title>MacCorkill's Scottish - The Dupplin Cross

Sconemac's, The Dupplin Cross - an Ancient Pictish Cross

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TheAncient Dupplin Cross

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The Dupplin Cross - an Ancient Pictish Cross


This is the story of a cross, thought for years to be Celtic, but now known to be a rare Pict Cross. Little is known about the Picts, although some websites have several pages on Pictish history - nothing is certain, nothing is proven - much is speculation and just outright incorrect information. This ancient cross holds much information on it, and is being deciphered by experts at the Historic Museum Of Scotland.

This Cross stood in a field on the north side of the river Earn overlooking the ancient Pictish capital of Forteviot. It is a free standing cross of Old Red Sandstone 8'7" high and 3'1" wide across the arms, and is heavily ornamented on all four sides with spiral work, square and diagonal key patterns and interlaced work, surrounding figures of men, animals and birds.

One can see why it was mistaken for a Celtic Cross because of the use of interlacing work, and figures of animals, a trade mark of the celts. Their are other designs though and some writing in Latin, that connect the cross with the Picts.

After several years of arguments 'for and against' removal to Edinburgh museum or a local site, the Scottish Secretary ruled in 1998 that the cross be taken into the care of Historic Scotland for restoration work, then placed in the New Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh for three years. It will then be returned to Strathearn and housed in St. Serf's Church in Dunning which is in the care of Historic Scotland.

The cross is estimated to date from the 9th century. A cast was made in 1990 for an exhibition in Edinburgh and the blank panel on the west face revealed seven lines of latin which connect the cross with Constantine rather than Kenneth MacAlpine as had been previously thought. It is now thought that the cross may have been erected by Kenneth or one of his sons as an apt dedication to Constantine, a Pictish King, who like Kenneth himself had ruled both nations, the Picts and the Scots.

A plywood mockup of the cross is currently on trial in St Serf's Church . Several positions are being tried out to evaluate access, lighting, floor strength and so on.

P.S.(Sent to me from the Person that suggested the article, Tam Anderson), After almost nine years of controversy, yesterday, officials are quietly returning the Dupplin Cross to Strathearn.

The 1000 year old artefact was finally in stalled at St Serf's Church in Dunning after three years at the National Museum in Edinburgh. The nine foot cross depicting scenes from the time of Kenneth Macalpine, the first king of a united Scotland, whose king-dome centred on Forteviot, stood since its creation in a field near the village As a forestry worker on Dupplin Estate back In the 70's, I was in a lucky position to view and touch that cross on its original site. Also to stand on the two battle sites of, Dupplin Moor 1332, and Tippermuir 1644, on different parts of the Estate, the Dewar family own it, if you have had a dram of Dewar's Whisky the water of life, that is their property.end/post script.

Previous information before cross was seated at Dunning:

The Dupplin cross holds much information on it, and is being deciphered by experts at the Historic Museum Of Scotland.

This Cross stood in a field on the north side of the river Earn overlooking the ancient Pictish capital of Forteviot. It is a free standing cross of Old Red Sandstone 8'7" high and 3'1" wide across the arms, and is heavily ornamented on all four sides with spiral work, square and diagonal key patterns and interlaced work, surrounding figures of men, animals and birds.

One can see why it was mistaken for a Celtic Cross because of the use of interlacing work, and figures of animals, a trade mark of the celts. Their are other designs though and some writing in Latin, that connect the cross with the Picts. (see below)

After several years of arguments for and against removal to Edinburgh museum or a local site, the Scottish Secretary ruled in 1998 that the cross be taken into the care of Historic Scotland for restoration work, then placed in the New Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh for three years. It will then be returned to Strathearn and housed in St. Serf's Church in Dunning which is in the care of Historic Scotland.

The cross is estimated to date from the 9th century. A cast was made in 1990 for an exhibition in Edinburgh and the blank panel on the west face revealed seven lines of latin which connect the cross with Constantine rather than Kenneth MacAlpine as had been previously thought. It is now thought that the cross may have been erected by Kenneth or one of his sons as an apt dedication to Constantine, a Pictish King, who like Kenneth himself had ruled both nations, the Picts and the Scots.

A plywood mockup of the cross is currently on trial in St Serf's Church . Several positions are being tried out to evaluate access, lighting, floor strength and so on. This is perhaps one of the favourites.

**************
P.S.(from the Person that suggested the article)After almost nine years of controversy, yesterday, officials are quietly returning the Dupplin Cross to Strathearn.

The 1000 year old artefact was finally in stalled at St Serf's Church in Dunning after three years at the National Museum in Edinburgh. The nine foot cross depicting scenes from the time of Kenneth Macalpine, the first king of a united Scotland, whose king-dome centred on Forteviot, stood since its creation in a field near the village As a forestry worker on Dupplin Estate back In the 70's, I was in a lucky position to view and touch that cross on its original site. Also to stand on the two battle sites of, Dupplin Moor 1332, and Tippermuir 1644, on different parts of the Estate, the Dewar family own it, if you have had a dram of Dewar's Whisky the water of life, that is their property.

Nancy MacCorkill (Scone)
Author, Poet
Historian of the Ancient Clans of Scotland
Sources:
Booklet on Dupplin Cross from Museum of Scotland,
Tam Anderson, forrester
Nora Chadwick,
Historic Scotland Museum Edinburgh,
N. MacCorkill, Author


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