When Adhesives Were Introduced

When Adhesives Were Introduced


The frugal Yankees of Worcester did not procure new cancellation devices just because of the innovation of adhesive postage stamps. Several cancels that were used in The Stampless Era also saw use in The Early Stamped Period. However, in The Stampless Era, a CDS was sufficient to identify the originating post office. With the advent of adhesive stamps, not only was it necessary to identify the originating post office, it was also necessary to obliterate the adhesive stamp in order to prevent reuse. Thus various styles of "killers" were put into service, literally along side the ubiquitous CDS's.


The first example below shows a very simple cork killer, a large solid circle with two wide horizontal negative lines, tying the stamp to the cover. A 31.5 mm matching CDS completes the cancel on this cover, which is shown by docketing marks to be from 1853.


Worcester CDS With Simple Cork Killer

Worcester
CDS With Simple Cork Killer
Circa 1853


The next image is of another elusive Rimless CDS. This example shows the handiwork of a postal clerk with some time on his hands. The cork killer is a little more ornate, taking on the shape of a "Circle of Wedges" design. This 30 mm CDS dates from 1854.


Worcester Rimless With Wedge Killer

Worcester
Rimless CDS With Circle Of Wedges Killer
Circa 1854


The next image shows a Balloon CDS with a simple Circular Grid killer. Note the use of a Year Date Slug in the CDS. The Year Date Slug can be found both above the Day and Month Slugs, as shown here, or below them. See also my Fancy Cancel page for such an arrangement of slugs. The Year Date Slug can also be found inverted, as shown below. This particular CDS saw very limited use.


Worcester Circular Grid Killer

Worcester
Balloon CDS With Circular Grid Killer
Circa 1857


The next image shows the same Balloon CDS as described above. As noted, the Year Date Slug is inverted in the CDS and is located below the Day and Month Slugs. On this particular cover, instead of using a carved cork killer to deface the stamp, the clerk instead used a "PAID" Handstamp to do the business.


Worcester 'PAID' Killer

Worcester
Balloon CDS With "PAID" Handstamp Killer
Circa 1857


The next image shows a "Black Jack" stamp, paying the local Drop Rate, with a simple carved cork killer and no CDS.


Worcester Simple Grid

Worcester
Simple Circular Grid Killer
On Black Jack


The next image shows a Double-Ring CDS. This marking alone ties the stamp to the cover. This 26 mm x 14 mm cancel shows Massachusetts abbreviated by "MS" and was normally used without a killer. An enclosure within this cover dates it from 1860.


Worcester Double-Ring CDS

Worcester
Double-Ring CDS
Circa 1860


The next image also shows a Double-Ring CDS from Worcester. In this cancel, Massachusetts is abbreviated by "MASS" and the CDS is duplexed with a 4-Ring Bullseye killer. The USCC is currently in the midst of a research project dealing with the cities and dates of use of Bullsey Killers. Note the guideline in the lower left margin of the adhesive.


Worcester Bullseye Killer

Worcester
Double-Ring CDS
With 4-Ring Bullseye Killer
Circa 1868


The next image shows a Balloon CDS, which was used in The Stampless Era, being used in The Early Stamped Era to cancel a piece of postal stationary from the 1860s. As noted before, this style of CDS is called the Small High "ASS" style.


Worcester Balloon CDS

Worcester
Balloon CDS
Circa 1868


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