Darling Downs Obituaries, 1886.

From the pages of the Toowoomba Chronicle.

Compiled by Terry Foenander.




In 1886, the News of the Day column in the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser commenced publishing obituaries of personalities of the region, and some who had passed away elsewhere, but who had previously resided on the Downs.. These obituaries were published over a number of years. They could sometimes be quite detailed, and are of assistance to genealogical researchers.

For some years I have been collecting copies of these interesting articles, and have decided to publish them on the Internet for the benefit of researchers on the subject. Additions will be included at regular intervals, and it is hoped that I will eventually be able to include all obituaries published in the News of the Day columns.

To assist those researching their ancestors, I have included, immediately after this introduction, an index of the names of those included in these lists, together with the date of the issue in which the obituary was published.


Index

William Aitken, September 2, 1886.

Thomas Anderson, July 13, 1886.

William Apjohn, November 2, 1886.

---- Ayling, May 20, 1886.

Frank Barlow, April 10, 1886.

E.I.C. Brown, June 19, 1886.

Denis Buckley, June 10, 1886.

Hugh Campbell, November 2, 1886.

Peter Campbell, October 5, 1886.

Patrick Griffin Clancy, May 1, 1886.

K. Cox, June 5, 1886.

Hugh Crawford, May 8, 1886.

Raglan Davey, November 2, 1886, November 4, 1886 and November 6, 1886.

William Drury, July 22, 1886.

August Farmer, December 22, 1886.

John Ferguson, August 28, 1886.

Henry Finlay, December 16, 1886.

Alexander Gaskarth, August 26, 1886.

John Gaul, June 26, 1886.

Richard Gibson, August 7, 1886.

Joseph Gould, May 8, 1886.

Mary Green, September 28, 1886.

---- Gunn (daughter of the late Donald Gunn), April 17, 1886.

William Gurney, June 3, 1886.

Thomas Hodgkinson, August 10, 1886.

C.W.I. Hoffman, June 17, 1886.

Thomas Johnson, August 28, 1886.

John Jones, April 17, 1886.

Frederick Jordan, April 20, 1886.

Arthur Kebbell, December 22, 1886.

August Keefer, September 18, 1886.

Peter Lambert, June 17, 1886.

D'Arcy Texas McDougall, July 22, 1886.

John McNicol, December 30, 1886.

Wilhelmina (Minnie) Mundt, July 31, 1886 and August 5, 1886.

Margaret Oakes, September 9, 1886.

Samuel Ogden, December 22, 1886.

David Ord, August 12, 1886.

Mary Ellen Parker, August 28, 1886.

Teddy Parker, August 28, 1886.

Henry Pickering, July 15, 1886.

Henry Plint, August 24, 1886.

John Cyril Roberts, November 9, 1886 and November 11, 1886.

Joseph Rub, September 18, 1886.

Morris Samuel, November 11, 1886.

George Share, May 22, 1886.

Margaret C. Sinclair, August 12, 1886.

Samuel Smith, October 19, 1886.

Shepherd Smith, September 18, 1886.

---- Spark (son of Michael Spark), July 31, 1886.

Alfred Spiro, June 5, 1886.

Archibald Stenhouse, September 9, 1886.

Edward Tarrant, June 15, 1886.

Toompani (aboriginal), September 16, 1886.

George Telford Weale, June 12, 1886.

William Weaber, October 19, 1886.

George Wheatly, November 6, 1886.

Herbert Wilson, November 18, 1886.

Arthur Wooldridge, Saturday, July 31, 1886.


From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, April 10, 1886:

It is with extreme regret that we record this morning a very painful accident which occurred in Toowoomba, on Wednesday evening, resulting in the death, a few hours afterwards, of a young man of great promise and one who was held in exceptionally high repute by all who knew him. From the particulars we have gathered, it would seem that the young man, Mr. Frank Barlow, a son of Dr. Barlow of the Grange, who was employed in the Queensland National Bank, was riding with his sister between five and six o'clock on the evening named, when his horse stumbled and fell, it is believed through getting one of his fore feet in a hole. The precise nature of the occurrence is not known but it is supposed from the nature of the injuries which were subsequently ascertained to have been sustained, that young Mr. Barlow was thrown off on his head, and probably on to a stump. The scene of the accident was not far from the residence of Mr. Baynes, whose family were especially kind to the injured youth, and on being informed of the occurrence by Miss Barlow, who rode there before proceeding to procure the services of Dr. Roberts, at once went to the sufferer's aid. In the first instance, Mr. Barlow was removed to the house of a German settler close by, where every kindness was shown him. Dr. Roberts was soon on the spot, and seeing the probable fatal ending of the injuries and uncertain as to whether the young man would survive to be carried home, recommended his removal to the Hospital, which was at once done. But hope from the first was not even entertained, the symptoms being those of fracture of the base of the skull, and the result showed that this was only too correct, for without regaining consciousness, except for a brief few moments when Miss Baynes was placing a cold cloth on his head he passed away shortly before midnight, at the early age of less than nineteen years. It is needless to say that the sad fatality cast considerable gloom over the town on its becoming known, and condolences were kindly conveyed to the sorrowing parents by many who knew and appreciated the genuine worth of the young man thus suddenly cut off in the early spring of what certainly promised to be a bright career. We can only now join with other townspeople in our expressions of regret at so untimely a death, and trust that the bereaved family will at least derive some consolation in their natural sorrow from the evidences that are being given that their son was at once beloved and esteemed by many.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, April 17, 1886:

The Glen Innes Guardian reports the death of Miss Gunn, daughter of the late Mr. Donald Gunn, of Pikedale, Darling Downs. Our contemporary says:- "We regret to have to announce the death of Miss Gunn, daughter of Mrs. Gunn, of Clarevaulx, which sad event took place the other day. The deceased lady, who was aged about 20 years, had been ailing some time and her death, which is generally regretted, was hardly unexpected."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, April 17, 1886:

A few days ago we published an account of the dreadful death of a boy named John Jones, 12 years of age at Warwick. A magisterial enquiry was held before Mr. T.P. Pugh, the Police Magistrate of Warwick, and the depositions have just been made public. From them we make the following extracts:- Jane Jones, mother of the deceased child deposed that she kept a refreshment stall on the 17th March at the Warwick rifle range. Brown put her son on a horse, and asked her to let him go into town on a message. She hesitated, but was assured the horse was quite safe, and soon afterwards she saw her boy going on the horse in the direction of Warwick. About three-quarters of an hour afterwards she saw him dragged past her booth by the horse with his foot caught either in the stirrup or stirrup-leather. When he was released from the horse she only saw him breathe twice. The boy was not used to riding, and was sent into town by Mr. Brown, and not by herself. William Brown deposed that the boy was going into town on a message, and he offered to lend him his horse; he was with Mrs. Jones at the time, and walked up to the horse with the boy, telling him to be very careful not to go racing; he did not shorten the stirrups, but put his feet in the leathers; previous to leaving the tent he asked the boy in the presence of his mother if he could ride, and he answered "Yes"; deceased went into town at a walking pace. Did not see the boy again, but got his mare back about 5 o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the near stirrup leather was cut; he offered the boy the mare out of kindness, but was not aware that the mare had ever been ridden previously by a boy; he had ridden the mare for over fifteen years, and knew her to be quiet for his own riding; she was not in the habit of shying, nor was she readily frightened; he had fired a gun while on her back; the boy went into town to oblige four persons, of whom witness was one, he was sent for a bottle of whisky; he told the boy's mother the mare was not a particularly spirited animal - that the boy would be perfectly safe. Thomas Moggridge, aerated water manufacturer, deposed to seeing the boy dragged by the stirrup and hearing his screams; the mare stopped of itself, and he was the first to catch hold of the boy, who was hanging on the off side; the boy was breathing when witness cut the stirrup-leather, but his head was very much battered, and was a mass of blood; he saw and heard the boy's head strike against a log. Dr. Arthur Phillips, who first attended to the boy, gave evidence as to the frightful injuries to his head; the boy never regained consciousness, and died within half-an-hour from fracture of the skull and consequent injury to the brain. Captain Desbois, who was scoring at the range, said he saw the horse cantering by, dragging the boy, and saw the widow Jones running after it; he caught her by the arm trying to pacify her, and she cried out, "Why did they make him go? I told them he should not go;" the witness Brown was one of the firing party on that day; he knew his mare to be somewhat nervous; she trembled at the shooting, and he considered her a timid creature. The Attorney-General comments as follows on the foregoing:- "I have read these depositions with the greatest pain and indignation. The conduct of the man Brown in placing the lad, unaccustomed as he was to riding, upon a strange horse and sending him into town for a bottle of whisky was in the highest degree reprehensible, but his conduct after the occurrence of the accident appears to me to have been unspeakably heartless and brutal."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, April 20, 1886:

It is with very sincere regret that we record the death of Mr. Frederick Jordan, formerly of Toowoomba, and lately of the Australian Hotel, Queen Street, Brisbane. It is only a few days ago that we recorded the successful sale of Mr. Jordan's business at a price which must have left him a handsome competence, and it is sad to think that in so short an interval he should be taken away. On the discovery of tin early in 1872, Mr. Jordan, who was then on the Tumberumba gold field, came across and took up his abode at Stanthorpe. For some time he was managing clerk for Messrs. Boland and Desmond, and when that firm removed to Toowoomba Mr. Jordan accompanied them and remained in their service a considerable time. He then took the hotel now in the occupation of Mr. Henry Fox, where he was for some years a successful man of business, always taking a leading part in the public movements of the town, and contributing most liberally to all kinds of amusements. Indeed, he was the life and soul of racing matters in this town for some time, and scarcely allowed a holiday to pass by without improvising amusements of some kind for holiday seekers. About three years ago he disposed of his business in Toowoomba, and purchased the lease of the Australian Hotel, situated at the corner of Queen and Albert Streets, Brisbane, where for three years he did a large and lucrative business. Only recently he received an extended lease upon his spending ^3000 on the property, and he made it one of the first class hotels in the city. Recently, as our readers are aware, he sold out to Mr. E. Voges for ^12,000. Telegrams announcing his death which came to Toowoomba early yesterday morning, could hardly at first be believed for a great many were scarcely aware that he was in any way indisposed. For some time past, however, he has been suffering from an affection of the liver, and of late this had begun to assume serious proportions. It was under medical advice that he decided upon selling his business and retiring into private life. Unfortunately the ease which he sought came too late. At ten o'clock on Sunday night, at Southport, whether he had gone in the hope that the invigorating sea breezes of that healthy watering place would restore him, he peacefully breathed his last, the immediate cause of death being dropsy which usually follows upon liver complaints. Mr. Jordan was of a kindly and genial disposition. He was a warm supporter of the turf, and only at the last Tattersall's races he generously presented a purse of 100 sovs., to be added to one of the chief events of the day, and also "gave promises of future support to the club." He will be missed by many who have frequently received from him acts of kindness, for he was one of those men who "do good by stealth and blush to find it fame." Even when in Brisbane, he did not forget Toowoomba, and has often contributed handsome prizes to the local Agricultural Societies for competition by farmers. The townspeople of Toowoomba will long have a kindly recollection of Mr. Jordan.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, May 1, 1886:

There are many in Toowoomba who will remember P.G. Clancy, once railway stationmaster, and a promising officer in the Railway Department. His active habits and business capacity secured for him the appointment of Station Master at Brisbane, the "blue ribbon" of the Railway Department. When leaving Toowoomba he was presented with a magnificent gold watch and appendages valued at (pounds sterling) 50, and his health was drunk in bumpers of champagne. Unfortunately, like too many young men, he needed ballast, he was not proof against the effects of sudden prosperity, he yielded to the seductive influence of the cup, and the inevitable result followed. He lost his situation, his character, everything in fact that made life dear, and become an outcast from his home and family. The following paragraph in Thursday's Courier records his sad end: - "It is reported that the remains of a man were found in the bush near Campbell and Son's sawmills at Coochin Creek. The body was identified as that of Patrick Griffin Clancy, formerly railway stationmaster at Toowoomba and Brisbane, also station auditor and pay clerk, and who subsequently retired. Clancy is supposed to have left Brisbane a few days ago in the steamer Mavis."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, May 8, 1886:

We regret to record the sudden and unexpected death of Mr. Hugh Crawford, youngest son of Mr. William Crawford, of Crawfordsbourne. The deceased was a member of the Permanent Force, and was at the recent Easter Encampment at Lytton. His parents never had the least information communicated to them that he was ill except a telegram from some friends on Wednesday evening stating that he was unwell, and on Thursday morning they received a telegram that he was dead. The body was brought to Toowoomba by the early train yesterday, and interred in the Toowoomba general cemetery, but not the slightest token of respect was shown by the officers or men of the Permanent Force for their deceased comrade. So far as the facts have been communicated to us, it is a case of great heartlessness, and a human life appears of very little consequence to some of the white kid-glove gentry who parade their "masher" forms in gaudy uniform at the public expense.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, May 8, 1886:

Many of our readers will learn with regret that the unfortunate accident which befell Mr. Joseph Gould, of the Royal Hotel, Crow's Nest, on Tuesday evening last, has terminated fatally. How the accident really occurred will remain a mystery, but it is conjectured that as the horse Mr. Gould was driving home with was a high spirited animal - he had expressed an opinion to one or two friends in Toowoomba that he was afraid of it - it became unmanageable and bolted, and it being a dark night, the horse dashed madly against the licensed gates in Mr. Pechey's paddock nearest to Crow's Nest. The shafts were found broken to pieces and the body of the cart turned upside down, and Mr. Gould lying against a portion of the fence in a pool of blood insensible, his bead being dreadfully injured. He was removed at once to his home, and medical assistance telegraphed for, and although all was done by Dr. Armstrong that medical skill could suggest, the unfortunate gentleman died on Thursday afternoon at three o'clock. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon at the Cabarlah cemetery and was attended by a large concourse of sorrowing friends and neighbours, the Rev. John Vosper officiating at the grave. The deceased leaves a wife and several children.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, May 20, 1886:

Some time ago a paragraph appeared in this paper announcing that a man had been found in a paddock near Toowoomba, and conveyed to the Hospital in an exhausted state. Every care was tendered to him while at the Hospital, and about two weeks ago he left without the permission of the authorities. The police found him on Sunday evening in a paddock near Drayton in a state of exhaustion, and he was immediately brought to the Hospital, where Dr. Wright did everything possible to cure him, but to no avail, and he died on Tuesday morning last. Deceased, whose name was Ayling, has been about 36 years in the colony.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, May 22, 1886:

From Wednesday's Courier we learn that the Attorney-General having read the depositions taken at Rockhampton on the 17th April last at a magisterial inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of one George Share, has endorsed the depositions as follows:- "The conduct of the men Sturgess, Cook, Hargraves, and Smith, in deliberately walking away and leaving the unfortunate man Share lying out on a verandah all night, when his home was so short a distance from the place, is discreditable, and, in the highest degree censurable." The facts of the case, as given in evidence, are to the effect that the five men named left an hotel together on the night of the 31st March. Share and Smith had rifles, and began fencing with their ramrods. Share fell down insensible after having hit Smith, who, with the three others, finding Share could not walk, placed him on the verandah of the hotel, where he was found the next morning in an unconscious state. Share was removed to his home, only a short distance away, and lingered on in an insensible state until the 5th April, when he died. Dr. H.E. Brown attended Share, and gave the cause of death as apoplexy, which he, in his evidence said might have been brought on by a blow.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, June 3, 1886:

Our obituary column this morning records the death of Mr. William Gurney, at the advanced age of 72 years. Mr. Gurney was one of the pioneers of this district, and has done much in his time to advance horticulture. Thirty years ago when Drayton was the capital of the Downs, he had in that town a splendid garden and orchard that used to be the admiration of visitors; and in the month of November, "Gurney's apricots" were eagerly inquired after by the numerous guests that used, in those days, to domicile at the old Bull's Head Hotel. His more recent home and its surroundings, at Ellengowan, are a picture of neatness, and bear evident traces of the skill and ability of a man who knew what gardening was, and what the district was capable of producing. His familiar face will be missed, and many will think of him regretfully.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, June 5, 1886:

Many of our readers will regret to learn that the Mr. Alfred Spiro, who was one of the passengers drowned by the wreck of the ill-fated Ly-ee-Moon, was a son of the late Mr. Henry Spiro, once a large storekeeper in Toowoomba, a local magistrate, and who occupied the position of mayor for one term. The young gentleman was born in Toowoomba, and at the time of his death was only 17 years of age. We are also sorry to learn that the saloon passenger, Mr. K. Cox, who was also among the drowned, was a brother-in-law of Mr. F.W.E. Baxter, manager of the local branch of the Australian Joint Stock Bank.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, June 10, 1886:

Mr. Denis Buckley, of the North Star Hotel, Ruthven-street, died suddenly at half-past eleven o'clock last night. His funeral will take place to-morrow, at two o'clock.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, June 12, 1886:

It is with sincere regret we announce that yesterday a telegram was received by the Police Magistrate from the manager of Canterbury station, South Gregory district, stating that Mr. George Telford Weale died on Thursday from a severe attack of dysentery from which he had been suffering for several days, and that his remains were to be interred yesterday in the Canterbury cemetery. By the numerous friends of Mr. Weale in this town and district we are sure this painful intelligence will be received with universal sorrow. Mr. Weale was in the service of the survey department, and from his high educational attainments and distinguished ability as a surveyor, was held in high esteem by the officers of his department. When in this district, in the employment of the survey department, he had a large circle of friends who were attached to him by his thorough good nature and his geniality as a host. In his domestic relations he was a kind and indulgent father and an affectionate husband, and his loss by his family will be deeply mourned. When the volunteer movement first began in Toowoomba Mr. Weale gave it his countenance and hearty support, and was one of the first lieutenants elected by the force in this district. He was a general favourite with the men, and when he retired from the force to carry out his survey duties in the far interior he left with the sincere regard of the entire contingent. Mr. Weale came from a family of very high standing in London, and was connected with one of the noble houses of Great Britain. When Mr. Weale left for the interior his wife and family remained in Toowoomba, and it will be readily understood how great was the shock and how deep the grief when the melancholy intelligence was broken to them yesterday. We tender to the family our heartfelt sympathy in their heavy bereavement.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, June 15, 1886:

Much surprise (says the Western Champion) was caused in town late on Sunday night by a report that Edward Tarrant, well-known throughout the district, and erstwhile trainer of Elsinore, had committed suicide at Banks' Hotel under very distressing circumstances. From what we learn it appears the unfortunate man lost heavily at the races, and had a few drinks during the day, perhaps half-a-dozen altogether. In the evening he was in the company of several gentlemen in the coffee-room at the Royal Hotel, and appeared to be in an unusually happy mood. At about half-past nine Tarrant retired to his room, and upon returning a little later asked for a drink. This was supplied him, and a gentleman standing alongside deceased saw him pop something into the glass, the contents of which he hastily drank. Tarrant was asked what he had been drinking, and he replied only some senna. Not believing him, and noticing a peculiar expression in the man's face, the question was repeated. Tarrant then said he had done it at last; that he had taken strychnine, and that he hoped the Lord would forgive him. Presently he said he feared the poison was no good, as he had carried it about with him for years. An alarm was immediately raised, and Dr. H.G. Button was speedily in attendance, and did all in his power to neutralise the poison. Tarrant was in severe pain, and said that if he thought he would have suffered so much he would not have taken the poison. In about half-an-hour afterwards the man died during a severe paroxysm. A magisterial enquiry will be held in due course, when we shall be able to give fuller particulars.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, June 17, 1886:

A telegram in this morning's issue states that Mr. C.W.I. Hoffman was drowned at Townsville on Monday afternoon last, having accidentally fallen from a vessel while witnessing a review in Cleveland Bay. Deceased for some years carried on the business of a cabinet maker in Warwick, and was known to many in this town.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, June 17, 1886:

An elderly man named Peter Lambert was found lying dead underneath the railway bridge over Devil's Gully early on Tuesday morning by the ganger in charge of the duplication works at that place. The Ipswich correspondent of the Courier writes that the deceased was night signalman, and it is supposed that he fell off the bridge, which is about 50 ft. in height, when crossing it during the night.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, June 19, 1886:

The death is announced of Mr. E.I.C. Brown, who will be known to a large number of the residents of the Darling Downs as a member of the late firm of Little and Brown, solicitors, Brisbane. For some years Mr. Brown was a member of the Legislative Council, and retired in 1882 in consequence of ill-health. His only daughter was married to Sir Ralph Gore, Bart, and is now in England, having left the colony with Mrs. Brown in April last in the Quetta. Mr. Brown is understood to have amassed a large fortune chiefly by acquiring land in and around Brisbane, and he was also one of the Three fortunate shareholders in the Courier and Queenslander newspapers. The funeral of the deceased gentleman took place yesterday.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, June 26, 1886:

The sad intelligence has reached Brisbane of the suicide of Mr. John Gaul, the manager of the Queensland National Bank at Isisford, at that town on Tuesday morning. As yet (says Thursday's Courier) but very brief particulars have been received in connection with this shocking occurrence. It appears that Mr. Gaul had for some days previous to his death been suffering acutely from a serious illness, and on Tuesday morning while in an apparent fit of despondency blew out his brains with a revolver, death being instantaneous. Through the courtesy of the general manager of the bank in this city, we are enabled to state that the deceased gentleman's accounts were in a most satisfactory state, and no reason can be ascribed for his rash act except that of his illness. The news of Mr. Gaul's untimely death will cause the profoundest regret amongst not only his intimate acquaintances in banking circles, but also amongst his numerous friends in this city, and in many of the Northern towns. The deceased gentleman was a resident of Brisbane for many years, and won the esteem of a host of friends by his good natured jovial disposition. While residing in this city he was an active member of the Albert Cricket Club in its palmiest days, and was always to the front in upholding the supremacy of the club. The deceased gentleman was at one time a teacher under the Education Department, but afterwards entered the employ of Messrs. D.L. Brown and Co., and from there joined the Queensland National Bank in 186. He gradually worked his way upward in that institution until he was placed in the position of bank manager. In this capacity he has conducted the business of the bank at Port Douglas, Ingham, Thornborough, Cooktown, and latterly at Isisford. The deceased was regarded as a valuable servant of the bank which he has served with faithfulness for upwards of ten years. Mr. Gaul was an unmarried man, about 22 years of age, and of strictly temperate habits. A brother of the deceased, Mr. S. Gaul, is in the service of the Queensland National Bank at Cloncurry; while another brother, Andrew, is a well-known townsman of Brisbane. The parents of the deceased live at Kangaroo Point.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, July 13, 1886:

One of those terrible accidents which cast a gloom over a whole community has occurred with reference to Mr. Thomas Anderson, of Rose Valley, Umbirom. The circumstances are as follows:- On Friday last, Mr. Anderson had an entire horse in his stockyard. While trying to put a halter round the horse's neck the animal broke away, and on turning kicked his late owner on the forehead, fracturing the frontal bone just above the eyebrows. The only witness of the accident was a little girl, who ran to acquaint her mother of the fact. The unfortunate man was taken to his home nearby, and Dr. Garde was immediately sent for, who, on arrival, found his patient unconscious, and upon examination of the nature of his injuries at once perceived that the chances of their successful treatment were but few. After doing all that experience and skill could suggest in connection with the case the Doctor returned to Toowoomba, to be again sent for on the following day. Revisiting his patient, the symptoms were not found to have improved, and Mr. Anderson was still unconscious, and after giving instructions as to further treatment, Dr. Garde again returned home with but small hope that the unfortunate man would survive the effects of his injuries. Intelligence reached here yesterday that Mr. Anderson had died the previous evening. As we have mentioned, the sad news cast a gloom over a large circle of friends and acquaintances who for many years had recognized in the deceased the materials, physical and mental, which go to make up a good colonist, and as belonging to the class of the men whose indomitable industry and perseverance have rescued so large a portion of the Australian soil from its wilderness condition. The deceased was a native of the north of Ireland, and arrived in the colony some twenty-seven years ago. He was for some years a storekeeper at Eton Vale, and subsequently took up a selection at Umbirom, where he has also been postmaster, and carried on the business of grocer and butcher. He was greatly respected for his thorough integrity and genial disposition, and his loss will be regretted by all who knew him, but especially by his widow and seven daughters who have now to mourn the loss of a considerate husband and father. The funeral will leave the deceased's late residence at nine this morning, and will arrive at Drayton at 1.40 p.m.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, July 15, 1886:

The death is reported by the Dalby Herald of Mr. Henry Pickering, formerly of Yuelbah hotel, the eldest son of one of the pioneer families of the district. The deceased died somewhat suddenly early last Sunday morning.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, July 22, 1886:

A sad accident is reported by Inspector Harris to have occurred between the New South Wales border and Stanthorpe on Thursday. A man whose name has been ascertained to be William Drury, from the papers found in his possession, while travelling from Molong, in New South Wales, got a lift on a ballast train at the 21-mile camp. When within three miles of Stanthorpe Drury fell off the truck, and the wheels of it passed over both thighs, shattering them frightfully. The unfortunate man, who was about 50 years of age, never spoke after the accident, and died within ten minutes afterwards.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, July 22, 1886:

It is with regret we record the death of Mr. D'Arcy Texas McDougall, eldest son of the Hon. J.F. McDougall, of Rosalie, who died at Eaton Farm, on the evening of Monday last from chronic rheumatism, a disease from which in its incipient stage the deceased gentleman began to suffer from more than ten years ago. Mr. McDougall had tried the hot springs in New Zealand, but without avail, and in May last he determined on returning home - according to the unanimous opinion of his medical advisers only to die, and this proved to be correct for Mr. McDougall passed away as stated, congestion of the lungs being the immediate cause of death, and which is often a result of rheumatism, and especially of rheumatic fever. The deceased gentleman leaves a widow, the sister of Mrs. Mackenzie of this town. He was at one time one of the best and strongest athletes in the district, and his decease, though the result was certain under any circumstances, is generally regretted.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, July 31, 1886:

A little lad, aged seven years, son of Mr. Michael Spark, a coal-miner, residing at Bundanba, was drowned in Bundanba Creek on Tuesday afternoon last.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, July 31, 1886:

The sudden death of a young woman 22 years of age named Minnie Mundt, is reported from Mount Walker, near Ipswich. The body of the girl was found about a quarter of a mile from her father's house, and there was no doubt she had committed suicide. She was enciente at the time, but the father of the expected child had promised to marry her. An enquiry has been held.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, July 31, 1886:

It is with regret we record this morning the death of Mr. Arthur Wooldridge, the manager of the Toowoomba branch of the Union Bank, which took place at his residence in Campbell Street yesterday afternoon. The deceased gentleman has been for about seven years resident in this town. In February, 1878, he arrived here from Melbourne, where he had been previously employed, for the purpose of opening up a business for the Union Bank in this district. When he had been some six months or more manager he was appointed one of the inspectors of the Bank, but, his health failing, he, after about twelve months absence from Toowoomba, applied to be again appointed to the management of the bank here, as the climate of the Darling Downs was best suited to the disease from which he was even then suffering in its incipient stage. His request was acceded to, and he has remained here ever since. He was a gentleman of quiet and unostentatious habits, and was highly respected by the bank authorities, by the customers of the bank, and by the officials with whom he was brought into contact. In his private relations he was a most estimable citizen. He leaves a widow and six children, but we are happy to say they are well provided for. Mr. Wooldridge was only 42 years of age at the time of his death. The funeral will take place this afternoon at three o'clock.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, August 5, 1886:

The case of the young woman, Wilhelmina (or Minnie) Mundt, who was found dead at Mount Walker on the 24th of July last is not to remain quiet. Strange things are rumoured about it (says the Queensland Times) and some of them, certainly, need clearing up. Even what has transpired since the girl's death is scarcely creditable to nineteenth century civilization or to a settled district, and there seems to have been an absence of proper investigation into the circumstances of the death and of observance of the precautions usual in the case of a human body found dead. True, the police (of Harrisville) inspected the body, and an order was given by the magistrate for its burial, but was this sufficient? Should not a doctor have examined the body at as early a period as possible, as was done on Saturday last with the one found at Alfred? We certainly think so, for, even though there be no suspicious circumstances about the death the precaution is a wise one. Better the old coroner's inquest than nothing. A magisterial inquiry was held, and we suppose the evidence taken was sent to headquarters in Brisbane, and found wanting, for the matter has since been placed in Senior Sergeant O'Driscoll's hand. On Friday last, the body was exhumed, and brought to Harrisville, and thence, on Saturday morning brought to Ipswich. Why the post mortem examination was not made at the cemetery on the Reserve, we do not know. It certainly would have been less revolting. On the body being conveyed to the morgue at the Hospital, admission was refused, Dr. Dunlop acting under instructions given by the acting committee, several weeks ago, to the effect that the use of the morgue was no longer to be given for police post mortems, it being then alleged that the police refused to clean up the mess after using it. Further appeal proving fruitless, the body was taken into an old shed in the police yard, the case being such an extreme one that the Sergeant could not think of taking it to an hotel. There, in the vicinity of dwellings, and without some of the facilities a proper room would have afforded, the sickening examination was made by Drs. Webb and Channing Neill. We hear that decomposition was so far advanced that little was shown by the examination, but the contents of the stomach were sent to the Government Analyst. The inquiry, as will be seen from our Brisbane letter, is to be reopened, and judging by reports, strange disclosures are expected. One thing has already been shown - the necessity for a public morgue being erected here, or arrangements being made for the use of the one at the Hospital, if it is desirable that it should be used for such cases.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, August 7, 1886:

Referring to the late Mr. Richard Gibson, whose death was recently reported by telegraph, the Melbourne Argus of Tuesday says: - "The deceased gentleman was born at Mauchline, in Ayrshire, Scotland, in November, 1831. Since his arrival in Victoria in 1852, he has been almost entirely identified with pastoral interests. He first went into business with Messrs. Mickle and Bakewell, stock and station agents, but soon after left them, and joined Mr. John McTier, ironmonger. Later on he relinquished his position with that gentleman, and joined the firm of Kissock and Lyall, stock and station agents, with whom he continued until 1858, when he and Mr. Kissock were taken into the firm of Messrs. Dal. Cambell and Co., which remained in existence until 1872. Mr. Gibson then embarked in business as stock and station agent, and in 1876 took Mr. E. Trenchard into partnership. Mr. Gibson never took any part in public affairs, but was widely known in his business capacity in which he had been very successful. During the last 18 months he has been suffering from disease of the heart, and his death which took place suddenly on Saturday morning, was not unexpected."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, August 10, 1886:

A fatal accident (writes the Queensland Times of Saturday) happened at the potting works at Dinmore early yesterday morning. Five men were at work in the clay pit as the night shift. Three of them were filling the material into a truck at the bottom of the pit, and the man in charge (Watson) and another were several feet up on the face of the work picking down the clay, where a shot had been fired at 2 o'clock that morning. At about a quarter past 4 o'clock one of the men above called to those below to "Look out," as a slip of earth was coming. Thomas Hodgkinson, one of the three men below, tripped as he essayed to run away, and fell on his side. A large lump of clay struck his head and shoulder, crushing his head almost flat, forcing out his right eye, and breaking his right arm. The matter was promptly reported to the police, and Senior Sergeant O'Driscoll sent a man down to the scene of the accident. An order for burial was afterwards given, and an inquiry will probably be held into the circumstances attending the mishap. The deceased was a single man, was twenty-seven years of age, and his mother and step-father (John Dunlop) reside at Woodend.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, August 12, 1886:

It will be heard with regret that Miss Margaret C. Sinclair, the youngest daughter of Alderman John Sinclair, of Brisbane, died on Tuesday morning. Miss Sinclair caught cold some weeks ago and gradually became worse until diptheria supervened. She languished until Tuesday morning when she died in the 23rd year of her age.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, August 12, 1886:

Many old Queenslanders will grieve to learn of the death of Mr. David Ord, who for many years was widely known in pastoral circles. Mr. Ord came to this colony with Mr. F.J. Ivory in the ship Vimiera in 1853. He having been an old and trusted servant in the family, Mr. James Ivory at once placed him in charge of Bundanba station. He afterwards purchased Doura station, in the Burnett district, which he held for many years. Acquiring some property at Dalby, he afterwards made that place his home, acting as accredited agent for banks and other monetary institutions, in charge of and valuing pastoral securities. He joined Mr. Paterson and others in the purchase of Fernless station, in the Maranoa district, and sold out of that with a competency sufficient to maintain him comfortably for the remainder of his days, but was induced, during the sugar fever, to invest in a sugar property in Bundaberg district, where he breathed his last yesterday. Mr. Ord had almost reached the "allotted span" of three score years and ten. He was a genial-hearted man, and his jovial face and merry laugh were always welcome at the social gatherings of squatters, which formed one of the most enjoyable features of early settlement in this colony.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, August 24, 1886:

The death is announced of Mr. Henry Plint, erstwhile editor of the Ipswich Advocate and the Dalby Bulletin. The deceased proceeded recently to Cairns as paymaster to the contractor for the Cairns - Herberton railway, but was overtaken by the fever which attacks so many southern people who go north, and unfortunately it terminated fatally. The deceased gentleman was a plodding industrious journalist, and was highly respected by all who knew him. He leaves a wife and family but poorly provided for.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, August 26, 1886:

The Bundaberg Star of the 7th instant contains the following item in reference to the death of an old Toowoombaite:- Alexander Gaskarth, familiarly known throughout the coast towns of the colony as "Old Gas," placidly yielded up his spirit to the unseen reaper (Death) yesterday, about 11 a.m., at our local hospital. Heart disease was the assigned cause of death, but he has been failing in health for some time past. He was 60 years of age, but, being the possessor of a jolly temperament, with always a playful sense of humor, it acted as a lubricator to the frictions and worries of life, and he was always "merry as a sandboy." He was well and favorably known in his comic delineations of "Mrs. Caudle's Lectures," in which he used to delight to appear in character. In this character he has figured at many an amateur entertainment, and caused great amusement. He was a native of Middlesex, England. We understand that he has no relatives in the colony. He was a member of the Orange Institution, as well as one of the local Masonic lodges. He was interred yesterday, the cortege starting from the Masonic Hall at 3 p.m. His remains were accompanied to the cemetery by a number of the brethren of both orders, the Masons wearing their aprons, and the four chief mourners carrying draped bannerettes on either side of the hearse. There were also a number of the friends of deceased in buggies.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, August 28, 1886:

We regret to have to record the death of Mr. John Ferguson, of this town, and all the more so that his early youth was connected with the office of this paper, where he learned his trade as a printer. After serving his apprenticeship he was for a short time on the staff of the Darling Downs Gazette. Leaving Toowoomba, Mr. Ferguson went to Sydney, where he caught a cold which affected him so severely that he returned to his home in this town, and after lingering for some time, departed this life yesterday afternoon. As will be seen by our advertising columns his funeral takes place at 2 o'clock tomorrow.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, August 28, 1886:

On Wednesday evening a married woman named Mary Ellen Parker, 25 years of age residing with her step father Martin Guthery, at Forbes Street, Darlington, was found hanging from a beam above the doorway in her bathroom, and close to the body was also found that of her little son, three years old, which was hanging to the same beam. The deceased has been living apart from her husband since March last, and was said to have fretted greatly in consequence. The other occupants of the house had been absent from it all day, and a stepsister, on returning from school, found the bodies as described. The deceased told the people when they left the house not to come home to dinner. The following letter was found in the room: "Mother, don't fret; I have been ill all the week, and I thought I would be better away out of the road, me and Teddy. I remain your loving daughter, Ellen and Teddy Parker. Don't fret for me. Goodbye."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, August 28, 1886:

The dead body of a man, (says the Courier) whose name is at present unknown, was found by the police on Bowen Terrace yesterday afternoon, and was removed to the morgue, where it now awaits identification. It seems that a man named Patrick Kennedy, who was passing at about half past 2 o'clock, saw the deceased lying in the bushes on Bowen Terrace, and spoke to him. He said he had been drinking for the past three months, and he asked Kennedy to get him a drink of water, which he did. He also stated that he had been working at Johnstone's and at Lather's sawmills at Southport. He spoke with a slight German accent, and had a German cast of countenance. Kennedy reported the matter to a policeman, who went to the place indicated, and found the man dead. There were no papers on the body that could give any clue to the name of the deceased, but poison of more than one kind was found in his possession, and he had stated in conversation with Kennedy that he had taken morphia to make him sleep. The body is described as that of a man apparently about 45 years of age, 5 ft. 7 in. In height, with full sandy brown whiskers and beard, reddish moustache, and dark sandy hair, cut short; the hair both on the face and head mixed with gray; the forehead was somewhat lofty, and the hair above it slightly thin. There was a large irregular scar as of a burn on the neck just above the collarbone. He was of muscular build, about 12 st. In weight, and from the appearance of the hands must have been a labouring man. The body was dressed in black soft felt hat, gray tweed sack coat, striped gray crimson shirt, brown tweed trousers mixed with gray, and with narrow reddish stripes; black socks, with blue, white, and yellow cross stripes; elastic side boots, well worn, and with imitation laces size 8's. The body has since been identified by Constable Perry as that of Thomas Johnson, who is a German, has been drinking very heavily of late, and is thought to have poisoned himself.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, September 2, 1886:

Says the Brewarrina Express: - Many very touching stories have been told of the fidelity of dogs to their masters, but few instances will be able to discount one which has just occurred in this district. Elsewhere appears the account of an inquest held on the body of a poor fellow named William Aitken, who was recently drowned in the Wamerawa. Alongside of the swag which was found on the bank was a little dog, of no particular breed, in fact a connoisseur might have termed it mongrel. From the swag to the water's edge, at the place where its master had entered the creek, this little animal had beaten a track, and though every day food was taken to it and every attempt made to entice it away it remained faithful to its trust, and trotted mournfully up and down the path it had formed in its vain search for its master, and it was not till forcibly, though not unkindly, led away that this faithful little creature left the spot.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, September 9, 1886:

The following account of a deplorable accident is taken from the S. M. Herald of Saturday last. A telegram from Dubbo says: - A terrible accident occurred on the railway line late last night. A man named Archibald Stenhouse, employed as a sleeper-getter, was found this morning near the Loggerheads, four miles out, with his head nearly severed from his body; near him was a bottle of brandy. It is thought that he was going to his camp, and being drunk lay down on the line. A late train coming awoke him, and he got up, but in his confused drunken state he walked towards instead of from the engine, which knocked him off the line to where he was found. The deceased had been locked up for drunkenness by the local police only a few days ago.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, September 9, 1886:

A Hobart telegram in the Sydney Evening News gives particulars of what appears to have been a most barbarous case of wife murder perpetrated there last Tuesday afternoon. It seems that a young man named Walch Oakes left his home in Campbell Street about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and went to the domain to play football. On his return, he was horrified to find his mother, Margaret Oakes, lying upon her bed with her clothing and bed clothes covered with blood, which had apparently escaped from a frightful wound discernible on the left side of her head. The young man's father was sitting on the floor beside the bed in a state of advanced intoxication. He was uttering drunken cries and singing, and saying continually, "Dear Jennie, come to me." The unfortunate woman was also under the influence of liquor when young Oakes left the house at 2 o'clock. The police were informed of the discovery. They proceeded to the house, and upon making search they found an iron bar under the bed, one end of which was covered with blood, while to the other a quantity of gray hair was adhering. The bar was about 18 in. long and pointed at one end, and of considerable weight. It is surmised that the drunken man struck his unfortunate wife several times with this weapon. Her skull was completely smashed in, and her head was almost battered beyond recognition. It is believed that the man made a sudden and unexpected attack upon the woman while she was lying on the bed, and that the first blow must have stunned her, for no cries were heard by the neighbours, and that portion of the town is largely populated. After having been arrested, and when being conveyed to the police station, the wretched man said, "He would tell all about it for a pint of beer." The accused, who is about 66 years of age, is a hawker by occupation. He has always been looked upon as a harmless character. He was known to be on generally good terms with his wife, who was about five years his junior, and was always particularly affectionate to her when under the influence of liquor.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, September 16, 1886:

There are not a few who will regret to hear of the death of Toompani, the well-known aboriginal, of Amity Point, Moreton Bay. Toompani was chiefly known for his bravery at the wreck of the steamer Sovereign, on 11th May, 1847, near the South Passage, when he and some of the boys of his tribe entered the surf and rescued several of the passengers. Toompani wore a plate on which (says the Courier of Tuesday) was recorded his gallantry on that occasion. Although he occasionally visited Brisbane and the township on the shores of Moreton Bay his home has been at Amity Point, where, in a boat presented by the Government - a gift renewed as often as required - he gained his livelihood by fishing. It is conjectured that his age was between 60 and 70 years. He had been ailing for some time past, and his extreme age gave small hopes of his recovery. He died on Sunday, 5th instant, and was buried by his aboriginal brethren on a high ridge near Amity Point.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, September 18, 1886:

One by one the old identities fade into the vasty shadow land, and the scenes of long years of labor know them no more for ever. Thus, it is, in relation to the late Mr. Joseph Rub, who has been intimately identified with the vicissitudes of Drayton for some thirty years or more. Though occasionally given to erratic moods, his absence from Drayton associations leaves a gap in the circle of his acquaintance that will often be noticed with regret. As will be seen by advertisement, the friends of the deceased are invited to attend his funeral this afternoon.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, September 18, 1886:

Our Sydney telegrams (says Thursday's Courier) have lately announced the death of three gentlemen well known in Queensland. One is Mr. Shepherd Smith, formerly manager of the Bank of New South Wales, Brisbane, and for many years since general manager of that powerful institution at Sydney. Mr. Smith was a native of the city of Durham, in the North of England, where he was born in the year 1835, being thus only 51 years of age at the date of his untimely death. He arrived in Sydney in 1855, just at the time when the gold discoveries were making the oldest banking institution in Australia expand its business wonderfully, a rosy-faced beardless boy at the time. He soon gave proof on entering the service of the bank of the high class banking talent that was in him; and from a subordinate position in the secretary's office, under the late Sir A. Stuart (whom he did not long survive) he rose to be branch manager at Deniliquin, Tamworth, and other places in New South Wales. Brisbane was then a country township in that colony, and from 1858 to 1864 Mr. Shepherd Smith had charge of the Brisbane branch, and most of his children were born here. After a brief charge of the New Zealand business of the bank, he was by the directors elected general manager at the head office in Sydney, and he at once relieved them of the burden of care which less competent men who preceded him had often left on the board's shoulders. Mr. Smith was a man of great talent and energy, a believer in vigor and action in bank and other matters, a man who, faithful to his trust, would press a customer in the bank's interest with one hand, while with the other his own private cheque book would be available to help the needy defaulter. Charitable with his own cash, he was never charitable with the bank's money, and herein lay the secret of his success both as a banker and as a man. Mr. Smith was a prominent mover in Church of England matters, an energetic synodsman, and one who believed, perhaps, more in the Bishop Moorhouse school of theology than in Bishop Hale's. He always invested in land in the different townships where he lived, and it need hardly be said that his Brisbane investments in this line were his best ones. The deceased gentleman was an active promoter of field sports, though not naturally of strong constitution. He was a trustee of the old cricket reserve in Brisbane, which was so unceremoniously annexed by the Works Office in 1876, and he always played in the Brisbane eleven of the ante-separation era. The immediate cause of his death was atrophy, caused by an internal cancer or tumour, one of the diseases that increase with the high pressure of modern civilisation; and twenty-two years of supervision of the head office of the bank was a life work for any man. His chief relaxation when oppressed with too much "bank" was a week's camp out at Botany Heads, where, with an old fisherman, plenty of bait, fresh air, and primitive diet, Shepherd Smith tried to forget the awful "shop" in George Street, and its telegrams and care, for a brief period. He married a Miss Phillips, of Parramatta, in 1858, and his family are now grown up. He will be missed from the well-known pew in St. Phillip's Church every Sunday, and his place in all respects will be difficult to fill. Requiescat.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, September 18, 1886:

An accident happened at Tummaville on Wednesday last to a young man named August Keefer (23), which resulted in fatal consequences. It appears the young man, who was in the employ of Messrs. Gore & Co., was conveying a few sheep on a dray from a paddock to Tummaville Station, and was expected to arrive with his load between 10 and 11 o'clock on the Wednesday morning, but up to 12 o'clock he had not made his appearance. His friends became very anxious about him, and Johnstone, one of the men on the station, decided to go to the paddock to see the cause of the delay; but on the road he came across the dray, which was turned clean over, the horse apparently uninjured, while the man Keefer was underneath the dray, with the guard iron across his neck and head. Johnstone immediately returned to Tummaville for assistance, and in a very short time returned with some other men and removed the dray from off Keefer, who was quite dead. How the accident happened remains a mystery, but from appearances it is supposed that the dray collided with a stump and turned completely over on top of Keefer, as the tracks of the dray seemed to be in the direction of a stump near by. He was buried in the Yandilla cemetery on Thursday, and a large number of friends followed his remains to the grave yard. August Keefer was a universal favorite with all who knew him, and was a most trustworthy servant to his employers. His friends reside at Greenmount, and much sympathy is felt with their natural sorrow under such a sudden and melancholy bereavement.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, September 28, 1886:

Amongst our obituary notices will be found an announcement of the death of Mrs. Mary Green, of Parramatta. The deceased lady was the mother of Mrs. H. Knight, who for some years was a respected resident of Toowoomba. Writing of the funeral of the late Mrs. Green the Sydney Daily Telegraph says: - "Two of the largest funerals that have been witnessed in Parramatta for many years took place there on last Sunday week. That of the late Hon. James Barnes was described in a portion of a previous issue, and about an hour afterwards the relatives and friends of the late Mrs. Mary Green, of Rock Farm, near Parramatta, followed her remains to their last resting place. The deceased lady was the widow of the late Mr. Robert Green, and had been a resident of Parramatta for the last 50 years. She was a native of the colony, her father, the late Mr. Hugh O'Donnell, arriving in Sydney in 1810. The deceased leaves a family of eight daughters and a large number of grandchildren and great grandchildren, the majority of whom were present at the funeral. The cortege left Rock Farm at 3 o'clock, and proceeded to All Saints' Church of which Mrs. Green had been a member since its erection in 1850. After an impressive service had been held by the Rev. J.R. Bloomfield, the procession moved to All Saints' Cemetery, headed by the church choir. The coffin was covered with beautiful wreaths, and the bereaved family received many marks of sympathy from friends and neighbors who had known the deceased for a lengthy period. The burial service then took place, after which a funeral hymn was sung by the choristers. The number of friends who attended was very large, and including many leading residents of the district."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, October 5, 1886:

The "Rev. Peter Campbell" - "bush missionary" - as he designated himself, will be remembered by many in this district. He was in Toowoomba about five years ago, preached in the School of Arts, and managed to extract from the pockets of the people about (pounds sterling) 50 towards the erection of places of worship in the interior, which should be open to any itinerant bush missionary. From here he traveled out west, still gathering in the dollars, and finally made his way overland to Melbourne. He has now met with an untimely death. The Melbourne Argus of Monday week says:- Mr. Peter Campbell, "bush missionary," who has for many years been known as of somewhat eccentric character, was accidentally killed on the St. Kilda railway line on Saturday night. As the 8.5 p.m. train from Melbourne to St. Kilda was passing a spot between Middle Park and its destination, the passengers in it experienced a slight jolting, and when the train stopped at St. Kilda some railway officials went back along the line and found the remains of the deceased. There was a large wound on his head, and his legs were very much crushed. In his pockets were found a gold open-faced watch, 7 (shillings) 10 (pence) in money, four diamond studs, two rings, two purses, and several document. Amongst the last was a pawn ticket, showing that he had that day borrowed (pounds sterling) 1. At 6 p.m. on Saturday, Mr. Jones, the Hobson's Bay station master, and Constable Flannery saw Campbell going in the St. Kilda train. He was slightly under the influence of liquor, and fell as he ascended the stairs of the bridge leading to the St. Kilda platform. Constable Flannery assisted him to rise, and he went on his way. There were no houses near where he was killed, nor was there any foot crossing. The supposition is that, unless he went to the spot with the intention of committing suicide which is not considered probable, he had remained in the train until it had gone beyond Albert Park, and was walking back along the line when he was killed. His watch chain was lying under him on the line. The deceased was not long ago released from gaol, after a lengthened term of imprisonment for having disobeyed an order of the court for the maintenance of his wife.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, October 19, 1886:

On Tuesday last two farmers residing near Logan Village met with a very startling death in a trial coal shaft full of choke damp. Their names are William Weaber (aged 40) and Samuel Smith (aged 36). From the evidence taken at the inquiry held by Mr. H. Hinchcliffe, J.P., it was elicited that about 3 o'clock on Tuesday afternoon Weaber called on Smith and inquired about his success in the coal shaft. Smith offered to then take Weaber and show him his pit. Nothing is absolutely known as to how they descended the shaft; but shortly afterwards another neighbour, Mr. Watson, called at Smith's house, and was told by a daughter he had gone to the shaft with Weaber. On Watson getting to the shaft he looked down and saw the two men at the bottom. He gave the alarm, and six railway lengthsmen engaged on the Logan railway went and found Smith with his leg fast in the bucket rope. They pulled him up, and discovered that he was quite dead. The body of Weaber was recovered about two hours afterwards. The railway men found the pit surcharged with foul air, as a bucket of fire let down into it went out. The two men were very much respected and leave each a wife and seven children. It is surmised that Smith lowered Weaber down first and then slid down the rope himself with his leg twisted round it, which accounts for him being fast to the rope. The shaft is about 40 chains from Smith's house, and is in the midst of trees, and could not be seen. The affair has cast a great gloom over the neighborhood on account of the fourteen young children.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, November 2, 1886:

Early yesterday morning Mr. Hugh Campbell, the father of the family bearing that name and so highly respected in this district, passed over quietly to the great majority, at the ripe age of 83. The deceased gentleman was born at Bridgetown, near Glasgow, in 1804. He was a gardener, and 50 years ago came to Australia on the ship Portland, and as a fellow passenger with the famed Dr. Lang. Mr. Campbell settled first at Newtown, near Sydney, and followed his occupation as gardener. His family of sons grew to manhood and left the parental roof tree, and pushed their way to Queensland. Their mother died in 1865, and then the deceased gentleman came over to Toowoomba to his sons, Mr. James Campbell, M.L.A., and the present Mayor of this town. Since coming to Queensland the deceased lived a quiet life, but when a resident in New South Wales he was a hard working, plodding Liberal politician, and did yeoman service in helping to obtain responsible government for the mother colony. Deceased died from sheer old age. His funeral moves from Mr. Charles Campbell's residence at 10 o'clock this morning.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, November 2, 1886:

Our readers will have learned from our telegraphic columns of the mysterious disappearance from Albury of a publican named Davey. It is believed that he has been murdered and his body concealed. The river at Albury has been dragged but without success. A Sydney clairvoyant has been consulted, and the following telegram in Saturday's Telegraph gives the result:- "A clairvoyant has been consulted over the Albury mystery at a private seance at Woollabra, and says that Davey was struck by a man over the right ear, when he fell senseless to the ground and was dragged to the river and thrown in. The body is now stuck in a snag in a bend of the river, and the woman living in a hut a quarter of a mile from the public house knows the name of the murderer. She called him Bob. Particulars of the interview with the clairvoyant have been sent to the Albury police."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, November 2, 1886:

"Mr. William Apjohn, (says Monday's Courier) late secretary and inspector of the Joint Municipality Board, breathed his last at his residence, Edmondstone Street, South Brisbane, yesterday afternoon, at the age of 54 years. The deceased had been suffering from asthma for some time, and about a fortnight ago he caught a cold, which developed into inflammation of the lungs. The name of Mr. Apjohn has been associated with the Brisbane Corporation for the past twenty years. He was the son of the late William Apjohn, J.P., of Toomlamine, Limerick, Ireland, and arrived in Brisbane a few months before separation in 1859. Shortly afterwards he entered the Police Force, and was subsequently appointed to the rank of sub-inspector, in which capacity he served successfully in Roma, Dalby, and Condamine. During Inspector May's absence in England the deceased acted in his behalf, after which he took the office of general inspector to the City Corporation, a post which he filled until the establishment of the Joint Board, in whose service he was at the time of his death." The late Mr. Apjohn was a brother of Mrs. J. Long of the Imperial Hotel. He was buried yesterday afternoon.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, November 4, 1886:

Clairvoyancy has been successful in the discovery of the remains of the murdered publican at Albury. A Sydney telegram in Tuesday's Telegraph says:- The body of the missing man Raglan Davey was found this afternoon in the Murray River, about four miles down from Albury. The face presents a horrible appearance, the eyes having been eaten out of the sockets, the throat cut from ear to ear, and the windpipe severed. It is clear that a most brutal murder has been committed, as it would have been impossible for Davey to walk to the river after inflicting such wounds. Sixteen shillings were found upon the body, and it is known that he had about (pounds sterling) 13 in notes and gold with him when last seen. His watch was also found on the body, stopped at seven minutes to 11. The body was found by Constables Holden and Nixon, and they are of opinion that it was floated yesterday at the spot pointed out by the Sydney clairvoyant.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, November 6, 1886:

A man who is suspected of being connected with the mysterious disappearance of Raglan Davey at Albury has been arrested at Junee. A middle aged man was observed sitting outside an hotel with the front of his trousers smeared with red spots, which had the appearance of being recently washed. The man was arrested, and on being asked to explain the spots he said they were paint marks. The local doctor examined the marks and declared that they were blood stains, probably human blood. The man was much confused, and it was impossible to extract any satisfactory information as to when he left Albury, or his recent movements. The prisoner stated that he left Albury two or three weeks ago, and walked to Junee. Steps have been taken to check the man's statement. A striking peculiarity is that the man in his appearance and dress tallies closely with the description of the murderer of Raglan Davey reported in one of the Sydney papers to have been given by a clairvoyant at Woollahra. The prisoner has a scar on his left arm, as described a few days ago by the clairvoyant.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, November 6, 1886:

On Sunday afternoon a man named George Wheatly was found dead on the mountain one mile south east of Tenterfield. Deceased was a native of the district, and resided here till 1871, when he left for New Zealand, returning three weeks ago. On his arrival he learned of the death of his mother, and this together with other matters, made him despondent. He was last seen alive about a fortnight ago, and his body when found was terribly decomposed. In a note book was written with blood the following words:- "Good sister and all, I have brought this on myself. G.W." At the inquest an open verdict was returned.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, November 9, 1886:

A fatal accident occurred at Umbirom on Sunday afternoon. A young man, named John Cyril Roberts, aged 19 years, son of Mr. J. Roberts, selector at Umbirom went bird nesting. He climbed up a tree about forty feet high, and was going out on one of the branches on which was a bird's nest, when the branch suddenly broke down and the unfortunate youth fell to the ground. Assistance was promptly rendered, and he was found to have sustained terrible injuries. His right arm and right thigh were broken and he complained of great pain in his back. Dr. Roberts was sent for and as soon as possible attended the injured youth. Upon examination he found, besides the other injuries, that the young man's back was broken and suggested his immediate removal to the hospital. Early yesterday morning the father started from Umbirom with his injured son, but on reaching Drayton the poor young fellow breathed his last. The body was brought to the hospital morgue, and the accident reported to the police authorities but, under the circumstances, the Police Magistrate did not consider an inquiry necessary.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, November 11, 1886:

The young man Roberts who met with a fatal accident by falling down a tree at Umbirom on Sunday last was a noted collector of birds' eggs, and passionately fond of ornithological study. When he met with his death he was gathering specimens for a professor who was visiting the district.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, November 11, 1886:

Mr. Morris Samuel, of the firm of Samuel Bros., died very suddenly at his residence, Queen Street, early this morning. He had been (says yesterday's Courier) complaining of a cold for some weeks previously, but no serious consequences were apprehended, and he attended the races with some friends yesterday. During last night he appeared rather worse than usual, and was strongly advised to see a doctor. He said he would do so next day and went to bed, leaving the gas burning "in case of anything happening." During the night the young man who sleeps on the premises heard him get up once, and Samuel explained that he thought he heard the boy come in. Some time after he started up from the bed and the assistant went to him to find him apparently very ill and gasping for breath. Mr. Phillips, who lives close by, came in and at once sent for a doctor. Dr. Little arrived without unnecessary delay, only in time, however, to see Mr. Samuel breathe his last.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, November 18, 1886:

A startling and sad occurrence (says the S.M. Herald) happened on board Messrs. Howard Smith and Sons' s.s. Buninyong during the voyage from Melbourne to Sydney that was completed on Monday, one of the passengers having committed suicide by means of a revolver. It appears that the vessel left the former city at 1.30 p.m. on Friday last. Captain Joy being in charge. At about 10 p.m. the chief steward, Herbert Butler, heard the report of a pistol, and, upon proceeding to the starboard side of the upper deck, saw a saloon passenger with a bullet wound in his right temple. The injured man was lying down, and was unconscious. By his side was a five-chambered revolver, four of the chambers being loaded, and one presenting the appearance of having been fired a few minutes beforehand. The captain was at once advised of the event, and he directed that every attention be given to the sufferer. The unfortunate man, however, survived only four hours. Upon his clothes being searched, an hotel bill was discovered which led to the belief that the man had stayed at the Yarra Family Hotel, Flinders and William Streets, Melbourne, from the 3rd to the 13th instant. In a corner upon the front of the document was written in lead pencil "I leave to Miss Healy, at the above hotel, all my goods and chattels. - Herbert Wilson." The sum of (pounds sterling) 41 and 10 shillings in money was also found upon him, and, in a portmanteau containing a quantity of linen articles was a volume of Shakespeare, upon the flyleaf being written in pencil, "I fear life's many changes, not death's changelessness. - Lord Lytton." On the arrival of the vessel in port, the police were communicated with, and the body was thereupon removed by them to the South Sydney morgue. An autopsy was made by Dr. Milford, who extracted the bullet from the head of the deceased. The body is that of a man about 33 years of age, 5 feet 5 and a half inches in height, of fair complexion, light brown hair, blue eyes, short sandy whiskers, beard, and moustache. The suit of clothes worn were manufactured by a San Francisco firm.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, December 16, 1886:

The death of a publican, under very exceptional circumstances, is thus reported by telegram from Bathurst in the S.M. Herald of Friday last:- A publican named Henry Finlay, residing at Evan's Plains, died suddenly on Tuesday. A magisterial inquiry was held yesterday afternoon, before Mr. H.H. Hutchinson, J.P., and the evidence showed that death resulted from heart disease, accelerated by drink. A statement was made by Mrs. Finlay to the effect that deceased got a license two months ago, and was not sober for 14 days out of whole time since, he having commenced to drink directly the house was opened. He became so violent at times that she and her daughter had to tie him up. The course they had to adopt on Sunday, when he was drinking and threatened to rip his wife open. He did strike her on the arm, and took up a cup to throw at his daughter. They overcame him and tied him down on the bed, but he got loose within twenty minutes, and again repeated his threats. He continued drinking on Monday, and abused and threatened his wife and daughter, who then knocked him down and dragged him to the stable, where they strapped him down. He got loose in half an hour and went on drinking. He again threatened to stab his wife, who finding it impossible to keep him quiet, took him to the stable, when she and her daughter once more bound him to a post with a rope. After dinner her two girls went out to see their father, and found him lying dead. The police were sent for, and an inquiry was held. On being questioned as to the reason for not communicating with the police before, witness said she was afraid of losing her license, and her husband refused to see a doctor. Dr. Bassett gave his opinion that death resulted from disease of his heart, accelerated by drink, and was in no way hastened by the treatment he received. The finding of the magistrate was given accordingly. When Finlay applied for his license he had been drinking heavily, though he produced high recommendations from several respectable persons.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Wednesday, December 22, 1886:

Amongst the ill-fated passengers who lost their lives through the Kellawarra disaster (says the Gympie Times of Saturday) were a brother and sister-in-law of the Messrs. Ogden, farmers, of this district. The circumstances connected with their sad end are somewhat peculiar. It seems that the deceased brother, Samuel, left the old country with his wife to join his brothers here, but through some mistake he landed in Western Australia. From there he communicated with Gympie, stating at the same time that he was dissatisfied with the prospects Western Australia held out. His brothers then sent him 25 (pounds sterling) to come on to Gympie; he reached Sydney safely, and telegraphed that he would leave by the Kellawarra. When the news of the disaster reached Gympie his brothers naturally feared the worst, but as his name did not appear among the list of the drowned or saved they hoped for a day or two that he had missed his passage or had decided to come by another steamer. Unfortunately, however, the hope proved delusive. Samuel Ogden and his wife were passengers by the lost boat, and a paragraph in Tuesday's Brisbane Telegraph gives a few mournful particulars of their last moments. No names are mentioned, but there can be little doubt that it refers to them. "A steerage passenger (says our Brisbane contemporary) told Mr. Alex. Matthews, one of the saved passengers, he had lately been working in Western Australia. Being unable to find further work there, he wrote to his brother, who is a farmer in Queensland. His brother telegraphed 25 (pounds sterling) to him asking him and his wife to come to Queensland at once. This man was sitting at the other side of the table when Mr. Matthews rushed upstairs. A few minutes before this the man's wife was lying in her bunk sick. "She said, "I am ill now, but I shall be all right when I get to Brisbane if the boat takes us there all right." They were both drowned."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Wednesday, December 22, 1886:

Another sad case of drowning (says the Gympie Times of Saturday) has to be added to the long list which have occurred in connection with low level bridges, the victim in this instance being a boy about 13 years of age, named August Farmer. The lad lived across the river with his parents, but was employed in town, at the fancy goods store of Mr. G.A. Watts. Yesterday morning, at about 7 o'clock, he was riding to his work, and reaching Normanby bridge, over which about 18 inches of water was running at the time, he attempted to cross it on horseback. He seems to have got on to the bridge all right, but almost immediately afterwards - it is supposed through the horse having shied at the broken water or the logs piled against the upper side of the bridge - a terrified scream indicated that he and the horse had gone over into the deep water. Mr. Thomas Taylor, who happened to be near the river at the time, hearing the scream, ran down to the edge of the water, and seeing the boy clinging to the horse, and apparently unable to swim, he, dressed as he was, plunged in and swam to his assistance. Before he could reach him, however, the boy lost his hold of the horse and disappeared under the water. Mr. Taylor did what he could to find the boy, but every effort was fruitless. There is very little doubt that as soon as he sank the lad was swept away by the strength of the current. The horse succeeded in getting out of the water a short distance below the bridge. Sad as accidents of this sort invariably are, there are various circumstances in connection with this one which tend to make it particularly deplorable. It will be remembered that somewhere about six years ago the boy's parents had the misfortune to get their house burnt down, and two of their children were consumed in the fire. In addition to this trouble, sickness assailed the family, and for the last year or so the father has been a confirmed invalid - suffering from cancer in the face. Of late the boy whose career has just been so unhappily cut short, has been the mainstay of the household, and his loss will therefore be most grievously felt by those who have had in a great measure to depend upon him for their means of support.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Wednesday, December 22, 1886:

An accident, attended with a fatal result happened on Monday (says the Courier) at the A.S.N. Company's wharf. The steamer Ranelagh had just left the wharf for Sydney and was about ten yards away when the third engineer, a man named Arthur Kebbell, who had been left behind, attempted to jump from the wharf to the steamer. He missed the steamer, and fell into the river. A wharf lumper named Clifford at once sprang after the unfortunate man, who was evidently unable to swim. Clifford appeared to be little better himself, and could not render any assistance. Detective Benson, who was on the wharf at the time, threw off his outer clothing, and was preparing to jump in also, when another wharf lumper named McCaverty called to him to hold back, as he was ready, and sprang into the river. Kebbell, however, was noticed at this point to disappear, and was not seen alive again. In the meantime the Ranelagh had been stopped, and a line was thrown to the deceased, who failed to catch it. Detective Benson telephoned for the police, and Senior constable Fitzmaurice was soon on the scene. A constable was sent to the Post Office, where grappling irons are kept. Captain Stanley took charge of the dragging, but failed to find the body. In the meantime Captain Armstrong procured another grappling iron at Kangaroo Point ferry, and two of his men, with Constable Moran, found the body in about fifteen minutes from the time it disappeared. Thinking that there might be a chance of restoring animation, Senior constable Fitzmaurice sent for medical aid; but Dr. Owens, who examined the body, pronounced life extinct. Deceased was about 22 years of age, and was of an athletic build. His relations, as far as is known, reside at Balmain, Sydney. The body was taken to the morgue.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, December 30, 1886:

Intelligence reached Toowoomba early on Christmas Day that Mr. John McNicol, who resided with his son-in-law, Mr. William Cook, at Lagoon Creek, had been found dead in his bed on the previous day. It appeared that Mr. McNicol, who was 82 years of age, was on the 23rd instant in his usual good health and spirits. He had his supper with his daughter and family. About eight o'clock he complained of a pain in his arm extending from the elbow to the shoulder. He went to bed and about eleven o'clock his daughter went to him and gave him a drink, and he appeared in good health. The next morning Mrs. Cook went to see how her father was and found him dead in his bed, the body being quite cold, showing that death must have occurred about midnight. The case was reported to Mr. Charles Williams, J.P., of Jondaryan, who gave an order for the interment of the body and did not consider an inquiry necessary, death having resulted from old age. The deceased had resided in the district for the last seven years and was very generally respected.


Darling Downs Obituaries, 1887.


Additional Links:

Electoral Lists, Darling Downs District [Queensland], 1899-1900.

Deaths at the Toowoomba Hospital, 1900.

Deaths in the Melbourne Hospital - Index, 1867-1880.

Deaths at the Alfred Hospital and the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum - Index, 1872-1879.

Portraits of the Past.

Index of Nineteenth Century Photographic Portraits.

Descriptive Index of Great War Soldiers (from the Toowoomba Chronicle).

Hunter Robert Gordon Poon. - a brief sketch of the life of a World War 1 digger, of Chinese ancestry.

List of Qualified Jurors, Singapore, 1904; Names, A-L. - List of European, as well as local residents, who were registered to act as jurors, in the island of Singapore, at that time a colony of Great Britain.

List of Qualified Jurors, Malacca, 1904. A similar list of jurors at the settlement of Malacca.

List of Qualified Jurors, Penang, 1904. Another list of jurors, this one at the settlement of Penang.

The Eurasian Company of the Singapore Volunteer Corps. The Singapore Volunteer Corps was a militia unit formed in this British island colony in the 19th Century. At a later stage, island residents were permitted to enlist in the unit, resulting in the formation of Chinese, Malay and Eurasian Companies. This particular site relates to one of those Companies.




© Terry Foenander.

2000. 1