Stan Stasiak

image


Real Name - George E. Stipich
Lifespan - 4/13/37 - 6/19/97
6'1" 272 lbs. - Buzzard Creek, OR

Aliases - Crusher Stasiak

Athletic background - Hockey (NHL)

Teachers - n/a

Professional background - Quebec(`58-`6?), Texas(`6?-`72), Portland(`65-`71), Stampede(`68), Vancouver(`68), Australia(`70), WWWF(`73-`79), NWF(`74), Toronto(`75-`76), Texas(`76), AWA(`78), Vancouver(`78), Portland(`79-`82), WCCW(`80)

Groups - n/a

Peak Years - `65-`76

Career Highlights - n/a

Finisher(s) -
- Heart Punch

Favorites -
- Crusher Hold (Bearhug)
- Pumping Standing Hammerlock
- Headlock Punch
- Pumping Side Headlock
- Punch Barrage

Ringwork Rating -
move set - 4
science - 2
aerial - 0
power - 5
strikes - 5

Intangible Rating -
entertainment - 7
selling - 6
bumping - 4
carrying - 5
heat - 6
legacy - 6

Place in History - Stan Stasiak was one of the big players in his heyday, enjoying runs in several big territories, NWA title shots and, of course, a brief run as WWWF Champion. George Stipich turned down the chance to be a professional hockey player and got into pro-wrestling in Quebec. He took the name of a Toronto star from thirty years earlier, this Stasiak though was a big man with a grizzled look, making him a heel for sure. He learned well and became a damn good entertainer. Don Owens brought him into Portland and he was one of the key stars in promotion's peak years. Stasiak adopted the heart punch as his finisher and feuded with everyone who came in over the Pacific Northwest Heavyweight title from Maddog Vachon and Pepper Martin in the early days to Lonnie Mayne and Dutch Savage in the later days. Then Stasiak headed to New York, an accomplishment in and of itself. He drew money though feuding with the champion, Pedro Morales, who he shockingly defeated in 1973. Although he was only a transitional champion, it tied Stan Stasiak's name to arguably the most presigious pro-wrestling title of the modern era as it is the world title that is most widely recognized as number one. Stasiak skated off that win for the rest of his career, he returned to Portland and worked on top for a few more years with tours in other regions where he'd been successful. Stasiak's son, Shawn, who became something of a pro-wrestling star in recent years, was getting older and the "hardest puncher in pro-wrestling" had to show him the ropes. Stan Stasiak began having heart problems and eventually a stroke saw him become deeply religious in his final years.

1