Stock Wagons of the NSWR
(With an emphasis on the post 1945 period)

Page added 12th December 2001

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A nice pair of 1921 CWs                                                                                                      Photo by Howard Armstrong

A Description Of The Stock Wagons Used By The NSWGR In The 
Post WW2 Period


These notes are based on the presentation I made at the 
1999 Modelling The Railways of NSW Convention at Petersham 
and would not have been possible without  the invaluable assistance of 
Craig Warton and Howard Armstrong.

Introduction

These notes briefly describe the various types of stock wagons used by NSWGR from the 1940s to the end of the "steam era", approximately 1974.  Stock wagons, are, of course, specialised vehicles used in the transport of (mainly) farm animals and this type of traffic has long been abandoned by the NSW railways.  Each type of stock wagon that was used in the post-war will be briefly described, including notes on modelling them in HO scale.
 

Overview

The movement of animals by rail was traditionally a very important source of traffic for the NSW railways, and much time and effort, by the standards of the times, was put into developing suitable rolling stock and utilising it in ways that gave a fast and convenient service.   The main animal traffic was in sheep and cattle, with lesser flows of pigs, calves and other small farm animals.   In the days when there was no real alternative to rail transport the system evolved by the railways served the state reasonably well, but as the convenience and speed of road transport, combined with the changing patterns of rural land use and city consumption, changed the demand for stock transportation services, the railways, as in many other areas, failed to compete, and stock transport by rail declined and finally ceased altogether in the early 1990s.


 
Types of Stock wagons used between 1945 and 1974 on the NSW System.
(Does not include interstate bogie exchange stock)

Click on the link to jump to the relevant section of the page.
 

Type and Code Period of service
 
4 wheel CATTLE WAGONS
The 1903 standard CW 1903 - mid 1960s?
The 1921 diagonally braced timber underframed CW 1921 - mid 1970s?
The 1948 steel underframed CWs 1948 - mid 1970s
The 1965 diagonally braced steel underframed CW 1965 - mid 1970s
 
Bogie CATTLE WAGONS
The 1890s BCW  (2 versions) 1890s - 1957
The 1927 BCWs 1927 - 1966
The 1959 BCWs 1959 - early 1990s
The 1971 BCWs 1971 - early 1990s
The 1974/75 conversions from BSVs 1974 - early 1990s
 
4 wheel SHEEP VANS  
The post 1930 timber underframed GSVs 1930 - mid to late 1960s
The 1948 steel underframed GSV 1948 - mid 1970s 
   
Bogie SHEEP VANS  
The 1895 BSVs 1895 - 1957 
The 1959 BSVs 1959 - early 1990s

 

Description of the Wagons

4 Wheel Cattle Wagons.


There was only one class of 4 wheel cattle wagons, coded CW, which came in two main versions, the timber underframed 1920 version with diagonal planking, and the much less common steel underframed 1948 version, which most NSWR modellers would be familiar with from the Protype, Bergs and Camco models.   There was also a minor variation in body design of the 1948 version around, and there were also a few unconverted 1903 types still around, but they were exceedingly rare.  In the mid 1960s a number of surplus 10ft wheelbase steel underframed GSVs and LVs were converted to cattle wagons, but the body style reverted to that of the 1921 wooden underframed CWs.

The oldest subclass was the few surviving members of the 1903 standard CW. This was the first of the modern 4 wheel wagons, and it is likely that this is the earliest wagon type that most modellers will find familiar. The wagons are quite distinctive with high diagonal braced sides to the same height as the door. They were hook coupled and had therefore had Turton buffers (the "bottle" shaped ones).   This design was built over a long period of time and there were several minor changes to details, and they were eventually superseded by the 1921 design.   While most were converted to the style of the 1921 wagons, or scrapped, some survived the war and there is photographic evidence of at least one at Nyngan as late as 1965.

However, the most common type of CW in use during this period was the 1921 diagonally braced timber underframed version.  This subclass is another example of a type of wagon that seems to have been all but forgotten, even though in the steam era, this version by far outnumbered the rest.  It was a development of the "1903" type, the main difference being differing height of the doors and the body sides, whereas the "1903" type had the doors and the sides at the same height.  The ends were also slightly different.  It was also decided to standardise on this design of cattle wagon, and most of the earlier versions were scrapped or converted to conform to the 1921 design by the war.  In 1950 there were approx 1100 CWs in service, of which about 850 were of this design.   With their diagonal bracing they are very easy to distinguish in photos. 

Then in 1948 came the 250 members of the steel underframed version, which like their steel underframed GSV counterparts, were the first CWs to be fitted with automatic couplings, all stock wagons up to this time being fitted with hook drawgear and screw couplings.  The major change, visually, apart from the underframe, was the alteration to the bracing of the sides.  Instead of diagonal bracing, some were fitted with short vertical braces in the middle of the side panels, and some had no bracing at all. 

I have seen one very distant photo, p117, Ron Preston's 50 class book, that indicates that originally, some had one diagonal brace in the middle panel, so some further research is indicated to sort the bracing question out.  However, for most of their life, they had the short bracing in the middle of the panels, but a significant number without bracing survived till at least the late 50s, early 60s.

Then in 1965 a further small batch of CWs appeared, converted from a number of surplus LVs and GSVs with the standard steel u/f, but having the diagonally braced bodystyle of the 1921 wagons.  Why they were built to the earlier body style, and indeed why they were built at all, is a total mystery.

There are a number of preserved 4 wheel cattle wagons, two each of the 1965 type at both Thirlmere and Dorrigo, while Dorrigo also has a 1948 version.

It is unfortunate that the least representative wagon type is the most commonly preserved.  There are also 2 other CWs in existence, both 1921 wooden U/F types.  These are the "Ned Kelly" cars at Thirlmere.  Beneath the plywood covering, much of the body is intact as most of the modifications were done around the "window" areas.

 

The 1903 standard CW


CW 674, from the 1915 batch, at Clyde Wagon Works, circa 1930.                                    SRA photo from Craig Warton collection

There were still a (dwindling) few of this sub-type running in the post war period, 
though most had already been “rebuilt” to conform with the 1921 standard or scrapped, 
but there was at least one at Nyngan as late as 1965.


Distinguishing features:-  top of door and side at same height, timber u/f with hooks and Turton buffers
Some numbers are:- 12699-13748, 13849-13948, 14661-14810, 14861-14919, 16024-16043, 19310-19379, 20991-20390, 716, 1084, 2126, 2344, 2706, 3583, 4252, 4676, 5791, 7192, 7496, 7912 and 8138

 


CW 20344, from the original 1903 batch, at Elston's siding, Carriage works Redfern circa 1930.  It is thought 
that this photo was taken to illustrate the experimental fitting of internal metal diagonal bracing, a feature 
that was later to become a standard feature of cattle wagon bodies.                SRA photo from my collection


Model Availability None.

An article by Greg Edwards on backdating a 1948 CW (in this case the Protype version) 
appeared in the March/April 1975 AMRM.  This conversion could be carried out on the 
Bergs and the Camco/Silvermaz/Classic version as well.
 

CONVERSION TO OTHER CODES

During the early years of World War 2 there was a shortage of covered vans and a number of 
meat vans and cattle wagons were converted to CVs. This involved building a new body on 
the existing underframe, and some ten years later the old timber u/fs were replaced with 
new standard 10ft steel u/fs.

Some of the 1903 wagons that were converted where: 
106, 1084, 1793, 2556, 2829, 3067, 3922, 5466 and 7604.
 

The 1921 diagonally braced timber underframed CW


CW  14756 at Boorowa, October 1968.                                                                           Photo by Howard Armstrong.

The most common postwar 4 wheel cattle wagon was the 1921 version.


Distinguishing features are:- top of door higher than top of side, diagonal framing in the side panels, timber underframe and hook couplings with "Turton" bottle shaped buffers, corner posts to bottom of buffer beams
Some numbers:- 627, 2238, 2942, 4778, 5785, 9104,
3564, 4591, 4645, 5064, 7202, 150, 218, 716, 2303, 2613, 2930, 4128, 4628, 5517, 6438, 6611, 7774, 8142, 9124, 10713, 13791, 13853, 13891, 13939, 
14689, 14754, 14793, 15858, 17651, 19338, 20320, 20344, 20884 and 20964

 
 
 
Model Availability
None.
(As yet) 

Mike McCormac has been working on masters for some time, but his promised release 
date has well and truly come and gone!  We wait in eager anticipation!


I converted a Bergs 1948 CW to the 1921 timber underframed version, which is described in an article in the April 1988 AMRM.  This cruel close up shows up all its faults!  I have since discovered that the Bergs model is 6” too high in the sides, so my most recent conversion of the Bergs model has had the 6” removed from the framing and the horizontal planking replaced with Northeastern timber.

 
 

The 1948 steel underframed CWs


 CW 28018 at Dapto, circa 1970.                                                                                       Photo by Howard Armstrong 


This batch of 250 vehicles were fitted with the standard post-war 10ft wb (S truck) underframe and like their steel underframed GSV counterparts, they were the first cattle wagons to be fitted with automatic couplings.  All stock wagons up to this time had been fitted with hook drawgear and screw couplings.  The major change, visually, apart from the underframe, was the alteration to the bracing of the sides.  Instead of diagonal bracing, some were fitted with short vertical braces in the middle of the side panels, and some had no bracing at all. 

I have seen one very distant photo, p117, Ron Preston's 50 class book, that indicates that originally, some had one diagonal brace in the middle panel, so some further research is indicated to sort the bracing question out.  However, for most of their life, they had the short bracing in the middle of the panels, but a significant number without bracing survived till at least the late 50s, early 60s.


 
Distinguishing features are:- most fitted with short vertical braces in the middle of the side panels, some had no bracing at all, and some may have had one diagonal brace in the middle panel when first delivered. 10ft wb standard steel u/f with auto couplers and parallel standard freight buffers.  Corner posts stop short at top of buffer beam.
 
They were numbered in a single block from 27775 to 28024.

This is the correct number range for the Camco, Bergs and Lloyds/Protype models.


CW 27904 at Waterfall, 16-10-76.  This one has lost its corrugated iron roof, as did most CWs that survived 
into the 1970s                                                                                                                       Photo by Howard Armstrong


Model availability
GOOD

All recently available CWs (Protype/LMR, Camco/Silvermaz/Classic and Bergs) have 
been of this version, and apart from the slightly overscale height of the Bergs version 
all are quite acceptable.
 
 

The 1965 diagonally braced steel underframed CW.


CW 10 as preserved at the Rail Transport Museum, Thirlmere, 19-6-93.               Photo by James McInerney

38 of these were converted from a number of surplus LVs and GSVs with the standard 
steel underframe around about 1965.


Distinguishing features are:- 10ft steel u/f with diagonal bracing in the side panels.
Some numbers were:- 26603, 26703, 26729, 10, 16111, 17029 and 18546.

 
 
Model availability
NONE

Though not available commercially as such, they would be quite a simple conversion 
from any of the currently available models.
 

Bogie Cattle Wagons

There have been 5 versions of the bogie cattle wagon, all coded BCW, in use in the 
post war period, though not all at the same time.

The 1890s BCW


BCW 9916 from the 1891 batch at Clyde Wagon Works, circa 1930.       SRA photo from Craig Warton collection.

Built in two batches totalling 35 members, this version of the BCW began to disappear in 
1940, though 19 were still in use in 1950 and the last survivors were withdrawn in 1957. 


Distinguishing features:- timber construction, doors in center of vehicle, separate doors to each compartment, but in the center of the body.  1891 batch fitted with a bogie very similar to the Baldwin tender bogies.  1896 batch had arch bar bogies. 

 
The 1891 batch were numbered 9894-9918, while the 1896-98 batch were randomly numbered.  Some numbers are; 5891, 4553, 7943 and 5301.

 
Model availability
EXCELLENT

(Limited Availability)

Both versions available from Peter Ford through his “Early Days” range, 
but only available at the "Modelling the Early Days" annual convention.
Contact the "Old Buggers" for availability and details of the convention.
 

The 1927 BCWs


BCW 22431 at Clyde Wagon Works, circa 1930.                                     SRA photo from Craig Warton Collection

The 50 members of this variant lasted till quite late in this period. The first withdrawals took place 
in 1956 while major withdrawals commenced when the new BCWs were delivered from November 1959, although 12 were still in service in 1963. The final three wagons, 22466, 22455 and 22459 were condemned in 1966.


Distinguishing features:- similar body style to 1890s batch but a steel underframe and steel bracing.  Other features included arch-bar bogies and parallel shank buffers. 

Numbers for these wagons were 22424, 22427-22442, 22445-22477. 

The 1927 and 1890 BCWs were the only bogie cattle wagons till the introduction of the 1959 BCWs. 


Model availability
NONE

Scratchbuilders only, I'm afraid!
 

The 1959 BCWs


Outside braced BCW 29743 at Kempsey, January 1979.                                            Photo by Howard Armstrong

The first of the 100 "modern" BCW were delivered from November 1959 with the final wagon entering service in June 1960.


BCW 29772 at Clyde, circa 1960                                                                       SRA Official photo from my collection


Distinguishing features:- These wagons had two wooden compartments similar to the 1948 CW design mounted on a steel underframe and were fitted with 2AR bogies. 

They were numbered 29725-29824.



 
 
 
 

Model availability
GOOD

Minimodels and Protype\LMR have both produced versions of this BCW.
 

1971 BCWs


NSCF 30387 at West Tamworth, 18-12-85.                                                                  Photo by Howard Armstrong

In 1971 Goninans delivered a further 50 wagons, numbered 30351 -30400. These wagons were different from the 1960 type in that they had a steel underframe and steel bracing, 2AP bogies and were not fitted with buffers. 


NSCF 30363 at Blacktown 23-8-84                                                                                 Photo by Howard Armstrong


Model availability
EXCELLENT

This batch has been modelled with a very high quality kit from Stephen Johnson Models.
 

The 1974/75 conversions from BSVs


BCW 30362 at Berry in August 1983, showing the greater height of the converted wagons 

  Photo by Howard Armstrong
The final group of BCWs were an order of 100 wagons converted by the Clyde workshops from surplus 1959 BSVs in 1974/75. These were re-numbered 30801-30900.


BCW 30803 at Unanderra 24-4-77                                                                                   Photo by Howard Armstrong


Model availability
EXCELLENT

This batch has also been modelled with a very high quality kit from Stephen Johnson Models.
 

Bogie wagons were (until the 1960's) a very small part of the wagon fleet. Of the 
1100 (give or take a few) cattle wagons in traffic in 1949, only 75 were bogie 
wagons.  There was a similar ratio with sheep vans.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4 Wheel Sheep Vans
The 4 wheel sheep vans were, up until the early 1960s,  the second most numerous group of wagons in service - second only to the ubiquitous S and U/K families of open wagons.  Interesting to contemplate in this day and age when stock transport has disappeared from the railways altogether.   Luckily, or unluckily however, depending on how you look at it, despite the large numbers of stock wagons in use post-war there were only a few variations in wagon design used.

The reason our sheep vans had such a distinctive appearance was due to the development of the grated floor.  While other Australian, and some overseas railways has double deck sheep vans, as far as I know, the NSW system was the only system that had a gated floor, and in the case of the top deck, a semi-self cleaning hopper, that prevented the buildup of sheepshit inside the vehicle.  This was a very significant development in the history of sheep transport as it  allowed the stock to travel in more hygienic conditions and enabled the more efficient cleaning of the wagons between assignments.  This development dated from about 1910 and is responsible for the letters used in the code for sheep vans, Grated Sheep Van; such was its significance.  A number of different designs were tried between 1910 and 1930.  However, by 1930 it had been decided to standardise on one design of GSV, and all earlier sheep wagon designs were either scrapped, or converted to the new standard, by 1940. 

While there was one class of 4 wheel sheep vans, coded GSV, after 1948 there were two sub types, the original, and by far the more common, timber underframed version and the 250 members of the steel underframe version, which is the one that Camco/Silvermaz etc, has attempted to model.  More on this hobby horse of mine later.

The bodies of the two versions were virtually identical, though some of the pre-war vehicles still retained the older style of door sliders, the main differences being in the underframe.  The post 1930 timber underframed GSVs, had, of course, timber underframes, and were hook coupled and fitted with Turton "bottle" shaped buffers and had the end pillars extending to the bottom of the underframe, whereas the 1948 steel underframed GSV had the standard post-war 10ft steel u/f, the "S" truck underframe.

They were auto coupled, had parallel sided freight buffers and the end pillars ended at the top of the underframe.  This difference in the height of the end pillars makes them very easy to distinguish in photos, and on the layout! The 1948 versions were really quite rare in real life, despite the number of models built, as while there were 1793 GSVs on the books in 1949, and only 45 of the 1948 version had entered service by then, and as I mentioned above, only 250 of them were built.

The post 1930 timber underframed GSVs.


GSV 12368 at Flemington Markets, circa 1930.                                       Photo SRA from Craig Warton collection

A number of different designs of sheep vans with grated floors (hence GSV, 
Grated Sheep Vans) were tried between 1910 and 1930.  However, by 1930 
it had been decided to standardise on one design of GSV, and all earlier sheep wagon 
designs were either scrapped, or converted to the new standard, by 1940. 


Distinguishing features are:- 10ft wheel base, timber underframe, hook couplings with "Turton" bottle shaped buffers, and the extension of the corner posts to the bottom of the buffer beams.  This corner post length makes the 1930 timber underframed versions easy to distinguish in photos.

 
Some numbers are: - “Rebuilds” from earlier versions,

1116, 14468, 14454, 14502, 14950, 6535, 7984, 9185, 12420, 14606, 14546, 14613, 7405, 7644, 12407, 12457, 14500, 14590, 22124, 22260, 22034, 22131, 22189, 22241, 14941
 

Built new,

11828, 11837, 11871, 5762, 6266, 6475, 7292, 7531, 7563, 7570, 7661, 7587


 
Model availability
NONE

Can be converted from Camco/Silvermaz/Classic model by alteration of u/f, but model 
will still be considerably underscale in height, but this can be fixed, 
see modelling notes below.
 

The 1948 steel underframed GSV.


GSV 26566 at Bungendore, 23-6-65.                                                                               Photo by Howard Armstrong

In 1948, a small batch of approx. 250 GSVs were built, the body style remained the same, but they were fitted to the postwar standard 10ft wheelbase auto coupled steel underframe (S truck u/f). 


Distinguishing features are:- 10ft wheel base steel underframe with auto couplers and standard freight buffers and corner posts stopping at top of buffer beams. 

 
Numbers:- 26532 to 26774

 
Model availability
There is one, Yes.......

The Camco/Silvermaz/Classic is based on this version, though it is approx 1 ft 
underscale in height.  It can be used as a basis for a decent model, see below.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bogie Sheep Vans
There were also two classes of bogie sheep vans, both coded BSV, but in this case, quite different in appearance. 

The older class was introduced in 1895, and had all disappeared by 1957, a couple of years before the 1959 introduction of the modern BSVs, the appearance of which most NSWR modellers should be familiar with.

The 1895 BSVs were a very interesting and distinctive class, another of those "invisible" classes that seem to have disappeared from the collective memory of modellers.  The 60 members of the class were introduced in December of 1895, after a number of short lived early experiments with bogie sheep vans. They were 36 feet long and carried 200 sheep, twice the capacity of a 4 wheeler, and were the last class of non grated sheep van to remain in service.  As can be seen from the photos below they had no gap between the top and bottom decks, as they were introduced before the adoption of the grated deck.  Unlike all other sheep vans before or since, they had only one set of doors on each deck, and while this design was not repeated, they must have been reasonably successful, as the last of them was not scrapped until 1957.

The NSW system was without bogie sheep vans for only 2 years, however, as a new type was introduced in 1959.  Also coded BSV and consisting of two GSV style bodies mounted on a steel underframe, these were the ultimate development of the sheep wagon in NSW.  They quickly replaced the 4 wheelers, and by about 1965, the number of GSVs on the system was quite small.  They are a tribute to the designers of the original grated and drained sheep van body, as they carried this design, perfected in the early years of the century, right through to the demise of stock transport in the early 1990s.

The 1895 BSVs.


BSV 590 at Clyde Wagon Works, circa 1930.                                           Photo SRA from Craig Warton collection

There were 60 of these 36ft vans with, unusually for NSW sheep vans, only one door per 
deck on each side.  They were all out of service by 1957.

Very few numbers are known for this class, the three confirmed numbers are: 
207, 590 and 7319.


BSV 7319 at Clyde, circa 1930.                                                                    Photo SRA from Craig Warton collection


Model availability
NONE

I understand that Peter Ford intends to do one of these as part of his “Early Days” range 
at some time in the future.  In the meantime, what a wonderful scratchbuilding challenge!
 

The 1959 BSVs


BSV 30016 at Unanderra, May 1974.                                                                               Photo by Howard Armstrong

Consisting of two GSV bodies mounted on a steel underframe and riding on 2AR bogies, these were the ultimate development of the sheep wagon in NSW.  They quickly replaced the 4 wheelers, and by about 1965, the number of GSVs on the system was quite small. 

They were numbered between 29825 and 30009.


BSV 29926 at Unanderra, July 1963.  Still fitted with buffers and transporting a "half" load of sheep. 
                                                                                                                                                    Photo by Howard Armstrong


Model availability
YES

The 1959 BSV is available from Minimodels, or can be converted from the Camco 
4 wheelers as per the article by John McKenzie in the December 1995 AMRM.  Stephen Ottaway (SJM) is working on masters for a very fine version of this vehicle but I don't know if it has been released yet.

Modelling Notes
It is possible to model a fair cross section of the stock wagons in use after WW2, by use of available kits and a bit of modification and alteration. 


The 1948 CWs
The easiest version to model is the 1948 steel underframed CW, available from Bergs Hobbies, Camco and Lloyds, who all produce models of this 4 wheel cattle wagon.  All need a little work to bring them up to "Lambing Flat" standards. 

The Camco version needs the underframe reduced in height to the correct 9", the underframe moved in towards the center of the wagon, and some work done on the W irons. 
The gaps between the planks can be opened out, a double roof fitted and brake gear and other detail items added.

The Bergs version needs to be reduced in height by 6”, which this conversion to the CW's 
"as delivered" appearance has had done to it. 

 
CW conversions:

I have converted the Bergs kit into two versions of the CW. 
 

 
This one is a variation on the 1948 steel underframed CW without the vertical framing in the side panels.  This one has had the extra 6” removed from the height.  The plastic horizontal planking has been removed and replaced with timber.
The 1921 timber underframed CW described
in my article in the April 1988 AMRM. 

 
 

The 1948 GSV is also available from Camco, but, unfortunately, the Camco model seems to have lost about a scale foot in height, and to my eyes, looks nothing like a GSV.  However, since I have defected to Large Scale it seems that it is unlikely that I will finish the masters I had been working on for a GSV , so unless someone else comes up with a good GSV it would seem that HO NSWR modellers are stuck with the Camco version .

A comparison of a standard Camco GSV (albeit superdetailed) and a correctly dimensioned post
     1930 GSV made from Camco parts showing how the kit is too low, despite the overscale height of the Camco underframe.

The bars are quite nice, however, and I have kit-bashed a number of sheep vans using them.

The basic technique is as follows, the bar sections of the side are carefully separated and trimmed, and a new framework is constructed from timber, the bars are then inserted into the framework and the rest of the vehicle constructed from timber and styrene.  The 4 wheeler underframe is constructed from scratch and the detailing bits available from ILM and Stephen Johnson Models make construction a lot quicker and easier.

A selection of stock wagons converted from Camco bits.  Standard 1948 CW upgrade on the left and sheep van parts used to produce the OSV in the middle and the post 1930 timber framed GSV on the right.


The OSV complete and in service. 
I have since learnt that the number and code on these vehicles was not placed on a plate on the door like the post 1930 and 1948 GSVs, but was instead painted on the underframe.


The completed post 1930 GSV.


A 1948 steel under framed GSV made from SJM BSV parts. 
 
 
 
 

Operation of Stock Wagons on the Layout.

Local movement of stock can be represented by the inclusion of any number of stock wagons in a “pick-up” goods while block loads of stock wagons can be used to represent the stock specials that ran from country centers to Flemington, Hanbury Jnt and Telarah saleyards on stock sale days and the “cross-country” stock specials that ran between various rural centers.


A cross-country stock special crossing the viaduct near Forbes, early 1960s.             Photo by Peter Neve.

Stock specials normally ran as ¾ Goods loads for the locomotive class rostered and if insufficient stock loading was available the load was made up with perishable and other urgent traffic as can be seen in this official NSWGR view from the early 1950s.

             SRA photo from my collection 
 Stock trains were regarded as the most important freight traffic and were given priority over all other traffic except passenger trains. 

Empty wagons were normally returned on any available goods train and while a blocks of stock wagons often appeared in the consist of the goods train it was not a dedicated stock train as such, and also conveyed any other type of loading available.

Another interesting aspect of stock trains that I have not seen modelled is the movement of starving stock in times of drought.
 This was done in ordinary stock wagons in normal conditions, but in times of extraordinary demand, as the stock was starving, and very weak, they were sometimes conveyed in open wagons, specifically high sided U and K wagons for cattle and ordinary S trucks for sheep.  This official NSWGR photo shows a train of starving stock at Wagga Wagga sometime in the late 1940s.

Another important aspect of modelling stock trains is the brake van.  The "Coaching and Goods Instructions" book clearly states that bogie brake vans provided with passenger and lavatory accommodation must be provided for the accommodation of the drovers and other persons accompanying stock on all stock trains.  This was most often an SHG, as these vans were built specifically with stock train operation in mind, which is why they have two passenger compartments and only a small goods area in the Guard's compartment. 


Standing at Young during the late '40s/early '50s this fine example of an SHG may well be looking for a stocktrain to trail.

SRA photo from my collection

One of Lambing Flat's MHGs performs a similar task, conveying a couple of drovers in search of a stock train.

 
As a final message from the Detail Police, only the 1948 GSVs and CWs, and the post 1959 BCWs and BSVs has auto couplings, all other stock wagons had hooks and buffers, so please, no non buffered autocoupled vehicles, such as RUs, K etc, marshalled next to the older hook coupled vehicles.  And that includes SHGs, as they were also hook drawgeared, as befitting their main use on stock trains. 

The information above is provided for the use and information of fellow modellers and enthusiasts
and may be reproduced for private use.  For permission for Commercial reproduction and use on
other web sites please contact the Copyright holder:

James McInerney


 
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