The Slave's Appeal - New England Music Scrapbook
The Slave's Appeal
-  Songs of the Hutchinsons  -

Hutchinson Family Singers Web Site



Over the mountain, and over the moor,

Comes the sad wailing of many a poor slave;

The father, the mother, and children are poor,

And they grieve for the day their freedom to have.

Pity, kind gentlemen, friends of humanity,

Cold is the world to the cries of God's poor,

Give us our freedom, ye friends of equality,

Give us our rights, for we ask nothing more.


Call us not indolent, vile and degraded,

White men have robbed us of all we hold dear;

Parents and children, the young and the aged,

Are scourged by the lash of the rough overseer.

Pity, kind gentlemen, friends of humanity,

Cold is the world to the cries of God's poor,

Give us our freedom, ye friends of equality,

Give us our rights, for we ask nothing more.


And God in his mercy shall crown your endeavors,

The glory of heaven shall be your reward;

The promise of Jesus to you shall be given,

"Enter, ye faithful, the joy of the Lord."

Pity, kind gentlemen, friends of humanity,

Cold is the world to the cries of God's poor,

Give us our freedom, ye friends of equality,

Give us our rights, for we ask nothing more.

Hutchinson Family

Jesse Hutchinson, Jr.  "The Slave's Appeal."  Adapted by Jesse Hutchinson, Jr., from H. Piercy's "The Beggar Girl (Over the Mountain and Over the Moor)."  First line: "Over the mountain, and over the moor, Comes the sad wailing of many a poor slave."  First line of chorus: "Pity, kind gentlemen, friends of humanity, Cold is the world to the cries of God's poor."  N.d. [No later than the 1845-1846 concert season. Known earlier listings seem ambiguous to me.]

  • H. Piercy.  "The Beggar Girl: A Favorite Ballad for the Piano Forte or Harp: Also as a Duett."  Music [and lyrics?]: H. Piercy.  London: H. Piercy.  N.d. [Circa 1798].
  • "The Slave's Appeal" was one of the most famous and infamous pieces sung by Abby Hutchinson. The quartet's antislavery songs - especially this one and "Get Off the Track!" - were often greeted with threats of mob violence; and at other times, at antislavery meetings, the singers were called on to quiet the mob's dark heart with song. Artist, writer, and Hutchinson Family friend Francis Bicknell Carpenter (1830-1900) said that Abby "would look directly into the eyes of the mob leaders, invariably with the effect of subduing the unruly spirits." - Frank Carpenter, New York Home Journal, December 7, 1892
  • Frank Carpenter's fine portrait of Abby Hutchinson Patton is in the collection of the Lynn Historical Society in Massachusetts. I'm drawing a blank, though, on what became of his portrait of John W. Hutchinson (1821-1908). Do you know?

-- Alan Lewis, October 8, 2002






[earliest Hutchinson Family publicity likeness]
A navigation bar appears at the bottoms of pages.
New England Music Scrapbook





E-Mail Us

Notes copyright © 2002 by Alan Lewis.
All rights reserved.

Webmaster
Songster Table of Contents
Hutchinson Family Singers Home Page
Francis Carpenter, Francis Bicknell Carpenter, Francis B Carpenter, Frank Carpenter, Frank B Carpenter, NEMS, New England Music Scrapbook. Slaves Appeal