F.A.Qs

          

                         

               Aesthetic Denture Experts 

                 

 

 

 

 

            

FREQUENTLY ASKED                                                  QUESTIONS

What is a complete upper and lower denture?
What is an "immediate" denture?
What is a partial denture?
What is a reline?
Will my dentures last a lifetime?
Can my dentures be repaired?
How often should I have to use denture adhesives?
What is the least expensive way to get dentures made?

What is a complete upper and lower denture?

Complete upper and lower dentures are essential for the person who has none of their own natural teeth. To help maintain a healthy diet it is necessary to be able to chew food properly and this can best be achieved by having regular check ups with a Denture Specialist who has been trained and licensed to perform all the procedures relating to the manufacture, construction and fitting of dentures. Properly fitted dentures should also be a source of pride and satisfaction to the denture wearer, who can once again feel confident to smile and eat in public without worrying if other people can hear them chewing their food, because they click, or be concerned that they might slip or fall down. One nickname for complete dentures among denturists is "Uppers and Downers".

The Upper Denture

The upper denture is "the good guy" - the one that gets all the smiles, the denture that causes the least discomfort. The big plus for the upper denture is its suction. This is caused by air caught between the palate of the denture and the roof of the mouth. This makes an ideal "suction cup".

The Lower Denture

The lower denture has become the culprit for much "oral abuse". Lower dentures are much maligned; so much so that people tend to divorce them from their partner, the upper denture. The lower denture has become something of a misfit and seeks refuge in the most unlikely of places: drawers, bottom of the bed, under the bed, amongst lipsticks in the bottom of ladies' handbags, in lunch pails and back pockets, or, if they have a caring owner, submerged for eternity in a denture bath. So you see, the lot of a lower denture leaves a lot to be desired.

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What is an "immediate" denture?

An "Immediate Denture" is a denture that is inserted immediately after extraction. What are the reasons for having a denture inserted immediately? It could be vanity: "No one is going to see me without teeth," or, "I deal with the public every day; no teeth, no work", or medical reasons: "I have a stomach problem and I need to masticate my food". These are the basic reasons for having an immediate denture.

In some cases an immediate is a "throw-away" (temporary) denture. If you have all your teeth out (a full mouth extraction), the shrinkage is major. After three or four weeks you will need a temporary soft liner inserted. Three or four months later you will receive a permanent reline. This will probably last up to a year. Every time you have your denture relined it becomes thicker; also, with so many relines the position of your denture could move, which will change your bite. This will cause your denture to tip and dislodge, causing sore spots. This is when you get your "permanent" denture.

If you do not have any of the reasons mentioned above for having an "immediate" denture, I would advise that you wait six to eight weeks before getting your teeth made; in actual fact, the longer you wait, the better fit you will get.

Having an immediate denture made is far more expensive than the regular type denture; with the relines and the extra work involved it is more time consuming, and time is money!

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What is a Partial Denture?

A partial denture is designed to replace those natural teeth which have been lost by accident, infection or other circumstance and have left spaces between the remaining teeth. In order to maintain full chewing ability, restore appearance and help prevent drifting of the remaining teeth a partial denture is usually required.

Partial dentures are available in a variety of designs and materials and your Denturist will be happy to discus the merits and drawbacks of each one. A partial denture is a very special appliance and in many cases requires more stringent care than a regular complete or full denture.  This is because of some of the specialized materials they can be made from, such as metal and hard and soft acrylic resins, once again your Denturist will be happy to explain how to care for the appliance designed and made for you.

In many instances, wearing a partial denture can have been of assistance when complete dentures are required, mainly because people have got used to wearing, caring for and knowing not to be unduly worried or concerned about what to expect from their dentures. 

As with complete dentures, regular visits to your Denturist to check the fit and comfort of your partial denture is essential.
On these visits any unusual changes in the mouth or movement of the natural teeth can be seen and recommendations made.  If you accidentally drop your partial denture and it has a metal base and clasps, do NOT try to fix it if it does not sit properly in your mouth. These appliances are more delicate than they appear and can be easily broken if bent too much. If you break your partial denture, simply put the appliance in a denture bath and make an appointment to see your Denturist for a repair.

As a denture specialist, your Denturist has been trained in all aspects of denture construction and will be only too pleased to have the opportunity to discuss your particular denture requirements.

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What is a Reline?

A denture reline is usually indicated when a denture starts to slip or fall down. This happening is almost always caused by minute changes which have been occurring in the gum tissue over a period of time. Eventually, of course, these changes have happened to such a degree that the denture will not stay in place. 

Relining a denture means that an impression of the gum is required and the denture is refitted to it using a new acrylic base. In certain cases a Soft Lining can be utilised, normally in the lower denture. In most cases this soft lining is not as durable as a regular hard liner and requires more attention. Your Denturist can advise you if you are a candidate for this type of lining and of the care it should be given. 

Remember, that relining is meant to tighten a denture and NOT change it, or your, appearance. Consequently, if you feel you are losing your smile and not showing as much of your teeth as you would like, relining will not make much, if any, difference. To restore your facial appearance to way you would like it normally calls for new dentures to be made.  Before a denture reline is started your Denturist will examine it very carefully for signs of wear. If excessive wear is noted it is not usually practical to reline it, as your gum tissues and almost certainly your bite, has changed to such a degree that it would be unwise to reline the denture and instead have a new one made.

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Will my dentures last a lifetime?

Many denture wearers are under the impression that a set of dentures are supposed to last a lifetime, to which I ask them, "Does one pair of shoes last you a lifetime? or do you occasionally have to buy new ones? Because of changes which may occur in the mouth and the absorption of fluid or bacteria, together with colour changes due to age, dentures, should always be changed every FIVE to SEVEN YEARS.

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Can my dentures be repaired?

It is almost always possible to repair a denture. Some exceptions are when a "home remedy" has been applied or when a number of pieces are missing. When I say "home remedy" I mean when someone has gone down to the local drug store or hardware store and bought a do-it-yourself tube of glue. In nearly all cases, the pieces have been mis-aligned and the glue cannot be removed, resulting in a new denture being required.  The first rule to obey with a broken denture is, DO NOT TOUCH IT. Put the pieces in a plastic bag and take them into your local Denturist. In most cases no appointment is necessary for denture repairs and it will usually be ready in a few hours or less.

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How often should I have to use denture adhesives?

It is quite permissible to use a denture adhesive occasionally, however, they should not have to be used all the time. Using these adhesives constantly can hide changes in the gum structure which can cause severe problems if not corrected. If you are not sure wether you are using these creams or powders too frequently, do not hesitate to make an appointment with your Denturist who will advise you on what course of action is required. 

It is also very important for denture wearers to clean their appliances every day to help remove stains, plaque and food which may become stuck to them. Brushing the gums, palate and tongue with a soft bristle brush dipped in a weak saline solution will help to stimulate blood flow to these areas and assist in keeping them free from the occasional sore spot. If a sore spot does develope and is not cleared within a few days when using this brushing technique, call your Denturist for an evaluation.

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What is the least expensive way to get dentures made?

It is always less expensive to get quality dentures made by an Independent Denturist.

Dentists do not make dentures! Dentists market dentures to their patients but they send them out to commercial dental laboratories and the cost is added to your dental bill. The person who makes your dentures never sees you and can't make the necessary adjustments for your unique mouth.

Independent Denturists do all their work on premises which saves you money and means that you are always dealing with the person who actually makes your dentures.

 

 

 

                       

        Send mail to James  Kontos, D.D.S with questions or comments about this web site.
        Copyright 2000 Dervish Designs DDS PA
        Last modified: November 15, 2000