The Time Line

For Documented Weapons

Testing in Utah and Nevada



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As we look at this record today, we shudder in disbelief that such an atrocity could have occurred. In comparison to the Holocaust it makes the Holocaust seem like but a mild blip in history.



Too, keep in mind that this is only one-third of the time line -- to 1955. The more complete (known) time line can be viewed in the Deseret News of Dec. 22-23, 1994. This, below, is but a sample. The more complete list covers those additional years to 1987.



Utah lies down wind of the Nevada Nuclear Test Site. Countless horrid stories are still being told today of those exposed to these and other sickly tests..



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Key: The listing below categorizes all tests and incidents in four groupings: germ, nerve (or chemical), radiation and nuclear. Symbols are included at the start of each listing to denote which type of test or incident is involved.

(Germ) -- germ

(Nerve) -- nerve or chemical

(Radiation) -- radiation

(Nuclear) -- nuclear



Note: The underground nuclear bomb tests listed below are only those where the government acknowledged at leasta slight release of radiation to the atmosphere. Hundreds of other underground tests were conducted where the government says all radiation was contained underground -- such tests are riot listed here.



1945

(Germ) Throughout the year, the Army conducted open-air tests on undisclosed dates on undisclosed public lands with bacillus subtilis, niger variety. The Army said it is a safe simulantof more dangerous germ weapons, but some scientists say It can also cause Infections.



1949

(Radiation) 1949 to 1952--Dugway Proving Ground dropped non radioactive bomb casings over the Great Salt Lake as part of experiments to develop bombs that could radiologically contaminate small areas.

(Germ) July to November--An unknown number of open-air tests were conducted by the Army on undisclosed public lands with bacillus subtllis, generally considered a safe simulant of more-dangerous biological arms.

(Radiation) Oct. 22--Cluster bombs filled with radio-active materials were dropped from 15,000 feet at Dugway Proving Ground and radioactively contaminated 0.6 of a square mile. It had a total of 260 curies of radiation.

(Radiation) Nov. 30--Cluster bombs filled with radioactive materials were dropped from 15,000 feet at Dugway Proving Ground and radioactively contaminated 0.8 of a square mile. it had released 1,506 curies of radiation (1,000 times more than the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident).



1950

(Germ) June to November--Possible open-air tests with undisclosed "pathogens," or germs that cause serious disease, may have been conducted at Dugway Proving Ground. Army lists say they are "unsubstantiated."

(Radiation) Aug. 4--Dugway Proving Ground tested a cluster bomb to spread radioactive particles of tantalum. It exploded 1,450feet above the ground, releasing 480 curies of radiation (33 times more than the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident), contaminating 1.7 square miles on the test grid; 69 percent of radiation released was not accounted for by grid monitors.

(Radiation) Aug. 6--Dugway Proving Ground tested a cluster bomb to spread radioactive particles of tantalum. It exploded on the ground, contaminating 0.89 of a square mile on the test grid --but some particles might have spread "indefinitely" In some directions, It used 480 curies of radioactive material.

(Radiation) Aug. 11--Dugway Proving Ground conducted four tests exploding different shapes of radioactive metal to see which would best spread contamination. They each used 26 curies of radiation.

(Radiation) Sept. 5--Dugway Proving Ground tested a cluster bomb that spread radioactive metal. It exploded at a height of 1,680 feet, releasing 930 curies and contaminating two square miles of the test grid; 62 percent of expected radiation was not accounted for by monitors on the grid.

(Radiation) Sept. 7--Dugway Proving Ground tested a cluster bomb that spread radioactive tantalum, exploding at 2,000 feet, releasing 3,900 curies and contaminating 3.2 square miles on the grid; 75 percent of expected radiation was not accounted for by grid monitors.

(Radiation) Sept. 13--Dugway Proving Ground conducted 15 tests of small dust generators that spread radioactive specks. Each was filled with 1.1 curies of radiation.



(Radiation) November -- Documents show Dugway Proving Ground to test a cluster bomb to spread a whopping 30,000 curies of tantalum but do not show whether the test actually occurred.



1951

(Germ) Throughout the year, psittacosis, which causes parrot fever, was spread in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground on undisclosed dates. The Army said lt was unsure If tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nerve) Throughout the year, the Army conducted 19 open-air tests of arms filled with nerve gents GA or GB at Dugway Proving Ground on undisclosed dates.

(Radiation) Sometime in 1951, documents show Dugway Proving Ground planned to drop radioactive pellets from hoppers in high-altitude aircraft, but do not show if it actually happened.

(Nuclear) Jan. 27 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Able in Operation Ranger. Had energy yield of l,000 tons of TNT.

Nuclear) Jan. 28 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Baker In Operation Ranger. Had energy yield of 8,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Feb. 1 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Easy in Operation Ranger. Had energy yield of 1,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Feb. 2 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Baker-2 In Qperation Ranger. Had energy yield of 8,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Feb. 6 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Fox in Operation Ranger. Had energy yield of 22,000tons of TNT.

(Radiation) May29 Dugway Proving Ground exploded four different shapes of radioactive munitions on 50-foot poles to see which would best spread contamination.

(Germ) June to Aug26 Coxiella burnetil, which causes potentially deadly Q fever, was spread In open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nuclear) Oct. 22 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Able in Operation Buster. Had energy yield of less than 100 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Oct. 28 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Baker in Operation Buster. Had energy yield of 3,500 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Oct. 30 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Charlie in Operation Buster. Had energy yield of 14,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Nov. 1 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Dog In Operation Buster. Had energy yield of 21,000 tons of TNT.

(Radiation) Nov. 3-4 Dugway Proving Ground conducted nine tests of small radioactive dust generators dropped from airplanes, exploding as high as 5,760 feet above ground in winds of up to 38 miles an hour. Each sphere released between 7.4 and 17.8 curies.

(Nuclear) Nov. 5 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Easy in Operation Buster. Had energy yield of 31,000 tons of TNT.

(Radiation) Nov. 7 Dugway Proving Ground dropped a cluster bomb of radioactive tantalum, exploding 1,700 feet above the ground, releasing 612 curies and contaminating 1.05 square miles on the grid. Only 26 percent of expected radiation was accounted for by grid monitors.

(Radiation) Nov. 8 Dugway Proving Ground dropped a cluster bomb of radioactive tantalum, exploding 1,050 feet above ground releasing 756 curies and contaminating 1.22 square miles on the grid.

(Radiation) Nov.7-8 Four tests at Dugway exploded different shapes of radioactive munitions to see which would spread radiation the farthest. Each munition had between 275 and 403 curies of radiation.

(Nuclear) Nov. 19 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Sugar in Operation Jangle. Had energy yield of 1,200 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Nov.29 Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Uncle in Operation Jangle. Had energy yield of 1,200 tons of TNT.



1952

(Nerve) Throughout the year, the Army conducted 38 open-air tests of arms filled with nerve agents GA or GB at Dugway Proving Ground on undisclosed dates.

(Germ) Feb. 18 to May 27--The Army spread wheat rust spores, which can destroy wheat crops, in open-air tests on "nonpublic domain" lands at Dugway Proving Ground.

(Germ) March 27 --An antivirulent strain of pasteurella pestis. which causes the plague, was used in an open-air test by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nuclear) April 1 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Able in Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 1,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) April 9 --Pasteurella tularensis, which causes potentially deadly tularemia, was used in open-alr tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nuclear) April 15 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Baker in Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 1,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) April 22 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Charlie in Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 31,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) May 1 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Dog in Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 19,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) May 7 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Easy In Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 12,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) May 12 -- Brucella suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosls or undulant fever, was used In an open-air test by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Radiation) May 20 --Dugway Proving Ground conducted four tests exploding different shapes of radioactive munitions on 50-foot poles. They each released between 337 and 421 curies of radiation and contaminated up to 0.33 square miles on the grid.

(Radiation) May 21-2 7 --Dugway Proving Ground conducted 16 tests of radioactive "dust generator" spheres dropped from airplanes. Nine may have been duds, and three were never located. Each test released 38.9 to 40 curies of radiation.

(Nuclear) May 25 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Fox in Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 11,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) June -- Brucella suis and brucella melitensis, which can cause potentially deadly disease, were used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nuclear) June 1 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named George in Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 15,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) June 5--Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named How in Operation Tumbler-Snapper. Had energy yield of 14,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) July to August --Brucella suls, which can cause brucellosls, was spread in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) July 9 --Pasteurella tularensis, which causes potentially deadly tularemia, was spread in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nerve) July 16--Dugway Proving Ground sprayed nerve agent GB from an F-80 fighter flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 125 feet.

(Nerve) July22 --Dugway Proving Ground sprayed nerve agent GB from an F-80 fighter flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Nerve) July 29 Dugway Proving Ground sprayed nerve agent GB from an F-80 flying 480 mph at a height of 50-75 feet.

(Germ) August to October Brucelia suis, which can cause brucellosis, was spread in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Aug.21 Coxiella burnetii, which causes potentially deadly Q fever, was used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure whether tests were confined to Army Lands.

(Germ) September Brucella suis and brucella melitensis, which can cause potentially deadly disease were used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. The Army said it was unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) September to November Coxiella burnetii, which causes potentially deadly Q fever, was used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army said it was unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Sept. 12 to May 26, 1953 Wheat stem rust, which can destroy wheat crops, was used in open-air tests at "nonpublic domain" lands at Dugway Proving Ground.

(Radiation) Sept.23 Dugway Proving Ground exploded five radioactive munitions in different shapes from 50-foot poles to see which would best spread contamination. Four tests that functioned released radiation in the amounts of 626.9, 571.3, 359.4 and 607 curies.

(Germ) Oct. 9 "Pasteurella" was used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army is unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Radiation) November A radiological weapon test of unknown type occurred at Dugway Proving Ground.

(Nerve) Nov. 13 Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F80 fighter flying 480 miles an hour at a height of l00 feet.

(Nerve) Nov.18 Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F80 fighter flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Germ) Nov. 19 Clostridium botulinum toxin, which can cause deadly botulism, was used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army is unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nerve) Nov. 20 Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F80 fighter flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 250feet.

(Nerve) Nov.25 Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F80 fighter flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Germ) December Brucella melitensis, which can cause potentially deadly disease, was used In open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army is unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nerve) Dec. 19 Deadly nerve agent GA was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F-80 flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Nerve) Dec. 30 Deadly nerve agent GA was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F-80 flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.



1953

(Nerve) Throughout the year, the Army conducted 109 open-air tests with arms filled with nerve agents GA or GB at Dugway Proving Ground on undisclosed dates.

(Nerve) Throughout the year, Dugway Proving Ground conducted 38 open-air tests involving nerve agents GA and GB to test hazards with leaking arms on airplanes and nerve agent attacks on airplane.

(Nerve) Jan.6 Deadly nerve agent GA was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F80 flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Nerve) Jan. 8 Deadly nerve agent GA was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F-80 flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Nerve) Jan.13 Deadly nerve agent GA was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F-80 flying 48O miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Nerve) Jan.26 Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F-80 flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 25 feet. (Nerve) Jan.28 -- Deadly nerve agent GA was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F47N fighter flying 310 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Nerve) Feb. 2 --Deadly nerve agent GA was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F-47M fighter flying 310 miles an hour at a height of 100 feet.

(Nerve) Feb. 10 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F80 ftghter flying 480 mites an hour at a height of 25 feet.

(Nerve) Feb. 12 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground from an F-80 fighter flying 480 miles an hour at a height of 25 feet.

(Nuclear) March 17 -- Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Annie in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 16,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) March 24 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Nancy in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 24,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) March 24 --.Pasteurella tularensis, which causes tularemia, was used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army is unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nuclear) March31 -- Open-air nuclear bomb test at Test Site, code-named Ruth in Operation Up shot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 200 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) April 6 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Dixie in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 11,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) April 11 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Slte, code-narned Ray in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 200 tons of TNT.

(Nerve) April 17 -- Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F3D2 aircraft flying 360 knots an hour at a height of 25 feet.

(Nuclear) April 18 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Badger in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 23,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) April 2l --Pasteurella tularensis, which causes tularemia, was used in open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground. Army is unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nerve) April 21 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F3D-2 alrcraft flying 358 knots an hour at a height of 35 feet.

(Nuclear) April 25 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Simon in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 43,000 tons of TNT.

(Nerve) April 30 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F3D-2 aircraft flying 360 knots an hour at a height of 20 feet.

(Germ) May and June --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtilis, serratla marcescens, aspergillus fumigatusand "fluorescent particles" (possibly toxic cadmium sulfide), all of which were considered by the Army to be safe, but others say they could still be dangerous.

(Nerve) May 5 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F3D-2 aircraft flying 360 knots an hour at a height of 35 feet.

(Nerve) May 7 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground byan F3D-2 aircraft flying 360 knots an hour at a height of 30 feet.

(Nuclear) May 8 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Encore in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of, 27,000 tons of TNT.

(Nerve) May 13 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed in two separate tests the same day at Dugway Proving Ground by an F3D-2 aircraft flying 360 knots an hour at a height of 25 to 40 feet.

(Nuclear) May 19 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Harry in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 32,000 tons of TNT.

(Radiation) May 23 --Two large tests were planned at Dugway Proving Ground. One was to drop 100,000 curies of radioactive tantalum (6,667 times as much as Three Mile Island) over four square miles. The other was to spread 10,000 curies over a one-square mile area. Documents do not show whether the tests occurred, but the Army assumed they had when it conducted a 1989 study on what radiation threat might still be present then.

(Nuclear) May 25 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Grable in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 15,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) June 4 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Climax in Operation Upshot-Knothole. Had energy yield of 61,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) June 17--Open-air test at Dugway used serratia marcescens and bacillus subtilis.

U June 25--Open-air test at Dugway used serratla marcescens and bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) July l3to Oct. 14 --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) July 13 --Open-air test at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) July 14 --Open-air test at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) July 2lto Sep. 24--Open-air tests at Dugway spread wheat stem rust, a germ designed to kill wheat crops.

(Germ) Aug. 6 --Open-air test at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) Aug. 12 --Open-air test at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) Sept. 12 to May 26, 1953--Open-air tests at Dugway spread wheat stem rust, a germ that can kill wheat crops.

(Germ) Oct. 15 --Open-air test at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) Nov.12 to Dec. 16 --Open-air tests by Dugway used wheat stem rust, a germ designed to kill wheat crops.



1954

(Germ) Throughout the year, Army documents say open-air tests of undisclosed biological warfare agents were conducted by Dugway on undisclosed dates. Army is unsure whether they were confined to Army lands.

(Nerve) Throughout the year, the Army conducted 171 open-air tests of arms filled wlth nerve agents GA or GB at Dugway Proving Ground on undisclosed dates. It also conducted three other tests on hazards of GB attack on airplanes.

(Germ) January to April --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used bacillus anthracis, which can cause deadly anthrax. Army is unsure whether tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Jan. 21 --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtilis and "fluorescent particles" (possibly toxic cadmium sulfide).

(Germ) Jan. 27 --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Nerve) Feb. 10 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F-80 fighter flying 470 miles an hour at a height of 30 feet.

(Germ) Feb. 12 --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtills.

(Nerve) Feb. 16--Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F-8O flghter flylng470 miles an hour at a height of 130 feet.

(Chemical) Feb. 17 --Open-air tests at Dugway used "fluorescent particles" (possibly toxlc cadmium sulfide) as part of germ warfare tests.

(Nerve) Feb. 19 --Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F-80 fighter flying 470 miles per hour at a height of 90 feet. at a height of 90 feet.

(Nerve) Feb. 24 -~.Deadly nerve agent GB was sprayed at Dugway Proving Ground by an F-80 fighter flying 470 miles per hour at a height of 65 feet.(Chemical) March 14 -- Open air tests at Dugway used "fluorescent particles" (possibly toxic cadmium sulfide) as part of germ warfare tests.

(Germ) April to August --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used wheat stem rust, a germ designed to kill wheat crops.

(Chemical) April 7 --Open-air tests at Dugway used "fluorescent particles" (possibly toxic cadmium sulfide) as part of germ warfare tests.

(Germ) May 13 --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) May 24 --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtilis.

(Germ) June 1954 to June 1955 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucelia suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or undulant fever.

(Germ) Sept. 4 to Feb. 21, 1956 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used bacillus anthracis, which causes deadly anthrax. Army said it is unsure tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) October --Open-air tests at Dugway used bacillus subtilis and "fluorescent particles" (possibly toxic cadmium sulfide).

(Germ) Oct. 14 --Open-air tests at Dugway used wheat stem rust, a germ that can kill wheat crops.

(Germ) Oct.27 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucelia suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or undulant fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Oct. 29 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucello suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or Undulant fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Nov. 3 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used bruceila suls, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or Undulant fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Nov. 12 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used pasteurella tularensis, which causes potentially deadly tularemia. Army Is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Nov. 15 to June 1955 --Open-air tests at Dugway used baciilus subtilis.

(Germ) Nov. 18 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used pasteurella tularensis, which causes potentially deadly tularemia. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Dec. 20 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucella suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or undulant fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Dec. 28 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucella suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or undulant fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.



1955

(Nerve) Throughout the year, the Army conducted 129 open-air tests of arms filled with nerve agents GA or GB at Dugway Proving Ground on undisclosed dates. It also conducted seven tests of GB attacks on airplanes.

(Germ) Jan. 6 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucella suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosls or undulent fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Germ) Jan. 12 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucella suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or undulant fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

(Nuclear) Feb. 18 --Open-air nuclear bomb-test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Wasp in Operation Teapot. Had energy yield of 1,000 tons of TNT.

(Nuclear) Feb. 22 --Open-air nuclear bomb test at Nevada Test Site, code-named Moth in Operation Teapot. Had energy yield of 2,000 tons of TNT.

(Germ) March to Feb. 1956 --Open-air tests by Dugway Proving Ground used brucella suis, which can cause potentially deadly brucellosis or undulant fever. Army is unsure if tests were confined to Army lands.

This list continues until 1987 showing a similar patterns of abuse to the public.



A complete listing can be found in the Deseret News of Dec. 22-23, 1994. This is only a partial listing to 1955. The list goes on to cover the years of 1956 to 1987. Wonder what else we don't know that continues from that date?


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