Ivan Putski

Ivan Putski

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Real Name - Joe Bednardski
Birthdate - ?/?/41
5'6" 205 lbs. - Austin, TX

Aliases - Hercules Bednarski

Athletic background - Football (CFL), Weightlifting, Bodybuilding (Mr. America competitor)

Teachers - Joe Blanchard

Professional background - Texas(`68), Tri-State, AWA, WWWF/WWF(`71-`84), TAW

Peak Years - `75-`81

Career Highlights - n/a

Finisher(s) -
- Polish Hammer (Running Double Axe Handle)

Favorites -
- Shoulder Block
- Overhead Forearms
- Turnbuckle Smash
- Snap Mare
- Punch

Ringwork Rating -
move set - 2
science - 1
aerial - 0
power - 7
strikes - 5

Intangible Rating -
entertainment - 6
selling - 4
bumping - 2
carrying - 3
heat - 7
legacy - 4

Place in History - Gimmicks are rehashed constantly in pro-wrestling. It often seems successful ones are reused ineffectively for various reasons. Typically its the wrong guy with the right gimmick. Sometimes however a gimmick is reused to such effect that people often forget the originator. Such is the case of the Mighty Igor. He played the role of a dimwit with incredible strength and he was a top star in the Midwest for a time. Leroy McGuirk saddled this odd schtick with fireplug powerhouse Joe Bednardski. While a dumb Pole is a popular stereotype, the man dubbed "Ivan Putski" had such amazing power that the other part never really mattered. The fans ate him up and he quickly moved up the ranks. He soon found his way onto the WWWF circuit and there he made his name. Putski had a natural charisma that earned him the admiration of the ethnic fans of the Northeast. Though he was always a top star and draw, Putski was always a below average worker. This prevented him from achieving as much as he truly could have, but it didn't really matter. Then in the 70s after years of being thickly built with a beard and a cigar, Putski radically changed his look. He dropped a lot of weight and transformed from a powerlifter into a bodybuilder. His popularity continued until he'd run his course and he returned to Texas to work independents and help break new wrestlers, like his son Scott, into the business.

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