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This page is dedicated to support a network of loosely affiliated auto body repair shops that convert cars to run on battery power.
Click here to go to WHY WAIT FOR DETROIT?
Would you support a candidate who said this about energy policy?
I want to change our nation's energy policy and use my bipartisan skills to do this. I want to push our nation into energy self-sufficiency and energy security. There is an obvious link between oil and terrorism, and terrorism is the biggest threat to democracy our nation has ever faced.
Here's Cynthia in a test drive of an electric car at the State Capitol in Honolulu.
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The YOUTUBE links are at the bottom of the page.

Dear Reader,
I have an idea for a short workshop and I wonder if you would like to participate or at least help organize or suggest someone to get involved.

The topic is “The Double Moon Shot”
Thomas Friedman described the need for a moon shot effort to find alternatives to gasoline and a moon shot effort would also be needed to revamp our schools to produce people capable of finding the alternatives to gasoline.   Energy and education, the double moon shot.

Part of the moon shot would involve
recycling older vehicles to switch them to run on battery power. With modifications described in a DVD (see the clips below), an auto body shop can add a "conversion service"…   see the video clips and see if you are excited about the possibilities.

For example, there are about 800,000 vehicles in Hawaii .
About 10 percent would be 80,000…  hmm, what would it take to turn 80,000 cars in say 10 years into battery power cars?

Maybe 1000 cars the first year (one shop)
2000 cars the second year
4000 cars the third year
Then each year after that perhaps 8,000 cars a year.

That might mean 8 body shops by year 4,
each shop converting 1000 cars annually or about 80 cars per month or about 20 a week per body shop.

Well, that’s the vision.   I wonder if it would make sense to organize a workshop in your city and invite 20 or 30 body shop owners to a presentation.   I will send you a copy of the DVD about Mike Moore, the guy who makes these conversions.  He's happy to talk by phone and answer questions from the assembled group.

What do you think?
call 954 646 8246 or email me at s2314@tmail.com to discuss how we can hold an "Auto Body Conversion Workshop."

Would you be interested in attending or suggesting a place to hold the workshop?  I think the general public can be invited, too, plus newspapers, to highlight the idea.   The tools for most of the work are already in a typical body shop.
A conversion costs about $12,000 or 14,000 depending on the hours needed to convert…  including the parts, which is cheaper than buying a hybrid car… 

Steve  

Here are the
YOU TUBE links… 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGWusLZbzqA    overview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n15woi0xsKQ  Tools for a workshop A

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2ijdVC_AAQ 
tools for a workshop B
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PRIME THE MARKET FOR BATTERIES
So, is this an EV or is it a gasoline-powered car?  Hmmmm....
Do you want to have a car
like this? 
Click here  >>>
electroauto.com
Are EVs a good idea for the State of Hawaii?
Why Wait For Detroit?
a site to advocate alternatives to gasoline
THREE REASONS FOR BUYING AN ALT-FUEL VEHICLE (electric or other...) and reduce our nation's addiction to oil...

1.  To support political reform in the Middle East.

Thomas Friedman wrote the following in the New York Times, May 13, 2007 A serious U.S. energy policy that permanently brings down the price of oil — by developing scalable alternative energies — is actually the best Plan B there is. You will see reform in the Arab-Muslim world only when regimes there can’t survive just by extracting oil, but have to extract the talents of their people by educating, empowering and connecting them.
You can’t be serious about getting out of Iraq if you’re not serious about getting off oil.

2.  To support new industries

There are opportunities for companies in the USA to develop services and products for electric cars.  Every gallon of gasoline is a vote for the current situation.  Every gallon of gasoline that is not used is a vote for other industries. 
As
Cynthia Thielen wrote in October 2006:
We can't afford to miss the energy wave
The volatility of the global oil market is a key factor in our skyrocketing energy costs. We are spending increasingly more on an unsustainable, non-renewable energy resource that has been proven to be highly detrimental to both the local and global environment. Economically and environmentally speaking, it is irresponsible that we continue to rely upon costly oil to meet virtually all of our energy needs.

We are in a position to develop new technologies.
This opportunity will create well-paying technical jobs in a new economic sector and will enable us to export our technical knowledge.   See "Prime the Market"

3.  To reduce oil company profits

Who's making a killing off oil profits? The oil companies are, and no one ought to be surprised, given the way prices at the pump keep surging.
Oil industry folks point out that prices are high because of, among other things, Middle East instability and much demand for crude on the global market.
Then why do Big Oil's profits keep going up? If the nations harboring the oil reserves are pocketing the windfall, then the oil companies shouldn't be seeing record profits in the stratosphere.   ©2006, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

There are other reasons to switch to alternative fuels.  Send me your suggestions: 
Analyst@comcast.net

What am I doing?
REPLY: 
I'm paying a car repair guy to convert a car to run on battery power. I'm not going to hope that oil company executives have the economic interest of the USA and the Western world in mind when they set their prices.
Click here to get your car.
-- Steve McCrea
Economic Patriot


What are you doing?   Write me and I'll post your letters here.

I love my Civic Hybrid.  I get between 35-40 MPG in town and 45-50 MPG on the highway.  It's a good step, but only a first step.  My personal view is that the most efficient and fastest way right now is what General Motors has come up with,
an electric car that has a small gas engine that only comes on to recharge the batteries when they need it.  It will average about 150 MPG in town. As oil is still plentiful, we can continue to use present facilities and technology immediately without having to build new facilities and filling stations.  Oil will last long enough for us to then come up with nuclear technology for our transportation needs (movie Back to the Future III).  (Bahman Azarm Southport, Conn.)

"Buy a diesel that can run on biofuel."  (Unique Auto Repair, Fort Lauderdale)
So, what do you want to do?
Global Cooling Vehicle
Whatever type of fuel you use, you can turn your car into a GLOBAL COOLING VEHICLE by sponsoring the planting of trees in Central America and Africa.
1-800-643-0001
www.Plant-Trees.org
More of the Friedman Column

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
The New York Times
May 13, 2007


Iif Democrats really want to be taken seriously on foreign affairs, they need to recognize that they have only half a policy on Iraq. And it’s the easy half.

You can’t be in favor of setting a date to withdraw from Iraq without also being in favor of a serious energy policy to radically reduce our dependence on oil — now. To call for withdrawing from Iraq by a set date, no matter what the situation is on the ground there — without a serious energy plan here — is reckless. All we would be doing is making ourselves more dependent on an even more unstable Middle East, because any U.S. withdrawal from Iraq is likely, in the short run, to be destabilizing.

The Middle East today is deeply troubled. If we determine that our efforts to tilt that region in a different direction — by building a decent Iraq — have failed, then our efforts to minimize our exposure to that region have to begin. But the last thing we can afford to do is walk away from the Middle East militarily while remaining chained to it economically.

More important, if Iraq totally fails, but we still believe it is in our interest to promote reform in the Middle East, a serious U.S. energy policy that permanently brings down the price of oil — by developing scalable alternative energies — is actually the best Plan B there is. You will see reform in the Arab-Muslim world only when regimes there can’t survive just by extracting oil, but have to extract the talents of their people by educating, empowering and connecting them.

But to hasten that day, Democrats have to be a lot more serious about energy than they have been up to now. Everyone has an energy plan for 2020. But we need one for 2007 that will start to have an impact by 2008 — and there is only one way to do that: get the price of oil right. Either tax gasoline by another 50 cents to $1 a gallon at the pump, or set a $50 floor price per barrel of oil sold in America. Once energy entrepreneurs know they will never again be undercut by cheap oil, you’ll see an explosion of innovation in alternatives.

“Right now we’re looking for solutions in all the wrong places,” argues the noted oil economist Philip Verleger. “The only way one can effectively address this problem today and get an immediate kick is by raising the price at the pump and keeping it there.” Some of the revenue could be used to buy back the most fuel-inefficient vehicles on our roads, he added. “The best monument to 9/11 we could erect would be a mountain of crushed gas guzzlers.”

There are some hopeful signs: Chris Dodd has just broken ranks and become the first presidential candidate to issue a serious, comprehensive energy plan that includes the “T word.” He has called for a “corporate carbon tax” that would both help fight global warming emissions and raise gasoline prices.

“You say the word ‘tax’ and people usually head for the hills,” Mr. Dodd told me. “But this is one where the American people can handle the truth. Unless you address the issue of price, you’re not serious about moving us from Point A to Point B.”

Barack Obama also just got right in Detroit’s face. He went to Motown, called for much tougher fuel economy standards and bluntly told automakers and autoworkers the truth: “For years, while foreign competitors were investing in more fuel-efficient technology for their vehicles, American automakers were spending their time investing in bigger, faster cars. Whenever an attempt was made to raise our fuel efficiency standards, the auto companies would lobby furiously against it, spending millions to prevent the very reform that could’ve saved their industry.” Those are fightin’ words!

Finally, in a move that also merits praise, General Motors announced that it was joining other major U.S. corporations, like General Electric, and signing on to the United States Climate Action Partnership (U.S.C.A.P.), which calls for a cap-and-trade program to control carbon dioxide emissions. G.M. is the first auto company to do so.

None of these go far enough, but they are all new positions and may be harbingers of a new competition in which companies and candidates try to outdo each other in being serious about energy rather than phony. That would be a big deal — and it might give the Democrats a more comprehensive Iraq policy just in the nick of time.

You can’t be serious about getting out of Iraq if you’re not serious about getting off oil.

-- Thomas Friedman, NY Times
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This truck was converted by Ken Watkins in Lake Mary, Florida.  Contact Ken at
kw1806@bellsouth.net
This truck was converted by Ken Watkins in Lake Mary, Florida.  Contact Ken at
kw1806@bellsouth.net
This truck was converted by Ken Watkins in Lake Mary, Florida. Contact Ken at
kw1806@bellsouth.net
Discusson on the Diane Rehm Show
A look at new developments in the effort to mass produce affordable, safe, and easy to charge electric cars

Guests (September 2008)
Les Goldman,  representing A123 Batteries
Chelsea Sexton, co-founder,
Plug In America
John O'Dell, senior editor, Edmunds.com
greencaradvisor.com
Elon Musk, founder and chair,
Tesla Motors
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