for the secondary plan, is that as it stands people can already develop on much of the land in question. In fact, 75 per cent of the northeast end of town can be developed under its current designation. In the secondary plan, Dykstra said there is less property for residential developments.

"I was shocked how much of that land could be developed tomorrow," said Dykstra, who asked council if it would be possible to freeze development in the area, as council had done while creating the plan, to provide more time to work through the secondary plan.

Steven Rivers, interim planner, said the province wouldn't allow another bylaw that freezes development for another three years.

When one resident asked if council was listening to the people, Ald. Ron Kramer said, "It depends on the percentage here. I'm hearing from a small number in the council chambers."

His comment got boos from the public, who needed to be settled down by Mayor Barbara Henderson.

"We are here tonight as council to listen to people," said Henderson. "We worked together with the public. Certainly the planner will put together a report once we have all your thoughts." One resident did issue petitions throughout the community, which were handed into the town. The petition has not yet been seen by council.

The next step is for the interim planner to put together a report and make recommendations to council.

Council will then have a number of options of how council can proceed, said Rivers, such as "scrap it," adopt the plan in principle, modify and adopt it in principle or adopt it as an official plan amendment. The report is expected to council back to council in one month.

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      MAGGIE RIOPELLE      OCTOBER 23 , 2007
 FEELING THE PRESSURE; WAINFLEET CREATING A GUIDE FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS  
  

Tonight people will have an opportunity to hear about the township's secondary plan for the northeast end of town, which until now has been a patchwork of various developments.

Now a guide for future developments has been created.

At the Wainfleet council meeting, the draft Northeast Community Secondary Plan will be presented and the public will be provided an opportunity to provide input or comment on any concerns.

"There is some property that can and probably should be kept for agricultural purposes," said Steven Rivers, interim manager of planning.

"As with any development there are people with concerns."

Rivers said this whole matter came about because the township was feeling some pressure from residential developers wanting a prime piece of Wainfleet property on which to build.

The northeast of town, which borders Welland and Port Colborne, he said, does have agricultural properties but there is also a section considered to be not ideal for agriculture that could be used for residential developments.

This secondary plan, he said, is meant to be a guide for future development as it identifies land use types and addresses specific local needs such as traffic calming, parkland improvements and core area revitalization.

One project, which has been going through the process outside of the secondary plan, is a subdivision for the northeast.

Rivers said he is recommending go ahead, is a subdivision for the northeast.

"The subdivision sort of triggered the perception that the town needed to do more planning for future development," said Rivers.

As with any development, he said, neighbouring residents may have concerns with respect to water, drainage and quality of life on their property.

People may have concerns with either the subdivision project or the draft secondary plan and tonight is an opportunity to raise concerns.

The northeast neighbourhood plan was developed with the assistance of a group of community residents and business owners who, along with township staff formed the community steering committee, the report states. Six residents met with staff throughout the process. "My understanding is that the secondary plan is a result of deliberations of that committee," said Rivers.

The secondary plan not only includes land use plans, it also contains a section on policies for growth and development to ensure "manageable growth" in the area, the report states.

The policies are intended to assist with "decision-making processes for the potential funding of community improvement projects on public and private property," states the draft plan.

After the public has had an opportunity to speak to the plan, Rivers said a report and recommendations will come back to council in about a month.

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      EDITORIAL      OCTOBER 24 , 2007

 URBAN SPRAWL IS NOT THE ANSWER  

  

On Saturday, Oct. 20 over 100 citizens of Wainfleet attended a meeting on the Big Pipe issue at a local church on Hwy 3. Canadians that we are, protest is not high on our list of preferred pastimes, so attracting that many people to a morning meeting is quite the achievement. The people are restless in Wainfleet over a proposed water and sewer line at a cost of over $30,000 per household.

One asks why the local council supports such an effort after having campaigned against it in the last municipal election.

Now we need to keep in mind the system would tie into Port Colborne's already over burdened system. Hmmm ... in need of some repairs no doubt.

But wait, it gets better. Some of the levies will land on all ratepayers in the region because it's the region pushing for it as well. And why should Welland or Niagara Falls pay for a sewer/water system on the Wainfleet lakeshore ... perhaps the region can answer that, or not.

I believe it all comes down to future property values ... not the current homes, but ag land looking to be rezoned residential. And the big pipe is the key to development on the lakeshore.

When are we going to wake up to the fact that sprawl in any form no longer works (as if if it ever did) and take on a better vision of urban planning that does not involve pavement politics?

Mark Grenier

Welland

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      EDITORIAL      OCTOBER 24 , 2007
 FIGHTING THE BIG PIPE;
WAINFLEET WATER AND SEWER COMMITTEE CHAIR BETTY KONC
SAYS GROUP LOOKING TO INCORPORATE  

RESIDENTS ALONG THE LAKESHORE ARE GOING TO CONTINUE TO FIGHT
THE BIG PIPE SOLUTION.
 
  

Wainfleet Water and Sewer Committee chair Betty Konc hosted a meeting on Saturday with residents in hopes of finding out if there was still will in the community to fight Niagara Region and Wainfleet council's plans to go ahead with extending municipal water and wastewater services into the lakeshore area.

Citizens, said Konc, are not willing to give up on the issue. In fact they have decided on a direction.

"I called the lakeshore community together and sent some flyers out to get more people out," said Konc. "After the report that came out two weeks ago and was presented to the region and local councilors, I thought it might be good to get direction from the community."

People want to continue to fight the plans, she said, and so the committee is reorganizing and will incorporate.

"Once we are incorporated, it will give us a chance to follow a path we couldn't follow before," said Konc, who wouldn't elaborate further on what path the group intends on taking.

When asked if she and the committee were intending on pursuing any legal avenues, Konc paused and said, "I can't say."

She did, however, tell The Tribune that the plan is to become a ratepayers association.

The reorganized committee, she said, has divided the lakeshore area into six sections, each with a captain and co-captain.

"Each area is going to get a committee formed to help with the workload and help to disseminate information," she said.

"We'll have to do some fundraising. The six groups will come up with fundraising ideas and follow those through."

Konc said the group has already set a target to raise $25,000 "to get us started but we will need much more."

At the meeting on Saturday, Konc said Welland riding MPP Peter Kormos attended and donated $500 to the committee to help them continue with their efforts.

In order to get people interested in becoming a member of the ratepayers association, the group is having a tailgate potluck party outside of Wainfleet town hall on Tuesday at 5:30 p.m., prior to the council meeting. "I firmly expect to see police there," she said.

There is a secondary planning issue and people from the north end, she said, will be at the council meeting opposing a planned development.

It will give them an opportunity to get more people on board, she said.

"Being a ratepayers association will give us more clout when we present in front of organizations like the region," said Konc.

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      MAGGIE RIOPELLE      OCTOBER 23 , 2007

  DEBATE BACK ON;
WAINFLEET RESIDENTS WILL HEAR FROM CANDIDATES RUNNING IN WELLAND RIDING NEXT WEEK  

  

The people of Wainfleet "have spoken loud and clear," said Port Colborne-Wainfleet Chamber of Commerce president Alfred Kiers.

And they'll get their political debate after all.

After meeting with candidates and their campaign managers prior to a political debate in Port Colborne Monday, organizers decided to cancel the Wainfleet debate due to the busy schedules of candidates. The decision, however, left Wainfleet residents out of the loop - many didn't attend the Port Colborne debate since they were under the impression the debate in Wainfleet would still be occurring.

When they learned their debate, originally scheduled for Oct. 2 at 7 p.m., was cancelled, Kiers said they "got up and got their troops together and rallied them. They challenged all the candidates who conceded and said, 'You know what, we owe them a visit.'"

Kiers said residents who have been fighting the proposed water/sewer line along the community's lakeshore were particularly concerned about the canceled debate.

"They said they would really, really appreciate the candidates coming down to Wainfleet," Kiers said.

He told the residents that "if all the parties were in agreement, we would definitely go ahead with it."

Kiers said he contacted the township to see if the Wainfleet Fire Hall was still available. It was, and the Wainfleet debate will continue as originally scheduled - Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7 p.m. at the Wainfleet Fire Hall.

"It worked out really, really well," Kiers said.

MPP Peter Kormos was looking forward to hearing from the people of Wainfleet.

"It looks like Wainfleet's debate is back on the tracks," Kormos told The Tribune.

In a news release issued earlier Wednesday, Kormos said "obviously there is a strong interest in all parts of the new riding for residents to hear from candidates."

He said he instructed his campaign manager Mike Grimaldi to accept all future debate invitations.

Green party candidate Mark Grenier was happy to learn the debate was back on.

He said he'd discussed the water/sewer issue with community members, "and from what I can gather it seems to me that one level of government is trying to impose their will on a citizenry that doesn't want it."

And philosophically, he said he's definitely in favour of the citizens of Wainfleet determining their own destiny.

Progressive Conservative candidate Ron Bodner said he understood the decision by campaign managers to cancel the debate considering the schedules they all face, but he was happy it was back on.

"It's not that we don't want to do it; it's just the time frame," he said.

Liberal candidate John Mastroianni said he was "disappointed" in the way things unfolded, initially.

Now he'll have to rework his schedule to accommodate the debate.

"I guess it comes down to this - who do I disappoint?" he said.

He said candidates have 12 to 13 debates leading up to the Oct. 10 election.

Kormos was also concerned that Grenier was left out of the meeting held to discuss cancelling the Wainfleet debate, and not informed about the decision until it was publicly announced.

As a result, he said he's asked his campaign manager to "insure that any discussions about debates or any other all-candidate events include representatives of all registered candidates in Welland Riding."

Grenier said he tipped his hat to Kormos for the support regarding the debate.

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      MAGGIE RIOPELLE      OCTOBER 23 , 2007

 DEBATE CANCELLED  
  

A busy campaign schedule with numerous debates has caused candidate campaign managers to cancel Wainfleet's Oct. 2 debate - without discussion with the Green party.

"We were bumped around," said Alfred Kiers, president of the Port Colborne-Wainfleet Chamber of Commerce. "I don't know their logic or reasoning. We've exhausted our end of it. We set it up three times and if we were to set up on anther date I don't think they would come."

The first Wainfleet debate was set for tomorrow, but conflicted with a Cogeco debate. The date was then changed to Oct. 1, but conflicted with the St. Catharines-Thorold Chamber of Commerce debate. The date was then set to Oct. 2 and all four candidates received notices.

During Monday night's debate in Port Colborne, three campaign managers held a meeting and determined which debates to cancel due to busy schedules.

"We all agreed that because of the number of all-candidates meetings it (the Wainfleet debate) was virtually impossible to accommodate it. There would have been two meetings (Oct. 2)," said Fred Davies, of John Mastroianni's campaign team.

"It was unanimously agreed upon," said Ron Bodner's campaign manager Amy Ball, noting two additional debates may also be cancelled.

Green party candidate Mark Grenier said he was not informed of the meeting held between campaign managers, nor included in the decision to cancel the debate.

He said he heard of the cancellation when it was announced to members of the public at the end of Monday night's debate in Port Colborne.

"I can't see how less information helps voters make informed choices," Grenier said. "There are four candidates and four parties. How can they make decisions without me?"

Grenier said the three other candidates are telling Wainfleet residents "they're not important."

He added he was looking forward to the Wainfleet debate. "It's pure power politics at its worse."

Mike Grimaldi, Peter Kormos' campaign manager, said they would rather have fewer debates with better turnouts and better media coverage. He said Monday night's low turnout of 28 residents was also a concern.

Managers said the St. Catharines-Thorold chamber and the Welland-Pelham chamber each hosted one debate and the same should have been done with the Port Colborne-Wainfleet chamber.

"We're not insulting the chamber, it's a 30-day campaign with 15 debates," Ball said. "They are overloaded with Thanksgiving at the end (of the campaign). It's election logistics."

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      LETTERS      OCTOBER 23 , 2007
 WRITER CALLS FOR LAKEWOOD REVERSAL  
  

  

Mayor Barbara Henderson, along with councillors and township planner Steve Rivers, dishonoured every Wainfleet taxpayer who rightfully treasures our blessed rural heritage.

At the Sept. 11 meeting in the township hall, one resident drew it to the mayor's attention that her neighbours had not been notified of the important meeting that included a vote on the development of the former Easter Seals Lakewood Camp. We were shocked.

The mayor replied with a list of reasons why she was not responsible for that. She should have made certain. She ended with: you made it here, so could have your neighbours.

She refused to defer the voting. Alderman Evan Main seemed in favour of deferring but was defeated on his suggestion.

It seemed to a lot of people council's intent was to ram it through with a sparse electorate present, and they don't seem to be aware of the anger and depression their actions have spread.

Andrew Watts' letter headlined Rural Wainfleet passing in The Tribune, Sept. 14, deserves reading. He tells us to "demand elected township councillors reverse their decision through letters and e-mails and copy and send to local newspapers."

He assures "our township council can still refuse building permission and return it to a sane planning policy that would ensure rural-style development."

There are still a few days left to go into Wainfleet township offices and get an Ontario Municipal Board appeal package. It is your right.

I am so disappointed with the lack of respect given to the taxpayers by our mayor and councillors.

We trusted you with our votes. You are supposed to represent us, not ignore us.

Taxpayers' wants and needs have not been considered in this instance.

Please start writing and believe there is still time and we can do it.

My husband Doug and I hereby call on the elected township councillors reverse their decision on Lakewood.

Faye Suthons

Wainfleet

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WELLAND TRIBUNE      MAGGIE RIOPELLE      OCTOBER 23 , 2007

 WAINFLEETERS MUST FIGHT URBANIZATION  
  

  

On behalf of the Wainfleet residents who oppose the urbanization of Wainfleet I am asking for support as well as a show of hands, so to speak, of how many of you are out there believing, as I do, that Wainfleet should remain rural country and not turned into another Binbrook.

The recent unanimous approval of the Lakewood Beach development on the former Lakewood Camp property shows our mayor and town council have what appears to be an agenda to urbanize Wainfleet.

How else could you justify allowing Phase One of 35 condominium homes to be built in a hazard zone (despite the rezoning, it is a hazard zone due to lake storms, wind) with another 21 homes to be built in Phase Two on 50 acres of property. This is not to mention phases yet to be announced.

This type of development is wrong for Wainfleet and for the Lakeshore area as there are many factors not supporting this type of urbanization. Among them are items like the fact the area is under a Boil Water Advisory, the development is to take place on a hazard zone and the communal septic system not approved for any other area on the lakeshore where many houses were built in close proximity.

There are others.

These are only a few of the issues surrounding the approval of this type of development. Another important point - once the flood gates are opened for this type of urban development there will be no stopping it.

If you have open space near your home, it is threatened too. Did you move to Wainfleet to have it become a city? Do you want Toronto in your backyard?

If not let me and others know. I have opened an e-mail account for those who are as upset about this as I am and want to fight back. Who want to have Wainfleet remain Green in the true sense of the word. Not in the way our Mayor, Barb Henderson sees it - in increased tax base.

We recently held our annual Marshville Heritage Festival to celebrate our Wainfleet Heritage. Our mayor and town council is destroying our rural heritage.

Let's take Wainfleet back! E-mail ruralwainfleet@yahoo.com, let your voice be heard and contact your town council, mayor and the local newspapers.

We need to pull together in true rural fashion and fight as a united front. Or regret it for generations to come.

Lee Bott

Wainfleet

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NIAGARA THIS WEEK     By Michael Speck      Oct 12, 2007
 COUNCIL USHERS NEXT PHASE OF BIG PIPE  
  

  

WAINFLEET -- With a unanimous vote, township council ushered in the next phase of the Big Pipe project at Tuesday's meeting.

The vote followed a lengthy and detailed presentation by Leo Gohier, former director of wastewater management for the region who is being kept on the project for continuity purposes. Gohier's presentation was a verbal account of the region's final report on lakeshore contamination, which states that faulty septic systems have lead to contaminated ground and drinking water. The report recommends the best solution is to extend municipal services from Port Colborne.

"The project is at a crossroads and it's time to move on," said Gohier. "We've studied technical alternatives, both onsite and central, for five years, but we have to move forward. We cannot stand still."

The report's recommendation was than passed on to council to be voted on in principle. Now that council has voted in favour, $1.5 million in studies will soon begin.

Over the next 12 to 15 months, regional staff will do five studies as instructed by the Ministry of the Environment with regards to the project. A cost evaluation and sharing plan, a social impact assessment, a natural resource assessment, an archeological assessment and additional public consultation will be done before the final vote goes before Wainfleet and regional council in the spring of 2009.

Following final approval, Gohier said construction on the project could be done in two years. The estimated cost is $72 million.

During questioning, Alderman Ted Hessels said he wanted to know the cost other municipalities had to pay for municipal services, adding that he had been doing research on the phone earlier.

"It seems what they're expecting Wainfleet to pay is significantly higher than what other municipalities are expected to pay," he said.

Gohier said the cost of water and wastewater services varies from town to town, and it would be an "oversimplification to say the cost is 'x.'"

Alderman Ron Kramer expressed disappointment in the region's report prior to the vote, stating that it took to long to get to this point and questioning the numbers the region used for the report, saying seasonal residents don't come close to bringing the township's population to 10,000 people.

"I believe a majority of the affected residents do not want the big pipe," he said.

Alderman Rudy Warkentin did not attend council because of a cross-border funeral, but did have a letter of regret read by Wainfleet Mayor Barbara Henderson stating that he was in favour of the recommendation.

By Michael Speck

Wainfleet

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NIAGARA THIS WEEK      STAFF      Oct 05, 2007

  WATER ISSUE TAKES FRONT SEAT AT DEBATE
CANDIDATES WEIGH IN ON CONTROVERSIAL PROPOSED WATER-SEWER LINE  
  

  

WAINFLEET -- The Green Party candidate wouldn't even answer the question regarding the proposed water-sewer line along the lakeshore at the Wainfleet candidates debate.

"The way the question is worded proposes that you want the development in the first place," said Mark Grenier while members of the township's water-sewer committee agreed from the crowd.

At the Port Colborne debate, Grenier admitted to not having enough knowledge on the issue. But after talks with residents, he said he was very impressed with the citizen action regarding the "big pipe," calling it an "exercise in real democracy."

The original question asked if the candidates thought provincial funding was necessary to take some of the financial burden off of affected homeowners and if they had researched any funding that might be available.

NDP candidate Peter Kormos said additional funding was definitely necessary and one fund he thought would be appropriate was the Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund.

"We have a special responsibility to rural communities with small tax bases," said Kormos.

Liberal candidate John Mastroianni said that the burden has been wrongfully placed on the township and its residents, as well as the regional government. He said it is a national problem, because the affected body of water, Lake Erie, is a shared between Canada and the United States, and pledged to get Ottawa involved if elected.

"It's unfair that this is placed on the backs of a few when so many enjoy the lake," he said.

Conservative candidate Ron Bodner said he has been approached by many lakeshore homeowners who have expressed fears of losing their homes if they have to pay the connection costs for the municipal services, which could run as high as $30,000.

"It's unacceptable," said Bodner. "It can't be in Ontario, it can't be in the Welland riding and it can't be in Wainfleet."

He said every level of government has to "step up" and help fund whatever solution that is approved by the township.

On faith-based school funding, another hot topic in the election, Grenier managed to get a few laughs out of the crowd.

"I'd like to find a pair of Canadian-made flip-flops to get Ron (Bodner) and John (Tory) a pair for the issue," said Grenier.

While all candidates except Bodner said they were against extending provincial funding to faith-based schools, the Conservative candidate said now that a free vote is the new policy, he will hold public meetings with constituents on how he should vote.

"Mr. McGuinty tried to make this the main thing in the election," said Bodner. "(He) tried to make it that because he wanted to hide behind it."

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WELLAND TRIBUNE ;      LETTERS ;      OCT 12, 2007
 WATER REPORT IS NOTHING NEW 
THE WAINFLEET REPORT IS OUT - ENJOY!   

It contains absolutely nothing new and perpetuates the wholly inappropriate plans and schemes of a bunch of people unable to accept not only that they may be wrong, but that all the evidence now available proves beyond doubt couldn't be more totally wrong!

The article at the following website, http://www.earth-policy.org/Books/Seg/PB2ch11_ss5.htm, will take you only three minutes to read. I urge every one of you to find that three minutes in your busy schedules!

And please don't dismiss it as not applicable to Canada. The same people who are demanding anywhere from $72 million and rising to force big pipe on a community that doesn't want it don't have any problem in demanding a further $180 million a year for the next 10 years just to prevent the current archaic and outdated water/wastewater systems from collapsing! They don't even have plans to improve them, merely to try to sustain the unsustainable.

Those who elected you hoped for some sensible and rationale leadership. So far it seems sadly lacking as we are finding to our cost in Wainfleet.

Andrew Watts

Wainfleet

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TRIBUNE     Letters     Posted By DEREK SWARTZ     OCT.10, 2007
 BIG PIPE PASSES; DECISION ENDS REGION'S CONSIDERATION OF ON-SITE ALTERNATIVES 
  

The clock struck midnight for Wainfleet lakeshore residents opposed to the Big Pipe.

Two days after Wainfleet council adopted a Niagara Region report recommending municipal water and wastewater services be extended into the lakeshore area, the region's committee of the whole endorsed the report.

Thursday's meeting consisted of a presentation by Leo Gohier followed by an extensive question and answer period from councillors.

Gohier, the region's former acting director of water and wastewater services, told councillors the decision they had to make Thursday was to close the door to on-site solutions or to scrap the water and wastewater servicing plan, which could see water and wastewater pipes extended from Port Colborne.

After a lengthy discussion - over 2 1/2 hours - councillors adopted the report. The decision stops short of committing the region to proceed with the project until a number of studies are completed.

Wainfleet Mayor Barb Henderson said the report provided indisputable evidence to act on and urged regional councillors to support the recommendation.

The report was supported unanimously at the township level. "That should be viewed as significant," she said.

Now Wainfleet lakeshore residents wanting on-site septic solutions to combat the groundwater contamination will have to consider their next steps.

Betty Konc, chair of the Wainfleet water and sewer committee, says the township and the region are making a mistake by closing the door on alternative technologies. Konc says she understands the regional committee's decision even though she disagrees with it. Her committee has opposed the so-called Big Pipe.

Current estimates have the cost of the project at $72 million, and residents are concerned they may have to pay $30,000 each to hook into a system most do not want.

Gohier told councillors the figure is a high-end estimate.

The current recommendation calls for a 16-inch diameter water pipe installed along a 15-kilometre stretch of the township.

The area has been under a boil water advisory for nearly 18 months. During his presentation, Gohier outlined the need for the project saying there are more than 1,200 residences in the affected area, and only 67 would meet both Ontario Building Code's regulations for septic bed setbacks and also be environmentally sustainable.

"Because of the density of development in certain areas, your well may be fine ... but your neighbour is too close, or the soil is so bad the water doesn't have time to clean itself and you bring it into your house as drinking water," Gohier said.

The extension of municipal water and wastewater services from Port Colborne to Wainfleet is also the only option that has the necessary approval of the province's environment ministry.

The region, he added, has a duty of care as the public health agency and a moral responsibility to ensure the health of its residents.

St. Catharines councillor Judy Casselman agreed something has to be done to counteract poor decisions made in the township's past.

"It's been irresponsible development that has created this situation," she said.

While this round appears to be over, Konc says the fight isn't finished. The township must still complete its secondary plan, a document which will address such issues as permitted residential development in the lakeshore area.

If the township incorporates residents' desire to prevent widespread development Konc says the Big Pipe might prove too costly for Wainfleet. "(The Big Pipe) is probably not going to be the right solution for Wainfleet. It depends on how the secondary plan evolves," she says.

Thursday's decision does not commit the region and Wainfleet to going ahead with the servicing project, Gohier said.

Over the next 15 months five provincially-mandated studies and the township's secondary plan governing any development for the lakeshore area must be completed.

After those reports are completed - and if both Wainfleet and the region endorse a final recommendation that details the exact nature of the work, the exact costs and the cost-sharing arrangements - construction could begin.

Those conditions push the earliest start date to the spring of 2009, and construction is expected to take a minimum of two years the committee heard.

Meanwhile, the Wainfleet water and sewer committee will meet at the Brethren in Christ Church on Highway 3.

The meeting is scheduled for Oct. 20 at 9 a.m. The outcome of that meeting will determine the group's plans for continuing the fight on a new day.

"I need direction from them," Konc says.

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TRIBUNE     Posted By KAESHA FORAND     Letters     Oct 06, 2007

 WAINFLEET MOVES AHEAD WITH STUDIES 
  

WAINFLEET MOVES AHEAD WITH STUDIES

Despite expressing concern towards a proposed water and sewer pipeline, Wainfleet council unanimously endorsed, in principle, moving ahead with $1.5 million in additional studies.

Leo Gohier, former acting director of water and wastewater for Niagara Region, presented the region's 71-page Wainfleet Township - Area Water and Wastewater Servicing Final Report on Alternatives to council which outlines five years of studies, public meetings and information regarding Wainfleet's contaminated water.

"The project is at a crossroads, it's time to move on. We studied on-site and central systems and we believe it's time to move forward," Gohier told council. "You are asked to endorse in principle the MOE- and EA-endorsed central municipal water system." He highlighted a pipeline with an estimated cost of $72 million or a small bore system as the region's preferred solution to Wainfleet's water woes.

Gohier explained that although certain systems currently in use adhere to the Ontario Building Code, they are not environmentally sustainable.

"Only 67 detached lots meet both, and 87 per cent never will," he said, noting half of the systems in Wainfleet are more than 20 years old.

Ald. Ted Hessels said it appeared that Wainfleet residents will be asked to pay two to three times more for a pipeline than other municipalities. He asked Gohier for the "real cost" homeowners would be asked to pay.

Gohier said it was impossible to say exactly how much homeowners would be asked to pay for the pipeline and said there are different methods of determining costs to homeowners.

He said two possible methods of charging could be based on square footage or lot frontage.

Ald. Evan Main said he supported the report saying it is "time to move forward," and that supporting additional studies "doesn't handcuff us," to construction.

He also worried about the township and region's liability if someone was to become ill due to the contaminated water.

Ald. Ron Kramer said he was disappointed with the amount of time it has taken the region to complete its studies.

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TRIBUNE      LETTERS      OCT. 06 , 2007

 IT'S NOT TOO LATE
OPEN LETTER TO WAINFLEET TOWNSHIP COUNCIL:
  

As I feel many Wainfleet residents have been disenfranchised, by you, our supposed elected representatives, it seems Letters to the Editor are the only way residents have to air our requests for answers from you.

Yet again, just this past week, Wainfleet council has unanimously approved continued support for Niagara Region's ongoing plans to impose mains services on Wainfleet's lakeshore.

In the absence of a single response from Wainfleet council to many e-mails, letters and phone calls, the only conclusion is the council's official policy is now to just ignore any of the many of us of Wainfleet's electorate who don't happen to agree with you.

Even worse, as it's impossible to believe that all five members of the Wainfleet council are completely in agreement with putting the wishes of the region, of speculators and of developers, ahead of the electorate who voted for you.

This is neither democratic, nor does it show any of the democratic representation and public debate promised by this council before your election only a year ago.

If any of you still believe in any of the above perhaps it is time you, all of you, considered standing down before any more democratic and political harm is done to Wainfleet.

Finally to the residents of Wainfleet, Betty Konc and a few others continue to work long and hard to try to offer genuine representation for the many of you most directly affected by the only two issues in Wainfleet at this time.

Attend the community meeting planned for Oct. 20.

Show your support for all Betty's hard work.

She believes it is still not too late to reverse what is being done to Wainfleet. Show you share her belief and fill the meeting hall. We all need to fight this urbanization of our rural community.

Andrew Watts

Wainfleet

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TRIBUNE      POSTED BY ADAM SHOALTS      OCT. 18 , 2007

  VOICES OF RESIDENTS BEING IGNORED  
  

In this day and age, it is a sad state of affairs when taxpayers have no voice in their township.

We are treated like children. Over and over we are simply told what is good for us and what is going to happen here.

At the Wainfleet council presentation last week we heard that the numerous alternatives to the water and sewer pipeline were deemed not viable. We were told it is a fact, the pipeline is the only way to go.

It is impossible to believe that well over 100 alternatives were seriously looked at by anyone in the region.

We all know this pipeline is about development and the almighty dollar. Big and little speculators are hovering over Wainfleet just waiting for it. People on limited incomes will not be able to keep their homes, and people with small cottages will be squeezed and pressured out by developers.

You don't need a crystal ball to see the new bylaws that will be coming in aid of this.

At the last regional meeting a well-known local contractor stood up to tell us not to worry because all our properties will increase in value. So, if we have to pay the $30,000, did he mean we are sure to get it all back when we sell?

Or, if there is a profit to be had beyond that, then we can sell and move elsewhere?

He doesn't get it, these are our permanent homes.

Greta Hales

Wainfleet

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MATTHEW VAN DONGEN / Osprey News Network     Local News      August 30, 2007

  MAINTAINING AGING WATER AND SEWAGE INFRASTRUCTURE  

            

Region aiming for a 'B'; Water and sewer infrastructure report presented by consultant

Niagara Region needs to spend an extra $75 million every year to maintain aging water and sewage infrastructure over the next 100 years, a new consultant's report says.

The report reviewed all of Niagara's treatment plants and underground pipes, worth about $2.2 billion, and ranked them in a report card for regional councillors.

"Right now, our infrastructure is in reasonably good shape," acting water director Leo Gohier told councillors at a public works committee meeting Wednesday.

"But we're getting to the stage where repairs and replacement will start costing us a lot of money."

Gohier called it "addressing the sustainability gap."

For example:

- Current regional waste-water funding is about $58 million annually. Longterm, consultants predict a need for $100 million a year, a 75 per cent increase.

- Current water funding is $47 million annually. Longterm, consultants predict a need for $80 million a year, an 86 per cent increase.

Those numbers represent broad averages predicted over 10 decades, emphasized Gohier.

"I don't want to give anyone a heart attack. This (report) does not recommend raising water and sewer rates tomorrow by "x" amount," he said.

"This is not a budget ... this is a document to get people thinking."

At the same time, Gohier cautioned councillors to expect "significant peaks" in spending will come soon.

In the next 25 years, for example, more than half of Niagara's sewage treatment plants will need heavy rehabilitation, or even rebuilding.

"Most of our infrastructure is in fair shape now, but the trend, in most cases, is down," he said.

"That's not a good sign."

The report card gave marks in the "C" range to most of the Region's treatment plants and pipes.

That means some deterioration and defects were evident, but everything still functions.

Ideally, Gohier said the Region should aim to maintain its system in the "B to C+ range."

The message, Gohier said, is that politicians and staff must work out a long-term plan to reinvest in sustainable water and sewage systems.

That could mean higher rates for residents, higher charges for developers or more borrowing on the part of the region.

"The bottom line is that if its not affordable, it's not sustainable," Gohier said.

The staff report accompanying the study didn't make suggestions about rate hikes, however.

Instead, it recommended staff and councillors get together to develop a "sustainable infrastructure reinvestment plan" to address the spending gap.

It also called for public outreach, to ensure residents understand the scope of the looming problem and possible solutions.

All regional councillors will see the report and vote on its recommendations at the next council meeting Sept. 6.

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Niagara THIS WEEK     By Michael Speck     OCT. 12 , 2007

 COUNCIL USHERS NEXT PHASE OF BIG PIPE  

            

With a unanimous vote, township council ushered in the next phase of the Big Pipe project at Tuesday's meeting.

The vote followed a lengthy and detailed presentation by Leo Gohier, former director of wastewater management for the region who is being kept on the project for continuity purposes. Gohier's presentation was a verbal account of the region's final report on lakeshore contamination, which states that faulty septic systems have lead to contaminated ground and drinking water. The report recommends the best solution is to extend municipal services from Port Colborne.

"The project is at a crossroads and it's time to move on," said Gohier. "We've studied technical alternatives, both onsite and central, for five years, but we have to move forward. We cannot stand still."

The report's recommendation was than passed on to council to be voted on in principle. Now that council has voted in favour, $1.5 million in studies will soon begin.

Over the next 12 to 15 months, regional staff will do five studies as instructed by the Ministry of the Environment with regards to the project. A cost evaluation and sharing plan, a social impact assessment, a natural resource assessment, an archeological assessment and additional public consultation will be done before the final vote goes before Wainfleet and regional council in the spring of 2009.

Following final approval, Gohier said construction on the project could be done in two years. The estimated cost is $72 million.

During questioning, Alderman Ted Hessels said he wanted to know the cost other municipalities had to pay for municipal services, adding that he had been doing research on the phone earlier.

"It seems what they're expecting Wainfleet to pay is significantly higher than what other municipalities are expected to pay," he said.

Gohier said the cost of water and wastewater services varies from town to town, and it would be an "oversimplification to say the cost is 'x.'"

Alderman Ron Kramer expressed disappointment in the region's report prior to the vote, stating that it took to long to get to this point and questioning the numbers the region used for the report, saying seasonal residents don't come close to bringing the township's population to 10,000 people.

"I believe a majority of the affected residents do not want the big pipe," he said.

Alderman Rudy Warkentin did not attend council because of a cross-border funeral, but did have a letter of regret read by Wainfleet Mayor Barbara Henderson stating that he was in favour of the recommendation.

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Niagara THIS WEEK     By Michael Speck     OCT. 05 , 2007

 WATER ISSUE TAKES FRONT SEAT AT DEBATE
CANDIDATES WEIGH IN ON CONTROVERSIAL PROPOSED WATER-SEWER LINE 

            

The Green Party candidate wouldn't even answer the question regarding the proposed water-sewer line along the lakeshore at the Wainfleet candidates debate.

"The way the question is worded proposes that you want the development in the first place," said Mark Grenier while members of the township's water-sewer committee agreed from the crowd.

At the Port Colborne debate, Grenier admitted to not having enough knowledge on the issue. But after talks with residents, he said he was very impressed with the citizen action regarding the "big pipe," calling it an "exercise in real democracy."

The original question asked if the candidates thought provincial funding was necessary to take some of the financial burden off of affected homeowners and if they had researched any funding that might be available.

NDP candidate Peter Kormos said additional funding was definitely necessary and one fund he thought would be appropriate was the Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund.

"We have a special responsibility to rural communities with small tax bases," said Kormos.

Liberal candidate John Mastroianni said that the burden has been wrongfully placed on the township and its residents, as well as the regional government. He said it is a national problem, because the affected body of water, Lake Erie, is a shared between Canada and the United States, and pledged to get Ottawa involved if elected.

"It's unfair that this is placed on the backs of a few when so many enjoy the lake," he said.

Conservative candidate Ron Bodner said he has been approached by many lakeshore homeowners who have expressed fears of losing their homes if they have to pay the connection costs for the municipal services, which could run as high as $30,000.

"It's unacceptable," said Bodner. "It can't be in Ontario, it can't be in the Welland riding and it can't be in Wainfleet."

He said every level of government has to "step up" and help fund whatever solution that is approved by the township.

On faith-based school funding, another hot topic in the election, Grenier managed to get a few laughs out of the crowd.

"I'd like to find a pair of Canadian-made flip-flops to get Ron (Bodner) and John (Tory) a pair for the issue," said Grenier.

While all candidates except Bodner said they were against extending provincial funding to faith-based schools, the Conservative candidate said now that a free vote is the new policy, he will hold public meetings with constituents on how he should vote.

"Mr. McGuinty tried to make this the main thing in the election," said Bodner. "(He) tried to make it that because he wanted to hide behind it."

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Ditches, Culverts and Run-off   

ARTICLES BY ANDREW WATTS , July/07
WAINFLEET
  

ARTICLES BY ANDREW WATTS
WAINFLEET
  

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NEWS CLIPPING AFTER NOVEMBER , 2005  

NEWS CLIPPING AFTER AUGUST 1 , 2005  

COTTAGES
SOME ANSWERS FOR SUMMER RESIDENCES
  

NEWS CLIPPINGS AFTER JULY 1 , 2005  

UP COMING EVENTS AND MEETING
NEWS CLIPPINGS AFTER JUNE 1 , 2005
  

IN REPLY TO PAC CHAIRMAN  

NEWS CLIPPINGS AFTER APRIL 1st , 2005  

LETTERS from CONCERNED TAXPAYERS  

COPY OF LETTER SENT OUT TO
LAKESHORE PROPERTY OWNERS
  

LETTER TO THE FEDS  

NEWS CLIPPINGS AFTER MARCH 04 , 2005  

NEWS CLIPPINGS AFTER FEB. 1st , 2005  

NEWS CLIPPINGS AFTER JANUARY 1st , 2005  

PRELIMINARY / INTERIM PERCENTAGES FROM OUR SURVEYS  

PLEASE FILL OUT AND MAIL THIS SURVEY  

NEWS CLIPPINGS AFTER NOV. 18th  

OUR EVENTS  

OUR HISTORY and OBJECTIVES  

OTHER READING / NEWS CLIPS ETC.  

OTHER READING / PETITIONS ETC.  

QUESTIONS from CONCERNED TAXPAYERS  

NIAGARA REGIONAL WATER REPORT FOR WAINFLEET  

NIAGARA CONSERVATION AUTHORITY , Groundwater Study  

TOWNSHIP OF WAINFLEET MEETINGS  

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CHAIRPERSON / SPOKESPERSON

BETTY KONC

10 L 51 LAKESHORE RD.

PORT COLBORNE , ONTARIO

L3K 5V4


TO CONTACT ; BY Phone :  905-834-1143

TO CONTACT  " BETTY KONC "  BY EMAIL

click here

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2004 / 2005 DIRECTORS
CHAIRPERSON  Betty Konc                   905-834-1143
Vice CHAIRPERSON  Lee Bott                        905-899-1311
SECRETARY  April Mikkesaar          905-834-3470
TREASURER  Sherry Mayne             905-834-1541
Membership  Paul Schilz                  905-834-0776
Membership  Veronica Robins Binka    905-835-2683
DIRECTOR  Tom Farr                      905-899-2501
DIRECTOR  Helen Hoskin             905-899-1803
DIRECTOR  Howard Gunn              905-835-2950
 
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TO EMAIL
" WAINFLEET WATER and SEWER COMMITTEE "

click here
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Mayor Barbara Henderson
PHONE:(905) 386-0977
EMAIL:bhenderson@township.wainfleet.on.ca

Alderman Evan Main
PHONE: (905) 899-2633 or (905) 899-1250
EMAIL: emain@township.wainfleet.on.ca

Alderman Rudy Warkentin
PHONE: (905) 899-1358
EMAIL: rwarkentin@township.wainfleet.on.ca

Alderman Ted Hessels
PHONE: 905-386-6580
EMAIL:thessels@township.wainfleet.on.ca

Alderman Ron Kramer
PHONE: (905) 834-4341
EMAIL: rkramer@township.wainfleet.on.ca


MPP JOHN MALONEY
PHONE: (905) 788-2204
FAX : (905) 788-0071
EMAIL: malonj@parl.gc.ca


MPP -WELLAND
PETER KORMOS , MPP
PHONE: 905 734 1579 WELLAND
PHONE: 905 834 7723 PORT COLBORNE
EMAIL: info@peterkormos.com
EMAIL: thewellandndp@cogeco.net
WEB SITE: http://www.peterkormos.com/

PROJECT MANAGER , Regional Niagara
BOB STEELE
EMAIL: bob.steele@regional.niagara.on.ca

 
They are listening and know we aren't going away!
Here's hoping for some changes to the problems .
 

PHONE THEM

WRITE THEM

EMAIL THEM

TELL THEM  



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